Bowman Capsule: A double-walled epithelial capsule that is the bulbous closed proximal end of the kidney tubular system. It surrounds the cluster of convoluted capillaries of KIDNEY GLOMERULUS and is continuous with the convoluted PROXIMAL KIDNEY TUBULE.Kidney Glomerulus: A cluster of convoluted capillaries beginning at each nephric tubule in the kidney and held together by connective tissue.Glomerulonephritis: Inflammation of the renal glomeruli (KIDNEY GLOMERULUS) that can be classified by the type of glomerular injuries including antibody deposition, complement activation, cellular proliferation, and glomerulosclerosis. These structural and functional abnormalities usually lead to HEMATURIA; PROTEINURIA; HYPERTENSION; and RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Glomerulosclerosis, Focal Segmental: A clinicopathological syndrome or diagnostic term for a type of glomerular injury that has multiple causes, primary or secondary. Clinical features include PROTEINURIA, reduced GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE, and EDEMA. Kidney biopsy initially indicates focal segmental glomerular consolidation (hyalinosis) or scarring which can progress to globally sclerotic glomeruli leading to eventual KIDNEY FAILURE.Podocytes: Highly differentiated epithelial cells of the visceral layer of BOWMAN CAPSULE of the KIDNEY. They are composed of a cell body with major CELL SURFACE EXTENSIONS and secondary fingerlike extensions called pedicels. They enwrap the KIDNEY GLOMERULUS capillaries with their cell surface extensions forming a filtration structure. The pedicels of neighboring podocytes interdigitate with each other leaving between them filtration slits that are bridged by an extracellular structure impermeable to large macromolecules called the slit diaphragm, and provide the last barrier to protein loss in the KIDNEY.Hypertrophy: General increase in bulk of a part or organ due to CELL ENLARGEMENT and accumulation of FLUIDS AND SECRETIONS, not due to tumor formation, nor to an increase in the number of cells (HYPERPLASIA).Kidney Tubules: Long convoluted tubules in the nephrons. They collect filtrate from blood passing through the KIDNEY GLOMERULUS and process this filtrate into URINE. Each renal tubule consists of a BOWMAN CAPSULE; PROXIMAL KIDNEY TUBULE; LOOP OF HENLE; DISTAL KIDNEY TUBULE; and KIDNEY COLLECTING DUCT leading to the central cavity of the kidney (KIDNEY PELVIS) that connects to the URETER.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Proteinuria: The presence of proteins in the urine, an indicator of KIDNEY DISEASES.Foot Bones: The TARSAL BONES; METATARSAL BONES; and PHALANGES OF TOES. The tarsal bones consists of seven bones: CALCANEUS; TALUS; cuboid; navicular; internal; middle; and external cuneiform bones. The five metatarsal bones are numbered one through five, running medial to lateral. There are 14 phalanges in each foot, the great toe has two while the other toes have three each.Hemicentrotus: A genus of SEA URCHINS in the family Strongylocentrotidae with a hemicyclic apical disk and short spines.Dendrites: Extensions of the nerve cell body. They are short and branched and receive stimuli from other NEURONS.Retinal Neovascularization: Formation of new blood vessels originating from the retinal veins and extending along the inner (vitreal) surface of the retina.Pyramidal Cells: Projection neurons in the CEREBRAL CORTEX and the HIPPOCAMPUS. Pyramidal cells have a pyramid-shaped soma with the apex and an apical dendrite pointed toward the pial surface and other dendrites and an axon emerging from the base. The axons may have local collaterals but also project outside their cortical region.Neocortex: The largest portion of the CEREBRAL CORTEX in which the NEURONS are arranged in six layers in the mammalian brain: molecular, external granular, external pyramidal, internal granular, internal pyramidal and multiform layers.Arthropathy, Neurogenic: Chronic progressive degeneration of the stress-bearing portion of a joint, with bizarre hypertrophic changes at the periphery. It is probably a complication of a variety of neurologic disorders, particularly TABES DORSALIS, involving loss of sensation, which leads to relaxation of supporting structures and chronic instability of the joint. (Dorland, 27th ed)MaineDiaphyses: The shaft of long bones.Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials: Depolarization of membrane potentials at the SYNAPTIC MEMBRANES of target neurons during neurotransmission. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials can singly or in summation reach the trigger threshold for ACTION POTENTIALS.Submandibular Gland: One of two salivary glands in the neck, located in the space bound by the two bellies of the digastric muscle and the angle of the mandible. It discharges through the submandibular duct. The secretory units are predominantly serous although a few mucous alveoli, some with serous demilunes, occur. (Stedman, 25th ed)Capillaries: The minute vessels that connect the arterioles and venules.Retinal Vessels: The blood vessels which supply and drain the RETINA.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Spondylarthropathies: Heterogeneous group of arthritic diseases sharing clinical and radiologic features. They are associated with the HLA-B27 ANTIGEN and some with a triggering infection. Most involve the axial joints in the SPINE, particularly the SACROILIAC JOINT, but can also involve asymmetric peripheral joints. Subsets include ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS; REACTIVE ARTHRITIS; PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS; and others.Pityriasis: A name originally applied to a group of skin diseases characterized by the formation of fine, branny scales, but now used only with a modifier. (Dorland, 27th ed)Neurosyphilis: Infections of the central nervous system caused by TREPONEMA PALLIDUM which present with a variety of clinical syndromes. The initial phase of infection usually causes a mild or asymptomatic meningeal reaction. The meningovascular form may present acutely as BRAIN INFARCTION. The infection may also remain subclinical for several years. Late syndromes include general paresis; TABES DORSALIS; meningeal syphilis; syphilitic OPTIC ATROPHY; and spinal syphilis. General paresis is characterized by progressive DEMENTIA; DYSARTHRIA; TREMOR; MYOCLONUS; SEIZURES; and Argyll-Robertson pupils. