Graft Occlusion, Vascular: Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Saphenous Vein: The vein which drains the foot and leg.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Mammary Arteries: Arteries originating from the subclavian or axillary arteries and distributing to the anterior thoracic wall, mediastinal structures, diaphragm, pectoral muscles and mammary gland.Preoperative Period: The period before a surgical operation.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Vascular Patency: The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.Coronary Artery Bypass, Off-Pump: Coronary artery bypass surgery on a beating HEART without a CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS (diverting the flow of blood from the heart and lungs through an oxygenator).Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Polytetrafluoroethylene: Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Vascular Grafting: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES, or transplanted BLOOD VESSELS, or other biological material to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Amputation: The removal of a limb or other appendage or outgrowth of the body. (Dorland, 28th ed)Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Ischemia: A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.Popliteal Artery: The continuation of the femoral artery coursing through the popliteal fossa; it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Coronary Artery Disease: Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Leg: The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Polyethylene Terephthalates: Polyester polymers formed from terephthalic acid or its esters and ethylene glycol. They can be formed into tapes, films or pulled into fibers that are pressed into meshes or woven into fabrics.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Popliteal Vein: The vein formed by the union of the anterior and posterior tibial veins; it courses through the popliteal space and becomes the femoral vein.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Tibial Arteries: The anterior and posterior arteries created at the bifurcation of the popliteal artery. The anterior tibial artery begins at the lower border of the popliteus muscle and lies along the tibia at the distal part of the leg to surface superficially anterior to the ankle joint. Its branches are distributed throughout the leg, ankle, and foot. The posterior tibial artery begins at the lower border of the popliteus muscle, lies behind the tibia in the lower part of its course, and is found situated between the medial malleolus and the medial process of the calcaneal tuberosity. Its branches are distributed throughout the leg and foot.Inguinal Canal: The tunnel in the lower anterior ABDOMINAL WALL through which the SPERMATIC CORD, in the male; ROUND LIGAMENT, in the female; nerves; and vessels pass. Its internal end is at the deep inguinal ring and its external end is at the superficial inguinal ring.Femoral Vein: The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.Lower Extremity: The region of the lower limb in animals, extending from the gluteal region to the FOOT, and including the BUTTOCKS; HIP; and LEG.Limb Salvage: An alternative to amputation in patients with neoplasms, ischemia, fractures, and other limb-threatening conditions. Generally, sophisticated surgical procedures such as vascular surgery and reconstruction are used to salvage diseased limbs.Coronary Occlusion: Complete blockage of blood flow through one of the CORONARY ARTERIES, usually from CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS.Coronary-Subclavian Steal Syndrome: A complication of INTERNAL MAMMARY-CORONARY ARTERY ANASTOMOSIS whereby an occlusion or stenosis of the proximal SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY causes a reversal of the blood flow away from the CORONARY CIRCULATION, through the grafted INTERNAL MAMMARY ARTERY (internal thoracic artery), and back to the distal subclavian distribution.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Balloon Occlusion: Use of a balloon CATHETER to block the flow of blood through an artery or vein.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Retinal Vein Occlusion: Blockage of the RETINAL VEIN. Those at high risk for this condition include patients with HYPERTENSION; DIABETES MELLITUS; ATHEROSCLEROSIS; and other CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.Peripheral Vascular Diseases: Pathological processes involving any one of the BLOOD VESSELS in the vasculature outside the HEART.Retinal Artery Occlusion: Sudden ISCHEMIA in the RETINA due to blocked blood flow through the CENTRAL RETINAL ARTERY or its branches leading to sudden complete or partial loss of vision, respectively, in the eye.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Intermittent Claudication: A symptom complex characterized by pain and weakness in SKELETAL MUSCLE group associated with exercise, such as leg pain and weakness brought on by walking. Such muscle limpness disappears after a brief rest and is often relates to arterial STENOSIS; muscle ISCHEMIA; and accumulation of LACTATE.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Aspirin: The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.MarylandFibrinolytic Agents: Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.Dental Occlusion: The relationship of all the components of the masticatory system in normal function. It has special reference to the position and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth for the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556, p472)Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Bariatric Surgery: Surgical procedures aimed at affecting metabolism and producing major WEIGHT REDUCTION in patients with MORBID OBESITY.International Normalized Ratio: System established by the World Health Organization and the International Committee on Thrombosis and Hemostasis for monitoring and reporting blood coagulation tests. Under this system, results are standardized using the International Sensitivity Index for the particular test reagent/instrument combination used.BostonAnastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery: NECROSIS occurring in the MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY distribution system which brings blood to the entire lateral aspects of each CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE. Clinical signs include impaired cognition; APHASIA; AGRAPHIA; weak and numbness in the face and arms, contralaterally or bilaterally depending on the infarction.Thoracic Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the heart, lungs, and esophagus. Two major types of thoracic surgery are classified as pulmonary and cardiovascular.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Surgery, Plastic: The branch of surgery concerned with restoration, reconstruction, or improvement of defective, damaged, or missing structures.TexasBrain Ischemia: Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Transplants: Organs, tissues, or cells taken from the body for grafting into another area of the same body or into another individual.Collateral Circulation: Maintenance of blood flow to an organ despite obstruction of a principal vessel. Blood flow is maintained through small vessels.Constriction: The act of constricting.