A bone tumor composed of cellular spindle-cell stroma containing scattered multinucleated giant cells resembling osteoclasts. The tumors range from benign to frankly malignant lesions. The tumor occurs most frequently in an end of a long tubular bone in young adults. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed)
Tumors of bone tissue or synovial or other soft tissue characterized by the presence of giant cells. The most common are giant cell tumor of tendon sheath and GIANT CELL TUMOR OF BONE.
Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.
A scraping, usually of the interior of a cavity or tract, for removal of new growth or other abnormal tissue, or to obtain material for tissue diagnosis. It is performed with a curet (curette), a spoon-shaped instrument designed for that purpose. (From Stedman, 25th ed & Dorland, 27th ed)
Multinucleated masses produced by the fusion of many cells; often associated with viral infections. In AIDS, they are induced when the envelope glycoprotein of the HIV virus binds to the CD4 antigen of uninfected neighboring T4 cells. The resulting syncytium leads to cell death and thus may account for the cytopathic effect of the virus.
A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.
An epithelial neoplasm characterized by unusually large anaplastic cells. It is highly malignant with fulminant clinical course, bizarre histologic appearance and poor prognosis. It is most common in the lung and thyroid. (From Stedman, 25th ed & Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
A non-neoplastic inflammatory lesion, usually of the jaw or gingiva, containing large, multinucleated cells. It includes reparative giant cell granuloma. Peripheral giant cell granuloma refers to the gingiva (giant cell epulis); central refers to the jaw.
A systemic autoimmune disorder that typically affects medium and large ARTERIES, usually leading to occlusive granulomatous vasculitis with transmural infiltrate containing multinucleated GIANT CELLS. The TEMPORAL ARTERY is commonly involved. This disorder appears primarily in people over the age of 50. Symptoms include FEVER; FATIGUE; HEADACHE; visual impairment; pain in the jaw and tongue; and aggravation of pain by cold temperatures. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed)
A neoplasm composed entirely of GRANULOSA CELLS, occurring mostly in the OVARY. In the adult form, it may contain some THECA CELLS. This tumor often produces ESTRADIOL and INHIBIN. The excess estrogen exposure can lead to other malignancies in women and PRECOCIOUS PUBERTY in girls. In rare cases, granulosa cell tumors have been identified in the TESTES.
The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.
Fibrous blood-filled cyst in the bone. Although benign it can be destructive causing deformity and fractures.
The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.
The bone of the lower leg lateral to and smaller than the tibia. In proportion to its length, it is the most slender of the long bones.
Neoplasms composed of primordial GERM CELLS of embryonic GONADS or of elements of the germ layers of the EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the gonads or present in an embryo or FETUS.
The outer shorter of the two bones of the FOREARM, lying parallel to the ULNA and partially revolving around it.
A sarcoma originating in bone-forming cells, affecting the ends of long bones. It is the most common and most malignant of sarcomas of the bones, and occurs chiefly among 10- to 25-year-old youths. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Unusual tumor affecting any site of the body, but most often encountered in the head and neck. Considerable debate has surrounded the histogenesis of this neoplasm; however, it is considered to be a myoblastoma of, usually, a benign nature. It affects women more often than men. When it develops beneath the epidermis or mucous membrane, it can lead to proliferation of the squamous cells and mimic squamous cell carcinoma.
A usually benign tumor composed of cells which arise from chondroblasts or their precursors and which tend to differentiate into cartilage cells. It occurs primarily in the epiphyses of adolescents. It is relatively rare and represents less than 2% of all primary bone tumors. The peak incidence is in the second decade of life; it is about twice as common in males as in females. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1846)
Five fused VERTEBRAE forming a triangle-shaped structure at the back of the PELVIS. It articulates superiorly with the LUMBAR VERTEBRAE, inferiorly with the COCCYX, and anteriorly with the ILIUM of the PELVIS. The sacrum strengthens and stabilizes the PELVIS.
Neoplasms of whatever cell type or origin, occurring in the extraskeletal connective tissue framework of the body including the organs of locomotion and their various component structures, such as nerves, blood vessels, lymphatics, etc.
Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.
Tumors or cancer of the TESTIS. Germ cell tumors (GERMINOMA) of the testis constitute 95% of all testicular neoplasms.
The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.
The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.
Gonadal neoplasm composed entirely of SERTOLI CELLS or may have a component of GRANULOSA CELLS. Some of the Sertoli cell tumors produce ESTROGEN or ANDROGENS, but seldom in sufficient quantity to cause clinical symptoms such as FEMINIZATION or masculinization (VIRILISM).
Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.
Outgrowths of synovial membrane composed of villi and fibrous nodules characterized histologically by hemosiderin- and lipid-containing macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. It usually occurs in the knee.
Gonadal interstitial or stromal cell neoplasm composed of only LEYDIG CELLS. These tumors may produce one or more of the steroid hormones such as ANDROGENS; ESTROGENS; and CORTICOSTEROIDS. Clinical symptoms include testicular swelling, GYNECOMASTIA, sexual precocity in children, or virilization (VIRILISM) in females.
Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.
A malignant neoplasm of the germinal tissue of the GONADS; MEDIASTINUM; or pineal region. Germinomas are uniform in appearance, consisting of large, round cells with vesicular nuclei and clear or finely granular eosinophilic-staining cytoplasm. (Stedman, 265th ed; from DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, pp1642-3)
Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.
The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.
Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.
The bones of the free part of the lower extremity in humans and of any of the four extremities in animals. It includes the FEMUR; PATELLA; TIBIA; and FIBULA.
Inflammation of the synovial lining of a tendon sheath. Causes include trauma, tendon stress, bacterial disease (gonorrhea, tuberculosis), rheumatic disease, and gout. Common sites are the hand, wrist, shoulder capsule, hip capsule, hamstring muscles, and Achilles tendon. The tendon sheaths become inflamed and painful, and accumulate fluid. Joint mobility is usually reduced.
Fibrous bands or cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE at the ends of SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS that serve to attach the MUSCLES to bones and other structures.
The largest of three bones that make up each half of the pelvic girdle.
Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.
The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.
A large multinuclear cell associated with the BONE RESORPTION. An odontoclast, also called cementoclast, is cytomorphologically the same as an osteoclast and is involved in CEMENTUM resorption.
A benign tumor composed, wholly or in part, of cells with the morphologic characteristics of HISTIOCYTES and with various fibroblastic components. Fibrous histiocytomas can occur anywhere in the body. When they occur in the skin, they are called dermatofibromas or sclerosing hemangiomas. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p1747)
Neoplasms of the bony part of the skull.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Tumors or cancer located in muscle tissue or specific muscles. They are differentiated from NEOPLASMS, MUSCLE TISSUE which are neoplasms composed of skeletal, cardiac, or smooth muscle tissue, such as MYOSARCOMA or LEIOMYOMA.
Diseases of BONES.
Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
A slowly growing malignant neoplasm derived from cartilage cells, occurring most frequently in pelvic bones or near the ends of long bones, in middle-aged and old people. Most chondrosarcomas arise de novo, but some may develop in a preexisting benign cartilaginous lesion or in patients with ENCHONDROMATOSIS. (Stedman, 25th ed)
An antiseptic and disinfectant aromatic alcohol.
Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.
The growth and development of bones from fetus to adult. It includes two principal mechanisms of bone growth: growth in length of long bones at the epiphyseal cartilages and growth in thickness by depositing new bone (OSTEOGENESIS) with the actions of OSTEOBLASTS and OSTEOCLASTS.
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.
The total amount (cell number, weight, size or volume) of tumor cells or tissue in the body.
A radiosensitive, malignant neoplasm of the testis, thought to be derived from primordial germ cells of the sexually undifferentiated embryonic gonad. There are three variants: classical (typical), the most common type; anaplastic; and spermatocytic. The classical seminoma is composed of fairly well differentiated sheets or cords of uniform polygonal or round cells (seminoma cells), each cell having abundant clear cytoplasm, distinct cell membranes, a centrally placed round nucleus, and one or more nucleoli. In the female, a grossly and histologically identical neoplasm, known as dysgerminoma, occurs. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.
The surgical fixation of a joint by a procedure designed to accomplish fusion of the joint surfaces by promoting the proliferation of bone cells. (Dorland, 28th ed)
An irregular unpaired bone situated at the SKULL BASE and wedged between the frontal, temporal, and occipital bones (FRONTAL BONE; TEMPORAL BONE; OCCIPITAL BONE). Sphenoid bone consists of a median body and three pairs of processes resembling a bat with spread wings. The body is hollowed out in its inferior to form two large cavities (SPHENOID SINUS).
Arteries arising from the external carotid or the maxillary artery and distributing to the temporal region.
A sex cord-gonadal stromal tumor consists of LEYDIG CELLS; SERTOLI CELLS; and FIBROBLASTS in varying proportions and degree of differentiation. Most such tumors produce ANDROGENS in the Leydig cells, formerly known as androblastoma or arrhenoblastoma. Androblastomas occur in the TESTIS or the OVARY causing precocious masculinization in the males, and defeminization, or virilization (VIRILISM) in the females. In some cases, the Sertoli cells produce ESTROGENS.
A malignant tumor of the bone which always arises in the medullary tissue, occurring more often in cylindrical bones. The tumor occurs usually before the age of 20, about twice as frequently in males as in females.
Bones that constitute each half of the pelvic girdle in VERTEBRATES, formed by fusion of the ILIUM; ISCHIUM; and PUBIC BONE.
Nonexpendable items used in the performance of orthopedic surgery and related therapy. They are differentiated from ORTHOTIC DEVICES, apparatus used to prevent or correct deformities in patients.
An unusual and aggressive tumor of germ-cell origin that reproduces the extraembryonic structures of the early embryo. It is the most common malignant germ cell tumor found in children. It is characterized by a labyrinthine glandular pattern of flat epithelial cells and rounded papillary processes with a central capillary (Schiller-Duval body). The tumor is rarely bilateral. Before the use of combination chemotherapy, the tumor was almost invariably fatal. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1189)
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.
