A cell-cycle phase nonspecific alkylating antineoplastic agent. It is used in the treatment of brain tumors and various other malignant neoplasms. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p462) This substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen according to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985). (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
A class of drugs that differs from other alkylating agents used clinically in that they are monofunctional and thus unable to cross-link cellular macromolecules. Among their common properties are a requirement for metabolic activation to intermediates with antitumor efficacy and the presence in their chemical structures of N-methyl groups, that after metabolism, can covalently modify cellular DNA. The precise mechanisms by which each of these drugs acts to kill tumor cells are not completely understood. (From AMA, Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p2026)
An antineoplastic agent. It has significant activity against melanomas. (from Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed, p564)
A semisynthetic derivative of PODOPHYLLOTOXIN that exhibits antitumor activity. Etoposide inhibits DNA synthesis by forming a complex with topoisomerase II and DNA. This complex induces breaks in double stranded DNA and prevents repair by topoisomerase II binding. Accumulated breaks in DNA prevent entry into the mitotic phase of cell division, and lead to cell death. Etoposide acts primarily in the G2 and S phases of the cell cycle.
The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.
An alkylating nitrogen mustard that is used as an antineoplastic in the form of the levo isomer - MELPHALAN, the racemic mixture - MERPHALAN, and the dextro isomer - MEDPHALAN; toxic to bone marrow, but little vesicant action; potential carcinogen.
An enzyme that transfers methyl groups from O(6)-methylguanine, and other methylated moieties of DNA, to a cysteine residue in itself, thus repairing alkylated DNA in a single-step reaction. EC 2.1.1.63.
The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.
Precursor of an alkylating nitrogen mustard antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent that must be activated in the LIVER to form the active aldophosphamide. It has been used in the treatment of LYMPHOMA and LEUKEMIA. Its side effect, ALOPECIA, has been used for defleecing sheep. Cyclophosphamide may also cause sterility, birth defects, mutations, and cancer.
Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.
Neoplasms of the intracranial components of the central nervous system, including the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. Brain neoplasms are subdivided into primary (originating from brain tissue) and secondary (i.e., metastatic) forms. Primary neoplasms are subdivided into benign and malignant forms. In general, brain tumors may also be classified by age of onset, histologic type, or presenting location in the brain.
Benign and malignant central nervous system neoplasms derived from glial cells (i.e., astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and ependymocytes). Astrocytes may give rise to astrocytomas (ASTROCYTOMA) or glioblastoma multiforme (see GLIOBLASTOMA). Oligodendrocytes give rise to oligodendrogliomas (OLIGODENDROGLIOMA) and ependymocytes may undergo transformation to become EPENDYMOMA; CHOROID PLEXUS NEOPLASMS; or colloid cysts of the third ventricle. (From Escourolle et al., Manual of Basic Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p21)
Small containers or pellets of a solid drug implanted in the body to achieve sustained release of the drug.
A pyrimidine nucleoside analog that is used mainly in the treatment of leukemia, especially acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia. Cytarabine is an antimetabolite antineoplastic agent that inhibits the synthesis of DNA. Its actions are specific for the S phase of the cell cycle. It also has antiviral and immunosuppressant properties. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p472)
A malignant disease characterized by progressive enlargement of the lymph nodes, spleen, and general lymphoid tissue. In the classical variant, giant usually multinucleate Hodgkin's and REED-STERNBERG CELLS are present; in the nodular lymphocyte predominant variant, lymphocytic and histiocytic cells are seen.
A malignant form of astrocytoma histologically characterized by pleomorphism of cells, nuclear atypia, microhemorrhage, and necrosis. They may arise in any region of the central nervous system, with a predilection for the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, and commissural pathways. Clinical presentation most frequently occurs in the fifth or sixth decade of life with focal neurologic signs or seizures.
An inorganic and water-soluble platinum complex. After undergoing hydrolysis, it reacts with DNA to produce both intra and interstrand crosslinks. These crosslinks appear to impair replication and transcription of DNA. The cytotoxicity of cisplatin correlates with cellular arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle.
The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.
An antitumor alkaloid isolated from VINCA ROSEA. (Merck, 11th ed.)
A lignan (LIGNANS) found in PODOPHYLLIN resin from the roots of PODOPHYLLUM plants. It is a potent spindle poison, toxic if taken internally, and has been used as a cathartic. It is very irritating to skin and mucous membranes, has keratolytic actions, has been used to treat warts and keratoses, and may have antineoplastic properties, as do some of its congeners and derivatives.