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp722-8)Olfactory Bulb: Ovoid body resting on the CRIBRIFORM PLATE of the ethmoid bone where the OLFACTORY NERVE terminates. The olfactory bulb contains several types of nerve cells including the mitral cells, on whose DENDRITES the olfactory nerve synapses, forming the olfactory glomeruli. The accessory olfactory bulb, which receives the projection from the VOMERONASAL ORGAN via the vomeronasal nerve, is also included here.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Blastula: An early non-mammalian embryo that follows the MORULA stage. A blastula resembles a hollow ball with the layer of cells surrounding a fluid-filled cavity (blastocele). The layer of cells is called BLASTODERM.Strongylocentrotus purpuratus: A species of SEA URCHINS in the family Strongylocentrotidae found on the Pacific coastline from Alaska to Mexico. This species serves as a major research model for molecular developmental biology and other fields.Retinal DiseasesRats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Retinopathy of Prematurity: A bilateral retinopathy occurring in premature infants treated with excessively high concentrations of oxygen, characterized by vascular dilatation, proliferation, and tortuosity, edema, and retinal detachment, with ultimate conversion of the retina into a fibrous mass that can be seen as a dense retrolental membrane. Usually growth of the eye is arrested and may result in microophthalmia, and blindness may occur. (Dorland, 27th ed)Nephrons: The functional units of the kidney, consisting of the glomerulus and the attached tubule.Chloral Hydrate: A hypnotic and sedative used in the treatment of INSOMNIA.Animal Care Committees: Institutional committees established to protect the welfare of animals used in research and education. The 1971 NIH Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals introduced the policy that institutions using warm-blooded animals in projects supported by NIH grants either be accredited by a recognized professional laboratory animal accrediting body or establish its own committee to evaluate animal care; the Public Health Service adopted a policy in 1979 requiring such committees; and the 1985 amendments to the Animal Welfare Act mandate review and approval of federally funded research with animals by a formally designated Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC).Smell: The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.Animal Welfare: The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.Animal Experimentation: The use of animals as investigational subjects.Kosovo: Independence from SERBIA was declared on February 17, 2008.Glomerular Mesangium: The thin membranous structure supporting the adjoining glomerular capillaries. It is composed of GLOMERULAR MESANGIAL CELLS and their EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX.Mesangial Cells: Smooth muscle-like cells adhering to the wall of the small blood vessels of the KIDNEY at the glomerulus and along the vascular pole of the glomerulus in the JUXTAGLOMERULAR APPARATUS. They are myofibroblasts with contractile and phagocytic properties. These cells and their MESANGIAL EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX constitute the GLOMERULAR MESANGIUM.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Juxtaglomerular Apparatus: A complex of cells consisting of juxtaglomerular cells, extraglomerular mesangium lacis cells, the macula densa of the distal convoluted tubule, and granular epithelial peripolar cells. Juxtaglomerular cells are modified SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS found in the walls of afferent glomerular arterioles and sometimes the efferent arterioles. Extraglomerular mesangium lacis cells are located in the angle between the afferent and efferent glomerular arterioles. Granular epithelial peripolar cells are located at the angle of reflection of the parietal to visceral angle of the renal corpuscle.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Microscopy, Fluorescence, Multiphoton: Fluorescence microscopy utilizing multiple low-energy photons to produce the excitation event of the fluorophore. Multiphoton microscopes have a simplified optical path in the emission side due to the lack of an emission pinhole, which is necessary with normal confocal microscopes. Ultimately this allows spatial isolation of the excitation event, enabling deeper imaging into optically thick tissue, while restricting photobleaching and phototoxicity to the area being imaged.Optogenetics: The combination of genetic and optical methods in controlling specific events with temporal precision in targeted cells of a functioning intact biological system.Olfactory Receptor Neurons: Neurons in the OLFACTORY EPITHELIUM with proteins (RECEPTORS, ODORANT) that bind, and thus detect, odorants. These neurons send their DENDRITES to the surface of the epithelium with the odorant receptors residing in the apical non-motile cilia. Their unmyelinated AXONS synapse in the OLFACTORY BULB of the BRAIN.Odors: The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Olfactory Nerve: The 1st cranial nerve. The olfactory nerve conveys the sense of smell. It is formed by the axons of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS which project from the olfactory epithelium (in the nasal epithelium) to the OLFACTORY BULB.
