Kidney Glomerulus: A cluster of convoluted capillaries beginning at each nephric tubule in the kidney and held together by connective tissue.Podocytes: Highly differentiated epithelial cells of the visceral layer of BOWMAN CAPSULE of the KIDNEY. They are composed of a cell body with major CELL SURFACE EXTENSIONS and secondary fingerlike extensions called pedicels. They enwrap the KIDNEY GLOMERULUS capillaries with their cell surface extensions forming a filtration structure. The pedicels of neighboring podocytes interdigitate with each other leaving between them filtration slits that are bridged by an extracellular structure impermeable to large macromolecules called the slit diaphragm, and provide the last barrier to protein loss in the KIDNEY.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Glomerular Mesangium: The thin membranous structure supporting the adjoining glomerular capillaries. It is composed of GLOMERULAR MESANGIAL CELLS and their EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX.Basement Membrane: A darkly stained mat-like EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX (ECM) that separates cell layers, such as EPITHELIUM from ENDOTHELIUM or a layer of CONNECTIVE TISSUE. The ECM layer that supports an overlying EPITHELIUM or ENDOTHELIUM is called basal lamina. Basement membrane (BM) can be formed by the fusion of either two adjacent basal laminae or a basal lamina with an adjacent reticular lamina of connective tissue. BM, composed mainly of TYPE IV COLLAGEN; glycoprotein LAMININ; and PROTEOGLYCAN, provides barriers as well as channels between interacting cell layers.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Glomerulonephritis: Inflammation of the renal glomeruli (KIDNEY GLOMERULUS) that can be classified by the type of glomerular injuries including antibody deposition, complement activation, cellular proliferation, and glomerulosclerosis. These structural and functional abnormalities usually lead to HEMATURIA; PROTEINURIA; HYPERTENSION; and RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Kidney Diseases: Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.Kidney Tubules: Long convoluted tubules in the nephrons. They collect filtrate from blood passing through the KIDNEY GLOMERULUS and process this filtrate into URINE. Each renal tubule consists of a BOWMAN CAPSULE; PROXIMAL KIDNEY TUBULE; LOOP OF HENLE; DISTAL KIDNEY TUBULE; and KIDNEY COLLECTING DUCT leading to the central cavity of the kidney (KIDNEY PELVIS) that connects to the URETER.Olfactory Bulb: Ovoid body resting on the CRIBRIFORM PLATE of the ethmoid bone where the OLFACTORY NERVE terminates. The olfactory bulb contains several types of nerve cells including the mitral cells, on whose DENDRITES the olfactory nerve synapses, forming the olfactory glomeruli. The accessory olfactory bulb, which receives the projection from the VOMERONASAL ORGAN via the vomeronasal nerve, is also included here.Olfactory Pathways: Set of nerve fibers conducting impulses from olfactory receptors to the cerebral cortex. It includes the OLFACTORY NERVE; OLFACTORY BULB; OLFACTORY TRACT; OLFACTORY TUBERCLE; ANTERIOR PERFORATED SUBSTANCE; and OLFACTORY CORTEX.Kidney Cortex: The outer zone of the KIDNEY, beneath the capsule, consisting of KIDNEY GLOMERULUS; KIDNEY TUBULES, DISTAL; and KIDNEY TUBULES, PROXIMAL.Proteinuria: The presence of proteins in the urine, an indicator of KIDNEY DISEASES.Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Olfactory Receptor Neurons: Neurons in the OLFACTORY EPITHELIUM with proteins (RECEPTORS, ODORANT) that bind, and thus detect, odorants. These neurons send their DENDRITES to the surface of the epithelium with the odorant receptors residing in the apical non-motile cilia. Their unmyelinated AXONS synapse in the OLFACTORY BULB of the BRAIN.Nephrosis: Pathological processes of the KIDNEY without inflammatory or neoplastic components. Nephrosis may be a primary disorder or secondary complication of other diseases. It is characterized by the NEPHROTIC SYNDROME indicating the presence of PROTEINURIA and HYPOALBUMINEMIA with accompanying EDEMA.Glomerulosclerosis, Focal Segmental: A clinicopathological syndrome or diagnostic term for a type of glomerular injury that has multiple causes, primary or secondary. Clinical features include PROTEINURIA, reduced GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE, and EDEMA. Kidney biopsy initially indicates focal segmental glomerular consolidation (hyalinosis) or scarring which can progress to globally sclerotic glomeruli leading to eventual KIDNEY FAILURE.Nephrons: The functional units of the kidney, consisting of the glomerulus and the attached tubule.Nephritis: Inflammation of any part of the KIDNEY.Puromycin Aminonucleoside: PUROMYCIN derivative that lacks the methoxyphenylalanyl group on the amine of the sugar ring. It is an antibiotic with antineoplastic properties and can cause nephrosis.Kidney Tubules, Proximal: The renal tubule portion that extends from the BOWMAN CAPSULE in the KIDNEY CORTEX into the KIDNEY MEDULLA. The proximal tubule consists of a convoluted proximal segment in the cortex, and a distal straight segment descending into the medulla where it forms the U-shaped LOOP OF HENLE.Odors: The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Acute Kidney Injury: Abrupt reduction in kidney function. Acute kidney injury encompasses the entire spectrum of the syndrome including acute kidney failure; ACUTE KIDNEY TUBULAR NECROSIS; and other less severe conditions.Immune Complex Diseases: Group of diseases mediated by the deposition of large soluble complexes of antigen and antibody with resultant damage to tissue. Besides SERUM SICKNESS and the ARTHUS REACTION, evidence supports a pathogenic role for immune complexes in many other IMMUNE SYSTEM DISEASES including GLOMERULONEPHRITIS, systemic lupus