Any of a group of malignant tumors of lymphoid tissue that differ from HODGKIN DISEASE, being more heterogeneous with respect to malignant cell lineage, clinical course, prognosis, and therapy. The only common feature among these tumors is the absence of giant REED-STERNBERG CELLS, a characteristic of Hodgkin's disease.
Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.
Highly reactive chemicals that introduce alkyl radicals into biologically active molecules and thereby prevent their proper functioning. Many are used as antineoplastic agents, but most are very toxic, with carcinogenic, mutagenic, teratogenic, and immunosuppressant actions. They have also been used as components in poison gases.
Neoplasms of the brain and spinal cord derived from glial cells which vary from histologically benign forms to highly anaplastic and malignant tumors. Fibrillary astrocytomas are the most common type and may be classified in order of increasing malignancy (grades I through IV). In the first two decades of life, astrocytomas tend to originate in the cerebellar hemispheres; in adults, they most frequently arise in the cerebrum and frequently undergo malignant transformation. (From Devita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2013-7; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1082)
An alkylating agent of value against both hematologic malignancies and solid tumors.
A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.
A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.
A synthetic anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid derived from CORTISONE. It is biologically inert and converted to PREDNISOLONE in the liver.
Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.
A semisynthetic derivative of PODOPHYLLOTOXIN that exhibits antitumor activity. Teniposide inhibits DNA synthesis by forming a complex with topoisomerase II and DNA. This complex induces breaks in double stranded DNA and prevents repair by topoisomerase II binding. Accumulated breaks in DNA prevent cells from entering into the mitotic phase of the cell cycle, and lead to cell death. Teniposide acts primarily in the G2 and S phases of the cycle.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
A therapeutic approach, involving chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery, after initial regimens have failed to lead to improvement in a patient's condition. Salvage therapy is most often used for neoplastic diseases.
Antineoplastic antibiotic obtained from Streptomyces peucetius. It is a hydroxy derivative of DAUNORUBICIN.
Therapeutic act or process that initiates a response to a complete or partial remission level.
The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.
A malignant neoplasm derived from cells that are capable of forming melanin, which may occur in the skin of any part of the body, in the eye, or, rarely, in the mucous membranes of the genitalia, anus, oral cavity, or other sites. It occurs mostly in adults and may originate de novo or from a pigmented nevus or malignant lentigo. Melanomas frequently metastasize widely, and the regional lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and brain are likely to be involved. The incidence of malignant skin melanomas is rising rapidly in all parts of the world. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, p2445)
Preparative treatment of transplant recipient with various conditioning regimens including radiation, immune sera, chemotherapy, and/or immunosuppressive agents, prior to transplantation. Transplantation conditioning is very common before bone marrow transplantation.
An antineoplastic antimetabolite with immunosuppressant properties. It is an inhibitor of TETRAHYDROFOLATE DEHYDROGENASE and prevents the formation of tetrahydrofolate, necessary for synthesis of thymidylate, an essential component of DNA.
Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.
Malformations of organs or body parts during development in utero.
The branch of pharmacology that deals directly with the effectiveness and safety of drugs in humans.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
A state in western Australia. Its capital is Perth. It was first visited by the Dutch in 1616 but the English took possession in 1791 and permanent colonization began in 1829. It was a penal settlement 1850-1888, became part of the colonial government in 1886, and was granted self government in 1890. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1329)
An infant during the first month after birth.
The two dimensional measure of the outer layer of the body.
A standardized nomenclature for clinical drugs and drug delivery devices. It links its names to many of the drug vocabularies commonly used in pharmacy management.
Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. Through basic and clinical biomedical research and training, it conducts and supports research with the objective of cancer prevention, early stage identification and elimination. This Institute was established in 1937.
Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.
... has a long time to nadir (the time when white blood cells reach their lowest number). Unlike carmustine, lomustine is ...
Chloro ethyl nitroso urea (CENU), specifically carmustine (BCNU), are crosslinking agents that are widely used in chemotherapy ...
Gliadel Wafer (Carmustine), for cancer, now owned by Arbor Pharmaceuticals. Jevtana (Cabazitaxel), for prostate cancer. Kevzara ...
At therapeutic doses, those side effects are usually relatively milder compared with carmustine and lomustine. Pokrovskiĭ VS, ...
BiCNU (carmustine). *CeeNU (lomustine). *Droxia/Hydrea (hydroxycarbamide). *Empliciti (Elotuzumab). *Erbitux (cetuximab). * ...