Vaughan, M; Quaggin, S (2008). "How Do Mesangial and Endothelial Cells Form the Glomerular Tuft?". Journal of the American ... Mesangial cells aid filtration by constituting part of the glomerular capillary tuft structure that filters fluids to produce ... Mesangial cells form a glomerular functional unit with glomerular endothelial cells and podocytes through interactions of ... Glomerular hypertension causes mesangial cells to stretch which causes induced expression of GLUT1 leading to increased ...
In advanced cases of benign nephrosclerosis the glomerular tufts may become globally sclerosed. Diffuse tubular atrophy and ... All structures of the kidney can show ischemic atrophy although glomerular ischemic atrophy may be patchy. ...
"Structure-stabilizing forces in the glomerular tuft"[1]. J Am Soc Nephrol. 5: 1731-1739. PMID 7787139. Schlöndorff, D. (Junho ... "Renal stromal miRNAs are required for normal nephrogenesis and glomerular mesangial survival" Physiol Rep. 2015 Oct;3(10). pii ... de 1996) "Roles of the mesangium in glomerular function"[2]. Kidney International 49: 1583-1585. DOI:10.1038/ki.1996.229. Phua ...
Glomerular mesangial cells structurally support the tufts. Blood enters the capillaries of the glomerulus by a single arteriole ... The blood is filtered across the capillary walls of this tuft through the glomerular filtration barrier, which yields its ... If a substance has passed through the glomerular capillary endothelial cells, glomerular basement membrane, and podocytes, then ... is the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The glomerulus is a tuft of small blood vessels called capillaries located within ...
The characteristic feature of collapsing glomerulopathy is collapse of glomerular tuft and proliferation and hyperplasia of ... glomerular visceral epithelial cells. Its prognosis is always poor, as it rapidly progresses to chronic kidney disease. There ...
It consists of a glomerulus - a tuft of capillaries composed of endothelial cells, and a glomerular capsule known as Bowman's ... Fluid from blood in the glomerulus is collected in the Bowman's capsule to form "glomerular filtrate", which is then further ... The glomerulus is a small tuft of capillaries containing two cell types. Endothelial cells, which have large fenestrae, are not ... The renal corpuscle filtration barrier is composed of: the fenestrated endothelium of glomerular capillaries, the fused basal ...
The glomerular blood pressure provides the driving force for water and solutes to be filtered out of the blood plasma, and into ... The glomerulus is the network known as a tuft, of filtering capillaries located at the vascular pole of the renal corpuscle in ... The filtering structure (glomerular filtration barrier) has three layers composed of endothelial cells, a basement membrane, ... About one-fifth of the plasma is filtered as the blood passes through the glomerular capillaries; four-fifths continues into ...
The axons of the mitral and tufts cells send signals to the olfactory cortex. Signals from odor sensation are sent from the ... It is made up of 6 layers: olfactory nerve layer, glomerular layer, external plexiform layer, mitral cell layer, internal ... The terminals of the receptor axons synapse with the dendrites of mitral and tufts cells within the glomeruli of the olfactory ... olfactory bulb through mitral and tufts cell axons via the lateral olfactory tract and synapse at the primary olfactory cortex ...
... mitrial/tufted cells and dopaminergic periglomerular cells. From the olfactory bulb, mitral/tufted cells send axons via the ... At the glomerular layer, axons from the olfactory receptor neurons intermingle with dendrites from intrinsic olfactory bulb ... These receptors are bipolar neurons that connect to the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb, traveling through the ...
... and may result in focal necrosis of the glomerular tuft. Clinically, macroalbuminuria (a random urine albumin/creatinine ratio ... Glomerular injury may also be a consequence of direct damage to the glomerular capillaries due to glomerular hyperperfusion. ... Glomerular pathology progresses to glomerulosclerosis, and eventually the renal tubules may also become ischemic and gradually ... Marín R, Gorostidi M, Fernández-Vega F, Alvarez-Navascués R (December 2005). "Systemic and glomerular hypertension and ...
