Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Reproductive Physiological Phenomena: Physiological processes, factors, properties and characteristics pertaining to REPRODUCTION.Societies, Pharmaceutical: Societies whose membership is limited to pharmacists.Education, Veterinary: Use for general articles concerning veterinary medical education.Education, Nursing, Graduate: Those educational activities engaged in by holders of a bachelor's degree in nursing, which are primarily designed to prepare them for entrance into a specific field of nursing, and may lead to board certification or a more advanced degree.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Foreign Medical Graduates: Physicians who hold degrees from medical schools in countries other than the ones in which they practice.Education, Pharmacy, Graduate: Educational programs for pharmacists who have a bachelor's degree or a Doctor of Pharmacy degree entering a specific field of pharmacy. They may lead to an advanced degree.Education, Dental, Graduate: Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.United StatesEducation, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Education: Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Education, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Education, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform individuals of recent advances in their particular field of interest. They do not lead to any formal advanced standing.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Competency-Based Education: Educational programs designed to ensure that students attain prespecified levels of competence in a given field or training activity. Emphasis is on achievement or specified objectives.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Education, Distance: Education via communication media (correspondence, radio, television, computer networks) with little or no in-person face-to-face contact between students and teachers. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1997)Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Accreditation: Certification as complying with a standard set by non-governmental organizations, applied for by institutions, programs, and facilities on a voluntary basis.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Osteopathic Medicine: A medical discipline that is based on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy, developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, recognizes the concept of "wellness" and the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Special attention is placed on the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Education, Pharmacy: Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.Fellowships and Scholarships: Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Personnel Selection: The process of choosing employees for specific types of employment. The concept includes recruitment.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Medically Underserved Area: A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.School Admission Criteria: Requirements for the selection of students for admission to academic institutions.Sex Education: Education which increases the knowledge of the functional, structural, and behavioral aspects of human reproduction.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Education, Nursing, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform nurses of recent advances in their fields.Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Training Support: Financial support for training including both student stipends and loans and training grants to institutions.Education, Special: Education of the individual who markedly deviates intellectually, physically, socially, or emotionally from those considered to be normal, thus requiring special instruction.Education, Professional: Formal education and training in preparation for the practice of a profession.Dentists: Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Problem-Based Learning: Instructional use of examples or cases to teach using problem-solving skills and critical thinking.Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate: A four-year program in nursing education in a college or university leading to a B.S.N. (Bachelor of Science in Nursing). Graduates are eligible for state examination for licensure as RN (Registered Nurse).Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Education, Dental, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform dentists of recent advances in their fields.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Private Practice: Practice of a health profession by an individual, offering services on a person-to-person basis, as opposed to group or partnership practice.General Practice: Patient-based medical care provided across age and gender or specialty boundaries.Students, Health Occupations: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Licensure, Medical: The granting of a license to practice medicine.Specialty Boards: Organizations which certify physicians and dentists as specialists in various fields of medical and dental practice.Physicians, Women: Women licensed to practice medicine.Education, Pharmacy, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform graduate pharmacists of recent advances in their particular field.Education, Premedical: Preparatory education meeting the requirements for admission to medical school.Computer-Assisted Instruction: A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.Great BritainEducation, Public Health Professional: Education and training in PUBLIC HEALTH for the practice of the profession.