erythematosus (LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, SYSTEMIC) and POLYARTERITIS NODOSA.Diabetic Nephropathies: KIDNEY injuries associated with diabetes mellitus and affecting KIDNEY GLOMERULUS; ARTERIOLES; KIDNEY TUBULES; and the interstitium. Clinical signs include persistent PROTEINURIA, from microalbuminuria progressing to ALBUMINURIA of greater than 300 mg/24 h, leading to reduced GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE and END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE.Smell: The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Kidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Mesangial Cells: Smooth muscle-like cells adhering to the wall of the small blood vessels of the KIDNEY at the glomerulus and along the vascular pole of the glomerulus in the JUXTAGLOMERULAR APPARATUS. They are myofibroblasts with contractile and phagocytic properties. These cells and their MESANGIAL EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX constitute the GLOMERULAR MESANGIUM.Olfactory Nerve: The 1st cranial nerve. The olfactory nerve conveys the sense of smell. It is formed by the axons of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS which project from the olfactory epithelium (in the nasal epithelium) to the OLFACTORY BULB.Kidney Medulla: The internal portion of the kidney, consisting of striated conical masses, the renal pyramids, whose bases are adjacent to the cortex and whose apices form prominent papillae projecting into the lumen of the minor calyces.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Receptors, Odorant: Proteins, usually projecting from the cilia of olfactory receptor neurons, that specifically bind odorant molecules and trigger responses in the neurons. The large number of different odorant receptors appears to arise from several gene families or subfamilies rather than from DNA rearrangement.Glomerular Basement Membrane: The layer of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX that lies between the ENDOTHELIUM of the glomerular capillaries and the PODOCYTES of the inner or visceral layer of the BOWMAN CAPSULE. It is the product of these two cell types. It acts as a physical barrier and an ion-selective filter.Kidney Function Tests: Laboratory tests used to evaluate how well the kidneys are working through examination of blood and urine.Glomerulonephritis, IGA: A chronic form of glomerulonephritis characterized by deposits of predominantly IMMUNOGLOBULIN A in the mesangial area (GLOMERULAR MESANGIUM). Deposits of COMPLEMENT C3 and IMMUNOGLOBULIN G are also often found. Clinical features may progress from asymptomatic HEMATURIA to END-STAGE KIDNEY DISEASE.Glomerular Filtration Rate: The volume of water filtered out of plasma through glomerular capillary walls into Bowman's capsules per unit of time. It is considered to be equivalent to INULIN clearance.Polycystic Kidney Diseases: Hereditary diseases that are characterized by the progressive expansion of a large number of tightly packed CYSTS within the KIDNEYS. They include diseases with autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Glomerulonephritis, Membranoproliferative: Chronic glomerulonephritis characterized histologically by proliferation of MESANGIAL CELLS, increase in the MESANGIAL EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX, and a thickening of the glomerular capillary walls. This may appear as a primary disorder or secondary to other diseases including infections and autoimmune disease SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS. Various subtypes are classified by their abnormal ultrastructures and immune deposits. Hypocomplementemia is a characteristic feature of all types of MPGN.rho-Specific Guanine Nucleotide Dissociation Inhibitors: A subcategory of guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors that are specific for RHO GTP-BINDING PROTEINS.Guanine Nucleotide Dissociation Inhibitors: Protein factors that inhibit the dissociation of GDP from GTP-BINDING PROTEINS.rho Guanine Nucleotide Dissociation Inhibitor alpha: An abundantly-expressed rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor subtype that regulates a broad variety of RHO GTPASES.rho Guanine Nucleotide Dissociation Inhibitor beta: A rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor subtype that is highly expressed in hematopoietic cells and in LYMPHOCYTES. The expression of this subtype is associated with the regulation of CELL PROLIFERATION; TUMORIGENESIS; and APOPTOSIS.Guanosine Diphosphate: A guanine nucleotide containing two phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety.Cytosol: Intracellular fluid from the cytoplasm after removal of ORGANELLES and other insoluble cytoplasmic components.rap GTP-Binding Proteins: A family of MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS that are related to RAS PROTEINS.This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.TexasEpithelial-Mesenchymal Transition: Phenotypic changes of EPITHELIAL CELLS to MESENCHYME type, which increase cell mobility critical in many developmental processes such as NEURAL TUBE development. NEOPLASM METASTASIS and DISEASE PROGRESSION may also induce this transition.Clinical Trials, Phase I as Topic: Works about studies performed to evaluate the safety of diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques in healthy subjects and to determine the safe dosage range (if appropriate). These tests also are used to determine pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic properties (toxicity, metabolism, absorption, elimination, and preferred route of administration). They involve a small number of persons and usually last about 1 year. This concept includes phase I studies conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Mice, Inbred C57BLMice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.