Thickening of Bowman capsule Tubulosclerosis Glomerular capillary tuft (atrophy) Play media The diagnosis of renal artery ... If the stenosis is longstanding and severe, the glomerular filtration rate in the affected kidneys never recovers and (prerenal ...
As a neural circuit, the glomerular layer receives direct input from afferent nerves, made up of the axons from approximately ... Despite dynamic turnover of sensory axons and interneurons, the projection neurons (mitral and tufted neurons) that form ... This may contribute to a more specific output from the olfactory bulb that would closer resemble the glomerular odor map. ... Glomerular Response Archive Leon & Johnson UC Irvine Olfactory Systems Laboratory at University of Utah. ...
... tufted and periglomerular cells in separating the output of mitral and tufted cells in time. It appears that tufted cells ... They typically have a single primary dendrite, which they project into a single glomerulus in the glomerular layer, and a few ... In lower vertebrates, mitral and tufted cells cannot be morphologically distinguished from tufted cells, and their morphology ... Tufted cells project mainly to the anterior olfactory nucleus, a center that also performs comparison between left and right ...
... collects the filtrate from the filtering capillaries of the glomerular tuft, which also contains mesangial cells supporting ... The glomerular blood pressure provides the driving force for water and solutes to be filtered out of the blood plasma, and into ... The glomerular filtrate next moves to the renal tubule, where it is further processed to form urine. The different stages of ... The glomerulus is the network known as a tuft, of filtering capillaries located at the vascular pole of the renal corpuscle in ...
MGN is characterized by a thickened glomerular basement membrane without a hyperproliferation of the glomerular cells. ... Photomicrograph of renal biopsy showing crescent formation and tuft narrowing. Periodic acid silver methenamine stain. ... It is characterised by deposits of IgA in the space between glomerular capillaries.[2]:501[4]:554-555 ... Glomerulonephritis (GN), also known as glomerular nephritis, is a term used to refer to several kidney diseases (usually ...
... and dendrites from the mitral and tufted cells, as well as, from cells that surround the glomerulus such as the external tufted ... The glomerular activation patterns within the olfactory bulb are thought to represent the quality of the odor being detected. ... Wachowiak, M; Shipley, MT (August 2006). "Coding and synaptic processing of sensory information in the glomerular layer of the ... Oka, Y.; Taki, Y.; Touhara, K. (2009). "Nasal airflow rate affects the sensitivity and pattern of glomerular odorant responses ...
Its synapses are located close to the soma of the thalamic neuron, often forming the center of glomerular complexes. The ... The first correspond to the thalamocortical neurons (or principal). They have a "tufted" (or radiate) morphology, as their ...
"Glomerular filtration rate: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia". www.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 2015-07-02.. ... Two glomeruli in diabetic nephropathy: the acellular light purple areas within the capillary tufts are the destructive ... The value of the serum creatinine can be used to calculate the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), which reflects the ... This matrix invades the glomerular capillaries and produces deposits called Kimmelstiel-Wilson nodules. The mesangial cells and ...
... and glomerular filtration rate (GFR).[20] Glomerular hyperfiltration and an aberrant regulation of RAAS lead to increased ... Two glomeruli in diabetic nephropathy: the acellular light purple areas within the capillary tufts are the destructive ... "Glomerular filtration rate: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia". www.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 2015-07-02.. ... Likewise, the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) may progressively fall from a normal of over 90 ml/min/1.73m2 to less ...
Dendritic excitability and calcium signalling in the mitral cell distal glomerular tuft.. Zhou Z1, Xiong W, Zeng S, Xia A, ... A back-propagating action potential was able to trigger a Ca2+ increase throughout the entire glomerular tuft, indicative of ... Corresponding to this fast prepotential was a Ca2+ increase confined locally within the glomerular tuft. In summary, the mitral ... cell distal dendritic tuft possesses both Na+ and Ca2+ voltage-dependent conductances which can mediate glomerular Ca2+ ...
External Tufted Cells: A Major Excitatory Element That Coordinates Glomerular Activity. Abdallah Hayar, Sergei Karnup, Matthew ... External Tufted Cells: A Major Excitatory Element That Coordinates Glomerular Activity. Abdallah Hayar, Sergei Karnup, Matthew ... External Tufted Cells: A Major Excitatory Element That Coordinates Glomerular Activity. Abdallah Hayar, Sergei Karnup, Matthew ... External Tufted Cells: A Major Excitatory Element That Coordinates Glomerular Activity Message Subject (Your Name) has ...