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Tissue and Organ Harvesting: The procedure of removing TISSUES, organs, or specimens from DONORS for reuse, such as TRANSPLANTATION.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Carotid Artery, Internal: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Intraoperative Care: Patient care procedures performed during the operation that are ancillary to the actual surgery. It includes monitoring, fluid therapy, medication, transfusion, anesthesia, radiography, and laboratory tests.Mesenteric Vascular Occlusion: Obstruction of the flow in the SPLANCHNIC CIRCULATION by ATHEROSCLEROSIS; EMBOLISM; THROMBOSIS; STENOSIS; TRAUMA; and compression or intrinsic pressure from adjacent tumors. Rare causes are drugs, intestinal parasites, and vascular immunoinflammatory diseases such as PERIARTERITIS NODOSA and THROMBOANGIITIS OBLITERANS. (From Juergens et al., Peripheral Vascular Diseases, 5th ed, pp295-6)Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Jugular Veins: Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Cerebral Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Dental Occlusion, Centric: Contact between opposing teeth during a person's habitual bite.Transplantation, Autologous: Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Cerebral Infarction: The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Therapeutic Occlusion: Methods used to temporarily or permanently block the flow of BODY FLUIDS through various ducts and tubules throughout the body, including BLOOD VESSELS and LYMPHATIC VESSELS such as by THERAPEUTIC EMBOLIZATION or LIGATION.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Intraoperative Period: The period during a surgical operation.Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Cerebrovascular Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.Surgery, Computer-Assisted: Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary: Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Skin Transplantation: The grafting of skin in humans or animals from one site to another to replace a lost portion of the body surface skin.Radial Artery: The direct continuation of the brachial trunk, originating at the bifurcation of the brachial artery opposite the neck of the radius. Its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to the three regions in which the vessel is situated, the forearm, wrist, and hand.Transplantation, Heterotopic: Transplantation of tissue typical of one area to a different recipient site. The tissue may be autologous, heterologous, or homologous.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Ischemic Attack, Transient: Brief reversible episodes of focal, nonconvulsive ischemic dysfunction of the brain having a duration of less than 24 hours, and usually less than one hour, caused by transient thrombotic or embolic blood vessel occlusion or stenosis. Events may be classified by arterial distribution, temporal pattern, or etiology (e.g., embolic vs. thrombotic). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp814-6)Cerebral Arterial Diseases: Pathological conditions of intracranial ARTERIES supplying the CEREBRUM. These diseases often are due to abnormalities or pathological processes in the ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY; MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY; and POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY.Arteriovenous Shunt, Surgical: Surgical shunt allowing direct passage of blood from an artery to a vein. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Monitoring, Intraoperative: The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).Primary Graft Dysfunction: A form of ischemia-reperfusion injury occurring in the early period following transplantation. Significant pathophysiological changes in MITOCHONDRIA are the main cause of the dysfunction. It is most often seen in the transplanted lung, liver, or kidney and can lead to GRAFT REJECTION.Aortography: Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.Ilium: The largest of three bones that make up each half of the pelvic girdle.Thoracic Arteries: Arteries originating from the subclavian or axillary arteries and distributing to the anterior thoracic wall, mediastinal structures, diaphragm, pectoral muscles, mammary gland and the axillary aspect of the chest wall.Fetal Tissue Transplantation: Transference of fetal tissue between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Aortic Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the AORTA.Reperfusion: Restoration of blood supply to tissue which is ischemic due to decrease in normal blood supply. The decrease may result from any source including atherosclerotic obstruction, narrowing of the artery, or surgical clamping. It is primarily a procedure for treating infarction or other ischemia, by enabling viable ischemic tissue to recover, thus limiting further necrosis. However, it is thought that reperfusion can itself further damage the ischemic tissue, causing REPERFUSION INJURY.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Cataract Extraction: The removal of a cataractous CRYSTALLINE LENS from the eye.Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted: Endoscopic surgery of the pleural cavity performed with visualization via video transmission.Fibula: The bone of the lower leg lateral to and smaller than the tibia. In proportion to its length, it is the most slender of the long bones.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Tissue Transplantation: Transference of tissue within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Carotid Stenosis: Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Carotid Artery Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.Perioperative Care: Interventions to provide care prior to, during, and immediately after surgery.Angioplasty, Balloon: Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Myocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Fractures, Ununited: A fracture in which union fails to occur, the ends of the bone becoming rounded and eburnated, and a false joint occurs. (Stedman, 25th ed)Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Ligation: Application of a ligature to tie a vessel or strangulate a part.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Aneurysm: Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the THORACIC AORTA. This proximal descending portion of aorta gives rise to the visceral and the parietal branches above the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Sternum: A long, narrow, and flat bone commonly known as BREASTBONE occurring in the midsection of the anterior thoracic segment or chest region, which stabilizes the rib cage and serves as the point of origin for several muscles that move the arms, head, and neck.Cerebral Revascularization: Microsurgical revascularization to improve intracranial circulation. It usually involves joining the extracranial circulation to the intracranial circulation but may include extracranial revascularization (e.g., subclavian-vertebral artery bypass, subclavian-external carotid artery bypass). It is performed by joining two arteries (direct anastomosis or use of graft) or by free autologous transplantation of highly vascularized tissue to the surface of the brain.Surgery, Oral: A dental specialty concerned with the diagnosis and surgical treatment of disease, injuries, and defects of the human oral and maxillofacial region.