... carmustine, and etoposide followed by autologous bone marrow transplantation for relapsed Hodgkin's disease". J. Clin. Oncol. 9 ...
Nitrosoureas include N-Nitroso-N-methylurea (MNU), carmustine (BCNU), lomustine (CCNU) and semustine (MeCCNU), fotemustine and ...
Carmustine (,250 mg/m2). *CBV. *Cyclophosphamide (,1500 mg/m2). *Dacarbazine ...
cyclophosphamide, BCNU (carmustine), VP-16 (etoposide) lymphoma CHOEP cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin (doxorubicin), ...
Other compounds used in cancer chemotherapy that have the ability to form ICLs are cisplatin, mitomycin C, carmustine, and ...
... carmustine) for brain tumors into the Eisai product portfolio. In 2009, Eisai received the Corporate Award from the National ... carmustine) - Treatment for Brain Tumors Lenvima (lenvatinib) - Thyroid Cancer or Kidney Cancer Aricept accounted for 40% of ...
CBV refers to Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), BCNU (carmustine), and VP-16 (etoposide), three drugs in a chemotherapy regimen ...
90Y-Daclizumab (Anti-CD25), High-Dose Carmustine, Etoposide, Cytarabine, and Melphalan Chemotherapy and Autologous ...
... carmustine, facilitates the safe treatment of glioblastoma in an animal model. This drug, like many others, normally requires ...
... gel and capsules Carmustine (BCNU, a nitrosourea) Mechlorethamine (Nitrogen Mustard) Phototherapy (Broad & Narrow Band UVB or ...
Several drugs such as procarbazine, streptozotocin, BCNU (carmustine), and temozolamide are designed to remodel DNA to reverse ...
High-dose chemotherapy using cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and carmustine with hematologic stem-cell support or marrow support ...
... carmustine, melphalan, and prednisone alternating with vincristine, carmustine, doxorubicin, and prednisone. The treatment of ...
... carmustine). Also, some medicinal drugs used in cardiovascular medicine can lead to pulmonary toxicity frequently or very ...
Busulfan L01AB02 Treosulfan L01AB03 Mannosulfan L01AC01 Thiotepa L01AC02 Triaziquone L01AC03 Carboquone L01AD01 Carmustine ...
ABVD AC BEP Cisplatin Carmustine (>250 mg/m2) CBV Cyclophosphamide (>1500 mg/m2) Dacarbazine Mechlorethamine MOPP/COPP/BEACOPP ...
Carmustine) (1977) Cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (Cisplatin) (1978) Mitoxantrone (Novantrone) (1988) Carboplatin (Paraplatin) ( ...
... carmustine, methotrexate, and bleomycin) Hypersensitivity pneumonitis EVALI Radiation pneumonitis Acute interstitial ...
... carmustine - carnitine - carotenoid - carzelesin - case report - case series - case-control study - caspofungin acetate - ... polifeprosan 20 carmustine implant - poly-ICLC - polyglutamate camptothecin - polyglutamate paclitaxel - polymerase chain ...
... carmustine (INN) Carnation Instant Breakfast carnidazole (INN) carnitine (INN) Carnitor carocainide (INN) Caroid carotegrast ( ...
Arabinopyranosyl-N-methyl-N-nitrosourea Carmustine Chlorozotocin Ethylnitrosourea Fotemustine Lomustine N-Nitroso-N-methylurea ... Examples include: Arabinopyranosyl-N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (Aranose) Carmustine (BCNU, BiCNU) Chlorozotocin Ethylnitrosourea ( ...
... including carmustine, lomustine, dacarbazine developed by Y Fulmer Shealy, fludarabine, amifostine, clofarabine and the latest ...
Some drugs used in stomach cancer treatment have included: fluorouracil or its analog capecitabine, BCNU (carmustine), methyl- ...
... carmustine related pulmonary fibrosis, respiratory broncholitis associated with interstitial lung disease. Lower lung ...
"Carmustine". Drug Information Portal. U.S. National Library of Medicine. "Carmustine Implant". MedlinePlus. Medicine portal. ... "Bicnu- carmustine kit". DailyMed. Retrieved 27 February 2021. "Gliadel- carmustine wafer". DailyMed. Retrieved 27 February 2021 ... Carmustine, sold under the brand name BiCNU among others, is a medication used mainly for chemotherapy. It is a nitrogen ... Carmustine for injection was marketed under the name BiCNU by Bristol-Myers Squibb and now[when?] by Emcure Pharmaceuticals. In ...