A mixed mesenchymal tumor composed of two or more mesodermal cellular elements not commonly associated, not counting fibrous tissue as one of the elements. Mesenchymomas are widely distributed in the body and about 75% are malignant. (Dorland, 27th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1866)
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
A benign tumor of the pancreatic ISLET CELLS. Usually it involves the INSULIN-producing PANCREATIC BETA CELLS, as in INSULINOMA, resulting in HYPERINSULINISM.
Renewal or repair of lost bone tissue. It excludes BONY CALLUS formed after BONE FRACTURES but not yet replaced by hard bone.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A malignant kidney tumor, caused by the uncontrolled multiplication of renal stem (blastemal), stromal (STROMAL CELLS), and epithelial (EPITHELIAL CELLS) elements. However, not all three are present in every case. Several genes or chromosomal areas have been associated with Wilms tumor which is usually found in childhood as a firm lump in a child's side or ABDOMEN.
Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.
Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.
The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.
An alternative to amputation in patients with neoplasms, ischemia, fractures, and other limb-threatening conditions. Generally, sophisticated surgical procedures such as vascular surgery and reconstruction are used to salvage diseased limbs.
Genes that inhibit expression of the tumorigenic phenotype. They are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. When tumor suppressor genes are inactivated or lost, a barrier to normal proliferation is removed and unregulated growth is possible.
Extracellular substance of bone tissue consisting of COLLAGEN fibers, ground substance, and inorganic crystalline minerals and salts.
Polymerized methyl methacrylate monomers which are used as sheets, moulding, extrusion powders, surface coating resins, emulsion polymers, fibers, inks, and films (From International Labor Organization, 1983). This material is also used in tooth implants, bone cements, and hard corneal contact lenses.
A syndrome in the elderly characterized by proximal joint and muscle pain, high erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and a self-limiting course. Pain is usually accompanied by evidence of an inflammatory reaction. Women are affected twice as commonly as men and Caucasians more frequently than other groups. The condition is frequently associated with GIANT CELL ARTERITIS and some theories pose the possibility that the two diseases arise from a single etiology or even that they are the same entity.
Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.
The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.
Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.
A usually small, slow-growing neoplasm composed of islands of rounded, oxyphilic, or spindle-shaped cells of medium size, with moderately small vesicular nuclei, and covered by intact mucosa with a yellow cut surface. The tumor can occur anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract (and in the lungs and other sites); approximately 90% arise in the appendix. It is now established that these tumors are of neuroendocrine origin and derive from a primitive stem cell. (From Stedman, 25th ed & Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1182)
Neoplasms of the intracranial components of the central nervous system, including the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. Brain neoplasms are subdivided into primary (originating from brain tissue) and secondary (i.e., metastatic) forms. Primary neoplasms are subdivided into benign and malignant forms. In general, brain tumors may also be classified by age of onset, histologic type, or presenting location in the brain.
Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).
Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
Multinucleated cells (fused macrophages) seen in granulomatous inflammations such as tuberculosis, syphilis, sarcoidosis, and deep fungal infections. They resemble foreign-body giant cells (GIANT CELLS, FOREIGN BODY) but Langhans giant cells contain less chromatin and their nuclei are arranged peripherally in a horseshoe-shaped pattern. Langhans giant cells occur frequently in delayed hypersensitivity.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Transplant comprised of an individual's own tissue, transferred from one part of the body to another.
The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.
Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.
Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.
Tumors whose cells possess secretory granules and originate from the neuroectoderm, i.e., the cells of the ectoblast or epiblast that program the neuroendocrine system. Common properties across most neuroendocrine tumors include ectopic hormone production (often via APUD CELLS), the presence of tumor-associated antigens, and isozyme composition.
Proteins that are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. Deficiencies or abnormalities in these proteins may lead to unregulated cell growth and tumor development.
A benign, painful, tumor of bone characterized by the formation of osteoid tissue, primitive bone and calcified tissue. It occurs frequently in the spine of young persons. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed)
A true neoplasm composed of a number of different types of tissue, none of which is native to the area in which it occurs. It is composed of tissues that are derived from three germinal layers, the endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. They are classified histologically as mature (benign) or immature (malignant). (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1642)
The region of the upper limb between the metacarpus and the FOREARM.
All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.
Tumors or cancer of the MEDIASTINUM.
The milieu surrounding neoplasms consisting of cells, vessels, soluble factors, and molecules, that can influence and be influenced by, the neoplasm's growth.
The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.
Breaks in bones.
A malignant tumor arising from the embryonic remains of the notochord. It is also called chordocarcinoma, chordoepithelioma, and notochordoma. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A connective tissue neoplasm formed by proliferation of mesodermal cells; it is usually highly malignant.
A solid tumor consisting of a dense infiltration of MAST CELLS. It is generally benign.
A cartilage-capped benign tumor that often appears as a stalk on the surface of bone. It is probably a developmental malformation rather than a true neoplasm and is usually found in the metaphysis of the distal femur, proximal tibia, or proximal humerus. Osteochondroma is the most common of benign bone tumors.
A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions.
Transplantation between animals of different species.
A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Experimentally induced mammary neoplasms in animals to provide a model for studying human BREAST NEOPLASMS.
Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.
Bone-growth regulatory factors that are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of proteins. They are synthesized as large precursor molecules which are cleaved by proteolytic enzymes. The active form can consist of a dimer of two identical proteins or a heterodimer of two related bone morphogenetic proteins.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.
A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.
Either of a pair of compound bones forming the lateral (left and right) surfaces and base of the skull which contains the organs of hearing. It is a large bone formed by the fusion of parts: the squamous (the flattened anterior-superior part), the tympanic (the curved anterior-inferior part), the mastoid (the irregular posterior portion), and the petrous (the part at the base of the skull).
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.
Tumors or cancers of the KIDNEY.
A rare, aggressive soft tissue sarcoma that primarily affects adolescents and young adults. It is most commonly found in the abdomen.
Proteins, glycoprotein, or lipoprotein moieties on surfaces of tumor cells that are usually identified by monoclonal antibodies. Many of these are of either embryonic or viral origin.
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.
VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.
A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.
Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
... giant cell tumor of bone; joint replacement techniques in the surgical treatment of bone tumors; and the use of musculoskeletal ... Kang L, Manoso MW, Boland PJ, Healey JH, Athanasian EA (November 2010). "Features of grade 3 giant cell tumors of the distal ... Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors About the Knee. The Adult Knee. Editors: J.J. Callaghan, A.G. Rosenberg, H.E. Rubash, P.T. Simion, ... Soft Tissue, Sarcoma and Bone Tumors. Townsend: Sabiston Textbook of Surgery, 16/E. Philadelphia, W.B. Saunders 2000:511-532. ...
Goldring SR, Schiller AL, Mankin HJ, Dayer JM, Krane SM (1986). "Characterization of cells from human giant cell tumors of bone ... "Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath". American Journal of Orthopedics. 34 (3): 116-21. PMID 15828513. Dunker J, Larsson U, ... "Grading of bone tumors by analysis of nuclear DNA content using flow cytometry". The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. ... "A unique multifocal osteoblastoma-like tumor of the bones of a single lower extremity. Report of a case". The Journal of Bone ...
Mutations in H3F3A and H3F3B are also found in chondroblastoma and giant cell tumor of bone. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ... p.Lys27Met were discovered in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG), where they are present 65-75% of tumors and confer a ... December 2013). "Distinct H3F3A and H3F3B driver mutations define chondroblastoma and giant cell tumor of bone". Nature ... Molecular Cell. 5 (6): 917-26. doi:10.1016/S1097-2765(00)80257-9. PMID 10911986. Deng L, de la Fuente C, Fu P, Wang L, Donnelly ...
They re-defined the tumor as a benign chondroblastoma of the bone that is separate from giant cell tumors. However, ... Other differential diagnoses for chondroblastoma consist of giant cell tumors, bone cysts, eosinophilic granulomas, clear cell ... flat bones, skull, etc.). Chondroblastoma was first described in 1927 as a cartilage-containing giant cell tumor by Kolodny but ... Codman believed chondroblastoma to be an "epiphyseal chondromatous giant cell tumor" in the proximal humerus. This view was ...
... "fish bone" known as a herringbone pattern. Poorly differentiated tumors consist in more atypical cells, pleomorphic, giant ... spindle cell squamous cell carcinoma, synovial sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and ... tumour cells may resemble mature fibroblasts (spindle-shaped), secreting collagen, with rare mitoses. These cells are arranged ... Fibrosarcoma is also a rare bone tumor in dogs. In cats, fibrosarcoma occurs on the skin. It is also the most common vaccine- ...
"Human giant cell tumors of bone identification and characterization of cell types". Primary. The Journal of Clinical ... known as giant multinucleated cells, sometimes accompany inflammation and are also implicated in tumor formation. A number of ... Other multinucleate cells in the human are osteoclasts a type of bone cell. Multinucleated and binucleated cells can also be ... The cell nucleus contains all of the cell's genome, except for the small amount of mitochondrial DNA and, in plant cells, ...
Giant cell tumors include giant-cell tumor of bone and giant-cell tumor of the tendon sheath. Medicine portal Anaplastic large- ... cell lymphoma Buttock cell Nosology Giant+Cell+Tumors at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) ... Overview at Mayo Clinic Large Cell and Giant Cell Carcinoma,+Giant+Cell at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject ... Large cell is a term used in oncology. It does not refer to a particular type of cell; rather it refers to cells that are ...
Retinal and choroidal vascular changes Paraganglioma/Pheochromocytoma Pheochromocytoma and Giant Cell Tumor of Bone H3 histone ... larger tumors at initial presentation, older age at initial diagnosis, and a shortened time from primary tumor to presence of ... is a rare tumor of the adrenal medulla composed of chromaffin cells, also known as pheochromocytes. When a tumor composed of ... Metastatic pheochromocytoma is defined as the presence of tumor cells (chromaffin tissue) where they are not normally found. ...
The tumor can be in any bone in the body but are most common in long bones, such as the femur and tibia. They account for 10 to ... and giant cells. The osteoblasts were generally small and regular in shape. Radiographs in osteoid osteoma typically show a ... "Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors: Benign Tumors". Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Archived from the original on 2009-02-28. Retrieved ... "Osteoid Osteoma , BoneTumor.org". www.bonetumor.org. Retrieved 2021-03-24. Sim, F. H.; Dahlin, C. D.; Beabout, J. W. (1975-03- ...