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Students, Pharmacy: Individuals enrolled in a school of pharmacy or a formal educational program leading to a degree in pharmacy.Internship, Nonmedical: Advanced programs of training to meet certain professional requirements in fields other than medicine or dentistry, e.g., pharmacology, nutrition, nursing, etc.Societies: Organizations composed of members with common interests and whose professions may be similar.Schools, Pharmacy: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of pharmacy.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Teaching Materials: Instructional materials used in teaching.Students, Nursing: Individuals enrolled in a school of nursing or a formal educational program leading to a degree in nursing.Career Mobility: The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.Preceptorship: Practical experience in medical and health-related services that occurs as part of an educational program wherein the professionally-trained student works outside the academic environment under the supervision of an established professional in the particular field.American Medical Association: Professional society representing the field of medicine.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Schools, Veterinary: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of veterinary medicine.Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Dental Hygienists: Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.Audiovisual Aids: Auditory and visual instructional materials.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)General Practice, Dental: Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.Nutritional Sciences: The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Pharmacists: Those persons legally qualified by education and training to engage in the practice of pharmacy.Vocational Education: Education for specific trades or occupations.Practice Management, Medical: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a physician's practice.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Dental Research: The study of laws, theories, and hypotheses through a systematic examination of pertinent facts and their interpretation in the field of dentistry. (From Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982, p674)Community Dentistry: The practice of dentistry concerned with preventive as well as diagnostic and treatment programs in a circumscribed population.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Credentialing: The recognition of professional or technical competence through registration, certification, licensure, admission to association membership, the award of a diploma or degree, etc.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Physical Education and Training: Instructional programs in the care and development of the body, often in schools. The concept does not include prescribed exercises, which is EXERCISE THERAPY.Internal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Aspirations (Psychology): Strong desires to accomplish something. This usually pertains to greater values or high ideals.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Professional Role: The expected function of a member of a particular profession.Physiology: The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Minority Groups: A subgroup having special characteristics within a larger group, often bound together by special ties which distinguish it from the larger group.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Schools: Educational institutions.Practice Management: Business management of medical, dental and veterinary practices that may include capital financing, utilization management, and arrangement of capitation agreements with other parties.Administrative Personnel: Individuals responsible for the development of policy and supervision of the execution of plans and functional operations.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.
  • Fly-in / Fly-out' is a work practice utilised by the mining sector for more than 25 years, although today it is becoming more common across varied professions, in particular nursing and allied health 2 . (rrh.org.au)
  • Additionally, poor opportunities for both professional development and ongoing education are serious disincentives for nurses to move into or remain nursing in rural and remote areas 11 . (rrh.org.au)
  • The answer to this question is of importance to many Ohio hospitals that permit CNPs with national certifications other than acute care to practice in the hospital setting. (bricker.com)
  • Staff working in an HCIC can only work in that HCIC, and the provider must have adequate supplies of PPE and must be able to share patient information with pharmacies, hospitals, nursing facilities and outpatient clinicians. (bricker.com)
  • As experts in the care of women and children, maternity nurses can be found in any setting that provides reproductive health services, including hospitals, schools, doctor's offices, outpatient clinics and patients' homes. (innerbody.com)
  • Maternity nurses employed by hospitals typically work extended shifts that cover nights, weekends and holidays. (innerbody.com)
  • Iran, a country of sixty eight million has a national health service which employs over 70,000 nursing personnel (including operating room technicians) who provide nursing care in general and specialty hospitals. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The role of nurses is unclear, for although most of them are employed in hospitals, yet few or none are in the role of Public Health Nursing. (biomedcentral.com)
