The 9th cranial nerve. The glossopharyngeal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve; it conveys somatic and autonomic efferents as well as general, special, and visceral afferents. Among the connections are motor fibers to the stylopharyngeus muscle, parasympathetic fibers to the parotid glands, general and taste afferents from the posterior third of the tongue, the nasopharynx, and the palate, and afferents from baroreceptors and CHEMORECEPTOR CELLS of the carotid sinus.
The 5th and largest cranial nerve. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve. The larger sensory part forms the ophthalmic, mandibular, and maxillary nerves which carry afferents sensitive to external or internal stimuli from the skin, muscles, and joints of the face and mouth and from the teeth. Most of these fibers originate from cells of the TRIGEMINAL GANGLION and project to the TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS of the brain stem. The smaller motor part arises from the brain stem trigeminal motor nucleus and innervates the muscles of mastication.
Diseases of the ninth cranial (glossopharyngeal) nerve or its nuclei in the medulla. The nerve may be injured by diseases affecting the lower brain stem, floor of the posterior fossa, jugular foramen, or the nerve's extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include loss of sensation from the pharynx, decreased salivation, and syncope. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia refers to a condition that features recurrent unilateral sharp pain in the tongue, angle of the jaw, external auditory meatus and throat that may be associated with SYNCOPE. Episodes may be triggered by cough, sneeze, swallowing, or pressure on the tragus of the ear. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1390)
Diseases of the trigeminal nerve or its nuclei, which are located in the pons and medulla. The nerve is composed of three divisions: ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular, which provide sensory innervation to structures of the face, sinuses, and portions of the cranial vault. The mandibular nerve also innervates muscles of mastication. Clinical features include loss of facial and intra-oral sensation and weakness of jaw closure. Common conditions affecting the nerve include brain stem ischemia, INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS, and TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA.
Traumatic injuries to the TRIGEMINAL NERVE. It may result in extreme pain, abnormal sensation in the areas the nerve innervates on face, jaw, gums and tongue and can cause difficulties with speech and chewing. It is sometimes associated with various dental treatments.
A syndrome characterized by recurrent episodes of excruciating pain lasting several seconds or longer in the sensory distribution of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE. Pain may be initiated by stimulation of trigger points on the face, lips, or gums or by movement of facial muscles or chewing. Associated conditions include MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, vascular anomalies, ANEURYSMS, and neoplasms. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p187)
Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.
Traumatic injuries to the GLOSSOPHARYNGEAL NERVE.
A branch of the facial (7th cranial) nerve which passes through the middle ear and continues through the petrotympanic fissure. The chorda tympani nerve carries taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and conveys parasympathetic efferents to the salivary glands.
The 11th cranial nerve which originates from NEURONS in the MEDULLA and in the CERVICAL SPINAL CORD. It has a cranial root, which joins the VAGUS NERVE (10th cranial) and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the LARYNX, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the TRAPEZIUS and the sternocleidomastoid muscles.
Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.
The ability to detect chemicals through gustatory receptors in the mouth, including those on the TONGUE; the PALATE; the PHARYNX; and the EPIGLOTTIS.
A muscular organ in the mouth that is covered with pink tissue called mucosa, tiny bumps called papillae, and thousands of taste buds. The tongue is anchored to the mouth and is vital for chewing, swallowing, and for speech.
Mechanical compression of nerves or nerve roots from internal or external causes. These may result in a conduction block to nerve impulses (due to MYELIN SHEATH dysfunction) or axonal loss. The nerve and nerve sheath injuries may be caused by ISCHEMIA; INFLAMMATION; or a direct mechanical effect.
The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.
Small sensory organs which contain gustatory receptor cells, basal cells, and supporting cells. Taste buds in humans are found in the epithelia of the tongue, palate, and pharynx. They are innervated by the CHORDA TYMPANI NERVE (a branch of the facial nerve) and the GLOSSOPHARYNGEAL NERVE.
A sensory branch of the MANDIBULAR NERVE, which is part of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The lingual nerve carries general afferent fibers from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue, the floor of the mouth, and the mandibular gingivae.
A sensory branch of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The ophthalmic nerve carries general afferents from the superficial division of the face including the eyeball, conjunctiva, upper eyelid, upper nose, nasal mucosa, and scalp.
The intermediate sensory division of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The maxillary nerve carries general afferents from the intermediate region of the face including the lower eyelid, nose and upper lip, the maxillary teeth, and parts of the dura.
Diseases of the tenth cranial nerve, including brain stem lesions involving its nuclei (solitary, ambiguus, and dorsal motor), nerve fascicles, and intracranial and extracranial course. Clinical manifestations may include dysphagia, vocal cord weakness, and alterations of parasympathetic tone in the thorax and abdomen.
Contraction of the muscle of the PHARYNX caused by stimulation of sensory receptors on the SOFT PALATE, by psychic stimuli, or systemically by drugs.
Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.
Small tubulo-alveolar salivary glands located beneath the circumvallate and foliate papillae.
Nuclei of the trigeminal nerve situated in the brain stem. They include the nucleus of the spinal trigeminal tract (TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS, SPINAL), the principal sensory nucleus, the mesencephalic nucleus, and the motor nucleus.
A neoplasm that arises from SCHWANN CELLS of the cranial, peripheral, and autonomic nerves. Clinically, these tumors may present as a cranial neuropathy, abdominal or soft tissue mass, intracranial lesion, or with spinal cord compression. Histologically, these tumors are encapsulated, highly vascular, and composed of a homogenous pattern of biphasic fusiform-shaped cells that may have a palisaded appearance. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp964-5)
Surgical interruption of a spinal or cranial nerve root. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Surgery performed to relieve pressure from MICROVESSELS that are located around nerves and are causing NERVE COMPRESSION SYNDROMES.
Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Branches of the VAGUS NERVE. The superior laryngeal nerves originate near the nodose ganglion and separate into external branches, which supply motor fibers to the cricothyroid muscles, and internal branches, which carry sensory fibers. The RECURRENT LARYNGEAL NERVE originates more caudally and carries efferents to all muscles of the larynx except the cricothyroid. The laryngeal nerves and their various branches also carry sensory and autonomic fibers to the laryngeal, pharyngeal, tracheal, and cardiac regions.