... treatment-induced bone loss, metastases to bone, and giant cell tumor of bone. Denosumab is contraindicated in people with low ... and in November 2010 as Xgeva for the prevention of skeleton-related events in patients with bone metastases from solid tumors ... the FDA approved denosumab for treatment of adults and skeletally mature adolescents with giant cell tumor of bone that is ... Bone remodeling is the process by which the body continuously removes old bone tissue and replaces it with new bone. It is ...
Depending on the features of the tumor cells present (whether they resemble bone cells, cartilage cells, or fibroblast cells), ... within the tumor. Tumor cells are very pleomorphic (anaplastic), some are giant, numerous atypical mitoses. These cells produce ... Family physicians and orthopedists rarely see a malignant bone tumor (most bone tumors are benign). The route to osteosarcoma ... The percentage of tumor cell necrosis (cell death) seen in the tumor after surgery gives an idea of the prognosis and also lets ...
Ovarian germ cell tumor Penile cancer Renal cell carcinoma Renal pelvis and ureter, transitional cell cancer Prostate cancer ... such as giant cell carcinoma, spindle cell carcinoma, and small-cell carcinoma.[citation needed] Chondrosarcoma Ewing's sarcoma ... Splenic marginal zone lymphoma T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia Basal cell carcinoma Squamous cell carcinoma Skin adnexal tumors ... each of which develop from cells originating in mesenchymal cells outside of the bone marrow. Lymphoma and leukemia: These two ...
... and receptor activator of NF-kappaB in giant cell tumor of bone: possible involvement in tumor cell-induced osteoclast-like ... Although it is fairly common for mixed tumors that are seen to contain malignant giant cells to be called "giant-cell ... Both "tumor cell-tumor cell" and "leukocyte-tumor cell" emperipolesis (i.e. active penetration of the latter by the former) is ... Occasionally, a bone metastasis of a GCCL could potentially be mistaken for a primary giant-cell tumor of bone - interestingly ...
"Giant Cell Tumor of Bone". Orthopedics. 37 (2): 112-120. doi:10.3928/01477447-20140124-08. PMID 24679193. Bennett, D. Lee; El- ... They may be associated with bone tumors. The simple bone cyst is a common, benign, fluid-containing lesion, most commonly found ... A bone cyst or geode is a cyst that forms in bone. Types include: Unicameral bone cyst Aneurysmal bone cyst Traumatic bone cyst ... Bloodgood, Joseph C. (August 1910). "Benign Bone Cysts, Ostitis Fibrosa, Giant-Cell Sarcoma and Bone Aneurism of the Long Pipe ...
... diagnose and treat malignant bone tumors. Bloodgood found that "giant-cell sarcoma" were bone tissue reactions to irritants ... Bloodgood was a pioneer in breast-conservation surgery, recommending local excision "when the palpable tumor is small and can ... Bloodgood, Joseph Colt (1910). Benign Bone Cysts, Ostitis Fibrosa, Giant-cell Sarcoma and Bone Aneurism of the Long Pipe Bones ... Bloodgood, Joseph Colt (1920). The Diagnosis and treatment of benign and malignant tumors of bone. s.n. Retrieved 2012-12-31. ...
... a giant cell tumor, or fibrous dysplasia. A giant cell tumor is the most common cause, occurring in 19% to 39% of cases. Less ... Recurrence rate of solid form of tumour is lower than classic form. It is common in age group of 10-30 years. It is second most ... Giant cell tumor of bone Traumatic bone cyst Maroldi, Roberto (2005). Imaging in Treatment Planning for Sinonasal Diseases. ... Unicameral bone cyst Giant cell tumor Telangiectatic osteosarcoma Secondary aneurysmal bone cyst Curettage is performed on some ...
Keratocystic odontogenic tumour Central giant-cell granuloma Odontogenic myxoma While chemotherapy, radiation therapy, ... Recurrence within a bone graft (following resection of the original tumor) does occur, but is less common. Seeding to the bone ... and tumors run larger in females. Ameloblastic fibroma Bone grafting Epithelial cell rests of Malassez List of cutaneous ... Radiographically, the tumour area appears as a rounded and well-defined lucency in the bone with varying size and features. ...
"Human giant cell tumors of bone identification and characterization of cell types". The Journal of Clinical Investigation. 79 ( ... known as giant multinucleated cells, sometimes accompany inflammation[72] and are also implicated in tumor formation.[73] ... Other multinucleate cells in the human are osteoclasts a type of bone cell. Multinucleated and binucleated cells can also be ... Anucleated cells. Human red blood cells, like those of other mammals, lack nuclei. This occurs as a normal part of the cells' ...
Boxers, Boston Terriers and Golden Retrievers are among the breeds that most commonly develop mast cell tumors. Large and giant ... Tumor suppressor genes prevent cells with erroneous cell cycles from replicating. Cancer cells ignore cell cycle regulators ... Dogs can develop carcinomas of epithelial cells and organs, sarcomas of connective tissues and bones, and lymphomas or ... Mast cell tumors are the most common type of skin cancer in canines. Lymphoma Prostate cancer Brain cancer Hemangiosarcoma is a ...
... epithelioid and tumor giant cells. Approximately two thirds of the tumors contain melanin pigment. Clear cell sarcoma, similar ... Furthermore, a chest CT, a bone scan and positron emission tomography (PET) may be part of the tests in order to evaluate areas ... Clear cell sarcoma of the soft tissues in adults is not related to the pediatric tumor known as clear cell sarcoma of the ... Despite the name clear cell sarcoma, the tumor cells do not necessarily need to have clear cytoplasm. The lesion has a ...
Hemosiderin deposition is not a distinctive feature of brown tumors; it may also be seen in giant cell tumors of the bone. ... "Brown Tumor". BoneTumor.org.. ... 1991). "Giant cell tumors of bone containing large amounts of ... Matsushige T, Nakaoka M, Yahara K, Kagawa K, Miura H, Ohnuma H, Kurisu K (August 2008). "Giant cell tumor of the temporal bone ... Histologically, it is impossible to distinguish a Brown tumor of hyperparathyroidism from other giant cell lesions of bone. ...
... giant cell tumor of bone and aneurysmal bone cyst. Malignant primary bone tumors include osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, Ewing's ... Bone tumors may be classified as "primary tumors", which originate in bone or from bone-derived cells and tissues, and " ... Stage 1A bone cancer Stage 1B bone cancer Stage 2A bone cancer Stage 2B bone cancer Stage 3 bone cancer Treatment of bone ... Secondary malignant bone tumors are estimated to be 50 to 100 times as common as primary bone cancers. Primary tumors of bone ...
Giant-cell tumor of bone - Gigli saw - Gilula's Lines - Girdlestone's Procedure - Gorham's disease - Gosselin fracture - ... bone tumours, and congenital limb deformities. Trauma surgery and traumatology is a sub-specialty dealing with the operative ... Bone grafting - Bone healing - Bone metastases - Bone mineral - Bone pathology - Bone remodeling - Bone resorption - Bone tumor ... Bone cutter - Bone cyst - Bone density - Bone disease - Bone fracture - Bone fracture healing - ...
... examples of benign bone tumours include osteoma, osteoid osteoma, osteochondroma, osteoblastoma, enchondroma, giant cell tumor ... Tumors[edit]. Main article: Bone tumour. There are several types of tumour that can affect bone; ... Blood cells that are created in bone marrow include red blood cells, platelets and white blood cells.[34] Progenitor cells such ... Cancellous bone, also called trabecular or spongy bone,[6] is the internal tissue of the skeletal bone and is an open cell ...
Number of glioma polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) associated with vasculogenic mimicry formation and tumor grade in human ... 2012). „Hypoxia inhibits the spontaneous calcification of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Journal of Cellular ... Cancer cell differentiation heterogeneity and aggressive behavior in solid tumors. Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, 117(2), ... 2014). „Generation of cancer stem-like cells through the formation of polyploid giant cancer cells. Oncogene 33: 116-128".. ...
Central Giant Cell Granuloma. *Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor. Histologically. *Orthokeratocyst. *Radicular cyst (particularly ... Yet, ameloblastomas show more bone expansion and seldom show high density areas.[9] ... 2005), World Health Organization Classification of Tumours: Pathology and Genetics of Head and Neck Tumours (PDF), World Health ... 2017), WHO Classification of Head and Neck Tumours, WHO/IARC Classification of Tumours, 9 (4th ed.), Lyon, France: IARC Press, ...
Choroid plexus tumor, Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour, Ependymal tumor, Fibrillary astrocytoma, Giant-cell glioblastoma ... Secondary brain tumors are the most common cause of tumors in the intracranial cavity. The skull bone structure can also be ... A brain tumor occurs when abnormal cells form within the brain.[2] There are two main types of tumors: malignant or cancerous ... Several current research studies aim to improve the surgical removal of brain tumors by labeling tumor cells with 5- ...
Choroid plexus tumor, Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour, Ependymal tumor, Fibrillary astrocytoma, Giant-cell glioblastoma ... Secondary brain tumors are the most common cause of tumors in the intracranial cavity. The skull bone structure can also be ... A brain tumor occurs when abnormal cells form within the brain.[2] There are two main types of tumors: malignant or cancerous ... Commonly, radioactive tracers are uptaken in large volumes in tumors due to the high activity of tumor cells, allowing for ...
... of bone in 1818. GCTs of bone have been described as the most challenging benign bone tumors. ... Cooper and Travers first described giant cell tumor (GCT) ... Giant Cell Tumor of Bone) and Giant Cell Tumor of Bone What to ... 1] giant cell tumors (GCTs) of bone have been labeled the most challenging benign bone tumors. [2] Although benign, GCTs show a ... Treatment of giant-cell tumors of long bones with curettage and bone-grafting. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1999 Jun. 81 (6):811-20. [ ...