... from mild to sclerosis of glomeruli) and scarring around the glomeruli (periglomerular fibrosis). In advanced stages, kidney ... The two proposed mechanisms of HN's pathophysiology both centre around how the glomerulus, a network of dense capillaries that ... The resulting inadequate blood flow produces tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and glomerular alterations (smaller ... The idea is that hypertension results in sclerosis of the glomeruli which ultimately means reduced kidney function. As a ...
... is a cup-like sack at the beginning of the tubular component of a nephron in the mammalian kidney that performs the first step ... A glomerulus is enclosed in the sac. Fluids from blood in the glomerulus are collected in the Bowman's capsule (i.e., ... Bowman's capsule (or the Bowman capsule, capsula glomeruli, or glomerular capsule) ... Glomerulus. Distribution of blood vessels in cortex of kidney. Histology image:22401lba from Vaughan, Deborah (2002). A ...
A glomerulus is enclosed in the sac. Also known as capsula glomeruli or glomerular capsule. building biology A science that ... Bowman's capsule A cup-like sac at the beginning of the tubular component of a nephron in the mammalian kidney that performs ...
Human kidneys are composed of approximately half a million nephrons. Each nephron contains a glomerulus with basement membrane ... The 500 mg of FLCs produced per day by the normal lymphoid system, however, flows through the glomeruli and is completely ... Disorders of serum protein catabolism in patients with tubular proteinuria, the nephrotic syndrome, or uremia". The Journal of ... J. Kidney Dis. 39 (5): 899-919. doi:10.1053/ajkd.2002.32764. PMID 11979334. CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) ...
Kidney tissue Glomerulus This image shows the types of cells present in the glomerulus part of a kidney nephron. Podocytes, ... renal tubular diseases include acute tubular necrosis, renal tubular acidosis, and polycystic kidney disease. Distribution of ... Over 150 liters of fluid enter the glomeruli of an adult every day: 99% of the water in that filtrate is reabsorbed. ... renal tubular diseases include acute tubular necrosis and polycystic kidney disease. The nephron is the functional unit of the ...
... the functional units of the kidney. The juxtaglomerular apparatus is named because it is next to (juxta-) the glomerulus. The ... These cells are similar to epithelium and are located in the media of the afferent arterioles as they enter the glomeruli. The ... At this location, thick ascending limb of loop of Henle, there is a modified region of tubular epithelium called the Macula ... The juxtaglomerular apparatus is part of the kidney nephron, next to the glomerulus. It is found between afferent arteriole and ...
The GFB is responsible for the highly selective filtration of blood entering the kidney's glomeruli and normally only allows ... These cells are in physical contact with one another at various locations within the glomerulus; they also communicate with one ... leading to eventual fibrogenesis and even mild hypoxia can induce transdifferentiation of cultured tubular cells into ... Diabetic nephropathy (DN), also known as diabetic kidney disease, is the chronic loss of kidney function occurring in those ...
Interstitial nephritis Nephrotic syndrome Acute kidney injury Acute tubular necrosis Renal papillary necrosis NSAIDs in ... At these elevated levels, angiotensin II also constricts the afferent arteriole into the glomerulus in addition to the efferent ... Prostaglandins normally dilate the afferent arterioles of the glomeruli. This helps maintain normal glomerular perfusion and ... on the kidney and over time can lead to chronic kidney disease. The mechanism of these kidney ADRs is due to changes in kidney ...
... renal tubular diseases include acute tubular necrosis, renal tubular acidosis, and polycystic kidney disease. ... GlomerulusEdit. Main article: Glomerulus. The glomerulus is the network known as a tuft, of filtering capillaries located at ... Over 150 liters of fluid enter the glomeruli of an adult every day: 99% of the water in that filtrate is reabsorbed. ... renal tubular diseases include acute tubular necrosis and polycystic kidney disease. ...