  • More and more hospitals are actively seeking MSN-degreed nurses to fill positions as nurse managers and nurse leaders in order to qualify for Magnet Hospital status . (nurse.org)
  • Because the JRC was under government control, their hospitals spread to all the major cities and a uniformity of training made the organization a leader in nursing development. (wikipedia.org)
  • Up to that time, job training was the only requirement and there was no prerequisite for a high school education to enter training at most hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • A random sample of 152 nurses was recruited from private hospitals. (who.int)
  • Hospice care also is provided in freestanding hospice centers, hospitals, and nursing homes and other long-term care facilities. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Advocated for and secured increases in Medicaid funding for ICF-IID, Class, HCS and foster care programs, children's hospitals and rural hospitals, the nursing home and home healthcare industries, vendor drug program, and other healthcare providers. (jw.com)
  • 2. Staff nurses working in hospitals: Who are they, what do they do, and what challenges do they face? (nii.ac.jp)
  • This year's version of the complaint - for it is a complaint that surfaces periodically, particularly during a nursing shortage - comes mainly from acute care hospitals. (longwoods.com)
  • This lack of flexibility in the British model may explain why most of the countries that previously followed it have switched to the North American approach to nursing education, which produces generalists who are prepared to move into entry-level positions in the care of adults and children with physical and mental health problems, both in hospitals and at home. (longwoods.com)
  • The nurses also work for a range of employers, from large organizations with more than 10,000 employees to ones with a hundred or fewer employees, and from public hospitals to colleges to home health care services. (minoritynurse.com)
  • For instance, white nurses working at private hospitals earn a median $80,000, while African American nurses earn a median $62,000. (minoritynurse.com)
  • When they left previous jobs, respondents said it was mostly to pursue better opportunities, and this year's respondents reported that the best-paying places to work are in private practice or at private or public hospitals. (minoritynurse.com)
  • At UHC, a council of chief nursing officers from member hospitals realized this was an issue that affected not only their employees, but their patients as well. (advanceweb.com)
  • At this point, more than half the nursing staff at some hospitals have experienced the residency. (advanceweb.com)
  • A detailed test-taking strategy and rationale is included for each question, offering clues for analyzing and uncovering the correct answer option, and guiding you to remediation in Saunders Strategies for Test Success: Passing Nursing School and the NCLEX ® Exam and Saunders Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN ® Exam . (elsevier.com)
  • Exam preparation chapters include test-taking strategies, the CAT format, transitional issues for the foreign-educated nurse, and the NCLEX-RN exam from a new graduate's perspective. (elsevier.com)
  • An emphasis on making the transition into the workplace is included in chapters such as NCLEX-RN and the New Graduate , Employment Considerations: Opportunities, Resumes, and Interviewing, and Mentorship and Preceptorship . (elsevier.com)
  • The student who meets all educational and institutional requirements for an Associate of Science Degree in Nursing from Broward College is eligible to have their name submitted to the Florida Board of Nursing to be considered as a candidate for the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN). (broward.edu)
  • The Florida Board of Nursing is the state agency authorized to determine if the applicant qualifies to take the NCLEX-RN for licensure as a registered nurse. (broward.edu)
  • Graduates who meet all educational and institutional requirements are awarded an Associate of Science degree in Nursing from Broward College and are eligible to have their name submitted to the Florida Board of Nursing for consideration as a candidate for the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). (broward.edu)
  • A family nurse practitioner directs the care that his or her patient receives, and in some cases the patient may have no need to see a doctor at all unless their condition is complicated enough that it should be referred to an MD specialist. (alliedhealthworld.com)
  • A family nurse practitioner studies aspects of health, wellness, illness and injury management for a full array of ages and conditions. (alliedhealthworld.com)
  • This means that when someone goes to a doctor's office for a visit, they may actually be seeing the family nurse practitioner first. (alliedhealthworld.com)
  • It is very common to find a family nurse practitioner working in a physician's office as part of a team that creates a successful family practice. (alliedhealthworld.com)
  • A family nurse practitioner might work in a public health clinic helping care for patients who need access to health care despite having limited access to insurance. (alliedhealthworld.com)
  • The College of Nursing is an integral part of the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, deriving its purpose from the mission and goals of the University. (uwosh.edu)