... a higher heterogeneity of glomerular tuft sizes was observable in NTN kidneys at day 14. Many shrunken glomerular tufts (open ... The glomerular tuft volumes at day 14 of NTN are increasing compared with control and day 7 of NTN as indicated via their ... The endothelial label also allowed the quantification of the volume of all glomerular tufts by voxel rendering (Figure 3C). ... The high contrast visibility of the kidney surface and all glomerular tufts facilitated the development of a fully automated ...
In the mouse olfactory system, mitral cells (MCs) and tufted cells (TCs) comprise parallel pathways of olfactory bulb output ... Differences in Glomerular-Layer-Mediated Feedforward Inhibition Onto Mitral and Tufted Cells Lead to Distinct Modes of ... Differences in Glomerular-Layer-Mediated Feedforward Inhibition Onto Mitral and Tufted Cells Lead to Distinct Modes of ... c, d, Spike rasters in a MC (c) and TC (d) before (black/red), during (gray/pink), and after (blue) blocking glomerular-layer- ...
Ballooned tufts were caused by enormous expansion of the sub-endothelial space simultaneously associated with mesangiolysis. ... Glomerular cysts, described in a variety of disorders including thrombotic microangiopathy and diabetes mellitus, are derived ... The morphogenesis of this unusual lesion when induced by MMC differs from that of the glomerular cysts previously reported. ... Severe ballooning of the glomerular tufts was observed in a 65-year-old man who was treated with mitomycin C (MMC) and had ...
Vaughan, M; Quaggin, S (2008). "How Do Mesangial and Endothelial Cells Form the Glomerular Tuft?". Journal of the American ... Mesangial cells aid filtration by constituting part of the glomerular capillary tuft structure that filters fluids to produce ... Mesangial cells form a glomerular functional unit with glomerular endothelial cells and podocytes through interactions of ... Glomerular hypertension causes mesangial cells to stretch which causes induced expression of GLUT1 leading to increased ...
Histopathology of the Glomerular Tuft. A vivid endocapillary inflammation was encountered in many glomeruli on day 3, but, at ... a through e) Podocytes on the tuft and the cells that connect the tuft with Bowmans capsule express WT-1 (a), α3 integrin (b ... b) A podocyte is partly embedded in the crescent and thus mediates a tuft adhesion. The cells in the crescents are not linked ... Kriz W, Gretz N, Lemley KV: Progression of glomerular diseases: Is the podocyte the culprit? Kidney Int 54 : 687-697, 1998. ...
... in the glomerular layer of the adult mouse OB as well as several of their synaptic targets. Both peripheral and serotoninergic ... Hayar, A., Karnup, S., Ennis, M. & Shipley, M. T. External tufted cells: a major excitatory element that coordinates glomerular ... Figure 3: Different populations of glutamatergic neurons in the glomerular area differ in soma size.. ... The dendritic tuft of TOM+ cells extensively arborized individual glomeruli (circular dotted lines in f,g). Some cells had ...
In advanced cases of benign nephrosclerosis the glomerular tufts may become globally sclerosed. Diffuse tubular atrophy and ... All structures of the kidney can show ischemic atrophy although glomerular ischemic atrophy may be patchy. ...
L) Percentage of open capillary area per glomerular tuft. (M) Thickness of glomerular basement membrane (GBM). (N) Plasma ... K) Quantification of PAS-positive mesangial material per total glomerular tuft cross-sectional area. ( ... quantitated the renal pathology in the five Elmo1 genotypes by measuring the fraction of PAS-positive area per glomerular tuft ... Scale bar: 50 μm.) (F-J) Transmission electron microscopy of the glomerular basement membrane in 40-wk-old male mice. (Scale ...
Selected compartment-specific transcripts (WT1 and GLEPP1 for glomerular tuft as well as PAX2 for parietal epithelial cells) ... we are able to separate parietal epithelial cells from glomerular tufts. ... Compartment-specific glomerular gene expression analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded renal biopsies could improve ... For comparison, in unstained sections from a number of 60 glomerular transections upwards, a minimum amount of 157 ng mRNA with ...
3. glomerular tuft 30 FSGS is seen in conditions where the renal mass cant meet the renal demands such as decreased renal mass ... 1. anti-glomerular basement membrane 2. alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. 3. pulmonary alveolar basement membrane. 4. ... The anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies in Goodpasture Disease attract complement producing linear deposits of (1) ... Type II MPGN often recurs in (1), suggesting that glomerular injury is mediated through some unknown humoral factor. ...