... thin epithelial tubes are densely packed with cilia and have a distinct morpology to the other tubular epithelia of the kidney ... In pronephroi the glomerulus (or glomus if it extends over multiple body segments) projects into the coelom rather than into ... It is a paired organ, consisting of a single giant nephron that processes blood filtrate produced from glomeruli or glomera- ... The embryonic kidney and its derivatives also produces the inductive signals that trigger formation of the adult kidney. The ...
... and in the course of each duct a glomerulus also is developed. A secondary glomerulus is formed ventral to each of these, and ... The kidney of the ox and many other animals, on the other hand, remains lobulated throughout life. The urinary bladder is ... Each arises on the lateral aspect of the corresponding Wolffian duct as a tubular invagination of the cells lining the ... In the other end, the renal tubules give rise to Bowman's capsules and glomeruli. The mesoderm around the tubules becomes ...
The main findings on kidney biopsy are increased cells and Ig deposition in the mesangium (part of the glomerulus, where blood ... The number of crescentic glomeruli is an important prognostic factor in determining whether the patient will develop chronic ... Proteinuria, hypertension at presentation, and pathology features (crescentic changes, interstitial fibrosis and tubular ... In adults, kidney involvement progresses to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) more often than in children. In a UK series of 37 ...
Hill noted that, in human kidneys, fibrin deposition in the glomerulus after reimplantation and postoperative function, ... The changes that Hill saw in the glomeruli on light microscopy were occasional fibrin thrombi and infiltration with polymorphs ... but found few gross abnormalities apart from some infiltration with lymphocytes and occasional tubular atrophy. The changes ... Stueber showed that kidneys would survive in situ clamping of the renal pedicle for 6 hours if the kidneys were cooled to 0-5 ° ...
Renal histology is the study of the microscopic structure of the kidney. Distinct cell types include: *Kidney glomerulus ... Specific proteins are expressed in the different compartments of the kidney with podocin and nephrin expressed in glomeruli, ... A.M. Weinstein (1994). "Mathematical models of tubular transport". Annual Review of Physiology. 56: 691-709. doi:10.1146/ ... Kidney injury and failure[edit]. Main articles: Acute kidney injury, Chronic kidney disease, and Kidney failure ...
... from mild to sclerosis of glomeruli) and scarring around the glomeruli (periglomerular fibrosis). In advanced stages, kidney ... Light micrograph showing signs of hypertensive nephropathy: interstitial fibrosis, tubular atrophy with thickened tubular ... The two proposed mechanisms of HN's pathophysiology[7] both centre around how the glomerulus, a network of dense capillaries ... Hypertensive kidney disease is a medical condition referring to damage to the kidney due to chronic high blood pressure. It ...
Although it usually affects the entire glomerulus, it can affect parts of the glomerulus in some cases.[9] ... A definitive diagnosis of membranous nephropathy requires a kidney biopsy. Causes[edit]. Primary/idiopathic[edit]. 85% of MGN ... the glomeruli will become sclerosed and finally hyalinized. ... Acute tubular necrosis. *Genetic *Fanconi syndrome. *Bartter ... A large part of this difficulty is due to a lack of ability to predict which people will progress to end-stage kidney disease, ...
... specifically it is a form of glomerulonephritis or an inflammation of the glomeruli of the kidney. Aggressive Berger's disease ... The ideal treatment for IgAN would remove IgA from the glomerulus and prevent further IgA deposition. This goal still remains a ... Chronic kidney failure (no previous symptoms, presents with anemia, hypertension and other symptoms of kidney failure, in ... and presenting as acute kidney failure. In general, the entry into chronic kidney failure is slow as compared to most other ...
These changes damage the kidney's glomeruli (networks of tiny blood vessels), which leads to the hallmark feature of albumin in ... The mesangial cells and matrix can progressively expand and consume the entire glomerulus, shutting off filtration.[5] As this ... Diabetic nephropathy (diabetic kidney disease) (DN)[1] is the chronic loss of kidney function occurring in those with diabetes ... Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage kidney disease,[8][9] which may require hemodialysis or even kidney ...
... arising from the kidney (outside the glomerulus), ureters, urinary bladder, prostate, or urethra.[1] ... Inflammation of or injury to the glomeruli can cause leakage of red blood cells, resulting in misshapen cells and red blood ... Polycystic kidney disease - a genetic disorder that causes cysts in the kidney[8] ... If hematuria is secondary to a kidney stone, then management depends on the size of the kidney stone. If the stone is small ...