The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.
An activity in which the organism plunges into water. It includes scuba and bell diving. Diving as natural behavior of animals goes here, as well as diving in decompression experiments with humans or animals.
A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.
Pain in the facial region including orofacial pain and craniofacial pain. Associated conditions include local inflammatory and neoplastic disorders and neuralgic syndromes involving the trigeminal, facial, and glossopharyngeal nerves. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent facial pain as the primary manifestation of disease are referred to as FACIAL PAIN SYNDROMES.
Nucleus of the spinal tract of the trigeminal nerve. It is divided cytoarchitectonically into three parts: oralis, caudalis (TRIGEMINAL CAUDAL NUCLEUS), and interpolaris.
The semilunar-shaped ganglion containing the cells of origin of most of the sensory fibers of the trigeminal nerve. It is situated within the dural cleft on the cerebral surface of the petrous portion of the temporal bone and gives off the ophthalmic, maxillary, and part of the mandibular nerves.
The resection or removal of the nerve to an organ or part. (Dorland, 28th ed)
GRAY MATTER located in the dorsomedial part of the MEDULLA OBLONGATA associated with the solitary tract. The solitary nucleus receives inputs from most organ systems including the terminations of the facial, glossopharyngeal, and vagus nerves. It is a major coordinator of AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM regulation of cardiovascular, respiratory, gustatory, gastrointestinal, and chemoreceptive aspects of HOMEOSTASIS. The solitary nucleus is also notable for the large number of NEUROTRANSMITTERS which are found therein.
A macular lesion on the side of the FACE, involving the CONJUNCTIVA and EYELIDS, as well as the adjacent facial skin, SCLERA; OCULOMOTOR MUSCLES; and PERIOSTEUM. Histological features vary from those of a MONGOLIAN SPOT to those of a BLUE NEVUS.
Neurons which send impulses peripherally to activate muscles or secretory cells.
The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.
A species of the family Ranidae (true frogs). The only anuran properly referred to by the common name "bullfrog", it is the largest native anuran in North America.
A branch of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The mandibular nerve carries motor fibers to the muscles of mastication and sensory fibers to the teeth and gingivae, the face in the region of the mandible, and parts of the dura.
The vocal apparatus of the larynx, situated in the middle section of the larynx. Glottis consists of the VOCAL FOLDS and an opening (rima glottidis) between the folds.
Nerve fibers which project from parasympathetic ganglia to synapses on target organs. Parasympathetic postganglionic fibers use acetylcholine as transmitter. They may also release peptide cotransmitters.
Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.
A funnel-shaped fibromuscular tube that conducts food to the ESOPHAGUS, and air to the LARYNX and LUNGS. It is located posterior to the NASAL CAVITY; ORAL CAVITY; and LARYNX, and extends from the SKULL BASE to the inferior border of the CRICOID CARTILAGE anteriorly and to the inferior border of the C6 vertebra posteriorly. It is divided into the NASOPHARYNX; OROPHARYNX; and HYPOPHARYNX (laryngopharynx).
The dilated portion of the common carotid artery at its bifurcation into external and internal carotids. It contains baroreceptors which, when stimulated, cause slowing of the heart, vasodilatation, and a fall in blood pressure.
The 10th cranial nerve. The vagus is a mixed nerve which contains somatic afferents (from skin in back of the ear and the external auditory meatus), visceral afferents (from the pharynx, larynx, thorax, and abdomen), parasympathetic efferents (to the thorax and abdomen), and efferents to striated muscle (of the larynx and pharynx).
Clusters of neurons in the somatic peripheral nervous system which contain the cell bodies of sensory nerve axons. Sensory ganglia may also have intrinsic interneurons and non-neuronal supporting cells.
Nerve structures through which impulses are conducted from a peripheral part toward a nerve center.
The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
An alkaloid derived from the bark of the cinchona tree. It is used as an antimalarial drug, and is the active ingredient in extracts of the cinchona that have been used for that purpose since before 1633. Quinine is also a mild antipyretic and analgesic and has been used in common cold preparations for that purpose. It was used commonly and as a bitter and flavoring agent, and is still useful for the treatment of babesiosis. Quinine is also useful in some muscular disorders, especially nocturnal leg cramps and myotonia congenita, because of its direct effects on muscle membrane and sodium channels. The mechanisms of its antimalarial effects are not well understood.
Neurons which conduct NERVE IMPULSES to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Traumatic injuries to the LINGUAL NERVE. It may be a complication following dental treatments.
Muscles arising in the zygomatic arch that close the jaw. Their nerve supply is masseteric from the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
The 12th cranial nerve. The hypoglossal nerve originates in the hypoglossal nucleus of the medulla and supplies motor innervation to all of the muscles of the tongue except the palatoglossus (which is supplied by the vagus). This nerve also contains proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles.
Junction between the cerebellum and the pons.
An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.
A general term indicating inflammation of a peripheral or cranial nerve. Clinical manifestation may include PAIN; PARESTHESIAS; PARESIS; or HYPESTHESIA.
HERPES ZOSTER but without eruption of vesicles. Patients exhibit the characteristic pain minus the skin rash, sometimes making diagnosis difficult.
The 6th cranial nerve which originates in the ABDUCENS NUCLEUS of the PONS and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the EYE. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.
Absent or reduced sensitivity to cutaneous stimulation.
The volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration. It is the equivalent to each of the following sums: VITAL CAPACITY plus RESIDUAL VOLUME; INSPIRATORY CAPACITY plus FUNCTIONAL RESIDUAL CAPACITY; TIDAL VOLUME plus INSPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus functional residual capacity; or tidal volume plus inspiratory reserve volume plus EXPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus residual volume.
The dense rock-like part of temporal bone that contains the INNER EAR. Petrous bone is located at the base of the skull. Sometimes it is combined with the MASTOID PROCESS and called petromastoid part of temporal bone.