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Intracranial Aneurysm: Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)Internal Mammary-Coronary Artery Anastomosis: Direct myocardial revascularization in which the internal mammary artery is anastomosed to the right coronary artery, circumflex artery, or anterior descending coronary artery. The internal mammary artery is the most frequent choice, especially for a single graft, for coronary artery bypass surgery.Blood Loss, Surgical: Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Coated Materials, Biocompatible: Biocompatible materials usually used in dental and bone implants that enhance biologic fixation, thereby increasing the bond strength between the coated material and bone, and minimize possible biological effects that may result from the implant itself.Thoracic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the thoracic organs, most commonly the lungs and the heart.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Heart Arrest, Induced: A procedure to stop the contraction of MYOCARDIUM during HEART SURGERY. It is usually achieved with the use of chemicals (CARDIOPLEGIC SOLUTIONS) or cold temperature (such as chilled perfusate).Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Axillary Artery: The continuation of the subclavian artery; it distributes over the upper limb, axilla, chest and shoulder.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Brain Tissue Transplantation: Transference of brain tissue, either from a fetus or from a born individual, between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Surgical Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements used by health professionals for the performance of surgical tasks.Reperfusion Injury: Adverse functional, metabolic, or structural changes in ischemic tissues resulting from the restoration of blood flow to the tissue (REPERFUSION), including swelling; HEMORRHAGE; NECROSIS; and damage from FREE RADICALS. The most common instance is MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Thrombectomy: Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material from a blood vessel at the point of its formation. Removal of a clot arising from a distant site is called EMBOLECTOMY.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Life Tables: Summarizing techniques used to describe the pattern of mortality and survival in populations. These methods can be applied to the study not only of death, but also of any defined endpoint such as the onset of disease or the occurrence of disease complications.Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Carotid Artery Thrombosis: Blood clot formation in any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES. This may produce CAROTID STENOSIS or occlusion of the vessel, leading to TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBRAL INFARCTION; or AMAUROSIS FUGAX.Aneurysm, False: Not an aneurysm but a well-defined collection of blood and CONNECTIVE TISSUE outside the wall of a blood vessel or the heart. It is the containment of a ruptured blood vessel or heart, such as sealing a rupture of the left ventricle. False aneurysm is formed by organized THROMBUS and HEMATOMA in surrounding tissue.Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.Graft vs Host Disease: The clinical entity characterized by anorexia, diarrhea, loss of hair, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, growth retardation, and eventual death brought about by the GRAFT VS HOST REACTION.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.Hyperplasia: An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.Microsurgery: The performance of surgical procedures with the aid of a microscope.Colorectal Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of disorders and abnormalities of the COLON; RECTUM; and ANAL CANAL.Angiography, Digital Subtraction: A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of synthetic material to repair injured or diseased heart valves.Dental Occlusion, Balanced: Dental occlusion in which the occlusal contact of the teeth on the working side of the jaw is accompanied by the harmonious contact of the teeth on the opposite (balancing) side. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556)Coronary Stenosis: Narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery.Endarterectomy: Surgical excision, performed under general anesthesia, of the atheromatous tunica intima of an artery. When reconstruction of an artery is performed as an endovascular procedure through a catheter, it is called ATHERECTOMY.Bone Substitutes: Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.
Monitoring immediately after bypass surgery focuses on signs and symptoms of bleeding and graft occlusion. If bleeding is ... Arteries can also serve as vascular grafts. A surgeon sews the graft to the source and target vessels by hand using surgical ... Risks of the bypass: Acute graft occlusion is the occlusion (blockage) of a vascular bypass graft shortly after the bypass is ... A vascular bypass (or vascular graft) is a surgical procedure performed to redirect blood flow from one area to another by ...
... grafting in bypass surgeries is the initial endothelial damage and denudation that occur during intra-operative vascular graft ... Vein Graft Disease that has progressed to significant graft stenosis or occlusion is called Vein Graft Failure (VGF). ... Regardless of the type of vascular graft; free vein, free artery and integral vein grafts are all subject to post-grafting Vein ... coronary artery bypass surgery, great saphenous vein, vascular surgery Lipoprotein LDL, HDL, IDL and VLDL "Saphenous vein graft ...
Prosthetic vascular grafts in the aorta Aortic aneurysm Aortofemoral grafts Sepsis Since the device is placed in the femoral ... Percutaneous coronary angioplasty In high risk coronary artery bypass graft surgery where cardiopulmonary bypass time was ... Placing the balloon too distal from the aortic arch may induce occlusion of the renal artery and subsequent kidney failure. ... Mechanical failure of the balloon itself is also a risk which entails vascular surgery to remove under that circumstance. After ...
AV grafts are at high risk to develop narrowing, especially in the vein just downstream from where the graft has been sewn to ... The creation of all these three major types of vascular accesses requires surgery. Catheter access, sometimes called a CVC ( ... This results in scarring and narrowing of the vein, often to the point of occlusion. This can cause problems with severe venous ... More options for sites to place a graft are available, because the graft can be made quite long. Thus a graft can be placed in ...
Full-thickness skin graft to hand (86.62) Other skin graft to hand (86.63) Full-thickness skin graft to other sites (86.64) ... Other shunt or vascular bypass (39.3) Suture of vessel (39.4) Revision of vascular procedure (39.5) Other repair of vessels ( ... Bilateral endoscopic destruction or occlusion of fallopian tubes (66.3) Other bilateral destruction or occlusion of fallopian ... Hair transplant (86.65) Heterograft to skin (86.66) Homograft to skin (86.7) Pedicle grafts or flaps (86.8) Other repair and ...