Histological image of a normal kidney glomerulus. It is possible to see a glomerulus in the centre of the image surrounded by ... The underlying mechanism typically involves damage to the glomeruli of the kidney.[1] Diagnosis is typically based on urine ... Kidney damage[edit]. The treatment of kidney damage may reverse or delay the progression of the disease.[38] Kidney damage is ... The renal glomerulus filters the blood that arrives at the kidney. It is formed of capillaries with small pores that allow ...
Acute kidney injury. *Acute tubular necrosis. *Renal papillary necrosis. NSAIDs in combination with excessive use of phenacetin ... Prostaglandins normally dilate the afferent arterioles of the glomeruli. This helps maintain normal glomerular perfusion and ... At these elevated levels, angiotensin II also constricts the afferent arteriole into the glomerulus in addition to the efferent ... on the kidney and over time can lead to chronic kidney disease. The mechanism of these kidney ADRs is due to changes in kidney ...
In kidney glomerulus, expressed in podocytes and mesangial cells.2 Publications. ,p>Manually curated information for which ... Tubular epithelial cells show degenerative changes with basement membrane thickening. Increase of apoptotic cells in kidney ... glomeruli and tubulointerstitium.1 Publication. ,p>Manually curated information for which there is published experimental ... In kidney, severe podocyte damage, glomerular lesions with focal and segmental sclerosis, along with prominent intratubular ...
The proximal tubule (PT) arising at the tubular pole of the glomerulus (nine oclock) and other proximal tubular cross sections ... showing two glomeruli and tubules (no staining). The macula densa is shown in the upper glomerulus (arrow). e: NOD diabetic ... The glomerulus at top shows a tubular pole and proximal tubule at 12 oclock with mild staining (arrowheads). d: NOD control ... C57BL/6 kidney showed unstained glomerulus and vasculature. There was mild staining of the proximal tubule in a basolateral ...
In kidneys, atrophied and cystic glomeruli, extensive degenerative changes in tubular epithelial cells were noticed. Cerebrum ... congested and swollen glomerulus, mild to moderate intertubular hemorrhages, extensive degenerative changes in tubular ... In kidneys, atrophied and cystic glomeruli (Figure 4), mild to moderate intertubular hemorrhages, extensive degenerative ... Zhan XA, Wang M, Xu Z-R, Li JX (2006) Toxic effects of F on kidney function and histology in young pigs. Research report ...
Figure 2: MMF attenuates T cells infiltration in diabetic kidney. Infiltration of renal CD4+ and CD8+ cells in glomeruli and ... "Angiotensin II-induced mitochondrial Nox4 is a major endogenous source of oxidative stress in kidney tubular cells," PLoS ONE, ... The degree of glomerular mesangial matrix expansion for each glomerulus was evaluated semiquantitatively using a score of 0-4: ... we evaluated the effect of MMF on diabetic ROS injury in the kidney. Increased expression of Nox4 and p67phox in the kidney of ...
Glomerulus with diabetic kidney disease featuring adhesin between the glomerular tuft and Bowman capsule at the tubular pole ( ... Kimmelstiel P, Wilson C. Intercapillary lesions in the glomeruli of the kidney. Am J Pathol. 1936;12:83-97.. * Cited Here , ... C, A glomerulus with diffuse and nodular mesangial expansion.. FIGURE 3: A glomerulus from a kidney with well-developed ... In diabetic kidneys, TGFβ1 expression is also associated with increased tubular cell apoptosis, which leads to tubular ...
Proximal tubules were the major site of iron deposition within the kidney. Iron deposition was very rare within the glomeruli ( ... Glomerular inflammation induces resistance to tubular injury in the rat. A novel form of acquired, heme oxygenase-dependent ... a) Kidney. ×200. (b) Liver. ×200. Asterisk indicates a glomerulus.. Immunohistochemistry of HO-1-producing cells. ... Iron staining of the liver and the kidney biopsy specimen. Paraffin-embedded liver and kidney sections from the patient were ...
Kidneys of Col4a3-/- animals treated with TPL exhibited improved tubular health, decreased sclerotic glomeruli, reduced ... of grid points that hit pink or red mesangial matrix deposition were divided by the total number of points in the glomerulus to ... Tubular injury was defined as tubular dilation, tubular atrophy, tubular cast formation, vacuolization, degeneration, and ... PtenWT/K80R kidneys when the animals suffered from kidney fibrosis (Figure 1, B and C). The tubular areas for each measurement ...
Gandhi M, Olson JL, Meyer TW: Contribution of tubular injury to loss of remnant kidney function. Kidney Int 54 : 1157 -1165, ... lectin positivity is present within the glomerulus in all sections). (B) Sections of glomeruli from the kidney after relief of ... 59 Atubular glomeruli are common in pyelonephritic kidneys, which are characterized by reduced glomerular and proximal tubular ... 70 Tubular apoptosis and small crowded glomeruli are found also in kidneys of neonatal mice subjected to chronic partial UUO.71 ...