The compartment containing the anterior extremities and half the inferior surface of the temporal lobes (TEMPORAL LOBE) of the cerebral hemispheres. Lying posterior and inferior to the anterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, ANTERIOR), it is formed by part of the TEMPORAL BONE and SPHENOID BONE. It is separated from the posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) by crests formed by the superior borders of the petrous parts of the temporal bones.
The sensory fibers innervating the viscera.
Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.
The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)
A transient loss of consciousness and postural tone caused by diminished blood flow to the brain (i.e., BRAIN ISCHEMIA). Presyncope refers to the sensation of lightheadedness and loss of strength that precedes a syncopal event or accompanies an incomplete syncope. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp367-9)
The caudal portion of the nucleus of the spinal trigeminal tract (TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS, SPINAL), a nucleus involved with pain and temperature sensation.
The act of blowing a powder, vapor, or gas into any body cavity for experimental, diagnostic, or therapeutic purposes.
Cells specialized to detect chemical substances and relay that information centrally in the nervous system. Chemoreceptor cells may monitor external stimuli, as in TASTE and OLFACTION, or internal stimuli, such as the concentrations of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE in the blood.
The lectin wheatgerm agglutinin conjugated to the enzyme HORSERADISH PEROXIDASE. It is widely used for tracing neural pathways.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
One of the FLAVORING AGENTS used to impart a meat-like flavor.
The 1st cranial nerve. The olfactory nerve conveys the sense of smell. It is formed by the axons of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS which project from the olfactory epithelium (in the nasal epithelium) to the OLFACTORY BULB.
Paired bundles of NERVE FIBERS entering and leaving the SPINAL CORD at each segment. The dorsal and ventral nerve roots join to form the mixed segmental spinal nerves. The dorsal roots are generally afferent, formed by the central projections of the spinal (dorsal root) ganglia sensory cells, and the ventral roots are efferent, comprising the axons of spinal motor and PREGANGLIONIC AUTONOMIC FIBERS.
Calcitonin gene-related peptide. A 37-amino acid peptide derived from the calcitonin gene. It occurs as a result of alternative processing of mRNA from the calcitonin gene. The neuropeptide is widely distributed in neural tissue of the brain, gut, perivascular nerves, and other tissue. The peptide produces multiple biological effects and has both circulatory and neurotransmitter modes of action. In particular, it is a potent endogenous vasodilator.
A small space in the skull between the MAXILLA and the SPHENOID BONE, medial to the pterygomaxillary fissure, and connecting to the NASAL CAVITY via the sphenopalatine foramen.
Brief closing of the eyelids by involuntary normal periodic closing, as a protective measure, or by voluntary action.
The posterior of the three primitive cerebral vesicles of an embryonic brain. It consists of myelencephalon, metencephalon, and isthmus rhombencephali from which develop the major BRAIN STEM components, such as MEDULLA OBLONGATA from the myelencephalon, CEREBELLUM and PONS from the metencephalon, with the expanded cavity forming the FOURTH VENTRICLE.
A small cluster of chemoreceptive and supporting cells located near the bifurcation of the internal carotid artery. The carotid body, which is richly supplied with fenestrated capillaries, senses the pH, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in the blood and plays a crucial role in their homeostatic control.
The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.
Procedures using an electrically heated wire or scalpel to treat hemorrhage (e.g., bleeding ulcers) and to ablate tumors, mucosal lesions, and refractory arrhythmias. It is different from ELECTROSURGERY which is used more for cutting tissue than destroying and in which the patient is part of the electric circuit.
Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.
An irregularly shaped venous space in the dura mater at either side of the sphenoid bone.
Branch-like terminations of NERVE FIBERS, sensory or motor NEURONS. Endings of sensory neurons are the beginnings of afferent pathway to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Endings of motor neurons are the terminals of axons at the muscle cells. Nerve endings which release neurotransmitters are called PRESYNAPTIC TERMINALS.
A branch of the tibial nerve which supplies sensory innervation to parts of the lower leg and foot.
A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the median nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C6 to T1), travel via the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the forearm and hand.
Neoplasms which arise from peripheral nerve tissue. This includes NEUROFIBROMAS; SCHWANNOMAS; GRANULAR CELL TUMORS; and malignant peripheral NERVE SHEATH NEOPLASMS. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp1750-1)
Muscles of facial expression or mimetic muscles that include the numerous muscles supplied by the facial nerve that are attached to and move the skin of the face. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Treatment of muscles and nerves under pressure as a result of crush injuries.
Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.
The medial terminal branch of the sciatic nerve. The tibial nerve fibers originate in lumbar and sacral spinal segments (L4 to S2). They supply motor and sensory innervation to parts of the calf and foot.
A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the ulnar nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C7 to T1), travel via the medial cord of the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the hand and forearm.
A syndrome associated with defective sympathetic innervation to one side of the face, including the eye. Clinical features include MIOSIS; mild BLEPHAROPTOSIS; and hemifacial ANHIDROSIS (decreased sweating)(see HYPOHIDROSIS). Lesions of the BRAIN STEM; cervical SPINAL CORD; first thoracic nerve root; apex of the LUNG; CAROTID ARTERY; CAVERNOUS SINUS; and apex of the ORBIT may cause this condition. (From Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, pp500-11)
Subjective cutaneous sensations (e.g., cold, warmth, tingling, pressure, etc.) that are experienced spontaneously in the absence of stimulation.
Measurement of the various properties of light.
A nitrosourea compound with alkylating, carcinogenic, and mutagenic properties.
Abnormal sensitivity to light. This may occur as a manifestation of EYE DISEASES; MIGRAINE; SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; MENINGITIS; and other disorders. Photophobia may also occur in association with DEPRESSION and other MENTAL DISORDERS.
A primary headache disorder that is characterized by severe, strictly unilateral PAIN which is orbital, supraorbital, temporal or in any combination of these sites, lasting 15-180 min. occurring 1 to 8 times a day. The attacks are associated with one or more of the following, all of which are ipsilateral: conjunctival injection, lacrimation, nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, facial SWEATING, eyelid EDEMA, and miosis. (International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd ed. Cephalalgia 2004: suppl 1)
A nerve originating in the lumbar spinal cord (usually L2 to L4) and traveling through the lumbar plexus to provide motor innervation to extensors of the thigh and sensory innervation to parts of the thigh, lower leg, and foot, and to the hip and knee joints.