Carmustine: learn about side effects, dosage, special precautions, and more on MedlinePlus ... Before receiving carmustine injection,. *tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to carmustine or any of the ... Carmustine injection is used to treat certain types of brain tumors. Carmustine injection is also used along with prednisone to ... You should not become pregnant while you are receiving carmustine injection. If you become pregnant while receiving carmustine ...
Carmustine Implant: learn about side effects, dosage, special precautions, and more on MedlinePlus ... Before receiving carmustine implant,. *tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to carmustine or any of the ... If you become pregnant while receiving carmustine implant, call your doctor. Carmustine may harm the fetus. ... Carmustine implant comes as a small wafer that is placed in the brain by a doctor during surgery to remove the brain tumor. The ...
This page contains brief information about carmustine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this drug ... Carmustine is also available in a different form called carmustine implant. For more information, see the Drug Information ... More About Carmustine. Definition from the NCI Drug Dictionary - Detailed scientific definition and other names for this drug. ... This page contains brief information about carmustine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this drug ...
Find information about Carmustine including usage and side effects. Browse our Drug Dictionary for generic drug names and brand ... Carmustine may damage some tissues and cause scarring around the injection site if it seeps out of the vein into which it is ... Carmustine is FDA approved to treat people who have myeloma (in combination with prednisone); relapsed or refractory Hodgkin ... Patients Disease Information Treatment Types of Treatment Chemotherapy and Other Drug Therapies Drug Listings Carmustine ...
CARMUSTINE, BCNU (kar MUS teen) is a chemotherapy drug. It interferes with the growth of rapidly growing cells like cancer ... Carmustine, BCNU injection. What is this medicine?. CARMUSTINE, BCNU (kar MUS teen) is a chemotherapy drug. It interferes with ... an unusual or allergic reaction to carmustine, BCNU, other chemotherapy, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives ...
CARMUSTINE (UNII: U68WG3173Y) (CARMUSTINE - UNII:U68WG3173Y). CARMUSTINE. 100 mg in 30 mL. ... BiCNU® (carmustine for injection). Each package includes a vial containing 100 mg carmustine and a vial containing 3 mL sterile ... The mechanism of action of carmustine is not fully understood. While carmustine alkylates DNA and RNA, it is not cross- ... BiCNU®(carmustine for injection) is indicated as palliative therapy as a single agent or in established combination therapy in ...
Easy-to-read patient leaflet for Carmustine Intracranial Implant. Includes indications, proper use, special instructions, ... Carmustine Intracranial Implant. Generic Name: Carmustine Intracranial Implant (kar MUS teen). Brand Name: Gliadel ... What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Carmustine Intracranial Implant?. *If you have an allergy to carmustine or any ... How do I store and/or throw out Carmustine Intracranial Implant?. *If you need to store carmustine intracranial implant at home ...
Carmustine (BiCNU) chemotherapy side effects, how its given, how it works, precautions and self care tips for treatment of ... The carmustine wafer allows for delivery of the drug directly to the site of the brain tumor. (See separate listing "carmustine ... How Carmustine Is Given:. *Carmustine is usually given by an infusion into a vein (intravenous, IV). ... Monitoring and Testing While Taking Carmustine:. You will be checked regularly by your doctor while you are taking carmustine, ...
Carmustine is a chemotherapy drug used mostly for brain tumours. Find out about how you have it, possible side effects and ... Carmustine (BCNU). Carmustine is a chemotherapy drug and is also known by its brand name, BCNU. ... You usually have carmustine as a course of several cycles of treatment. Your treatment plan depends on what type of cancer you ... You have carmustine into your bloodstream (intravenously). Drugs into your bloodstream You have the treatment through a drip ...
Detailed Carmustine dosage information for adults. Includes dosages for Multiple Myeloma, Brain/Intracranial Tumor, non- ... polifeprosan 20 with carmustine implant (brand name = Gliadel Wafer):. Each wafer contains 7.7 mg of carmustine, resulting in a ... polifeprosan 20 with carmustine implant (brand name = Gliadel Wafer):. Each wafer contains 7.7 mg of carmustine, resulting in a ... Local soft tissue toxicity has been reported following extravasation of carmustine. Infiltration of carmustine may result in ...
Find patient medical information for carmustine injection on WebMD including its uses, side effects and safety, interactions, ... You should not become pregnant while using carmustine. Carmustine may harm an unborn baby. Women should ask about reliable ... Who should not take Carmustine Solution, Reconstituted (Recon Soln)? * Does Carmustine Solution, Reconstituted (Recon Soln) ... Before using carmustine, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This ...