Tubular secretion is the passage of certain substances out of the capillaries directly into the renal tubules. Tubular ... The tuft of capillaries is called a glomerulus. Its capsule is cup-shaped and is known as Bowmans capsule. The glomerulus and ... Filtration occurs in the glomeruli. Blood pressure forces plasma, the liquid portion of the blood, through the capillary walls ... Kidney transplants also help chronic kidney failure. In this procedure, a surgeon replaces a diseased kidney with a closely ...
Roald, Anca; Tenstad, Olav; Aukland, Knut. 1997. Glomerular filtration and tubular uptake of Cystatin C (Cy) in the rat kidney. ... of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded glomeruli suggests depletion of glomerular filtration barrier proteins in two-kidney one- ... Uptake site relative to glomerulus. Journal of Structural Biology. 409-415. *. Christiansen, Rolf E.F.; Roald, Anca Beatrice; ... Roald, Anca Beatrice; Aukland, Knut; Tenstad, Olav. 2004. Tubular absortion of filtered cystatin-C in rat kidney. Experimental ...
The pathological change of kidney in diabetic nephropathy is represented hypertrophy, inflammation, and renal fibrosis. ... The pathological changes of diabetic nephropathy include kidney hypertrophy, glomerulus and tubular basement membrane ... Diabetic nephropathy, a progressive kidney disease caused by angiopathy of capillaries in the kidney glomeruli, is one of the ... Kidney Int. 2006;69:1578-85.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar. *. Kanwar YS, Wada J, Sun L, Xie P, Wallner EI, Chen S. Diabetic ...
Denotes all tubular and connective tissue elements of the kidney, not including the glomerulus. ... TGP treatment significantly decreased the number of macrophages in the glomeruli and tubulointerstitial areas (Figs.. Effects ... loss of tubular brush border, tubular dilatation, cast formation, and neutrophil infiltration.. Protective effects of ... INFLUENCE OF INCREASING FLUORIDE DOSE RATES ON SELECTED LIVER AND KIDNEY ENZYMES PROFILE IN DOMESTIC CHICKEN (Gallus domesticus ...
Y-box protein-1 controls transforming growth factor-beta1 translation in proximal tubular cells. Kidney Int 2008;73:724-732pmid ... MicroRNA-192 in diabetic kidney glomeruli and its function in TGF-beta-induced collagen expression via inhibition of E-box ... Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of kidney failure, affecting the glomerulus and ultimately leading to ... Review: the role of microRNAs in kidney disease. Nephrology (Carlton) 2010;15:599-608pmid:20883280. ...
kidneys appear small, uniformly shrunken. - hyalinzation of glomeruli. - tubular atrophy. - fibrous tissue in the dilated ... nephron = functional unit of the kidney. The glomerulus is the specialized capillary bed that allow passage of fluids and ... approx 1.5 L of urin excreted daily (10% of the blood volume filtered through the glomeruli) ... RCC = most common kidney cancer. possibly caused by smoking, link with VHL syndrome (loss of VHL tumor suppressor gene, ...
Ongoing intraglomerular hypertension and increased glomerular volume eventually harm glomeruli. Tubular hypermetabolism, ... glomerular hydraulic forces and development of glomerulosclerosis is limited when protein trafficking across the glomerulus is ... Cats with normal kidneys that eat mostly dry food usually make urine with a USG of greater than 1.035. A USG cut-off of 1.040 ... 2005) Clinical benefit of calcitriol in canine chronic kidney disease [abstract] J Vet Int Med 19:433. ...
... including within the glomeruli, on endothelial cells, and on renal tubular cells located within the outer stripe of the medulla ... C and D, High power images of WT kidney sections. C, Shows a glomerulus in the top panel stained with anti-TLR2 (labeled TLR2 ... and then kidneys were harvested and halved kidneys were snap frozen in liquid nitrogen. The kidneys were homogenized in ... TLR2 expression within normal mouse kidney. Fig. 1 shows four panels (labeled A-D) and a section of WT kidney stained for H&E ...
The functional unit of the kidney is the nephron. Each nephron is a tubular structure consisting of four regions. It arises in ... the glomerulus. Bowmans capsule is continuous with the proximal convoluted tubule, which also lies in the cortex. Following ... The mammalian kidney is a compact organ with two distinct regions: cortex and medulla. ... but the kidneys of fishes are not able to do this. In marine bony fishes the kidney has small glomeruli and produces only a ...
blood passing through glomeruli within cortex of kidneys and blood pressure forces materials through glomerular walls into ... droup of symptomes occuring when damage to glomerulus of kidney is present and there is large amounts of protein in the urine. ... tubular secretion. materials selectively transferred from blood into filtrate to be excreted in urine occurs in renal tubules ... polycystic kidney disease. heridetary disorder of kidneys grapelike fluid filled sacs or cysts replace normal kidney tissue. ...