... and registries for facilitating translational research in the area of glomerular disease. ... Ron Perrone, Tufts University. *Qualification of diagnostic or severity/stratification biomarkers Dr. Courtney Lias, FDA ... C3 Glomerular Disease Dr. Terry Cook, Imperial College. 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.. Lunch (bag lunch in breakout rooms). 1:00 p.m ... European Registry for Glomerular Diseases. Dr. Charles Pusey, Imperial College. *Nephcure. Dr. Larry Holzman, University of ...
Glomerular sclerosis index (A) and glomerular tuft volume (B) of LETO and OLETF rats. Each bar represents mean±SEM (n=7 or 8 ... The average glomerular tuft volume (Vg) on the same sections was calculated according to the method of Weibel.24 25 The mean ... The average glomerular tuft volume (Vg) of OLETF rats was also greater than that of LETO rats. Both cilazapril (1 and 10 mg/kg ... The OLETF rat showed severe glomerulosclerosis and an increase in glomerular tuft volume compared with the LETO rat. The degree ...
... provide support to the capillary tuft. Urine is formed as blood (bl) is filtered from the capillaries, across the GBM, and ... In this paper, we show that glomerular-selective deletion or overexpression of VEGF-A leads to glomerular disease in mice. ... Development of the glomerular filtration barrier. In the S-shape stage, podocyte precursors (po) express VEGF-A. Endothelial ... Glomerular-specific alterations of VEGF-A expression lead to distinct congenital and acquired renal diseases. ...
However, by 9 weeks of age, the glomerular tufts were retracted with expansion of the mesangial matrix and were surrounded by ... During glomerular development, the podocytes express numerous vascular growth factors such as VEGF-A, while the glomerular ... In this paper, we show that glomerular-selective deletion or overexpression of VEGF-A leads to glomerular disease in mice. ... VSMA, a marker of glomerular mesangial cells during glomerular development, was also absent from null glomeruli, demonstrating ...
metanephric glomerular basement membrane development Source: Ensembl. *metanephric glomerular visceral epithelial cell ... Callithrix jacchus (White-tufted-ear marmoset)Imported. ,p>Information which has been imported from another database using ...
... expansion of the glomerular tuft requires adaptation of the glomerular epithelial cells to cover a wider area of the glomerular ... Glomerular hypertension, abnormal glomerular growth, and progression of renal diseases. Kidney Int. 2000;75(suppl):S15-S21. ... Structure-stabilizing forces in the glomerular tuft. J Am Soc Nephrol. 1995;5:1731-1739. ... We showed that the simultaneous paucity of early glomerular changes including absence of glomerular volume expansion, desmin ...
It appears that podocytes cannot sustain the same degree of growth as the tuft as a whole; podocyte hypertrophy is soon ... Glomerular damage after uninephrectomy in young rats. II. Mechanical stress on podocytes as a pathway to sclerosis.. Nagata M1 ... Concomitant with overall glomerular growth after UNX, a pronounced hypertrophy of podocytes was observed, while the mean number ... Tuft hypertrophy, pseudocyst formation and local capillary expansion cause wide-spread apposition of podocytes to Bowmans ...
... focusing on the glomerular dendritic tuft. The main finding was that the dendritic tuft functions as a single electrical ... A, The fluorescent image of the glomerular tuft in recording position. B, EPSP-related Vm signals from multiple locations as ... 2006) Dendritic excitability and calcium signalling in the mitral cell distal glomerular tuft. Eur J Neurosci 24:1623-1632. ... In some experiments in which the glomerular tuft was situated deeper in the slice causing the reduction in the signal-to-noise ...
... of the glomerular tuft; 2, staining affecting 26 to 50%; 3, staining in ,50%). TM was detected in PLP-fixed sections using ... This study also highlights the critical role of C3a, derived from glomerular C activation, in potentiating glomerular ... C, Few glomerular fibrin(ogen) deposits in Bf−/− mice given Stx2/LPS are present versus wild type mice exhibiting abundant ... Glomerular endothelial expression of P-selectin causes C3 deposits in C57BL/6 mice treated with Stx2/LPS. A, Staining of P- ...
Electron micrograph showing part of the glomerular tuft. A central mesangial area (M) is surrounded by capillary loops (C). ... Glomerular volume was increased in diabetic patients, but surface area of glomerular basement membrane (GBM) underlying the ... For the estimation of glomerular cell number, two adjacent glomerular profiles, 2 μm apart, were selected at a set interval, or ... Density is calculated as the number of cells divided by glomerular volume; therefore an increase in any component of glomerular ...
2006) Dendritic excitability and calcium signalling in the mitral cell distal glomerular tuft. Eur J Neurosci 24:1623-1632. ... Naris occlusion can cause reduction in the size of glomerular tufts, a reduction in dopamine content, and possible synaptic ... rapid synchronization of glomerular output can occur in the apical tuft without requiring bAPs. Because there are ≈15-20 mitral ... 1997) Mitral/tufted cell activity is attenuated and becomes uncoupled from respiration following naris closure. J Neurobiol 33: ...