Intense or aching pain that occurs along the course or distribution of a peripheral or cranial nerve.
The 31 paired peripheral nerves formed by the union of the dorsal and ventral spinal roots from each spinal cord segment. The spinal nerve plexuses and the spinal roots are also included.
Pain in the adjacent areas of the teeth.
... vcm-trigeminal nerve and vena capitis medialis; cnVI, abducens nerve; cnVII, facial nerve; cnIX-XI, glossopharyngeal and ... vagoaccessory nerves; cnXII, hypoglossal nerve; en, epiphyseal nerve; fb, forebrain; fcl, flocculus; ibic, internal branch of ... Evolution of mammals Therocephalia ce, cerebellum; cnI, olfactory nerve; cnV + ... a large epyphysial nerve (found in creatures with a parietal eye on the top of the head), an enlarged pituitary gland, and an ...
Apnea in seals is induced by stimulation of trigeminal and glossopharyngeal nerve receptors in the mouth. The consequent ... or stimulation of trigeminal and glossopharyngeal nerves. Animals cannot convert fats to glucose, and in many diving animals ... Dense innervation of arteries in seals by sympathetic nerves may be part of a system for maintaining vasoconstriction of the ... "Stretchy nerves are an essential component of the extreme feeding mechanism of rorqual whales". Current Biology. 25 (9): 360- ...
... and also communicates with the tympanic branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve. Nerves of the orbit, and the ciliary ganglion. ... The internal carotid plexus communicates with the trigeminal ganglion, the abducent nerve, and the pterygopalatine ganglion ( ... Some of the fibres from the internal carotid plexus converge to form the deep petrosal nerve. ...
... is pain in the distribution of a nerve or nerves, as in intercostal neuralgia, trigeminal neuralgia, and glossopharyngeal ... glossopharyngeal neuralgia sometimes results from an abnormally positioned artery that compresses the glossopharyngeal nerve ... The pain is due to malfunction of the glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX), which moves the muscles of the throat and carries ... Vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve, infections of the teeth or sinuses, physical trauma, or past viral infections are ...
... the trigeminal nerve), CN VII (the facial nerve), CN IX (the glossopharyngeal nerve), CN X (the vagus nerve), and CN XII (the ... These lesions typically damage the cranial nerves leading to both motor and sensory deficits. The cranial nerves that are ... FCMS caused by the formation of lesions unilaterally causes muteness of speech and upper motor neuron cranial nerve paresis, ... hypoglossal nerve). Cerebral malformation, namely unilateral schizencephaly in association with contralateral polymicrogyria ...
... and from the tonsillar branches of the glossopharyngeal nerve. The glossopharyngeal nerve continues past the palatine tonsil ... The nerves supplying the palatine tonsils come from the maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve via the lesser palatine ... This nerve is most likely to be damaged during a tonsillectomy, which leads to reduced or lost general sensation and taste ... Through the capsule pass trabecules that contain small blood vessels, nerves and lymphatic vessels. These trabecules divide the ...
... the trigeminal nerve (V), the facial nerve (VII), the glossopharyngeal nerve (IX), the vagus nerve (X) and the accessory nerve ... Some sources prefer the term "branchiomotor" or "branchial efferent". The only nerves containing SVE fibers are cranial nerves ... Special visceral efferent fibers (SVE) are the efferent nerve fibers that provide motor innervation to the muscles of the ...
... partial fusion of the trigeminal nerve (V) with the facial (VII) and auditory (VII) nerves, the proximal nerve roots coming off ... and there was fusion of the glossopharyngeal (IX) nerve complex. The early growth response protein 2 is a transcription factor ... Pareyson D, Taroni F, Botti S, Morbin M, Baratta S, Lauria G, Ciano C, Sghirlanzoni A (April 2000). "Cranial nerve involvement ...
... a branch of mandibular nerve, the third branch of the trigeminal nerve - the only muscle of the palate not innervated by the ... which is formed by the vagal and glossopharyngeal nerves. The tensor veli palatini tenses the soft palate and by doing so, ... Mandibular division of trifacial nerve, seen from the middle line. Levator veli palatini This article incorporates text in the ... The tensor veli palatini is supplied by the medial pterygoid nerve, ...
... the facial nerve (VII), the glossopharyngeal nerve (IX), the vagus nerve (X), and the hypoglossal nerve (XII). Dysarthria does ... Cranial nerves that control the muscles relevant to dysarthria include the trigeminal nerve's motor branch (V), ... from which the cranial nerves originate), or the neuromuscular junction (in diseases such as myasthenia gravis) which block the ...
... trigeminal), VII (facial), IX (glossopharyngeal), and X (vagus), and the great auricular nerve (cervical nerves C2-C3). These ... cranial nerve VII) or glossopharyngeal nerve (cranial nerve IX): Tonsillitis: infection/inflammation of the tonsils Post- ... Irritation of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V) is the most common cause of referred ear pain. While some disorders may ... Conditions causing irritation the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V): Temporomandibular joint syndrome: inflammation or ...
... also in trigeminal? redundancy?) Vestibulocochlear nerve Vestibular nerve Cochlear nerve Glossopharyngeal nerve Tympanic nerve ... termsi Cranial nerves Olfactory nerve Optic nerve Oculomotor nerve Trochlear nerve Trigeminal nerve Sensory root Trigeminal ... nerve of forearm Median nerve Ulnar nerve Radial nerve Axillary nerve Thoracic nerves Lumbar nerves Medial clunial nerves ... nerve Deep fibular nerve Tibial nerve Interosseous nerve of leg Medial sural cutaneous nerve Sural nerve Medial plantar nerve ...
... nerve 352.1 Glossopharyngeal neuralgia 352.2 Other disorders of glossopharyngeal [9th] nerve 352.3 Disorders of pneumogastric [ ... not elsewhere classified 349.8 Other 349.9 Unspecified 350 Trigeminal nerve disorders 350.0* Post-herpetic trigeminal neuralgia ... 10th] nerve 352.4 Disorders of accessory [11th] nerve 352.5 Disorders of hypoglossal [12th] nerve 352.6 Multiple cranial nerve ... 354.0 Carpal tunnel syndrome 354.1 Other lesion of median nerve 354.2 Lesion of ulnar nerve 354.3 Lesion of radial nerve 354.4 ...