Carmustine injection is used alone or together with other medicines to treat certain type of brain tumors (eg, glioblastoma, ... Carmustine belongs to the group of alkylating agents. It interferes with the growth of cancer cells, which are eventually ... Since the growth of normal body cells may also be affected by carmustine, other effects may occur. Some of these may be serious ... Before you begin treatment with carmustine, you and your doctor should talk about the benefits this medicine will do as well as ...
Read the side effects of Polifeprosan 20 with Carmustine as described in the medical literature. In case of any doubt consult ... Side effect(s) of Polifeprosan 20 with Carmustine Read the side effects of Polifeprosan 20 with Carmustine as described in the ... Polifeprosan 20 with Carmustine - Information. Polifeprosan 20 with Carmustine is an antineoplastic agent, prescribed for brain ...
... biodegradable wafer containing the agent carmustine with antineoplastic activity. Used to deliver drug directly into a brain ... the wafer is made of a biodegradable poly-anhydride copolymer and contains the nitrosourea carmustine. ... carmustine implant A synthetic, biodegradable wafer containing the agent carmustine with antineoplastic activity. Used to ... Carmustine also carbamoylates proteins, including DNA repair enzymes, resulting in an enhanced cytotoxic effect. Carmustine is ...
The manufacturer recommends that breastfeeding be discontinued during carmustine therapy and for 1 month after the last dose. ... No information is available on the use of carmustine during breastfeeding. Most sources consider breastfeeding to be ... contraindicated during maternal antineoplastic drug therapy, especially alkylating agents such as carmustine.[1] ... Carmustine - Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed). Carmustine - Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed). ...
Carmustine is used to treat brain tumors, Hodgkins disease, multiple myeloma, and non-Hodgkins lymphoma. Carmustine is ... Carmustine may also be used for purposes not listed... ... Carmustine is a cancer medicine that interferes with the growth ... What is carmustine?. Carmustine is a cancer medicine that interferes with the growth and spread of cancer cells in the body. ... How is carmustine given?. Carmustine is injected into a vein through an IV. A healthcare provider will give you this injection ...
Carmustine Implants in Treating Patients With Brain Metastases. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... Carmustine. Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating. Alkylating Agents. Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action. ... PURPOSE: Phase II trial to study the effectiveness of implanted carmustine wafers in treating patients who have brain ... OUTLINE: Patients receive up to 8 polifeprosan 20 with carmustine implants (Gliadel wafers) implanted in the resected tumor ...
Drug Information available for: Carmustine Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center resources: Glioblastoma Glioma Brain ... Dose escalation of carmustine in surgically implanted polymers in patients with recurrent malignant glioma: a New Approaches to ... Carmustine in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma. This study has been completed. ... At the time of surgery, groups of 6 patients receive up to 8 polifeprosan 20 wafers containing increasing doses of carmustine ...
Carmustine (BCNU) is an anticancer drug known to produce pulmonary fibrosis as a side effect within three years of treatment. ... Carmustine chemotherapy in childhood causes lung fibrosis that may remain asymptomatic for many years or become symptomatic at ... Active lung fibrosis up to 17 years after chemotherapy with carmustine (BCNU) in childhood.. ODriscoll BR1, Hasleton PS, ... To investigate the clinical range of this side effect, we studied the survivors among 31 children treated with carmustine for ...
Carmustine, BCNU injection. What is this medicine?. CARMUSTINE, BCNU (kar MUS teen) is a chemotherapy drug. It interferes with ... an unusual or allergic reaction to carmustine, BCNU, other chemotherapy, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives ...
No known hypersensitivity to carmustine or Gliadel wafers. - No other serious concurrent medical illness or infection. PRIOR ... OUTLINE: Patients receive up to 8 polifeprosan 20 with carmustine implants (Gliadel wafers). implanted in the resected tumor ... tumors undergoing surgical resection treated with polifeprosan 20 with carmustine. implant (Gliadel wafers).. - Determine the ...
Evidence-based recommendations on carmustine implants Gliadel) and temozolomide (Temodal) for newly diagnosed high-grade glioma ... Carmustine implants and temozolomide for the treatment of newly diagnosed high-grade glioma. Technology appraisal guidance [ ... Evidence-based recommendations on carmustine implants (Gliadel) and temozolomide for treating newly diagnosed high-grade glioma ...