Adhesion of the glomerular tuft to Bowman capsule (synechiae) is observed. Glomerular hypertrophy is common. Interstitial ... FSGS describes a lesion in which, as seen on LM, discrete segments of the glomerular tuft reveal sclerosis (segmental); some ... A subtype of FSGS, in which the glomerular tufts demonstrate collapse of capillaries (collapsing glomerulopathy) on LM, has a ... Schematic drawing of the glomerular barrier. Podo = podocytes; GBM = glomerular basement membrane; Endo = fenestrated ...
The projects he has worked on so far include: automated segmentation of glomerular tuft region; automated segmentation of lumen ...
  • Glomerulosclerosis and glomerular hypertrophy in OLETF rats were improved by cilazapril and E4177 to a comparable extent. (ahajournals.org)
  • Thus, we tested whether differences exist between consomic MWF-6 SHR and MWF-8 SHR strains in the glomerular expression changes of these proteins and/or early hypertrophy development in comparison with MWF rats. (ahajournals.org)
  • Biochemical and histopathologic investigations of this study indicated that prostodin caused increased blood serum creatinine and urea and Bowman capsule diameter, decreased urinary space, as well as glomerular dilation (glomerular hypertrophy), resulting in disorder in renal function, lack of proper blood treatment, and finally further increase in serum creatinine. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • All structures of the kidney can show ischemic atrophy although glomerular ischemic atrophy may be patchy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Long-term follow up in MWF-6 SHR 8 SHR rats demonstrates the relevance of the absence of glomerular changes in young animals, because double-consomics demonstrate a complete suppression of progressive albuminuria and kidney damage compared with MWF rats despite similar blood pressures. (ahajournals.org)
  • as a first-line test to assess kidney function and using cystatin C or measured glomerular filtration rate (GFR) as confirmatory tests. (gsajournals.org)
  • Here, we show that inactivation of the RAGE gene in a mouse model of diabetic nephropathy results in significant suppression of kidney changes, including kidney enlargement, increased glomerular cell number, mesangial expansion, advanced glomerulosclerosis, increased albuminuria, and increased serum creatinine compared with wild-type diabetic mice. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • The average human kidney faces daunting duty, filtering more than 70 liters of fluid each day through internal structures called glomerular tufts. (eurekalert.org)
  • In healthy individuals, the two collagen proteins that form the fetal glomerular basement membranes switch during normal development to become three different -- and much stronger -- collagens that are then used to build adult kidney membranes. (eurekalert.org)
  • Alpha-1 and -2 collagens are abundant in many parts of the body in addition to the fetal kidney, while the more specialized alpha-3, -4, and -5 collagens that appear in the glomerular filtering unit of the adult kidney are less common. (eurekalert.org)
  • Interestingly, even though the genetic flaw affects only one of the three collagens involved in construction of the glomerular basement membrane of the adult kidney, all three are absent in the kidney membranes of people with Alport syndrome. (eurekalert.org)
  • The glomerular filtration barrier (GFB) is a complex spatial structure within the kidney glomerulis where ultrafiltration takes place. (leica-microsystems.com)
  • Disruption of the PDGF-B or PDGF-Rβ genes in mice leads to the development of lethal hemorrhage and edema in late embryogenesis and absence of kidney glomerular mesangial cells ( 4 , 5 ). (sciencemag.org)
  • PTH acts on bone and kidney to stimulate bone turnover, increase the circulating levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 and calcium and inhibit the reabsorption of phosphate from the glomerular filtrate. (genome.jp)
  • The diagnosis of DDD was based on the ultrastructural finding of a transformation of glomerular basement membranes by ribbon-like, highly electron-dense material and predominant immunofluorescence staining for C3. (asnjournals.org)
  • In the mouse olfactory system, mitral cells (MCs) and tufted cells (TCs) comprise parallel pathways of olfactory bulb output that are thought to play distinct functional roles in odor coding. (nih.gov)
  • We used combined calcium and voltage imaging from the same neuron and computer modeling to investigate signal processing in the mitral cells, focusing on the glomerular dendritic tuft. (jneurosci.org)
  • The innervation and the functional structure of the dendritic tuft is one of the key factors that determine the input-output function of mitral cells. (jneurosci.org)
  • To assess glomerular activity, we used paired somatic and paired dendritic recordings from mitral cells during the first 5 postnatal weeks. (pnas.org)