... trigeminal nerve (V), abducens nerve (VI), facial nerve (VII), vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII), glossopharyngeal nerve (IX), ... The oculomotor nerve (III), trochlear nerve (IV), abducens nerve (VI) and the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve (V1) ... The nerves are: the olfactory nerve (I), the optic nerve (II), oculomotor nerve (III), trochlear nerve (IV), ... and trochlear nerve (IV); the pons has the nuclei of the trigeminal nerve (V), abducens nerve (VI), facial nerve (VII) and ...
Other cranial nerves involved were vagus, trigeminal, spinal accessory nerve, abducent, occulomotor and glossopharyngeal in ... In the Gomez review facial nerve was affected in all cases while hypoglossal nerve was involved in all except one case. ... Post mortem examination of cases have found depletion of nerve cells in the nuclei of cranial nerves. The histologic ... It causes progressive bulbar paralysis due to involvement of motor neurons of the cranial nerve nuclei. The most frequent ...
A number of cranial nerves are involved in sensations in the mouth including trigeminal (V), Facial (VII), glossopharyngeal (IX ... Usually solitary, they can occur as part of syndromes such as Sturge-weber Syndrome affecting the trigeminal nerve. They are at ... If viral reactivation occurs in the facial nerve, it can cause Ramsay-Hunt Syndrome in which patients can develop facial ... It consists of loose connective tissue within the connective tissue papillae, along with blood vessels and nerve tissue. The ...
Upon entering the medulla these fibers descend in the spinal trigeminal tract and synapse in the caudal spinal nucleus of the ... The glossopharyngeal nerve as noted above is a mixed nerve consisting of both sensory and motor nerve fibers. The sensory ... The glossopharyngeal nerve (/ˌɡlɒsoʊfəˈrɪn(d)ʒiəl, -ˌfærənˈdʒiːəl/), known as the ninth cranial nerve (CN IX), is a mixed nerve ... On the inferior side, the glossopharyngeal nerve is lateral and anterior to the vagus nerve and accessory nerve. In its passage ...
... the glossopharyngeal nerve) and X (the vagus nerve). All sensory fibers from these nerves terminate in the trigeminal nucleus. ... The three major branches of the trigeminal nerve-the ophthalmic nerve (V1), the maxillary nerve (V2) and the mandibular nerve ( ... The trigeminal nerve (the fifth cranial nerve, or simply CN V) is a nerve responsible for sensation in the face and motor ... Diagram of facial sensory nerves (front view) Trigeminal nerve in yellow Trigeminal ganglion Cerebrum (deep inferior dissection ...
... it is carried to the central nervous system by the trigeminal nerve. ... The olfactory nerve is typically considered the first cranial nerve, or simply CN I, that contains sensory nerve fibers ... The olfactory nerve is the shortest of the twelve cranial nerves and, similar to the optic nerve, does not emanate from the ... CN IX - Glossopharyngeal. *CN X - Vagus. *CN XI - Accessory. *CN XII - Hypoglossal ...
The optic nerve, also known as cranial nerve II, or simply as CN II, is a paired nerve that transmits visual information from ... Other optic nerve problems are less common. Optic nerve hypoplasia is the underdevelopment of the optic nerve resulting in ... CN V - Trigeminal. *CN VI - Abducens. *CN VII - Facial. *CN VIII - Vestibulocochlear ... CN IX - Glossopharyngeal. *CN X - Vagus. *CN XI - Accessory. *CN XII - Hypoglossal ...
The pharyngeal part is supplied by the glossopharyngeal nerve and the oral part is supplied by the lingual nerve (a branch of ... of the trigeminal nerve) for somatosensory perception and by the chorda tympani (a branch of the facial nerve) for taste ... division of the trigeminal nerve (CN V) via general visceral afferent fibers Posterior one third of tongue: Taste and sensation ... glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX) via a mixture of special and general visceral afferent fibers Base of tongue Taste and sensation ...
The central processes of the neurons which provide general sensory information synapse in the spinal trigeminal nucleus. ... The tympanic nerve is the first branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve. It branches at the level of the inferior ganglion. ... It is larger than and below the superior ganglion of the glossopharyngeal nerve. It is located within the jugular foramen. The ... The inferior ganglion of the glossopharyngeal nerve (petrosal ganglion) is a sensory ganglion. ...
The central processes of the neurons in the superior ganglion of the glossopharyngeal nerve synapse in the spinal trigeminal ... It is located within the jugular foramen where the glossopharyngeal nerve exits the skull. It is smaller than and above the ... inferior ganglion of the glossopharyngeal nerve. The neurons in the superior ganglion of the glossopharyngeal nerve provide ... The axons of these neurons branch from the glossopharyngeal nerve at the level of the inferior ganglion and form the tympanic ...
The trigeminal nerve The abducens nerve The facial nerve The vestibulocochlear nerve The glossopharyngeal nerve The vagus nerve ... nerves Thoracodorsal nerve Tibial nerve Transverse cervical nerve Trigeminal nerve Trochlear nerve Tympanic nerve Ulnar nerve ... nerve Genitofemoral nerve Glossopharyngeal nerve Greater auricular nerve Greater occipital nerve Greater petrosal nerve Hepatic ... of the radial nerve Musculocutaneous nerve Mylohyoid nerve Nasociliary nerve Nasopalatine nerve Nerve of pterygoid canal Nerve ...
The mandibular and maxillary branches of the trigeminal nerve (CN V) innervate the structures derived from the corresponding ... The stylopharyngeus and other structures from the third pharyngeal arch are all innervated by the glossopharyngeal nerve. All ... The mandibular nerve is the post-trematic nerve of the first arch and chorda tympani (branch of facial nerve) is the pre- ... The nerve of the arch itself runs along the cranial side of the arch and is called post-trematic nerve of the arch. Each arch ...