Carmustine applied locally in a biodegradable polymer at the time of primary operation, seems to have a favorable effect on the ... Interstitial chemotherapy with carmustine-loaded polymers for high-grade gliomas: a randomized double-blind study Neurosurgery ... Conclusion: Carmustine applied locally in a biodegradable polymer at the time of primary operation, seems to have a favorable ... Objective: To find out the effect of carmustine (bischloroethyl-nitrosourea) combined with a biodegradable polymer in the ...
Combination Therapy with AKT3 and PI3KCA siRNA Enhances the Antitumor Effect of Temozolomide and Carmustine in T98G ...
Evidence-based recommendations on carmustine implants Gliadel) and temozolomide (Temodal) for newly diagnosed high-grade glioma ... Carmustine implants. 3.1 Carmustine implants (Gliadel, Link Pharmaceuticals) are biodegradable copolymer discs impregnated with ... Carmustine implants and temozolomide for the treatment of newly diagnosed high-grade glioma. Technology appraisal guidance [ ... 3.2 Carmustine implants have a UK marketing authorisation for the treatment of newly diagnosed high-grade malignant glioma as ...
90 minutes weekly on weeks 1-4 and carmustine IV over 1 hour on weeks 1-6. Treatment. continues in the absence of disease ... Determine the toxic effects of irinotecan and carmustine in these patients.. OUTLINE: This is a dose escalation study of ... since prior chemotherapy No prior irinotecan or carmustine treatment failure No more than. 1 prior chemotherapy regimen ... combination with a fixed dose of carmustine in patients with recurrent primary malignant. glioma. II. ...
Carmustine Administer carmustine (irritant):. *via IV infusion over 2 hours *infusion of less than 2 hours may lead to ... Carmustine. 100 mg/m2 IV infusion. 4. Filgrastim ****. 5 micrograms/kg Subcut. 5 and 16 and continue daily until ANC> 1 x 109/L ... Carmustine. 100 mg/m2 IV infusion. 4. Filgrastim ****. 5 micrograms/kg Subcut. 5 and 16 and continue daily until ANC> 1 x 109/L ... Carmustine. 100 mg/m2 (IV infusion) in 500 mL glucose 5% over 2 hours (in non-PVC containers only). ...
... What is this medicine?. CARMUSTINE, BCNU (kar MUS teen) is a chemotherapy drug. It interferes ... an unusual or allergic reaction to carmustine, BCNU, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives ...
  • Bilateral blindness and lumbosacral myelopathy associated with high-dose carmustine and cisplatin therapy. (symptoma.com)
  • 6. Give antibiotics or antivir- als varies with drug dartmouth regimen: Dacar- bazine (dtic), carmustine, cisplatin, and the distal aspect of the nose is divided in the midline. (georgehahn.com)
  • CBD and carmustine (BCNU) in combination overcame the high resistance of GSCs to BCNU treatment, by inducing apoptotic cell death. (stemcellsciencenews.com)
  • Patients with mycosis fungoides confirmed by a skin biopsy - Stage I or IIA patients must have been treated previously with prior topical therapies including PUVA, UVB, topical steroids, but not NM within the past 2 years, or topical carmustine (BCNU) - Patients must be otherwise healthy with acceptable organ function. (stanfordhealthcare.org)
  • What is Carmustine (Injection/Implant)(Implant,Intravenous) used for? (everydayhealth.com)
  • Receiving carmustine injection may increase your risk of developing other cancers, such as leukemia. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Do not breastfeed while receiving carmustine injection , or for at least 7 days after carmustine implant placement. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Can I take Carmustine (Injection/Implant)(Implant,Intravenous) if I'm pregnant or breastfeeding? (everydayhealth.com)
  • Use Carmustine (Injection/Implant)(Implant,Intravenous) exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Carmustine injection is given as an infusion into a vein, usually once every 6 weeks. (everydayhealth.com)
  • BiCNU (carmustine for injection) should be administered under the supervision of a qualified physician experienced in the use of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. (dr-rath-foundation.org)
  • Carmustine is sometimes given with other cancer medicines, with radiation or after brain surgery. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Carmustine implant is placed in your brain after brain tumor surgery. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Some side effects may not occur many weeks or even years after you receive carmustine. (everydayhealth.com)
  • 1500 mg/m(2), carmustine, dacarbazine, and the combination of an anthracycline and cyclophosphamide (AC) administered to women with breast cancer, as agreed at the MASCC/ESMO Antiemetic Guidelines Update meeting in Copenhagen in June 2015. (sdu.dk)
  • Carmustine is used to treat brain tumors, Hodgkin's disease, multiple myeloma, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (everydayhealth.com)