Staples versus sutures for closing leg wounds after vein graft harvesting for coronary artery bypass surgery PMID 20464762 ... Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor for macular oedema secondary to branch retinal vein occlusion PMID 23440840 https://doi ... Skin grafting and tissue replacement for treating foot ulcers in people with diabetes PMID 26866804 https://doi.org/10.1002/ ... Radiotherapy versus open surgery versus endolaryngeal surgery (with or without laser) for early laryngeal squamous cell cancer ...
Coronary artery bypass graft surgery is the best treatment for some patients. Differences between outcomes with stenting and ... Stent occlusion because of thrombosis may occur during the procedure, in the following days, or later. The presence of thrombi ... coronary-artery bypass grafting in multivessel coronary disease". N. Engl. J. Med. 358 (4): 331-41. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa071804. ... Finn AV, Nakazawa G, Joner M, Kolodgie FD, Mont EK, Gold HK, Virmani R (2007). "Vascular responses to drug eluting stents: ...
Allen KB (2005). "Endoscopic Vascular Harvest in Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Surgery: A Consensus Statement of the ... Damage to the endothelium, the interior of the vessel, has been shown to increase the likelihood of graft occlusion or blockage ... Allen K (2005). "Endoscopic Vascular Harvest in Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Surgery: A Consensus Statement of the ... "Endoscopic Vascular Harvest in Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Surgery: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials and Controlled ...
EVH has been associated with higher risk of vein graft stenosis and occlusion. The solutions in which vein grafts are stored ... Journal of vascular surgery. 51 (2): 429-37. doi:10.1016/j.jvs.2009.09.026. PMID 20036101. Quax, PH; Lamfers, ML; Lardenoye, JH ... "Vein graft preservation solutions, patency, and outcomes after coronary artery bypass graft surgery: follow-up from the PREVENT ... In medicine, vein graft failure (VGF) is a condition in which vein grafts, which are used as alternative conduits in bypass ...
... of blood vessels include vascular surgery, cardiac surgery, and angioplasty. When a stent is used and restenosis occurs, this ... over the months following a vascular procedure, such as the implantation of a stent-graft. Late loss is one metric that is ... An occlusion, or the blocking of all blood flow through a vessel, is considered 100% percent diameter stenosis. Binary ... Rates of restenosis differ between devices (e.g., stent-grafts, balloon angioplasty, etc.) and location of procedure (i.e., ...
"Which Troponometric Best Predicts Midterm Outcome After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery?". The Annals of Thoracic Surgery ... In the first prospectively designed trial to examine the effect of RIC on clinical outcomes in coronary artery bypass grafting ... Reduced cerebral blood flow is an early finding in vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Cardiovascular risk factor control is ... and damage instead results from distal embolization and side-branch occlusion. Nevertheless, myocardial damage during elective ...
... surgery may be indicated. Vascular bypass surgery can re-establish flow around the diseased segment of artery, and angioplasty ... Coronary artery bypass grafting without manipulation of the ascending aorta has demonstrated reduced rates of postoperative ... A number of procedures may also be carried out such as percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass graft, or ... Plaque rupture can lead to artery lumen occlusion within seconds to minutes, and potential permanent debility and sometimes ...
... including open flap debridement and osseous surgery, as well as guided tissue regeneration and bone grafting. The goal of ... In addition to initial scaling and root planing, it may also be necessary to adjust the occlusion (bite) to prevent excessive ... Systemic disease may develop because the gums are very vascular (have a good blood supply). The blood stream carries these ... naeslundii Campylobacter Candida albicans Chronic periodontitis Dental implant Dental plaque Edentulism Gingivitis Gum graft ...
Deb, S; Wijeysundera, HC; Ko, DT; Tsubota, H; Hill, S; Fremes, SE (20 November 2013). "Coronary artery bypass graft surgery vs ... Faxon, D. P. (1 June 2004). "Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease Conference: Executive Summary: Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease ... A more severe form is chronic total occlusion (CTO) when a coronary artery is completely obstructed for more than 3 months. ... Sipahi I, Akay MH, Dagdelen S, Blitz A, Alhan C (1 February 2014). "Coronary artery bypass grafting vs percutaneous coronary ...
Cardiac surgery training may be combined with thoracic surgery and / or vascular surgery and called cardiovascular (CV) / ... One of the more commonly known cardiac surgery procedures is the coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), also known as "bypass ... surgery." In this procedure, vessels from elsewhere in the patient's body are harvested, and grafted to the coronary arteries ... Among them was an open repair of an atrial septal defect using hypothermia, inflow occlusion and direct vision in a 5-year old ...
Deb, S; Wijeysundera, HC; Ko, DT; Tsubota, H; Hill, S; Fremes, SE (20 November 2013). "Coronary artery bypass graft surgery vs ... Faxon, D. P. (1 June 2004). "Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease Conference: Executive Summary: Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease ... Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Medications[edit]. *Statins, which reduce cholesterol, reduce the risk of coronary ... A more severe form is chronic total occlusion (CTO) when a coronary artery is completely obstructed for more than 3 months.[52] ...
By the mid 1980s, over 300,000 PTCAs were being performed on a yearly basis, equalling the number of bypass surgeries being ... Palmaz JC, Sibbitt RR, Reuter SR, Tio FO, Rice WJ (1985). "Expandable intraluminal graft: a preliminary study. Work in progress ... The use of tapered Teflon dilating catheters for the treatment of atherosclerotic vascular disease was first described in 1964 ... Occlusive aortography involved the transient occlusion of the aorta and subsequent injection of a small amount of radiographic ...
