Cheese: A nutritious food consisting primarily of the curd or the semisolid substance formed when milk coagulates.Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Food Technology: The application of knowledge to the food industry.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Dairy Products: Raw and processed or manufactured milk and milk-derived products. These are usually from cows (bovine) but are also from goats, sheep, reindeer, and water buffalo.Lactococcus lactis: A non-pathogenic species of LACTOCOCCUS found in DAIRY PRODUCTS and responsible for the souring of MILK and the production of LACTIC ACID.Propionibacterium: A genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria whose cells occur singly, in pairs or short chains, in V or Y configurations, or in clumps resembling letters of the Chinese alphabet. Its organisms are found in cheese and dairy products as well as on human skin and can occasionally cause soft tissue infections.Lactococcus: A genus of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria mainly isolated from milk and milk products. These bacteria are also found in plants and nonsterile frozen and dry foods. Previously thought to be a member of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS (group N), it is now recognized as a separate genus.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Cooking: The art or practice of preparing food. It includes the preparation of special foods for diets in various diseases.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Cookbooks as Topic: Set of instructions about how to prepare food for eating using specific instructions.Foundations: Organizations established by endowments with provision for future maintenance.Heparinoids: Heparin derivatives. The term has also been used more loosely to include naturally occurring and synthetic highly-sulphated polysaccharides of similar structure. Heparinoid preparations have been used for a wide range of applications including as anticoagulants and anti-inflammatories and they have been claimed to have hypolipidemic properties. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th, p232)Soybean Oil: Oil from soybean or soybean plant.Egg Yolk: Cytoplasm stored in an egg that contains nutritional reserves for the developing embryo. It is rich in polysaccharides, lipids, and proteins.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Dictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Food: Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.Social Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.Margarine: A butterlike product made of refined vegetable oils, sometimes blended with animal fats, and emulsified usually with water or milk. It is used as a butter substitute. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)VermontParish Nursing: A nursing specialty involving programs designed to bring wholeness and healing to a particular faith community through addressing the health needs of body, mind, and spirit. They are coordinated by registered NURSES and may involve HEALTH EDUCATION and counseling, facilitation, referral, PATIENT ADVOCACY, and health care plan interpretation, as influenced and defined by the unique needs of the congregation.Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Plant Oils: Oils derived from plants or plant products.Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Celiac Disease: A malabsorption syndrome that is precipitated by the ingestion of foods containing GLUTEN, such as wheat, rye, and barley. It is characterized by INFLAMMATION of the SMALL INTESTINE, loss of MICROVILLI structure, failed INTESTINAL ABSORPTION, and MALNUTRITION.Diet, Gluten-Free: A diet which is devoid of GLUTENS from WHEAT; BARLEY; RYE; and other wheat-related varieties. The diet is designed to reduce exposure to those proteins in gluten that trigger INFLAMMATION of the small intestinal mucosa in patients with CELIAC DISEASE.Glutens: Prolamins in the endosperm of SEEDS from the Triticeae tribe which includes species of WHEAT; BARLEY; and RYE.Legislation, Veterinary: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of veterinary medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Gliadin: Simple protein, one of the prolamines, derived from the gluten of wheat, rye, etc. May be separated into 4 discrete electrophoretic fractions. It is the toxic factor associated with CELIAC DISEASE.Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Rare, chronic, papulo-vesicular disease characterized by an intensely pruritic eruption consisting of various combinations of symmetrical, erythematous, papular, vesicular, or bullous lesions. The disease is strongly associated with the presence of HLA-B8 and HLA-DR3 antigens. A variety of different autoantibodies has been detected in small numbers in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Caseins: A mixture of related phosphoproteins occurring in milk and cheese. The group is characterized as one of the most nutritive milk proteins, containing all of the common amino acids and rich in the essential ones.Chymosin: The predominant milk-clotting enzyme from the true stomach or abomasum of the suckling calf. It is secreted as an inactive precursor called prorennin and converted in the acid environment of the stomach to the active enzyme. EC 3.4.23.4.Lactobacillus: A genus of gram-positive, microaerophilic, rod-shaped bacteria occurring widely in nature. Its species are also part of the many normal flora of the mouth, intestinal tract, and vagina of many mammals, including humans. Pathogenicity from this genus is rare.RestaurantsMexican Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican descent.Mexico
  • Chhena List of water buffalo cheeses indiacurry.com Fuzzy Math for reducing milk Archived 2007-10-12 at the Wayback Machine. (wikipedia.org)
  • This black rind cheese is made using part-skim milk of cows. (cheese.com)
  • Cheese, a by-product of milk, has been made for centuries. (ehow.com)
  • To make blue cheese, molds or fungi, such as penicillium roqueforti and penicillium glaucum, are stirred into milk and left to ripen. (ehow.com)
  • In most stinky cheese, Brevibacterium linens is used to ripen the milk. (ehow.com)
  • To produce this cheese, only the best quality cultures, milk and rennet are used. (ehow.com)
  • Cheese is a solid food made from the curdled milk of various quadruped mammals-cheese can be made from the milk of the yak, water buffalo, reindeer and the horse, as well as the cow, goat and sheep common to American and European cultures. (thenibble.com)