Specifically the: trigeminal ganglion geniculate ganglion superior ganglion of the glossopharyngeal nerve inferior ganglion of ... the glossopharyngeal nerve superior ganglion of the vagus nerve inferior ganglion of the vagus nerve Pseudounipolar neurons in ... inferior ganglion of the glossopharyngeal nerve and inferior ganglion of the vagus nerve also carry information about taste ... Some of the pseudounipolar neurons in the inferior ganglion of the glossopharyngeal nerve carry information from the carotid ...
... neuropathies Trigeminal neuralgia Glossopharyngeal neuralgia Sphenopalatine Ganglion neuralgia Sluder's Neuralgia Mental nerve ... a surgical or traumatic injury to a peripheral nerve. Primarily psychological, which is rare (See: psychogenic pain) Diagnosis ...
... is innervated by the glossopharyngeal. It also carries nerve fibers that are not part of the trigeminal nerve, including the ... It contains fibres from both the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve (CN V3) and from the facial nerve (CN VII). The ... Lingual nerve Lingual nerve Mandibular nerve and bone. Deep dissection. Anterior view. Infratemporal fossa. Lingual and ... The submandibular ganglion is suspended by two nerve filaments from the lingual nerve. The most common cause of lingual nerve ...
... and a partial loss of the glossopharyngeal and facial motor nerves. However, the somatic hypoglossal and abducens motor nerves ... The trigeminal nerve is not affected in the double knockout mouse embryos, indicating that cell fate alteration is limited to ... Cell lineage analysis of Nkx 2.9 and Nkx 2.2 double knockout (deficient) mouse embryos shows that cranial nerve alterations are ... Disturbance of Nkx 2.9 and Nkx 2.2 in mouse embryos results in the total loss of the spinal accessory and vagal motor nerves, ...
See cranial nerve section Olfactory nerve (#1) smell. See cranial nerve section Trigeminal nerve (#5) facial sensation biting ... Glossopharyngeal nerve (cranial nerve 9) primarily receives sensation from the throat, tonsils, part of the tongue, heart, and ... Trochlear nerve (cranial nerve 4) controls most eye rotation (with head still, look up, down, left, right). Trigeminal nerve ( ... Olfactory nerve (cranial nerve 1) Smell. See also: olfactory receptor neurons Optic nerve (cranial nerve 2) Sight. See also: ...
... triangles of the neck triceps triceps reflex tricuspid valve trigeminal ganglion trigeminal lemniscus trigeminal nerve Trigone ... glenohumeral joint glenoid fossa glia globose nucleus globus pallidus glomerulus glossoepiglottic fold glossopharyngeal nerve ... cranial cranial autonomic ganglia cranial bone cranial nerve ganglia cranial nerve lesion cranial nerve nuclei cranial nerves ... mental foramen mental nerve mentalis muscle mentum mesencephalic reticular formation mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus and tract ...
... the glossopharyngeal nerve and the pharyngeal branch of the vagus nerve. It is in relation, behind, with the longus capitis, ... Branches to trigeminal ganglion - provide blood to trigeminal ganglion Artery of the foramen rotundum Branches to nerves C5: ... At the base of the skull the glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory, and hypoglossal nerves lie between the artery and the internal ... the nerve lying on a plane posterior to the artery; medially, with the pharynx, superior laryngeal nerve, and ascending ...
GN may also occur in combination with trigeminal or glossopharyngeal neuralgia. The pain of GN is sharp, shooting or burning ... GN may be caused by compression of somatic sensory branch of cranial nerve VII which goes through the nervus intermedius. In ... Use of these new techniques, sometimes in combination with selective section of the Vth cranial nerve, has been successful in ... A variety of surgeries have been performed including microvascular decompression (MVD) of the fifth, ninth, and tenth nerves; ...
... superior ganglion of glossopharyngeal nerve inferior ganglion of glossopharyngeal nerve superior ganglion of vagus nerve ... ciliary ganglion pterygopalatine ganglion otic ganglion submandibular ganglion trigeminal ganglion (CN V) geniculate ganglion ( ... the cranial nerve ganglia are ganglia of certain cranial nerves. They can be parasympathetic or sensory. All cranial nerve ... ISBN 978-0-87893-697-7.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link) "Neuroanatomy, Cranial Nerve 8 (Vestibulocochlear) on U.S. ...
The mandibular nerve is a branch of the trigeminal nerve (CN5), and the mandibular nerve exits the skull through the foramen ... preganglionic secretomotor fibers originate from the glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX) as one of its branches, the tympanic nerve ... The auriculotemporal nerve is a branch of the mandibular nerve (V3) that runs with the superficial temporal artery and vein, ... It is the main nerve that supplies the TMJ, along with branches of the masseteric nerve and the deep temporal. After a ...
The nuclei of the glossopharyngeal nerve (IX), vagus nerve (X), accessory nerve (XI) and hypoglossal nerve (XII) are located in ... The nuclei of the trigeminal nerve (V), abducens nerve (VI), facial nerve (VII) and vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII) are located ... At the level of the midpons, CN V (the trigeminal nerve) emerges. Cranial nerve III (the oculomotor nerve) emerges ventrally ... Oculomotor nerve nucleus: This is the third cranial nerve nucleus. Trochlear nerve nucleus: This is the fourth cranial nerve. ...
... trigeminal nerve), hearing loss or vertigo (vestibulocochlear nerve), swallowing problems (glossopharyngeal nerve) and weakness ... Rarer symptoms are double vision (oculomotor nerve, trochlear nerve or abducens nerve), decreased sensation of the face ( ... but abnormalities of the cranial nerves (a group of twelve nerves supplying the head and neck area) are the most common. It may ... 65 percent resp 35 percent of all cranial nerve cases), followed by reduction in visual perception due to optic nerve ...
Large tumors that compress the adjacent brainstem may affect other local cranial nerves. The glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves ... Larger tumors can press on the trigeminal nerve (CN V), causing facial numbness and tingling - constantly or intermittently. ... and cranial nerve VII (controls facial expression and taste). Cranial nerve VIII, along with these two nerves, also passes ... portion of the vestibulocochlear nerve (cranial nerve VIII). VS are slow-growing, benign and non-invasive. Progression to ...