  • Why would the COLLEGE of nursing permit someone with no ties to the province to have practice permit? (allnurses.com)
  • The Fitzpatrick College of Nursing, established in 1953, has a reputation of excellence and is highly respected for its contribution to graduate education, which commenced in 1980. (villanova.edu)
  • From the participants' perspective, empowerment is a dynamic process that results from mutual interaction between personal and collective traits of nurses as well as the culture and the structure of the organization. (biomedcentral.com)
  • By 1933, the organization had around 1500 members from throughout Japan and joined the International Council of Nurses (ICN). (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1946, the Japanese Nursing Association was created, merging the Japanese Midwife Society, Japanese Public Health Nurses Association and the Nursing Association of the Japanese Empire into one umbrella organization. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Chief Nursing Officers at each organization will work together to develop and share standards for cardiology services provided in inpatient and outpatient settings. (tuftsmedicalcenter.org)
  • Comments from users and reviewers have continued to praise the book for it's in depth discussion of critical issues, solid organization of material, and encouragement of independent thinking. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Aase Langvad, Vice President of the Danish Nursing Organization, opened the meeting. (who.int)
  • Specifically, we analyzed data from a comprehensive survey of schools fielded annually by the AACN, an online survey developed and fielded specifically for this project, as well as qualitative interviews with deans and directors of 29 nursing schools. (rand.org)
  • The semiannual meetings in Washington, D.C. advance the business of the association and enable deans to address emerging issues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additional floor/unit specific related experience (NAII, Nurse Extern, Practicum) is desired but not required. (aftercollege.com)
  • A CNP may provide services for acute illnesses so long as the services are consistent with the nurse's formal education, clinical experience and national certification, and the services are provided in accordance with rules adopted by the OBN. (bricker.com)
  • This is an introduction to and the development of nursing expertise in diagnosis, treatment, prevention of complications, and promotion of health in adults with acute illnesses. (wcsu.edu)
  • For the clinical nurse specialist student, this course offers an introduction to and development of nursing expertise in diagnosis and treatment to prevent, remediate, and alleviate illness and to promote health for adults with acute health problems. (wcsu.edu)
  • NURS 604 Advanced Clin Pathophysiology (3) Advanced pathophysiological concepts and clinical manifestations of diseases necessary to support clinical decision-making of advanced practice nurses in the manage- ment of common acute and chronic diseases of adults, older adults and children are presented. (hawaii.edu)
  • CHES, associate dean, College of Health and Social Services, New Mexico State UniversityCultural Competence in Health Education and Health Promotion, 12 was published 2008 under ISBN 9780787986360 and ISBN 0787986364. (valorebooks.com)
  • Waide, of Godfrey, along with the ALA, presented key members of the SWIAC, including Rhonda Comrie, PhD, SIUE School of Nursing (SON) associate dean, with a check for $4,000 on July 14 at Glazebrook Park in Godfrey. (siue.edu)
  • She is the Chair of the Nurses Committee and a member of the Executive Committee of the European Society of Endocrinology (ESE), a Board member of the Federation of International Nurses in Endocrinology (FINE), and the only nurse member in the Scientific Committee for the International Congress in Men's Health. (springer.com)
  • I apologize if this is a repeat topic, I have searched a lot before posting and there are a number of topics about nurses looking for work in the US or international nurses coming to CA, but that's about it. (allnurses.com)
  • Conducted in the cultural context of regional Victoria, Australia, the design, implementation and evaluation of the package revealed that it was a useful resource, served the intended purpose of ensuring that neophyte graduate nurses were provided with pertinent information on CRM upon the commencement and during their graduate nurse year, and enabled graduate nurses to be facilitated to translate that information into their everyday practice. (edu.au)
  • This chapter next provides a brief background on the current context of medical education. (nih.gov)
  • bioethical issues in a global context. (upenn.edu)
  • Elective Objectives: To provide experience of the discipline of bioethics within the context of medical practice. (ualberta.ca)
  • Ms. Murphy is the Founder and current CEO of Nylex Educational & Counseling Services Inc. Her private practice is located in Wilmington, Delaware, where she practices as a board-certified counselor. (chietaphi.com)
  • Sylvia Boecker an attorney in private practice in Virginia, has served as Chair of AILA's Greater Chicago Chapter and as President of the Chicago Bar Association Committee on Immigration Law. (ilw.com)
  • Completion of the course required a final examination before diplomas were given and additional six months of training could qualify nurse candidates as head nurses. (wikipedia.org)