The blood enters the kidney and goes to the glomerulus. Pressure forces fluid out of the blood through membrane filtration ... Glomerulonephritis (nephritis) - inflammation of the glomeruli. *Hydronephrosis - water in the kidney caused by blocked urine ... Urine is formed in the nephrons in three process: glomerlular filtration, tubular reabsorbtion and tubular secretion. The ... Kidney Disease and Disorders. Kidney disease and kidney problems are usually treated by a nephrologist. Kidney stones are ...
6F ). Several cysts were found in the urinary space surrounding glomeruli. Primary cilia were present on renal tubular cells in ... The polycystic kidney component of the phenotype does not appear to be fully penetrant. Double heterozygous animals (Bbs2 +/- ... Bbs2 -/- mice have numerous cysts, some of which involve the glomerulus. Scanning electron microscopic views of renal tubules ... In some cases, vesicles were observed in association with these microtubules in Bbs2 -/- mice (C, arrow). Kidneys from Bbs2 +/+ ...
... from mild to sclerosis of glomeruli) and scarring around the glomeruli (periglomerular fibrosis). In advanced stages, kidney ... The two proposed mechanisms of HNs pathophysiology both centre around how the glomerulus, a network of dense capillaries that ... The resulting inadequate blood flow produces tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and glomerular alterations (smaller ... The idea is that hypertension results in sclerosis of the glomeruli which ultimately means reduced kidney function. As a ...
In normal kidney both Mcm2 and Ki-67 immunoreactivity was observed in nuclei of the glomerular and tubular compartments with ... A, staining for Mcm2 in occasional nuclei within the renal glomerulus (arrows). Mcm2 immunopositivity of nuclei (arrows) in a ... Results: In normal tissues, Mcm2 nuclear labeling was identified in both glomeruli (LI median 0.35%; range 0-1.7) and renal ... RCCs (n = 56) and histologically normal kidney tissue (n = 10; taken from uninvolved morphologically normal kidney tissue ...
Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Therapy in Chronic Kidney and Cardiovascular Disease , IntechOpen, Published on: 2013-05-22. ... tubular atrophy, glomerulosclerosis, renal vasculopathy, and presence of granulation tissue. Alterations in the glomerulus ... Compensatory hypertrophy of the inner-cortical glomeruli results, leading to hyperfiltration injury and global ... The proximal tubular cells account for the majority of kidney NO synthesis [189, 190], thus kidney damage and atrophy, a ...
... with much less tubular necrosis (arrows) was detected (Supplemental Figure 1A). In the 15-day reperfusion kidneys, tubular ... The purity of glomeruli was 95%-100%.. Primary podocyte culture. Isolated glomeruli from Lamb2+/-, Lamb2-/-;Tg-C321R, and Lamb2 ... Nuclei were counterstained with Hoechst 33342 (blue). G, glomerulus. Scale bars: 40 μm. (C) Whole-kidney lysates from mice ... Li PK, Burdmann EA, Mehta RL, World Kidney Day Steering Committee 2013. Acute kidney injury: global health alert. Kidney Int. ...
Older animals developed dense congophilic amyloid deposits in the glomeruli and focal deposits in the interstitium. Of note, in ... Amyloid was found predominantly in vessels and tubular basement membrane in ATTR S52P. Detailed pathologic descriptions of ... Massive deposits in the glomerulus, ATTR V30M-amyloidosis, antitransthyretin (TTR) fixation (immunoperoxidase technique; ... Kidney and anemia in familial amyloidosis type I. Kidney Int 66: 2004-2009, 2004pmid:15496172. ...