  • Once the odorant has been bound to a matching receptor(s), a neural signal is produced that travels along the receptor axon through the cribiform layer of the ethmoidal bone to the glomerular enlargement of the mitral cells, which lie in the olfactory bulb. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • We estimated glomerular cell number in 50 normotensive type 1 diabetic patients with raised albumin excretion rate (AER) and investigated any change after 3 years in a subgroup of 16 placebo-treated patients. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • The only pathological abnormality was noted at the highest level and consisted of dilation of the glomerular tuft with protein loss and casts in Bowman's space and renal tubules (Gralla et al. (inchem.org)
  • Schistosomal antigens induce immunological responses which could provoke several forms of glomerular injury known as schistosomal glomerulopathy and that affect 10-15% of infected individuals. (who.int)
  • We here show that the Elmo1 hypermorphs have albuminuria, glomerulosclerosis, and changes in the ultrastructure of the glomerular basement membrane that increase in severity in parallel with the expression of Elmo 1 . (pnas.org)
  • Thus, we hypothesized that treatment with a selective inhibition of HuR function with a small molecule, KH-3, would down-regulate HuR-targeted proinflammatory transcripts thereby improving glomerulosclerosis in experimental nephritis, where glomerular cellular HuR is elevated. (portlandpress.com)
  • Histopathologic analysis of renal biopsy specimens revealed marked extracapillary cell proliferation with pronounced crescent formation, moderate to marked glomerulosclerosis, and only minimal or mild hypercellularity of the glomerular tufts. (annals.org)
  • Analysing the membrane properties and calcium signalling mechanisms in these tiny dendritic branches is crucial for understanding how the glomerular tuft transmits and processes olfactory signals. (nih.gov)
  • The average range of normalized amplitudes of the EPSP-driven Ca 2+ signals from different locations on dendritic branches in the glomerular tuft was relatively narrow and appeared to be independent of the dendritic surface-to-volume ratio. (jneurosci.org)
  • The direct measurement of membrane potentials ( V m ) signals from the dendritic tuft branches is not possible because these structures are too small to tolerate the use of electrodes. (jneurosci.org)
  • Factor B-deficient mice after Stx2/LPS exhibited less thrombocytopenia and were protected against glomerular abnormalities and renal function impairment, indicating the involvement of complement activation via the alternative pathway in the glomerular thrombotic process in HUS mice. (jimmunol.org)
  • A comparison of the efficacy of the copper chelator, trientine, with combined renin angiotensin system (RAS) blockade on the progression of glomerular pathology in the diabetic (mREN-2)27 rat is reported. (ovid.com)
  • Simulations of a glomerular network were used to assess the relationship of the gap-junctional conductance to other membrane conductances. (pnas.org)
  • If you continue to increase in capillary tuft vize blood plasma this filtrate crosses the membrane around the proximal part of the wnt gene development a kispert a and al awqati hence such secreted factors could have a high probability of the. (nationalnewstoday.com)
  • That filtering raises the local concentration of protease enzymes that can slowly digest a critical component of the tufts -- the glomerular basement membrane -- requiring that the membrane be highly resistant to the action of these enzymes. (eurekalert.org)
  • Its name is derived from the characteristic histologic changes including hypercellularity and thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, often leading to a lobular appearance of the glomerular tuft ( picture 1A-B ) [ 1 ]. (uptodate.com)
  • Immunofluorescence showed diffuse deposition of glomerular basement membrane immunoglobulin (Ig)M and complement component C3, with mesangial IgG, but negative for C4, fibrin and IgA. (who.int)
  • Ang II/L-NAME-treated mice showed glomerular ischemia, proteinuria, and necrosis of myocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells with an associated mixed inflammatory response, deposition of loose collagen, and neovascularization. (ahajournals.org)
  • The present study demonstrates that below-normal Elmo1 expression in mice ameliorates the albuminuria and glomerular histological changes resulting from long-standing type 1 diabetes, whereas above-normal Elmo1 expression makes both worse. (pnas.org)
  • Here we investigated the separate genetic influence of RNO6 and RNO8 on early glomerular changes and subsequent albuminuria in single-consomic MWF rats in which RNO6 (MWF-6 SHR ) and RNO8 (MWF-8 SHR ) were replaced by the respective spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) chromosome. (ahajournals.org)
  • Therefore, blocking inhibition originating in the glomerular layer, but not granule-cell-mediated inhibition, reduces MC spike latency at weak stimulation intensities and distinct temporal patterns of odor-evoked responses in MCs and TCs emerge in part due to differences in glomerular-layer-mediated inhibition. (nih.gov)
  • The functional role of C3a was documented by data showing that glomerular fibrin(ogen), platelet clumps, and TM loss were markedly decreased in HUS mice receiving C3aR antagonist. (jimmunol.org)