... is a benign osteolytic tumour with three main cellular components: multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells, mononuclear ... Denosumab induces tumor reduction and bone formation in patients with giant-cell tumor of bone. Clin Cancer Res Off J Am Assoc ... bone marrow, and giant cell tumors of bone. J Bone Miner Res Off J Am Soc Bone Miner Res. 2006;21:1339-49. doi: 10.1359/jbmr. ... Treatment of giant-cell tumors of long bones with curettage and bone-grafting. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1999;81:811-20.PubMed ...
The metastatic tumor burden decreased significantly after only 3 months of therapy. The size of the metastases has been stable ... i,Case,/i,. A 68-year-old female was diagnosed with giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) metastatic to her lungs. The patient was ... "Malignancy in giant cell tumour," in World Health Organization Classification of Tumours: Pathology And Genetics of Tumours of ... Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a benign yet aggressive lytic tumor of bone occurring in the metaphysis and epiphysis of ...
Giant cell tumor of bone exhibited near-total absence of disease progression during treatment with denosumab (Xgeva), results ... No tumors progressed during treatment with denosumab by investigator assessment.. Three patients had major surgery as ... In this study, giant cell tumor of bone exhibited near-total absence of disease progression during treatment with denosumab ( ... Giant cell tumor of bone is a rare but aggressive osteolytic cancer that causes substantial skeletal morbidity. Typically ...
Giant-cell tumor of the bone accounts for 4-5% of primary bone tumors and about 20% of benign bone tumors. However, ... A number of tumors have giant cells, but are not true benign giant-cell tumors. These include, aneurysmal bone cyst, ... Giant-cell tumor of the bone (GCTOB), is a relatively uncommon tumor of the bone. It is characterized by the presence of ... Imaging of giant cell tumor and giant cell reparative granuloma of bone: radiologic-pathologic correlation". Radiographics. 21 ...
Giant cell tumour of bone, Authors: Ramses G Forsyth, Pancras CW Hogendoorn. Published in: Atlas Genet Cytogenet Oncol Haematol ... can be used as a diagnostic tool for the distinction of giant cell tumor of bone from other giant cell-containing tumors. A ... Bone: Giant cell tumour of bone. Written. 2003-06. Ramses G Forsyth, Pancras CW Hogendoorn. ... Giant cell tumor of bone is a locally aggressive primary bone neoplasm.. ...
Giant cell tumors of bone consist of stromal cells expressing RANKL and osteoclast-like giant cells expressing RANK receptor. ... Giant cell tumour of bone. Current Opinion in Oncology. 2009;21:338-344.. 4 Bone Cancer. American Cancer Society. website. http ... About Giant Cell Tumor of Bone. GCTB is a locally aggressive, benign tumor primarily afflicting younger adults between the ages ... www.cancer.org/Cancer/BoneCancer/DetailedGuide/bone-cancer-what-is-bone-cancer. Accessed June 24, 2013. .. 5 Giant Cell Tumor ...
Giant-cell tumour of bone metastasising to the lungs. A long-term follow-up.. J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1998;80:43-7. [Google ... Metastases from histologically benign giant-cell tumor of bone.. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1984;66:269-74. [Google Scholar] ... Giant cell tumor (GCT) of the bone or osteoclastoma is generally a benign and locally invasive tumor that occurs close to the ... Giant cell tumour of bone with late presentation: Review of treatment and outcome.. J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong). 2002;10:120-8. [ ...
Of the 187 patients whose tumors could be measured, 47 patients had their tumors reduce in size after an average of three ... to treat adults and some adolescents with giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB), a rare and usually non-cancerous tumor. ... FDA Approves Xgeva for Giant Cell Tumor of the Bone. Jun 13, 2013 , Articles , 0 , ... limited range of motion and bone fractures. Rarely, GCTB can transform into a cancerous tumor and spread to the lungs. ...
To our knowledge, this case report is the first to describe an assessment of the transformation of a benign GCT of bone into an ... evaluated by the same medical team.There are only a few case reports and case series of malignancy associated with GCT of bone ... we report a case of transformation of a benign giant cell tumor (GCT) of the calcaneus into an epithelioid angiosarcoma. The ... Giant cell tumors (GCTs) of bone account for about 5% of all primary bone tumors in adults, with a predominance in the third ...
Chemotherapy for Rare Musculoskeletal Tumors Department, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, discusses the long-term efficacy of ... in patients with giant cell tumor of bone. ... in patients with giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB).. The phase II ... Palmerini on Long-term Efficacy of Denosumab in Giant Cell Tumor of Bone. Emanuela Palmerini, MD ... in patients with giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB).. The phase II study enrolled more than 500 patients with GCTB, which is ...
Malignant bone tumors initially classified as osteosarcomas were the only other lesions (n=11) that showed G34W expression. ... Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a locally aggressive subarticular tumor. Having recently reported that H3.3 G34W mutations ... H3F3A (Histone 3.3) G34W Immunohistochemistry: A Reliable Marker Defining Benign and Malignant Giant Cell Tumor of Bone. ... We also determined the incidence of H3.3 G34 mutations in primary malignant bone tumors as assessed by genotype and H3.3 G34W ...
Xgeva was shown to reduce tumor size-of 187 patients with measurable tumors, 47 patients experienced tumor reduction after an ... Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a rare, aggressive, benign osteolytic tumor in which bone destruction is mediated by a ... FDA approves Xgeva to treat giant cell tumor of the bone. [FDA News Release]. U.S. Food and Drug Administration website. ... Xgeva Approved for Treatment of Giant Cell Tumor of the Bone. By ... adults and some adolescents with giant cell tumor of the bone ( ...
... giant cell tumor of. Treatment Bone, giant cell tumor of. Symptoms and causes Bone, giant cell tumor of Prophylaxis Bone, giant ... Giant Cell Tumor , BONETUMOR.ORG. Giant cell tumor accounts for 5 to 9 percent of all primary bony tumors. ... Giant Cell Tumor of Bone. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone. Giant cell tumor accounts for 5 to 9 percent of all primary bony tumors and ... For More Information «Bone, giant cell tumor of». *. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone - Your Orthopaedic Connection - AAOS. Giant cell ...
Giant Cell Tumour of the Bone (GCTB) is a rare, histologically benign but locally aggressive neoplasm of the bone that also has ... 1458P - Trends in Giant Cell Tumour of the Bone and Osteosarcoma Incidence in the Sweden (1958-2011). ... Trends in Giant Cell Tumour of the Bone and Osteosarcoma Incidence in the Sweden (1958-2011) ... Also, lectured for Amgen Ltd (on giant cell tumor of bone).. *Aetiology, epidemiology, screening and prevention ...
Giant cell tumors of bone (GCTBs) are characterized by mononuclear stromal cells and osteoclast-like giant cells; up to 95% ... of miR-30c on giant cell tumor of bone cell metastasis and growth and provide therapeutic targets for giant cell tumor of bone ... Giant cell tumors of bone (GCTB) are intermediate and locally aggressive bone tumor. Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) is a bone ... tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT) or diffuse-type pigmented villonodular synovitis (dtPVNS), and giant cell tumor of bone ( ...
... modeling based on analysis of fifteen primary breast tumors and find that apparent clonal change between two tumor samples can ... Two tumors underwent clonal replacement with treatment, and mathematical modeling indicates these two tumors had resistant ... Our results provide a needed framework to incorporate primary tumor heterogeneity in investigating the evolution of resistance. ... treatment biopsy and multi-region sampling of the post-treatment surgical specimen and apply this measure to five breast tumors ...
Treatment of bone tumours by radiofrequency thermal ablation. Curr Rev Musculoskelet Med. 2009;2(1):43-50pmid:19468917. ... Tumor-Induced Rickets in a Child With a Central Giant Cell Granuloma: A Case Report. Elisa Fernández-Cooke, Jaime Cruz-Rojo, ... Giant cell tumour of soft tissue causing oncogenic osteomalacia: report demonstrating the use of octreotide scintigraphy in ... Tumor-Induced Rickets in a Child With a Central Giant Cell Granuloma: A Case Report ...
Background Whether reconstruction is more beneficial after iliosacral bone tumor resection remains controversial. Because of ... 6 patients had primary benign bone tumors (4 with giant cell tumors, 1 with desmoid tumor, 1 with chondromyxoid fibroma); and 2 ... One patient in group 1B, a 31-year-old woman diagnosed with giant cell tumor of bone, developed a dislocation of the hip joint ... 1 with giant cell tumor, and 1 with desmoid tumor) underwent secondary local surgery, with no further recurrence or distant ...
... benign bone tumor of chondroblastic derivation. Jaffe and Lichtenstein first described the condition in 1943. ... Giant cell tumor of bone. Patients with giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone are typically older than persons with CMF, and the ... Benign cartilaginous tumors of bone: from morphology to somatic and germ-line genetics. Adv Anat Pathol. 2009 Sep. 16 (5):307- ... Diagnostic and therapeutic problems of giant cell tumor in the proximal femur. Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2007 Dec. 127 (10):867- ...
Giant cell bone tumor is one of the common types of giant cell tumor, which is also called large cell tumor. Giant cell bone ... Giant cell bone tumor is a primary bone tumor. Typically, giant cell bone tumor develops near the joints of the knee, wrist, ... giant cell bone tumor accounts. for 5% of all primary bone tumors. Among the benign tumors, 21% of them are giant. cell tumor. ... tumor is a benign, non-cancer tumor. Other two types of giant cell tumors are anaplastic large cell lymphoma and giant cell ...
Giant cell tumor-a primary bone tumor that is malignant (cancerous) only about 10% of the time; most common in the arm or leg ... removal of a sample of bone tissue to test for cancer cells. Excisional (removing the tumor) biopsy for bone tumors may mean ... Bone cancer is a relatively rare disease in which cancer cells grow in the bone tissue. Cancer occurs when cells in the body ( ... When cancer cells travel to the bone from elsewhere, it is called secondary or metastatic cancer to the bone. Types of bone ...