  • DKD is associated with increased matrix expansion that manifests morphologically as a diffuse or nodular expansion of the mesangium and diffuse thickening of the glomerular and tubular basement membranes. (lww.com)
  • It shows that Mcm2 is a superior marker to Ki-67 in the assessment of cell cycle entry in histological archival material and that normal kidney has a subset of cells within the glomerular and tubular compartments that are in cycle. (aacrjournals.org)
  • 2016. Proteomic Analysis of Minimally Damaged Renal Tubular Tissue from Two-Kidney-One-Clip Hypertensive Rats Demonstrates Extensive Changes Compared to Tissue from Controls. (uib.no)
  • One approach to alleviate this demand is to reconstruct kidneys using tissue engineering scaffolds. (ufl.edu)
  • Pluripotent embryonic stem cells are highly proliferative, capable of differentiating into all cells of the kidney, and respond to tissue-specific extracellular matrix proteins. (ufl.edu)
  • Renal disease is usually attributed to metabolic consequences of abnormal glucose regulation manifested by elevated blood and tissue levels of glycosylated proteins and hemodynamic changes within the kidney tissue ( 1 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Obstruction may result in type 1 renal tubular acidosis due to reduced distal hydrogen secretion probably because of a defect in the hydrogen ion transporter. (scribd.com)
  • In the kidneys, as a result of benign arterial hypertension, hyaline (pink, amorphous, homogeneous material) accumulates in the walls of small arteries and arterioles, producing the thickening of their walls and the narrowing of the arterial openings, a process known as arteriolosclerosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • This leads to a build-up of plaques and they can be deposited in the renal arteries causing stenosis and ischemic kidney disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some arteries nourish the kidney cells themselves. (healthpages.org)
  • People with diabetes are also at risk of other kidney problems including narrowing of the arteries to the kidneys, called renal artery stenosis or renovascular disease. (scribd.com)
  • This reabsorptive process is accomplished without any change in the concentration of the tubular fluid, which remains the same as that of the blood plasma. (britannica.com)
  • A few substances are also secreted from the blood through the walls of the tubule into the tubular fluid. (britannica.com)
  • TTR binds to thyroxine and retinol-binding protein in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid and transports vitamin A without the loss of retinol-binding protein molecules in the kidney ( 5 ). (asnjournals.org)
  • This overlap between CKD and CVD, in part, relates to common etiologies such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension, but important dynamic and bidirectional interactions between the cardiovascular system and kidneys may also explain the occurrence of concurrent organ dysfunction [ 1 ]. (intechopen.com)
  • In conclusion, soybeans may prevent the weight loss and morphological disruption of the kidney associated with diabetes mellitus. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Diabetes Mellitus One cause of kidney failure is diabetes mellitus, a condition characterised by high blood glucose (sugar) levels. (scribd.com)
  • and transitional cell carcinoma n = compare its sensitivity to the established proliferation marker Ki-67, examine for differences in tumors derived from stable and labile epithelial cell populations in the kidney, and assess the relationship of Mcm2 proliferation to clinicopathological characteristics of kidney tumors. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Examining the ability of these cells to proliferate and differentiate in a whole kidney extracellular matrix scaffold would serve as a valuable baseline for future studies in producing a functioning organ. (ufl.edu)
  • Histological changes were evaluated by quantitative measurement of tubulointerstitial injury, which was assessed by counting the number of necrotic and apoptotic cells, loss of tubular brush border, tubular dilatation, cast formation, and neutrophil infiltration. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The adrenal glands (part of the endocrine system ) sit on top of the kidneys and release renin which affects blood pressure, and sodium and water retention. (healthpages.org)
  • Osteopontin (OPN) is an arginine-glycine-aspartate containing adhesive glycoprotein that is expressed in a variety of organs including bone, kidney, vasculature, and epithelia. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • The kidneys are the major organs that maintain homeostasis (balance of the various body functions) in the body and help control blood pressure. (healthpages.org)
  • Hematoxylin and eosin histochemical analysis and electron microscopy showed preserved glomerular, vascular and tubular structures without observed nuclear material and only trace amounts of residual cellular debris. (ufl.edu)
  • For histology and Northern blotting studies, the two poles from the left kidney were removed, snap-frozen, and stored at −80°C. The center one-third of the left kidney was fixed in 10% buffered formalin for routine histology and immunohistochemistry. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Hyperglycemia plays a crucial role in the development of pathologic changes within the kidney. (lww.com)
  • Histopathological analysis showed mild injury in the liver and kidney of rats subjected to oral administration of realgar for 14 days. (frontiersin.org)
  • The association between altered miRNA expression and the development and progression of the various diabetes complications implicates certain miRNAs in the development of diabetes-related injury in the heart, kidney, peripheral nerves, and retina. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Medicines to lower blood pressure (antihypertensives) are used to keep blood pressure in a safe range and slow the progression of kidney damage that is caused by high blood pressure. (scribd.com)
  • We conclude that TLR2 protein is constitutively expressed in the kidney and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute ischemic injury by signaling both MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent pathways. (jimmunol.org)
  • Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β) is a divergent homeobox transcription factor that is expressed in kidney from the first steps of nephrogenesis. (biologists.org)
  • Our study defines the constitutive protein expression of TLR2 in kidneys of humans and mice, and provides insight into the signaling mechanisms by which a deficiency of TLR2 protects from ischemic organ injury. (jimmunol.org)
  • Proteins that cause familial forms of amyloidosis are transthyretin (TTR), apolipoprotein-AI, apolipoprotein-AII, gelsolin, fibrinogen Aα-chain, lysozyme, and cystatin C. All except the cystatin C clinically affect the kidney. (asnjournals.org)