"Bypass surgery significantly better than stents for treating multiple blockages in diabetics" (Press release). Heart.org. ... Moreno, PR; Sanz, J; Fuster, V (Jun 2009). "Promoting mechanisms of vascular health: circulating progenitor cells, angiogenesis ... and resistance to atherothrombosis The first demonstration of the role played by platelets in CABG occlusion and prevention by ... "Effect of Dipyridamole and Aspirin on Late Vein-Graft Patency after Coronary Bypass Operations". New England Journal of ...
... with grafts of autologous fat is a non-implant alternative to further surgery after a breast cancer surgery, be it a lumpectomy ... In fat-graft breast augmentation procedures, there is the risk that the adipocyte tissue grafted to the breast(s) can undergo ... between the grafted fat-tissue and the recipient breast-tissue, because proximity to a vascular system (blood supply) ... Amsterdam Excerpta Medica Schiffman, p. 5. Coleman, S. (2002). "Avoidance of arterial occlusion from injection of soft tissue ...
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery. "Patient's Guide to Heart Transplant Surgery". University of Southern California. ... Medical grafting. *Bone grafting. *Skin grafting. *Vascular grafting. Organ donation. *Non-heart-beating donation ... 1999), Early heart transplant surgery in the UK, Wellcome Witnesses to Contemporary Medicine, History of Modern Biomedicine ... Surgery and other procedures involving the heart (ICD-9-CM V3 35-37+89.4+99.6, ICD-10-PCS 02) ...
Corneal transplant surgery may be difficult due to the peripheral thinning of the cornea, even with large and off-center grafts ... However, if there is not enough normal tissue present, then attaching the graft is difficult. New surgical techniques are in ... Ocular ischemic syndrome / Central retinal vein occlusion. *Central retinal artery occlusion. *Branch retinal artery occlusion ... Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery. 41 (1): 2-8. doi:10.1016/j.jcrs.2014.11.030. PMID 25532629.. ...
... where clogged blood vessels are bypassed with a graft from another part of the body. Alternatively, grafts may be from other ... Vascular surgery ICD-9-CM V3 38-39, ICD-10-PCS 03-6 ... Left atrial appendage occlusion. *Cardiotomy. *Heart ... Although grafting is often used in cosmetic surgery, it is also used in other surgery. Grafts may be taken from one area of the ... See also: Pediatric surgery and Pediatric plastic surgery. Vulnerable populations[edit]. Doctors perform surgery with the ...
Cardiac surgery training may be combined with thoracic surgery and / or vascular surgery and called cardiovascular (CV) / ... One of the more commonly known cardiac surgery procedures is the coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), also known as "bypass ... surgery." In this procedure, vessels from elsewhere in the patient's body are harvested, and grafted to the coronary arteries ... Among them was an open repair of an atrial septal defect using hypothermia, inflow occlusion and direct vision in a 5-year old ...
Definition Vascular surgery [2] is the treatment of surgery on diagnosed patients with diseases of the arterial, venous, and ... acute arterial and graft occlusion. *carotid endarterectomy. *endovascular grafting. *vasculogenic erectile dysfunction ... Vascular surgery. Definition. Vascular surgery is the treatment of surgery on diagnosed patients with diseases of the arterial ... Journal of Vascular Surgery 36, no. 6 (2002): 1276-1282.. organizations. American Board of Vascular Surgery (ABVS). 900 ...
... in vascular limb injuries is the graft material of choice. Denatured saphenous vein homograft (DSVH), thanks to its ... Graft Occlusion, Vascular / etiology. Graft Survival. Humans. Leg Injuries / surgery*. Male. Middle Aged. Necrosis. Popliteal ... 11833999 - Flow dynamics in internal thoracic artery grafts 10 years after coronary artery bypass .... 6610349 - Progression of ... European journal of vascular and endovascular surgery : the official journal of the European Society for Vascular Surgery ...
Is transfusion associated with graft occlusion after cardiac operations? Engoren M, Schwann TA, Jewell E, Neill S, Benedict P, ... Transfusion in coronary artery bypass grafting is associated with reduced long-term survival. Koch CG, Li L, Duncan AI, ... Impact on early and late mortality after blood transfusion in coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Santos AA, Sousa AG, Thomé ... Allogeneic blood transfusions explain increased mortality in women after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Rogers MA, ...
... is a common graft being used in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Conventional (CON), intermediate (I), and no-touch (NT ... Recent strategies to reduce vein graft occlusion: a need to limit the effect of vascular damage. European Journal of Vascular ... Suma, H. (1999). Arterial grafts in coronary bypass surgery. The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, 5, 141-144.Google Scholar ... Pedicled no-touch saphenous vein graft harvest limits vascular smooth muscle cell activation: the PATENT saphenous vein graft ...
Treatment of acute arterial occlusion. Thrombectomy or grafting. Thrombolytic therapy (via catheter) only if ischemia not ... Could be due to aortoenteric fistula develping over time between graft and distal duodenum. Can be difficult to see on ... A vasodilator that can be used to dilate the mesenteric vascular bed in a case of low-flow (non-occlusive) mesenteric ischemia ... A uncommon severe form of DVT which results from extensive thrombotic occlusion of the major and collateral veins of an ...