In this study we examined a series of giant cell rich primary bone tumors, aiming to evaluate the possible diagnostic role of ... Giant cell rich sarcomas, Giant cell tumor of bone, Histone 3.3 gene mutations, Malignant giant cell tumor", ... Histone 3.3 Mutations in Giant Cell Tumor and Giant Cell-Rich Sarcomas of Bone. In: Human Pathology. 2017 ; Vol. 68. pp. 128- ... Histone 3.3 Mutations in Giant Cell Tumor and Giant Cell-Rich Sarcomas of Bone. / Righi, Alberto; Mancini, Irene; Gambarotti, ...
The petrous portion of the temporal bone forms a rare location for this tumor. The authors report a case of a large giant cell ... Radical excision of skull base giant cell tumor may be hazardous but if achieved is the optimal treatment and may be curative. ... tumor involving the petrous and squamous portions of the temporal bone in a 26 year old male patient. He presented with right ... Radical excision of the tumor was achieved but facial palsy could not be avoided. ...
... and giant cell tumour of tendon sheath (Nodular tenosynovitis)". The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. British Volume. 94-B (7 ... "Giant cell tumor of soft tissues: A case report of extra-articular diffuse-type giant cell tumor of the quadriceps". ... Tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT) is a group of rare, typically non-malignant tumors of the joints. TGCT tumors often ... effect in tenosynovial giant-cell tumor from activation of CSF1 expression by a translocation in a minority of tumor cells". ...
  • Given the aggressiveness of GCT of bone, recommendations for operative intervention include intralesional curettage with adjuvant therapy (eg, cryotherapy, phenol, argon beam, electrocautery) and placement of bone void fillers (eg, bone graft polymethylmethacrylate). (amjorthopedics.com)
  • We report a case of secondary malignant transformation of GCT of bone 11 years after surgical curettage, cryotherapy, and cementation without adjuvant radiation therapy. (amjorthopedics.com)
  • Also with patients treated with curettage, denosumab seems to facilitate the procedure as a new peripheral bone rim around the tumor was built, though a histologic analysis reveals viable tumor cells persisting in the denosumab-induced bone formation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • But as tumor cells remain in the new-formed bone, the surgical technique of curettage has to be changed from gentle to more aggressive to avoid higher local recurrence rates. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Most of the times, a local curettage is performed, followed by stuffing the bone defect with bone cement or bone graft and prophylactic internal fixation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Most benign giant cell tumors of bone are treated by radical curettage and packing with methyl methacrylate or by bone graft. (merckmanuals.com)
  • 6] F. Vult von Steyern, H. C. Bauer, C. Trovik, A. Kivioja, P. Bergh, P. Holmberg J?rgensen, G. Foller?s and A. Rydholm, "Treatment of Local Recurrences of Giant Cell Tumour in Long Bones after Curettage and Cementing. (scirp.org)
  • 12] G. H. Prosser, K. G. Baloch, R. M. Tillman, S. R. Carter and R. J. Grimer, "Does Curettage without Adjuvant Therapy Provide Low Recurrence Rates in giant-Cell Tumors of Bone? (scirp.org)
  • Curettage and bone grafting is the usual conservative treatment. (nicoledelepine.fr)
  • Typical treatment for giant cell tumors is curettage and packing of the lesions. (wikibooks.org)
  • She also underwent curettage and cementing of distal femoral lesion with prophylactic distal femoral locked plate fixation (Fig ) and curettage and autologous bone grafting for talar lesion. (ipl.org)
  • 6. Rock MG. Curettage of giant cell tumor of bone. (ipl.org)
  • In case of extended curettage, the cavity was filled with cement or bone graft. (ac.ir)
  • Extended curettage or reconstruction with auto graft in grade I and II tumor or en-doprosthesis in higher grade or recurrence of GCTB can give good to excellent functional result in majority of the cases. (edu.np)
  • Treatment of giant-cell tumors of long bones with curettage and bone-grafting. (jbstjournal.com)
  • Intralesional curettage for grades II and III giant cell tumors of bone. (jbstjournal.com)
  • While 31 of 60 patients were treated by curettage of the tumor, 9 of 10 patients with recurrence were treated with curettage rather than surgical resection. (readabstracts.com)
  • The results suggest that surgical resection for giant cell tumor of bone is superior to curettage with bone chip packing. (readabstracts.com)
  • However, when curettage was followed with packing with methylmethacrylate cement rather than bone chips, a relapse rate comparable to that associated with surgical resection was observed. (readabstracts.com)
  • Treatment options include curettage with adjuvant therapy, the use of denosumab, and en bloc resection. (aaos.org)
  • Four patients, all with grade 2 Enneking and Campanacci's classification, were treated by extended curettage and bone grafting, while 5 patients with grade 3 were managed by distal ulnar resection. (ac.ir)
  • Based on our study, which is the largest cohort of GCT of distal ulna, extended curettage, and en bloc resection can be suggested as valuable methods of treatment for grades 2 and 3 tumors, respectively. (ac.ir)
  • The indications for a wide resection were extensive tumor (Campanacci III [ 6 ]) invasion with or without pathological fracture and rapid or large recurrent tumor after intensive curettage. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Rock MG. Curettage of giant cell tumor of bone. (ipl.org)
  • Such destructive lesions were first described by Cooper and Travers [ 2 ] in 1818, but GCTB was not distinguished from other tumors of bone until 1940 [ 3 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • this distinguishes the lesion from other osteogenic lesions which commonly have (benign) osteoclast-type giant cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] On X-ray, giant-cell tumors (GCTs) are lytic/lucent lesions that have an epiphyseal location and grow to the articular surface of the involved bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Malignant bone tumors initially classified as osteosarcomas were the only other lesions (n=11) that showed G34W expression. (ovid.com)
  • Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABC) are expansile tumor-like lesions. (radiologydefinition.com)
  • Benign tumors and tumor-like lesions of synovial tissue. (medscape.com)
  • This article considers the range of neoplastic and nonneoplastic lesions, which histologically contain numerous osteoclastic giant cells, and focuses on several lesions that frequently enter into the differential diagnosis. (ox.ac.uk)
  • On imaging, some aneurysmal bone cyst-like lesions may appear more ominous, having characteristics similar to osteosarcoma, and thus should raise suspicion of telangiectatic osteosarcoma . (merckmanuals.com)
  • Benign giant cell tumors of bone appear as expansile lytic lesions on imaging. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Simple unicameral bone cysts typically appear as well-marginated lesions without reactive sclerosis or an expansile cortex. (merckmanuals.com)
  • The abnormal bone lesions of fibrous dysplasia commonly stop developing at puberty. (merckmanuals.com)
  • In the article Bone Tumors - Differential diagnosis we discussed a systematic approach to the differential diagnosis of bone tumors and tumor-like lesions. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • In this article, which is the first in a series of three, we will discuss the most common bone tumors and tumor-like lesions in alphabethic order. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • On the left the most common ill-defined bone tumors and tumor-like lesions. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • On the left a table with the most common bone tumors and tumor-like lesions in different age-groups. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • Methods: Thirty patients who had two or more separate lesions that had been pathologically confirmed to be giant cell tumors were identified. (elsevier.com)
  • Radiographically, the tumors in long bones manifested as expansive lytic lesions involving the metaphysis and extending into the epiphysis. (elsevier.com)
  • Conclusions: Multicentric giant cell tumors occur more often in younger patients than do solitary giant cell tumors, and they frequently present as synchronous lesions around the knee. (elsevier.com)
  • Giant cell tumors of the bone are uncommon bone tumors which represent around 4-5% of primary bone tumors and 18% of all benign bone lesions. (wikibooks.org)
  • We report a case of young girl with metachronous multicentric giant cell tumors with 5 documented lesions in a monomelic lower limb. (ipl.org)
  • Multicentric giant cell tumor of bone: ten lesions at presentation. (ipl.org)
  • Lesions of the pancreas are fairly common leading to the occurrence of simple cysts, serous cystadenoma or solid tumors. (ipl.org)
  • Glomus tumors under the nail bed are blue appearing lesions caused by blood vessels that when placed under cold water enhance their pain. (healthtap.com)
  • What are bone lesions? (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Bone lesions are areas of bone that are changed or damaged. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Causes of bone lesions include infections, fractures, or tumors. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Most bone lesions are benign, meaning they are not cancerous. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Some bone lesions are cancerous, however, and these are known as malignant bone tumors. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Bone lesions are a masses of tissue that can form in any part of the bone. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Bone lesions can affect any part of the body and develop in any section of bone, from the surface to the bone marrow in the center. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Most bone lesions are benign, not life-threatening, and will not spread to other parts of the body. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • These bone lesions can sometimes metastasize, which is when the cancer cells spread to other parts of the body. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • There are also some diseases and conditions that resemble bone lesions. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Other bone lesions can be treated successfully with medications. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Causes of malignant bone tumors or cancerous bone lesions depend on whether the cancer is primary or secondary. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • What bone conditions might show lesions in the brain? (brainscape.com)
  • Since the local behavior of giant cell tumors can be aggressive and they have a greater risk of local recurrence, some authors advocate en bloc resection and reconstruction for these grade III lesions from the point of view of preventing local recurrence rate and preserving joint function [ 2 , 3 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Central nervous system changes occur as the lesions invade and destroy tissue, and, because the tumors compress the brain, cranial nerves, and cerebral blood vessels, the compression causes cerebral edema and increased intracranial pressure (ICP). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Typical age is 10-25 years of age and lesions commonly occur in the metadiaphysis of long bones, similar to conventional osteosarcoma . (wikibooks.org)
  • this review of bone tumors does not include metabolic or degenerative lesions. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Some lesions, such as solitary bone cysts (Figure 4), enchondromas (Figure 5), EG and Ewing's sarcoma, tend to be centrally located. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Use caution when assessing periosteal reactions, as many benign lesions such as infection, EG (Figure 1), and aneurysmal bone cysts can result in an aggressive-appearing periostitis. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Moreover, while infection, metastatic lesions, and aneurysmal bone cysts typically present with pain, discomfort is rare (in the absence of trauma) with fibrous dysplasia, enchondromas, and solitary bone cysts. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Approximately one year later, she developed local recurrence of the tumor, which was also curetted with additional use of cement. (hindawi.com)