... generates the inferior ganglion of glossopharyngeal nerve and distal parts of cranial nerve IX The nodosal placode, associated ... The profundal placode, corresponding to the ophthalmic lobe of the trigeminal complex. In Xenopus this remains partly unfused. ... The epibranchial or epipharyngeal placodes generate the distal portion of the ganglia of cranial nerves VII, IX and X: The ... dorsolateral placodes includes: The trigeminal placode, which consists of ophthalmic and maxillomandibular parts, and gives ...
The tensor veli palatini is innervated by the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve (V3). The soft palate is moveable, ... Soft palate visible in lower right) Palatine tonsil Walker, H. Kenneth (1990). "Cranial Nerves IX and X: The Glossopharyngeal ... which moves the uvula These muscles are innervated by the pharyngeal plexus via the vagus nerve, with the exception of the ... and Vagus Nerves". In Walker, H. Kenneth; Hall, W. Dallas; Hurst, J. Willis (eds.). Clinical Methods: The History, Physical, ...
Eby, Joseph; Sung Tae Cha; Hrayr K. Shahinian (2002). "Fully endoscopic vascular decompression of the glossopharyngeal nerve". ... Jannetta, PJ (1975). "Trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm--etiology and definitive treatment". Trans Am Neurol Assoc. 100 ... stretching the facial nerve (seventh cranial nerve), and high-pressure irrigation of the nerve with lactate ringer's solution. ... The results illustrated nerve-vessel conflicts (or cholesteatoma) to be located at the root exit zone of the facial nerve in ...
... such as damage to the glossopharyngeal nerve, the vagus nerve, or brain death. In unilateral (one-sided) glossopharyngeal nerve ... However, in that case, the sensory limb of the reflex is the CN V (trigeminal nerve). In very sensitive individuals, much more ... glossopharyngeal nerve) the motor limb by CN X (vagus nerve). The gag reflex involves a brisk and brief elevation of the soft ... This is because the sensory component is intact on both sides, but only the motor nerves supplying one side of the soft ...
Specific nerves include several cranial nerves, specifically the oculomotor nerve, facial nerve, glossopharyngeal nerve, and ... The vagus nerve is an unusual cranial parasympathetic in that it doesn't join the trigeminal nerve in order to get to its ... Several parasympathetic nerves come off the vagus nerve as it enters the thorax. One nerve is the recurrent laryngeal nerve, ... ophthalmic nerve, maxillary nerve, mandibular nerve). The vagus nerve does not participate in these cranial ganglia as most of ...
The Trigeminal nerve(CNS V); The Facial nerve(CNS VII); The Glossopharyngeal nerve (CNS IX); The Vegus nerve(CNS X); The ... Auditory training grows neurons at 1/10 mm per day; these major nerves are stimulated and remediated through listening to the ... Accessory nerve(CNS XI); and the Hypoglossal nerve(CNS XII) are required to be integral and in cooperation with one another for ... All of the nerves of speech articulation are innervated in the ear. ...
Idiopathic neuralgia of the glossopharyngeal nerve.. Carbamazepine is intended for oral use; the daily dose of the drug should ... Idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia and trigeminal neuralgia in multiple sclerosis (typical and atypical).. - ...
... optic nerve; III, oculomotor nerve; IV, trochlear nerve; Vmx, maxillary ramus of trigeminal nerve; IX, glossopharyngeal nerve; ... X, vagus nerve; apal, palatine artery (parabasal canal); aps, pseudobranchial artery; asc, anterior semicircular canal; asp, ... ventral anterior myodome and potential course of profundus nerve. Scale bar equals 1 cm ...
Largest cranial nerve is Trigeminal nerve.. *The smallest cranial nerve is the Abducens nerve. ... Glossopharyngeal. taste and swallow. 10(X). Vagus. heart rate and digestion. 11(XI). Accessory. head movement. ... Cranial nerves are the paired nerves that originated from the brain and supply to the different targeted organs to control ... There are 12 pairs of cranial nerves found in amniotes.. *The 12 cranial nerves and their functions are stated in the below ...
I: Trigeminal (V). II: Facial (VII). III: Glossopharyngeal (IX). IV/VI: Vagus (X) What are the skeletal derivatives of ... What are the Cranial Nerve derivatives of the 5 Branchial Arches?. ARCH I ...
Some of the common nerve pain problems such as diabetic neuropathy and trigeminal neuralgia are treated with Tegretol. Some ... Tegretol decreases the nerve impulses which cause pain and seizures. ... Tegretol is also used for treatment of diseases such as trigeminal neuralgia and glossopharyngeal neuralgia.. ... Some of the common nerve pain problems such as diabetic neuropathy and trigeminal neuralgia are treated with Tegretol. Some ...
Trigeminal nerve February 20, 2021 * Vagus Nerve Stimulation Indications February 19, 2021 ... Recurrent glossopharyngeal neuralgia February 4, 2021 * Pediatric traumatic brain injury guidelines February 3, 2021 ... Vagus nerve stimulation for drug-resistant epilepsy October 30, 2020 * Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy treatment October 29, 2020 ... Diffusion tensor imaging for trigeminal neuralgia September 28, 2020 * Methotrexate for Primary central nervous system lymphoma ...
Trigeminal nerve February 20, 2021 * Vagus Nerve Stimulation Indications February 19, 2021 ... Recurrent glossopharyngeal neuralgia February 4, 2021 * Pediatric traumatic brain injury guidelines February 3, 2021 ... Vagus nerve stimulation for drug-resistant epilepsy October 30, 2020 * Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy treatment October 29, 2020 ... Diffusion tensor imaging for trigeminal neuralgia September 28, 2020 * Methotrexate for Primary central nervous system lymphoma ...
V: trigeminal: trigeminal ganglion V1: ophthalmic: lacrimal - frontal (supratrochlear, supraorbital) - nasociliary (long root ... IX: glossopharyngeal: fasciculus solitarius - nucleus ambiguus - ganglia (superior, petrous) - tympanic - carotid sinus ... The greater petrosal nerve is a nerve in the skull that branches from the facial nerve; it forms part of a chain of nerves that ... The nerve joins with the deep petrosal nerve (a nerve which carries sympathetic fibers) to form the nerve of pterygoid canal. ...