  • Quark is somewhat similar to yogurt cheeses such as the South Asian chak(k)a , the Arabic labneh , and the Central Asian suzma or kashk , but while these products are obtained by straining yogurt (milk fermented with thermophile bacteria), quark is made from soured milk fermented with mesophile bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, this could also have meant soured milk or any other kind of fresh cheese or fermented milk product . (wikipedia.org)
  • Winter is prime time for the aged mountain cheeses from this region because they are made with flavorful summer milk. (sfgate.com)
  • For many of us, cow milk is the default cheese dairy, but consider the sheep . (seriouseats.com)
  • In Rivertown, their grass-fueled milk, naturally double the fat and protein of cow or goat, is minimally handled to produce a sticky river of cheese that approximates the great, savory complexity of traditional French Brie (de Meaux). (seriouseats.com)
  • He went to Tibet to teach Tibetans how to make yak's milk into cheese that Americans would like, so they'd have something to export. (npr.org)
  • My first sip, out of a can in a saddlebag, with bits of butter in it that were churned by the motion of the horse I was riding, told me this milk had the soul of a fine cheese. (foodandwine.com)
  • Last summer, the Trace Foundation--a New York-based nonprofit aimed at helping Tibetan communities in China--sent White, one of America's most celebrated food artisans and the founder of the legendary Egg Farm Dairy, to teach Tibetans how to make a quality cheese out of yak milk. (foodandwine.com)
  • Made from pasteurized sheep's milk, the cheese is aged 5 to 6 months and costs about 31 Euros a kilo. (catavino.net)
  • Rennin- A stomach enzyme that coagulates casein and is used to commercially curdle milk in the making of cheese. (powershow.com)
  • Did you know cheese was traditionally made as a way of preserving the nutrients of milk. (powershow.com)
  • When cheese is overheated, the milk separates out from the fat, leaving a greasy film and the remaining cheese becomes stringy and grainy. (csmonitor.com)
  • Blintzes are usually thin pancakes made with wheat flour, eggs and milk that are fried on one side, filled with fruit, cheese or potato filling, and then fried again once filled. (interfaithfamily.com)
  • Crayeux de Roncq, also spelt as Carré du Vinage, is a washed rind cheese prepared from raw cow's milk in the Roncq region of Northern France, about 30 kms from Lille. (cheese.com)
  • If using pasteurized milk adding a little more cream could be an option for a richer cheese. (cheesemaking.com)
  • The second culture will be a Helveticus culture (LH100) which is characterized by it's ability to convert only part of the milk sugar and leave a sweet note in the final cheese. (cheesemaking.com)
  • Wholegrain English muffins topped with reduced fat cheese and tomato, with a glass of cold milk and MILO (using reduced fat milk). (nestle.com.au)
  • Milk and products derived from milk, such as yogurt and cheese constitutes major dairy products. (nutrition-and-you.com)
  • The quantity, nutritional value and characteristics of cheese vary according to the type of milk used (cow, goat, sheep, buffalo), the method of production (fresh or ripened) and local preferences. (nutrition-and-you.com)
  • Its name is believed to have originated because the simple cheese was usually made in cottages from any milk left over after making butter. (bhf.org.uk)
  • A vegetarian's delight, this pizza is piled-high with flavorful summer produce, two types of cheese, and fresh oregano and basil. (cookinglight.com)
  • Neufchâtel (pronunciation: nøʃatɛl) is a soft, slightly crumbly, mold-ripened cheese made in the Neufchâtel-en-Bray, French region of Normandy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some cheeses are better suited for melting, however, and do very well when combined with a more crumbly hard cheese such as cheddar. (csmonitor.com)
  • all salads need punch and crunch, and here, it comes from toasted, salted pepitas (though any nut will do), crumbled ricotta salata (though any salty, crumbly cheese will do) and minced red onion that I pickled at the last minute in sherry vinegar. (smittenkitchen.com)
  • Almost everyone loves a spoonful or three of tasty yogurt, and with Lakeland's multi yogurt and soft cheese maker, it's easy to whip up batch after batch of your fresh, creamy and nutritious favourites for your family at home. (lakeland.co.uk)
  • Hehe I had to compensate low- fat cheese and low-fat yogurt somehow. (bakingbites.com)
  • Eating a carbohydrate based snack (e.g. fruit, yoghurt, wholegrain crackers with cheese) before training can help to 'switch on' your brain and muscles for the session ahead. (sportsdietitians.com.au)
  • Who has not had a perfectly wonderful slice of hot pizza that when they lifted the wedge, the cheese stretched out like a silken arm, beckoning us to taste it? (csmonitor.com)
  • Simply slice some of the cheese into half-inch thick pieces, then lay them into a hot skillet that's been brushed with just a hint of olive oil. (blogspot.com)
  • 3. Place about a teaspoon of Pine Nut "Cheese" on one beet slice, then top with another. (mynewroots.org)
  • This pairs perfectly with my Chili Cheese Nachos or Mac and Peas recipes from Oh She Glows Every Day , but is just as good heated up and used as a nacho dip for salsa, guacamole, or refried beans. (ohsheglows.com)
  • I foresee nachos and grilled cheeses. (theppk.com)
  • The cheeses made in the mountainous region between France and Switzerland are some of the world's most famous: Gruyere, Comte, Reblochon, Vacherin, Beaufort, Emmental and Tomme de Savoie, among others. (sfgate.com)
  • After you've added Parmigiano-Reggiano to your cooking repertoire, you'll be forced to adopt guerilla defense tactics to protect the ungrated cheese. (winexmagazine.com)
  • This type of cheese is named for its strong smell and sharp taste. (ehow.com)
  • Originating in the Somerset County village of Cheddar in southwest England around 1170 C.E. or earlier, Cheddar is the most popular type of cheese in the U.K. and accounts for more than half of English cheese production. (thenibble.com)
  • Cheddar is the most popular type of cheese in the UK, originating in the English village of Cheddar in Somerset around the late 12th century. (bhf.org.uk)
  • Sweet, crisp Fuji apple provides a great balance to the rich, gooey cheese and savory ham, and everyone knows there's no better place to slip in some extra leafy greens than on a pizza. (cookinglight.com)
  • It definitely has a nacho cheese taste, it's smooth, gooey, and has that slight "artificial twang" from the baking soda and lemon juice. (instructables.com)