  • Some authors have reported that surgical margin is the only risk factor in local recurrence, 5,6 and thus complete resection may be needed for tumor eradication. (amjorthopedics.com)
  • 13 During the early stages of tumor recurrence, however, it is difficult to distinguish between malignant transformation and primary disease overlooked as a result of sampling error. (amjorthopedics.com)
  • The tumor was completely excised, and no recurrence was observed at a 1-year follow-up. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • In this case report we document a case of giant cell tumor of the patella in which, associated with local recurrence, there were simultaneous metastases to lymph nodes and lungs. (pdf-paper.com)
  • Primary pelvis bone tumors around the iliosacral joint are difficult to treat because of the large size of tumors, difficulties in limb salvage surgery, and high recurrence after surgery. (springer.com)
  • 1 , 2 ] Because of the relatively high rates of complications and recurrence, only few patients benefit from such reconstruction, although no reconstruction leads to superior and posterior migration of the residual bone, resulting in subluxation of the ipsilateral hip joint. (springer.com)
  • Initially, described by Cooper and Travers in 1818 as an aggressive and destructive lesion of long bones, then Virchow first described the recurrence and possible degeneration into a malignant GCT. (tumorsurgery.org)
  • 10] F. M. Klenke, D. E. Wenger, C. Y. Inwards, P. S. Rose and F. H. Sim, "Giant Cell Tumor of bone: Risk Factors for Recurrence," Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Re-search, Vol. 469, No. 2, February 2011, pp. 591-599. (scirp.org)
  • Cementation in giant-cell tumor as is exposed to recurrence and sometimes requires to be repeated. (nicoledelepine.fr)
  • The recurrence rate was similar to that of solitary giant cell tumors. (elsevier.com)
  • In most patients, the tumor has an indolent course, but repeated local recurrence of the tumor does happen. (wikibooks.org)
  • Giant cell tumor of bone: risk factors for recurrence. (ac.ir)
  • Functional outcome with Musculoskeletal Tumor Society Score (MSTS), recurrence and complications were analyzed with at least 24 months of follow up. (edu.np)
  • 18. Schiller C, Ritschl P, Windhager R, Kropej D, Kotz R. [The incidence of recurrence in phenol treated and non-phenol treated bone cavities following intralesional resection of non-malignant bone tumors]. (jbstjournal.com)
  • Previous research has shown that the site of the tumor, the histological appearance, or the radiological appearance are not good predictors of local recurrence or metastasis. (readabstracts.com)
  • This indicates that recurrence was more common among the aneuploid tumors, but this characteristic was of only marginal value in prognosis. (readabstracts.com)
  • 4 patients were with primary tumor and the other 4 with recurrence. (biomedcentral.com)
  • OBJECTIVES: I. Estimate the overall survival, progression-free interval, and time to progression or recurrence in patients with nondisseminated glioblastoma multiforme or diffuse intrinsic brain stem tumors that are nonprogressive following surgery (if feasible) and involved-field irradiation and treated with intensive chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) or autologous bone marrow (ABM) rescue. (knowcancer.com)
  • Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a benign yet aggressive lytic tumor of bone occurring in the metaphysis and epiphysis of long bones. (hindawi.com)
  • Giant cell tumor of bone is a rare but aggressive osteolytic cancer that causes substantial skeletal morbidity. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Giant cell tumor of bone is a locally aggressive primary bone neoplasm. (atlasgeneticsoncology.org)
  • Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a rare, aggressive, benign osteolytic tumor in which bone destruction is mediated by a protein known as the RANK ligand. (unm.edu)
  • Tenosynovial giant cell tumor of diffuse type is a locally aggressive neoplasm that most commonly arises in the lower extremities. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Giant cell tumors of bone (GCTB) are intermediate and locally aggressive bone tumor. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Giant cell tumor is a benign but locally aggressive bone neoplasm which uncommonly involves the skull. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a primary benign lesion with local aggressive behavior, affecting usually young adults. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is a benign but aggressive bone tumor originating from mesenchymal cells. (tumorsurgery.org)
  • These tumors are aggressive and grow to destroy the bone if left untreated. (tumorsurgery.org)
  • These tumors are considered locally aggressive. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Giant cell tumor is a benign lesion, but can be locally aggressive. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • GCT is characterized by locally aggressive growth usually leading to extensive bone destruction [ 9 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 17 of the tumors were radiologicaly aggressive (7 of these fractured) and 10 evolutive. (nicoledelepine.fr)
  • But immediate rehabilitation and late results plae for this conservative procedure even in aggressive, huge, fractured or recurrent tumors. (nicoledelepine.fr)
  • Background: Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a locally aggressive lesion with an unpredictable behavior. (ac.ir)
  • 2. Malawer MM, Dunham W. Cryosurgery and acrylic cementation as surgical adjuncts in the treatment of aggressive (benign) bone tumors. (jbstjournal.com)
  • A giant cell tumor of bone is a benign, aggressive tumor that typically involves the distal femur, proximal tibia, and distal radius. (aaos.org)
  • Giant cell tumor (GCT) of the bone is a benign neoplasm with local aggressive behavior. (ac.ir)
  • Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is aggressive, potentially malignant lesion which remains a difficult and challenging management problem. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The reconstruction of large bone defects and restoration of joint function resulting from resection of aggressive grade III GCT around knee remains a challenging problem. (biomedcentral.com)
  • As compared with their ovarian counterparts, these tumors may follow a more aggressive c. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Telangiectatic osteosarcoma This is a rare variant that present as an entirely lytic bone lesion with a much less aggressive appearance. (wikibooks.org)
  • Giant cell tumor of bone is a rare, aggressive non-cancerous tumor. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • 1:361:1:102 Diffuse TGCT occurs less frequently and is locally aggressive (in some cases, tumors may infiltrate surrounding soft tissue). (wikipedia.org)
  • 103:1 Diffuse TGCT is locally aggressive and can spread to surrounding tissues, causing bone erosion and tissue damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • It usually develops in long bones but can also occur in unusual locations. (springer.com)
  • They usually originate from the epiphysis of long bones, but in rare cases, they may arise from anterior arc of the ribs. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is slightly more common in females, has a predilection for the epiphyseal/metaphyseal region of long bones, and generally occurs in the third to fourth decade. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1 Clinically, GCT of bone often presents with pain, pathologic fracture, and/or soft- tissue expansion in the epiphysis of long bones. (amjorthopedics.com)
  • However, GCT of bone also has been reported in non-long bones, such as the talus and the calcaneus. (amjorthopedics.com)
  • Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is an uncommon primary bone neoplasm that usually occurs in the long bones. (biomedcentral.com)
  • They arise from metaphysis and extends into the epiphysis of the long bones. (radiologydefinition.com)
  • Sequences of comparative radiographs taken 1 year apart (January 2008 and February 2009) demonstrate progressive diffuse bone demineralization, widening of the growth plates, metaphyseal cupping and fraying, bowing of long bones, and multiple rib fractures with collapse of the thoracic cage. (aappublications.org)
  • Most of GCTs are located in the secondary ossification center (epiphysis) and metaphysis with extension to, and sometimes through the subchondral area of the long bones (distal femur, proximal tibia, and distal radius). (tumorsurgery.org)
  • This cystic lesion usually occurs in the metaphyseal region of the long bones, but almost any bone may be affected. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Simple unicameral bone cysts occur in the long bones starting distal to the epiphyseal plate in children. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Osteochondromas (osteocartilaginous exostoses), the most common benign bone tumors, may arise from any bone but tend to occur near the ends of long bones. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Commonly found in the skull, mandible, spine and long bones, but can occur anywhere. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • 5] F. M. Klenke, D. E. Wenger, C. Y. Inwards, P. S. Rose and F. H. Sim, "Recurrent Giant Cell Tumor of Long Bones: Analysis of Surgical Management," Clinical Or-thopaedics and Related Research, No. 469, April 2011, pp. 1181-1187. (scirp.org)
  • Most tumors had arisen in the long bones. (elsevier.com)
  • Approximately 85% of tumors occur in the long bones, namely the distal femur, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, and distal radius. (wikibooks.org)
  • 7. Salai M, Rahamimov N. Prevention of recurrent giant-cell tumors of long bones a new surgical technique. (jbstjournal.com)
  • What benign bone neoplasms can present on the metaphysis of long bones? (brainscape.com)
  • The ends of long bones in skeletally mature individuals are involved in more than 80% of cases and 75% of them occur around the knee joint [ 1 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Most occur in the long bones of the legs and arms. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • A 68-year-old female was diagnosed with giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) metastatic to her lungs. (hindawi.com)
  • The metastatic tumor burden decreased significantly after only 3 months of therapy. (hindawi.com)
  • 3 ] Metastatic lung nodules can present at the time of initial surgery or develop many years after the appearance of the primary tumor. (cytojournal.com)
  • When cancer cells travel to the bone from elsewhere, it is called secondary or metastatic cancer to the bone. (empowher.com)
  • Sixteen cases of non-metastatic GCTB, 9 GCTB with lung metastases, and 35 giant cell-rich sarcomas were selected from our institutional archives. (elsevier.com)
  • and 2 patients had metastatic tumor (1 from prostate cancer and 1 from clear cell renal carcinoma). (springer.com)
  • Most malignant brain tumors are metastatic, with 20% to 40% of patients with cancer developing brain metastasis. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Secondary aneurysmal bone cyst formation is present in 6,5% of the cases. (atlasgeneticsoncology.org)
  • Although the age range for aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) and CMF is similar, the former typically demonstrates ballooning cortical expansion. (medscape.com)
  • Differentials include chondroblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and enchondroma. (radiologydefinition.com)
  • Benign cysts include aneurysmal bone cysts and unicameral bone cysts . (merckmanuals.com)
  • An aneurysmal bone cyst is an idiopathic expansile lesion that usually develops before age 25 years. (merckmanuals.com)
  • A solid variant aneurysmal bone cyst can be confused radiographically for a giant cell tumor of bone at the very end of the bone. (merckmanuals.com)
  • A biopsy-confirmed aneurysmal bone cyst can be injected with doxycycline , albumin, and air that forms an injectable foam. (merckmanuals.com)