Peripheral nerves extend out from your spine at every level on both the left and right sides. The nerves that extend from your ... V- Trigeminal- movement & sensation to your face, tongue, nose, ear. VI- Abducent- eye movement ... IX- Glossopharyngeal- swallowing, speech, taste. X- Vagus- control heart, lungs & digestion. XI- Accessory- neck muscles ... Is your head twisted? Cranial Nerves: A missing link for head, face and body pain. Posted on December 14, 2016. by Brent ...
Oculomotor (CN) III, Trochlear (CN) IV, Abducent nerves (CN) VI. *Trigeminal nerve (CN) V ... Facial nerve (CN) VII. *Vestibulocochlear nerve (CN) VIII. *Glossopharyngeal nerve (CN) IX ...
The spinal accessory nerve innervates the sternomastoid and trapezius muscles. Its cranial component contributes to the ... Oculomotor (CN) III, Trochlear (CN) IV, Abducent nerves (CN) VI. *Trigeminal nerve (CN) V ... Facial nerve (CN) VII. *Vestibulocochlear nerve (CN) VIII. *Glossopharyngeal nerve (CN) IX ... The spinal accessory nerve innervates the sternomastoid and trapezius muscles. Its cranial component contributes to the ...
The 4 Cranial Nerves In The Pons Are:. 5 Trigeminal: ipsilateral alteration of pain, temperature and light touch on the face ... The 4 Cranial Nerves In The Medulla Are:. 9 Glossopharyngeal: ipsilateral loss of pharyngeal sensation.. 10 Vagus: ipsilateral ... The 6th cranial nerve is the motor nerve in the pons.. The 7th is a motor nerve but it also carries pathways of taste, and ... The 4 cranial nerves in the pons are: 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th. The 6th nerve is the motor nerve in the midline, the 5th, 7th and ...
Cranial Nerve Compression Syndromes *Trigeminal Neuralgia *Microvascular Decompression for Trigeminal Neuralgia. *Percutaneous ... Microvascular Decompression for Glossopharyngeal Neuralgia. *Geniculate Neuralgia. *Menieres Disease. *Epilepsy Surgery * ... The arterialized vein is just superficial to the trigeminal nerve and entering the tentorial dura, where a clip is placed to ... The main arterialized draining vein is isolated from the surrounding normal veins and the trigeminal nerve, and a permanent ...
Neurological (whiplash, tumors of the VIII nerve, MS). - Infections (otitis media, meningitis). - side effects of drugs ( ... a device for converting sounds into electrical signals and stimulating the auditory nerve through electrodes threaded into the ... Schwannoma on vestibular part of Cn VII (vestibulo-cochlear nerve). - compresses acoustic part --? deafness & tinnitus (few ... What branches from the facial nerve (CN VII) exit and join V3? ... Aditory nerve projects to ____ and ____ cochlear nuclei in ...
Anatomy Topic 02 Trigeminal nerve * Anatomy Topic 03 Facial nerve * Anatomy Topic 04 Branchial arch derivatives ... Anatomy Topic 11 Glossopharyngeal Nerve * Anatomy Topic 12 Veins * Anatomy Topic 13 Occulomotor Nerve ...
Dissection of the face and the trigeminal nerve Artist Jacob, Nicolas Henri, 1781-1871 Part of Book Traité complet de ... Glossopharyngeal Nerve (3). + - Show more. Artist. * Jacob, Nicolas Henri, 1781-1871 (16) ... Brain, spinal cord, spinal nerves, cranial nerves Artist Haincelain Part of Book Manuel danatomie descriptive du corps humain ... Variations of the facial nerve Artist Jacob, Nicolas Henri, 1781-1871 Part of Book Traité complet de lanatomie de lhomme ...
AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 02 Trigeminal nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 03 Facial nerve ... AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 11 Glossopharyngeal Nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 12 Veins * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 13 Occulomotor Nerve ...
AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 02 Trigeminal nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 03 Facial nerve ... AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 11 Glossopharyngeal Nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 12 Veins * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 13 Occulomotor Nerve ...
AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 02 Trigeminal nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 03 Facial nerve ... AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 11 Glossopharyngeal Nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 12 Veins * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 13 Occulomotor Nerve ...
AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 02 Trigeminal nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 03 Facial nerve ... AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 11 Glossopharyngeal Nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 12 Veins * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 13 Occulomotor Nerve ...
AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 02 Trigeminal nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 03 Facial nerve ... AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 11 Glossopharyngeal Nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 12 Veins * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 13 Occulomotor Nerve ...
AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 02 Trigeminal nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 03 Facial nerve ... AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 11 Glossopharyngeal Nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 12 Veins * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 13 Occulomotor Nerve ...
AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 02 Trigeminal nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 03 Facial nerve ... AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 11 Glossopharyngeal Nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 12 Veins * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 13 Occulomotor Nerve ...
AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 02 Trigeminal nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 03 Facial nerve ... AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 11 Glossopharyngeal Nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 12 Veins * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 13 Occulomotor Nerve ...
AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 02 Trigeminal nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 03 Facial nerve ... AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 11 Glossopharyngeal Nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 12 Veins * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 13 Occulomotor Nerve ...
AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 02 Trigeminal nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 03 Facial nerve ... AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 11 Glossopharyngeal Nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 12 Veins * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 13 Occulomotor Nerve ...
AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 02 Trigeminal nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 03 Facial nerve ... AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 11 Glossopharyngeal Nerve * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 12 Veins * AIPGMEE Anatomy Topic 13 Occulomotor Nerve ...
Cranial Nerve Disorders *Glossopharyngeal Neuralgia. *Hemifacial Spasm. *Trigeminal Neuralgia. *Cervical Spine Conditions ... We provide complete care for spinal, cranial and peripheral nerve conditions. ✐ Robert Louis, MD has advanced fellowship ... Louis has particular expertise in minimally invasive endoscopic procedures for brain tumors, pituitary tumors, cranial nerve ... peripheral nerves, and extra-cranial cerebrovascular system. Neuroradiology methods are used in modern neurosurgical diagnosis ...

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