Preclinical assessment of a compliance matched biopolymer vascular graft. His research builds upon his work at Pitts Soft ... Large-diameter vascular grafts are commonly used in some vascular surgeries and can function perfectly up to 10 years after ... However, the body often treats small-diameter grafts as dangerous foreign objects. The result can be artery occlusion or blood ... "Small-diameter vascular grafts, or grafts involving blood vessels with an internal diameter smaller than five millimeters, have ...
Initially, the patient was seen by vascular surgery and an unsuccessful attempt at an endovascular stent placement was ... Furthermore, the venogram demonstrated occlusion of the superior vena cava. She was subsequently referred to thoracic surgery ... The use of spiral vein grafting in benign SVC obstruction is superior to either PTFE grafting or nonsurgical interventions such ... The vein graft was left on the end of the cannulae and using a parachute technique an end-to-end anastomosis was first created ...
0055] vascular occlusion in peripheral arterial disease; and [0056] venous thromboembolic disease following surgery, during ... they are then transplanted or grafted back into a subject to be treated. The cells once introduced into the body can produce ... 0052] occlusion of coronary artery bypass graft; [0053] occlusion following percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty; ... vWF is synthesized by vascular endothelial cells and megakaryocytes and circulates in blood as a series of multimers containing ...
He has had surgery on all of them with artificial grafts as well as vein grafting in both legs, the artificial ones are in his ... These people are at high risk of arterial occlusion, and are candidates for peripheral vascular bypass surgery. Occlusive ... My husband had the vascular graft surgery in October 2017. The incision did not heal right and he had to have another surgery ... I had surgery on 15/10/2016 with PEFT graft 8cm on knee the way of surgery was wrong after 6month the graft was repeatedly ...
The present invention provides an implantable graft, including a primary tubular body having a first outer wall surface and a ... and possibly graft occlusion. Thus, in order to maintain the integrity of the graft, blood cannot be withdrawn from a PTFE ... the PTFE grafts are generally not used to withdraw blood until they have been in place for a minimum of 14 days after surgery. ... Grafts and stent grafts having a radiopaque marker. US8652284. 21 Nov 2011. 18 Feb 2014. C. R. Bard, Inc.. Vascular graft with ...
... resulting in graft stenosis and occlusion. On the other hand, arterial grafts, specifically IMA grafts, are resistant to ... 5,7 Graft occlusion can also occur due to vascular damage during harvesting of the saphenous vein. In a large study, the SVG ... Graft thrombosis and occlusion Bypass graft failures are classified either as early or late following CABG surgery. During the ... Acute or chronic graft occlusion can sometimes be differentiated by the diameter of the bypass graft. In chronic occlusion, the ...
Our unit of analysis was the bypass graft. Our main outcome measure was a combined measure of either permanent graft occlusion ... "Results of a regional study of modes of death associated with coronary artery bypass grafting," Annals of Thoracic Surgery, vol ... "Pivotal results of the medtronic vascular talent thoracic stent graft system: the VALOR trial," Journal of Vascular Surgery, ... and mortality in peripheral vascular surgery," Journal of Vascular Surgery, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 205-216, 2006. View at ...
Vascular surgery uses human blood vessels to replace stenotic or occluded vessels (bypass operation). Grafts are likewise used ... The stenosis or a complete occlusion of blood vessels by deposits over the course of ones life can be particularly dangerous ... The number of the cells gives explanation about the quality of the graft. ... The members of this board will be experts in the fields of ophthalmology, general surgery and cardiovascular surgery. Trust ...
PTA may provide increased assisted primary patency for endovascular treatment of central vein stenosis or occlusion in patients ... Source: The Journal of Vascular Access - May 1, 2019. Category: Surgery Tags: J Vasc Access Source Type: research ... The main indication of PΤΑ is stenosis, 50% or obstruction of the vascular lumen of an arteriovenous fistula and graft. It is ... according to patency of arteriovenous fistula and grafts. ... Vascular access for hemodialysis: Current practice in Vietnam. ...
... most notably in coronary artery bypass grafting. Numerous studies have shown that failure is secondary to graft occlusion, ... Herring M, Gardner A, Glover J. A single-staged technique for seeding vascular grafts with autogenous endothelium. Surgery. ... Background- Synthetic vascular grafts cannot be used in small vessels because of graft failure caused by thrombosis and ... The major limitation of prosthetic vascular grafts is their tendency to occlude after various periods of time. This occlusion ...
A graft deployment system includes a tissue dilator and a needle for perforating tissue, mounted coaxially within the dilator. ... A bypass graft incorporates fixation mechanisms at its opposite ends, for securing these ends to different locations along a ... Vascular Science Inc.. Medical grafting connectors and fasteners. US6036703. 5 Feb 1999. 14 Mar 2000. Ethicon Endo-Surgery Inc. ... Percutaneous catheter directed constricting occlusion device. US5944750. 18 Jul 1997. 31 Aug 1999. Eva Corporation. Method and ...
Vascular Bypass Grafting: A Biomimetic Engineering Approach. When a patient with heart disease is in need of a vascular graft ... Large-diameter vascular grafts are commonly used in some vascular surgeries and can function perfectly up to 10 years after ... However, the body often treats small-diameter grafts as dangerous foreign objects. The result can be artery occlusion or blood ... "Small-diameter vascular grafts, or grafts involving blood vessels with an internal diameter smaller than five millimeters, have ...