  • An aneurysmal bone cyst is an idiopathic expansile lesion that usually develops before age 25 yr. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Aneurysmal bone cyst typically presents as a painful expansile or 'aneurysmal' well-defined osteolytic lesion in a patient younger than 30 years. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • On the left images of an aneurysmal or expansile well-defined osteolytic bone lesion in the fibula. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • This is typical for an aneurysmal bone cyst. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • Secondary histopathologic changes including fibrohistiocytic regions, reactive bone formation, or aneurysmal bone cyst-like changes were not uncommon. (elsevier.com)
  • Differential includes aneurysmal bone cyst and giant cell tumor . (wikibooks.org)
  • Patients who underwent surgery that ended with incomplete tumor resection could continue treatment with denosumab at the clinical investigator's discretion. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Sometimes 'en bloc' resection is needed to be curative. (atlasgeneticsoncology.org)
  • Sixteen patients presented a large tumor extension necessitating a resection of the involved bone or joint. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In the remaining six cases, the surgical indication was not changed despite the denosumab treatment, and two of them needed a joint replacement after the tumor resection. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We report a craniofacial approach for resection of a giant-cell tumor of the sphenoid bone. (semanticscholar.org)
  • How does iliosacral bone tumor resection without reconstruction affect the ipsilateral hip joint? (springer.com)
  • Whether reconstruction is more beneficial after iliosacral bone tumor resection remains controversial. (springer.com)
  • Nevertheless, iliosacral resection without reconstruction could serve as a viable treatment option for pelvic type I-IV tumors. (springer.com)
  • En bloc resection of the tumor is performed followed by reconstruction with centralization of the ulna. (aaos.org)
  • We questioned whether en bloc resection and reconstruction with alcohol inactivated autograft-prosthesis composite would provide (1) local control and long-term survival and (2) useful limb function in patients who had grade III GCT around the knee. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Standard therapy for glioblastoma multiforme consists of maximal surgical resection of the tumor, followed by radiotherapy between two and four weeks after the surgical procedure to remove the cancer, then by chemotherapy. (ipl.org)
  • Diaphyso-epiphysial resection for bone tumour at the knee with reports of nine cases. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Limb conservation in primary bone tumours by resection, extracorporeal irradiation and re-implantation. (semanticscholar.org)
  • citation needed] The diagnosis of giant-cell tumors is based on biopsy findings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biopsy of the tumor. (pointclickcares.com)
  • Excisional (removing the tumor) biopsy for bone tumors may mean excision of a considerable portion of the involved bone or limb, and occasionally, partial or complete amputation of the extremity depending on the location and type of tumor. (empowher.com)
  • Biopsy was taken from surrounding bone, muscle and dura from 4 different sites. (biomedcentral.com)
  • To assess for clonal replacement, we devise a summary statistic based on whole-exome sequencing of a pre-treatment biopsy and multi-region sampling of the post-treatment surgical specimen and apply this measure to five breast tumors treated with neoadjuvant HER2-targeted therapy. (nature.com)
  • We then performed whole-exome sequencing on a separate, non-overlapping cohort of a single pre-treatment diagnostic core biopsy and multiple regions of the post-treatment surgical specimen from five archival HER2-positive breast tumors that were treated with neoadjuvant HER2-targeted therapy combined with chemotherapy and did not achieve a pCR. (nature.com)
  • Incisional biopsy of the tumor revealed a CGCG with mesenchymal matrix. (aappublications.org)
  • Axail CT image prior to biopsy demonstrates the lytic appearance of the lesion within the thickened cortical bone. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • To determine the type of spinal tumor, tumor cells (taken during biopsy ) are microscopically examined. (spineuniverse.com)
  • The only way for us to be sure that the lump on your mom's finger is a giant cell tumor is to have a biopsy done. (medhelp.org)
  • Buzzoword on bone biopsy with osteosarcoma? (brainscape.com)
  • Diagnostic tests may include X-rays, biopsy, and bone scans. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Secondary malignant GCT of bone histologically has been classified as a fibrosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, or osteosarcoma transformation. (amjorthopedics.com)
  • 14] A. Abudu, N. K. Sferopoulos, R. M. Tillman, S. R. Carter and R. J. Grimer, "The Surgical Treatment and Outcome of Pathological Fractures in Localised Osteosarcoma," Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery British Volume, Vol. 78, No. 5, September 1996, pp. 694-698. (scirp.org)
  • In some cases, the pagetic tissue undergoes neoplastic transformation, resulting in osteosarcoma and, less frequently, in giant cell tumor of bone (GCT). (elsevier.com)
  • Osteosarcoma sarcoma, a form of bone cancer, is largely a disease of children and adolescents. (readabstracts.com)
  • However, men and women over 30 can develop a rare form of osteosarcoma which occurs in tissues outside of the bone. (readabstracts.com)
  • These cancers form bone and bone-like tissue outside the skeleton, and the prognosis for extraskeletal osteosarcoma is poor. (readabstracts.com)
  • Osteosarcoma , the most common type of primary bone cancer, usually occurs in the thigh, upper arm or shin. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Chondroblastoma and CMF occur in individuals of the same age group and may have similar histologic features, including chondroblastic differentiation, giant cells, and a markedly positive S-100 stain result. (medscape.com)
  • Mutually exclusive histone 3.3 gene mutations have been recognized in chondroblastoma and giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB), which may be useful for differential diagnostic purposes in morphologically ambiguous cases. (elsevier.com)
  • Cavities filled with blood can also be found in giant cell tumor, osteoblastoma and chondroblastoma (i.e with secondary ABC). (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • Instillation in intralesional tumor excision of chondroblastoma, osteoclastoma and enchondroma. (jbstjournal.com)
  • Chondroblastoma Epiphyses Giant Cell tumor Epiphyses Adamantinoma Tibia Chordoma Sacrum. (scribd.com)
  • Simple bone cyst Proximal humerus Chondroblastoma Epiphyses Giant Cell tumor Epiphyses Chordoma Sacrum. (scribd.com)
  • Radical excision of the tumor was achieved but facial palsy could not be avoided. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Radical excision of skull base giant cell tumor may be hazardous but if achieved is the optimal treatment and may be curative. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Right temporoparietal craniectomy and tumor exposure after right external carotid artery control (inset) and excision of the temporalis muscle. (biomedcentral.com)
  • After completion of tumor excision. (biomedcentral.com)
  • After radical excision of tumor (piecemeal) the defect is covered with gelfoam. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Is only VALID is given by the NEUROSURGEON who performed the excision of this benign tumor . (healthtap.com)
  • Giant cell tumors (GCT) around the knee are common and pose a special problem of reconstruction after tumor excision, especially for grade III GCT. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Locally destructive, mono-ostotic tumoral lesion, typically presenting in the meta-epiphysis of long tubular bones with predilection for the knee region of skeletally mature patients (more than 95% of the patients is older than 25 years). (atlasgeneticsoncology.org)
  • However caution is employed since a majority of recurrent tumors with transformations to the malignant sarcoma phenotype have been in patients receiving radiotherapy for their primary benign lesion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most malignant transformations of GCT of bone have been attributed to previous irradiation of the lesion. (amjorthopedics.com)
  • CT scan of the brain showed a large well defined hyperdense contrast enhancing lesion originating from the right temporal bone - squamous and petrous portions with a large intracranial extension causing uncal herniation [Fig. 1 & 2 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • GCT is a giant cell-rich lesion of bone with characteristic multinuclear giant cells, with a background of active mononuclear stromal cells. (tumorsurgery.org)
  • The giant cells are evenly and widely dispersed throughout the lesion. (tumorsurgery.org)
  • The lesion may penetrate subchondral bone and articular cartilage. (tumorsurgery.org)
  • A periosteal new bone shell forms around the expansile lesion and is often wider than the original bone. (merckmanuals.com)
  • The plain radiograph shows a layered periosteal reaction and Codman triangle in direct relationship to an expansile lytic lesion with a thin peripheral bone shell. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • CT also reveals the subperiosteal origin of the lesion with secondary involvement of the cortical bone. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • Young patient with a lobulated lytic lesion within the anterior cortical bone of the proximal tibia. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • Must be included in the differential diagnosis of almost any ill-defined osteolytic bone lesion in patients under the age of 30. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • Most common presentation: ill-defined osteolytic lesion with multiple small holes in the diaphysis of a long bone in a child with a large soft tissue mass. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • On the left an ill-defined lytic lesion of the right iliac bone in a young patient which can easily be overlooked. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • A minority of the tumors were confined to the metaphysis, had features of a fibro-osseous or bone-forming lesion, or arose in skeletally immature patients. (elsevier.com)
  • Glomus tumors control the thermoregulatory function of the dermal glomus They produce Pulsatile tinnitus since they occur as the most common lesion of the middle ear. (healthtap.com)
  • A growing lesion can destroy healthy tissue and weaken the bone, making it more vulnerable to fractures . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The cause of a bone lesion depends on whether it is benign or cancerous, in addition to other factors. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In some cases, it may be necessary to surgically remove the lesion to reduce the risk of a bone fracture. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Giant Cell Tumor of the bone (GCTB) has got variable outcome after the different methods of surgical treatment depending upon the site and grade of lesion and extent of tumor removal. (edu.np)
  • Classically, 10 radiographic features of a bone lesion should be examined. (appliedradiology.com)
  • The zone of transition is that outer margin of the lesion that represents the change from pathologic to normal bone. (appliedradiology.com)
  • The location of the lesion in the bone, both transversely and longitudinally, can also be useful in narrowing the differential. (appliedradiology.com)
  • however, malignant tumors with giant cells have been noted in some cases, on a retrospective review. (cytojournal.com)
  • The term cancer refers to malignant tumors, which can invade nearby tissues and spread to other parts of the body. (empowher.com)
  • Radiographically, benign versus malignant tumors are difficult to distinguish. (wikibooks.org)
  • Chapter 22, Malignant Tumors of Bone. (spineuniverse.com)
  • Tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT) is a group of rare, typically non-malignant tumors of the joints. (wikipedia.org)