... a coronary bypass graft, of a living being. The system comprises an atherectomy catheter having a working head, e.g., a rotary ... in many instances a vascular occlusion of a coronary artery can only be treated by coronary bypass surgery wherein a graft, e.g ... Thus, the re-occluded graft has to be either bypassed by another graft (i.e., second bypass surgery), or the re-occluded graft ... It must be reiterated that the atherectomy catheter for producing the lumen through the vascular occlusion need not be a rotary ...
... agents or compounds may be utilized in the treatment of vascular disease. The intralumen medical device is selectively coated ... and vascular occlusion in a mammal, particularly following either biologically or mechanically mediated vascular injury, or ... Essentially, stents or other similar medical devices, e.g. grafts, in combination with one or more drugs, agents or compounds ... This is the basis for its immunosuppresive activity and its ability to prevent graft rejection. ...
... and vascular occlusion in a mammal, particularly following either biologically or mechanically mediated vascular injury, or ... Expandable Grafts Partnership. Expandable intraluminal graft. US5213576. 11 Jun 1991. 25 May 1993. Cordis Corporation. ... Tubular prostheses for vascular reconstructive surgery and process for preparing same. US4990155. 19 May 1989. 5 Feb 1991. ... Tubular prosthesis for vascular reconstructive surgery and process for preparing same. US5133732. 22 Mar 1989. 28 Jul 1992. ...
Global Vascular Grafts Market Attractiveness Analysis, by Size of Vascular Graft. 9. Global Vascular Grafts Market Analysis and ... vascular occlusion, critical limb ischemia, renal failure, and others. Based on end-user, the global vascular grafts market has ... been divided into hospitals, ambulatory surgery centers, cardiac catheterization laboratories, specialty clinics, and others. ... Global Vascular Grafts Market Analysis, by Size of Vascular Graft. 8.4. Global Vascular Grafts Market Value Forecast, by Size ...
... and vascular occlusion in a mammal, particularly following either biologically or mechanically mediated vascular injury, or ... again just prior to surgery and for the remainder of the study. At the time of surgery, animals were premedicated with ... Modification of polymeric surface by graft polymerization. US5254107 *. 23 Sep 1992. 19 Oct 1993. Cordis Corporation. Catheter ... Additionally, restenosis is a chronic problem in patients who have undergone saphenous vein bypass grafting. The mechanism of ...
... and vascular occlusion in a mammal, particularly following either biologically or mechanically mediated vascular injury, or ... Expandable Grafts Partnership. Expandable intraluminal graft. US5197977 *. 30 Apr 1992. 30 Mar 1993. Meadox Medicals, Inc.. ... Tubular prostheses for vascular reconstructive surgery and process for preparing same. US4990155 *. 19 May 1989. 5 Feb 1991. ... Collagen-polymer tubes for use in vascular surgery. US5304121 *. 22 Nov 1991. 19 Apr 1994. Boston Scientific Corporation. Drug ...
Section of Vascular Surgery; Director of Vascular Services, UC Medical Center ... George Meier, MD is a member of the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and Professor of Surgery; Chief, ... Reoperation for aortofemoral graft limb occlusion: optimal methods and long-term results. Journal of vascular surgery, 5 2, 363 ... The effect of a venous anastomosis Tyrell vein collar on the primary patency of arteriovenous grafts in patients undergoing ...
1st occurrence over the duration of follow-up of : index bypass graft occlusion based on imaging procedure, or graft ... Peripheral Vascular Diseases. Arterial Occlusive Diseases. Atherosclerosis. Arteriosclerosis. Vascular Diseases. Cardiovascular ... Patient receiving aorto-bifemoral, iliac-femoral or crossover (femoral-femoral) grafts, or undergoing peripheral transcutaneous ... 1st occurrence of any component of following cluster of events : index bypass graft occlusion,any revascularization procedure ...
  • 10-12 The introduction of 64-slice MDCT and dual-source CT permitted improved temporal resolution (up to 83 msec) and spatial resolution (0.4 × 0.4 × 0.4 mm 3 ) and reduction of both cardiac and respiratory motion, leading to improved assessment of graft stenosis and occlusion. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Coronary stenting versus coronary bypass surgery in patients with multiple vessel disease and significant proximal LAD stenosis: results from the ERACI II study. (ebscohost.com)
  • Objective- Previous studies have suggested that neointimal formation, a central cause of vein graft stenosis, has several potential cell sources. (ahajournals.org)
  • The relative neointimal wall thickness is much greater in this model compared with other murine and larger-species vein graft models, even showing near-occlusive stenosis of the perianastomotic region. (ahajournals.org)
  • Conclusions- Vein graft neointimal cells arise predominantly from vein-derived cells, suggesting clinical relevance of stenosis-inhibiting therapies directed at the vein graft. (ahajournals.org)
  • 7,8 This neointimal growth appears to stabilize beyond 1 to 2 months in animal models 9,10 and does not create significant graft stenosis at any time, thus differing from the clinical progression of this complication. (ahajournals.org)
  • 20 The following study confirms this result using a new murine model that has direct analogy to clinical vein grafting and stenosis. (ahajournals.org)
  • Patients treated with the aggressive lipid-lowering strategy had less progression of atherosclerosis in the LMCA as measured by changes in minimum ( P =0.0003) lumen diameter or the maximum percent stenosis ( P =0.001), or the presence of substantial progression ( P =0.008), or vascular occlusion ( P =0.005) when compared with the moderate strategy. (ahajournals.org)
  • Cerebral perfusion reserve testing using fluorine-18-fluoromethane and position emission tomographic brain scanning to define cerebral blood flow abnor- malities was performed in 5 patients being considered for combined coronary and carotid reconstructive surgery. (ebscohost.com)
  • The present invention provides an implantable graft, including a primary tubular body having a first outer wall surface and a first inner wall surface defining a primary blood contacting lumen, and a secondary tubular body having a second outer wall surface and a second inner wall surface. (google.es)
  • 2 . The graft according to claim 1 , wherein at least one of said tubular bodies is made of a fluoropolymer, a polyimide, a silicone, a polyurethanes, a polyurethane ether, a polyurethane ester, a polyurethaneurea, and mixtures and copolymers thereof. (google.es)
  • This invention relates to the fields of composite yarns, fabrics manufactured therefrom and to tubular, e.g., vascular tissue, prostheses manufactured from yarns or fabrics. (google.co.uk)
  • An intralumen medical device comprising anti-proliferative and anti-thrombotic or anti-coagulant drugs, agents or compounds may be utilized in the treatment of vascular disease. (google.com)
  • The present invention relates to the local administration of drug/drug combinations for the prevention and treatment of vascular disease, and more particularly to intraluminal medical devices for the local delivery of drug/drug combinations for the prevention and treatment of vascular disease caused by injury and methods for maintaining the drug/drug combinations on the intraluminal medical devices. (google.ca)
  • Association between intraoperative blood transfusion and mortality and morbidity in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery. (jw.org)
  • Peri-operative mortality and morbidity, retrograde type A dissection, maximum aortic transverse diameter (TD) and its post-operative evolution, endoleak, survival, freedom from cardiovascular re-interventions, and CPG freedom from occlusion during the follow-up were analysed. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • No. 09/903,219, entitled "Percutaneous Bypass Graft and Securing System" filed Jul. (google.ca)
  • No. 09/415,776, entitled "Percutaneous Bypass Graft and Securing System" filed Oct. 8, 1999 (now U.S. Pat. (google.ca)
  • No. 08/966,003, entitled "Percutaneous Bypass Graft and Securing System", filed Nov. 7, 1997 (now U.S. Pat. (google.ca)
  • No. 60/030,733 entitled "Percutaneous Bypass Graft and Securing System", filed Nov. 8, 1996. (google.ca)
  • 17 . The graft according to claim 15 , further comprising at least one drug present in or on a surface of at least one of said primary lumen and said plurality of secondary lumens. (google.es)
  • More particularly, the present invention relates to an implantable graft having an integral multi-lumen structure. (google.com)
  • Numerous studies have shown that failure is secondary to graft occlusion, either because of thrombogenicity of the synthetic material or because of encroachment of tissue (intimal hyperplasia) into the lumen of the graft at anastomotic sites. (ahajournals.org)
  • Most obstructions are caused by the insidious development of atherosclerotic plaque buildup, and, terminally, by thrombotic occlusion of the remaining lumen. (ispub.com)
  • Vascular surgery is indicated when a patient has vascular disease that cannot be treated by less invasive, nonsurgical treatments. (encyclopedia.com)
  • A significant proportion of vascular disease cases involve small-diameter blood vessels, so the demand for viable treatment options is very high. (eurekalert.org)
  • Non-atherosclerotic vascular disease (e.g. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Results obtained in this preliminary series show how preoperative noninvasive testing of cerebral perfusion reserve adds to the diagnostic evaluation of patients with widespread vascular disease. (ebscohost.com)
  • In the laboratory of McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine deputy director, Stephen Badylak, DVM, PhD, MD , professor in the Department of Surgery and director of the Center for Pre-Clinical Tissue Engineering within the Institute, researchers are working to increase the shortage of viable, transplantable livers by engineering a functional whole organ for treatment of end stage liver disease. (pitt.edu)
  • While there are many anatomical arrangements for vascular bypass grafts in the lower extremities depending on the location of the disease, the principle is the same: to restore blood flow to an area without normal flow. (wikipedia.org)
  • The lack of an adequate venous conduit is a relative contraindication to bypass surgery, and depending on the area of disease, alternatives may be used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medical conditions such as ischemic heart disease or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease that increase the risk of surgery are also relative contraindications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vein graft disease}} from http://somahlution.com/pdfs/SOMA_0069_VGD_VGF_White_Paper2_LR.pdf. (wikipedia.org)
  • 3. An opening created by surgery, trauma, or disease between two or more normally separate spaces or organs. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • This chapter aims to describe the pathophysiological changes that may occur in sub-optimal donor livers, focusing on viral infections, since, after transplantation, infection of the graft is almost universal and can lead to chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and graft failure. (intechopen.com)
  • Such replacement procedures, however, generally involve invasive surgery, resulting in extensive recovery and high risk of infection and/or rejection. (google.es)
  • Superficial wound infection is possible, yet graft infections are also possible and are major complication that require life-long antibiotics and graft excision if possible. (teachmesurgery.com)
  • In addition, to counteract the shortage of liver grafts, transplant centers accept the use of sub-optimal livers, which may show higher risk of primary non-function or initial poor function. (intechopen.com)
  • Twenty-two patients with complex aortic pathologies were retrospectively studied from January 2013 to August 2016 in two vascular centers of teaching hospitals. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Patients were classified as cases when their first functioning dialysis access had a thrombotic occlusion. (asnjournals.org)