  • GCTB typically presents in persons 20 to 40 years old and accounts for approximately 20% of all benign tumors of bone [ 4 , 5 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • The histologic composition of GCTB consists of sheets of neoplastic spindle shaped mononuclear cells with high levels of RANK Ligand (RANKL) expression, intermixed with large osteoclast giant cells [ 8 , 12 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Some studies have shown that denosumab has the ability to prevent tumor progression, induce primary tumor reduction, increase bone formation, and reduce pain in patients with GCTB [ 16 - 18 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Giant cell tumour of bone (GCTB) is a benign osteolytic tumour with three main cellular components: multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells, mononuclear spindle-like stromal cells (the main neoplastic components) and mononuclear cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. (springer.com)
  • Recent advances in the understanding of GCTB pathogenesis are essential to develop new treatments for this locally destructive primary bone tumour. (springer.com)
  • Giant cell tumour of bone (GCTB) is a rare osteolytic tumour that is responsible for approximately 6 % of all primary bone tumours. (springer.com)
  • THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. , July 15, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) today announced the Lancet Oncology published planned interim results from an international, open-label, Phase 2 clinical trial that is evaluating XGEVA ® (denosumab) in adults and skeletally mature adolescents diagnosed with giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB). (amgen.com)
  • GCTB is a rare, osteolytic tumor of the bone that often results in complete destruction of the affected bone, leading to bone fracture, joint dysfunction, deformity or amputation. (amgen.com)
  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today expanded the approved use of Xgeva (denosumab) to treat adults and some adolescents with giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB), a rare and usually non-cancerous tumor. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • In most cases, GCTB does not spread to other parts of the body but destroys normal bone as it grows, causing pain, limited range of motion and bone fractures. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Rarely, GCTB can transform into a cancerous tumor and spread to the lungs. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Over an average follow-up duration of 20 months, re-growth of GCTB occurred in three patients whose tumors originally became smaller during treatment. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Emanuela Palmerini, MD, Prometeo Laboratory: Clinical and Experimental Research Contract, Chemotherapy for Rare Musculoskeletal Tumors Department, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, discusses the long-term efficacy of denosumab (Xgeva) in patients with giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB). (onclive.com)
  • The phase II study enrolled more than 500 patients with GCTB, which is defined as a progressive osteolytic tumor, in 3 cohorts: unresectable disease (cohort 1), resectable disease with planned high morbidity surgery (cohort 2), and prior GCTB study patients (cohort 3). (onclive.com)
  • Having recently reported that H3.3 G34W mutations are characteristic of this tumor type, we have now investigated the sensitivity and specificity of the anti-histone H3.3 G34W rabbit monoclonal antibody in a wide variety of tumors including histologic mimics of GCTB to assess its value as a diagnostic marker. (ovid.com)
  • We propose that subarticular primary malignant bone sarcoma with H3.3 mutations represent true malignant GCTB, even in the absence of a benign GCTB component. (ovid.com)
  • Xgeva was approved in 2010 for the prevention of bone complications such as fracture in patients with bone metastases from solid (not blood-related) cancers-and now for patients whose GCTB cannot be surgically removed or for when surgery is likely to result in severe morbidity, such as loss of limb or joint removal. (unm.edu)
  • In this study we examined a series of giant cell rich primary bone tumors, aiming to evaluate the possible diagnostic role of histone 3.3 mutations in the differential diagnosis between GCTB and giant cell rich sarcomas. (elsevier.com)
  • In conclusion, we confirm that H3F3A mutational testing may be a useful adjunct to differentiate GCTB from giant cell rich sarcomas. (elsevier.com)
  • Recurrent giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath. (medscape.com)
  • Osteoclast-like tumor cells express receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK), and the tumor contains stromal cells that express RANK ligand, a mediator of osteoclast formation. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The giant cells overexpress a key mediator in osteoclastogenesis: the RANK receptor, which is stimulated in turn by the cytokine RANKL, which is secreted by the stromal cells. (springer.com)
  • The giant-cell tumour stromal cells (GCTSC) constitute the neoplastic cells, which are from an osteoblastic origin and are classified based on expression of osteoblast cell markers such as alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is based on the notion that increased expression of RANK-ligands by stromal cells plays a role in tumor pathogenesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2,3 Histologically, GCT of bone consists of neoplastic stromal cells, mononuclear histiocytic cells, and multinucleated giant cells that resemble osteoclasts. (amjorthopedics.com)
  • We found that conditioned medium from 24-h cultures of highly purified giant cells (10 6 /ml) contained large amounts of IL-6 (37.9 ± 8.8 ng/ml), similar to the amount of IL-6 produced by tumor stromal cells (29.8 ± 11.5 ng/ ml). (elsevier.com)
  • Giant cells and stromal cells from giant cell tumors expressed IL- 6 mRNA, as indicated by polymerase chain reaction analysis and in situ hybridization studies, and immunohistochemical techniques demonstrated that the giant cells expressed IL-6 receptors. (elsevier.com)
  • About 5% of giant-cell tumors metastasize, usually to a lung, which may be benign metastasis, when the diagnosis of giant-cell tumor is suspected, a chest X-ray or computed tomography may be needed. (wikipedia.org)
  • A diagnosis of giant cell tumor was made on histopathological examination. (cytojournal.com)
  • Correlation of clinical, radiologic, and laboratory findings is required for accurate histopathologic diagnosis and treatment of a giant cell-containing tumor of bone. (ox.ac.uk)
  • In this article we will discuss the differential diagnosis of ill-defined osteolytic bone tumors in alphabetic order. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • Calcifications can be seen when there is a large myxoid component within the tumor, but they are not essential for the diagnosis. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • Diagnosis of Bone and Joint Disorders. (wikibooks.org)
  • These tumors had typical radiological appearance and the diagnosis of giant cell tumor was confirmed on histopathology. (ipl.org)
  • The diagnosis of 'giant cell tumor' is a tissue diagnosis and cannot be arrived at by the gross appearance of the lump alone. (medhelp.org)
  • Diagnosis of giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath or joint capsule made. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Orthopaedic oncologist Adam Levin answers questions about the types of bone sarcomas, their diagnosis and available treatments. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Herein, we report for the first time a case of an extra-articular tenosynovial giant cell tumor of diffuse type in the temporal region with brain parenchymal invasion. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • It is indicated for adults with tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT) that is associated with severe morbidity or functional limitations and is not amenable to improvement with surgery. (medscape.com)
  • Abdul-Karim FW, el-Naggar AK, Joyce MJ, Makley JT, Carter JR. Diffuse and localized tenosynovial giant cell tumor and pigmented villonodular synovitis: a clinicopathologic and flow cytometric DNA analysis. (medscape.com)
  • Localized tenosynovial giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. (medscape.com)
  • This is a multicenter, open-label Phase 1/2 study of DCC-3014 in patients with malignant solid tumors and tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Fibrous xanthoma of synovium (giant-cell tumor of tendon sheath, pigmented nodular synovitis). (medscape.com)
  • Fibrous dysplasia can also affect bones. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Fibrous dysplasia involves abnormal bone development during childhood. (merckmanuals.com)
  • If periostitis is present, fibrous dysplasia, solitary bone cyst, nonossifying fibromas, and enchondromas can be removed from consideration unless complicated by fracture. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Chondroblastomas typically occurs in an epiphyseal location, whereas CMFs are metaphyseal tumors. (medscape.com)
  • Patients with giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone are typically older than persons with CMF, and the radiographic and cellular features of GCT differ from those of CMF. (medscape.com)
  • Typically, giant cell bone tumor develops near the joints of the knee, wrist, shoulder or spine. (pointclickcares.com)
  • 3 - 5 Tumors are typically benign, small, and with mesenchymal origin. (aappublications.org)
  • The tumors typically show uniform and widespread loss of MMR protein stainin. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Plus, the immunohistochemical staining result for this tumor is typically positive mostly for glial fibrillary acidic protein. (ipl.org)
  • 100:245 Localized TGCT tumors are typically 0.5 cm-4 cm),:101 develop over years,:100 are benign and non-destructive to the surrounding tissue, and may reoccur in the affected area. (wikipedia.org)
  • Intra-articular tumors typically occur in the knee (approximately 75% of cases) and hip (approximately 15% of cases). (wikipedia.org)
  • Denosumab is a human monoclonal antibody that inhibits normal and tumor associated RANKL [ 13 - 15 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • After discussion at a tertiary center musculoskeletal tumor board the patient was started on denosumab therapy. (hindawi.com)
  • In this study, giant cell tumor of bone exhibited near-total absence of disease progression during treatment with denosumab (Xgeva). (medpagetoday.com)
  • CHICAGO -- Giant cell tumor of bone exhibited near-total absence of disease progression during treatment with denosumab (Xgeva), results of an ongoing international trial showed. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Denosumab was generally well tolerated, and no unexpected adverse events occurred, investigators reported here at the International Conference on Cancer-Induced Bone Disease. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The resulting imbalance in bone remodeling in favor of resorption provided a rationale for evaluating denosumab in giant cell tumor of bone. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Chawla and colleagues reported interim data for 73 patients with unresectable disease and 23 with resectable tumors, all of whom had received denosumab for a minimum of six months. (medpagetoday.com)
  • No tumors progressed during treatment with denosumab by investigator assessment. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Emanuela Palmerini, MD, Prometeo Laboratory: Clinical and Experimental Research Contract, Chemotherapy for Rare Musculoskeletal Tumors Department, Instituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, discusses optimal patient selection for denosumab (Xgeva) in patients with giant cell tumor of bone. (targetedonc.com)
  • The RANK ligand inhibitor denosumab is being investigated for treatment of giant cell tumor of bone, but the available data in the literature remains sparse and controversial. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A total of 91 patients were treated surgically for giant cell tumor of bone between 2010 and 2014 in an institution, whereas 25 patients of the total additionally received denosumab and were part of this study. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Denosumab and giant cell tumor of bone- a review and future management considerations. (ipl.org)
  • Among patients with surgically resectable tumors, the primary location was the femur, tibia, patella/knee, or tarsus in two-thirds of cases. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The site most commonly struck by this tumor is the knee -- the far end of the femur and the near end of the tibia. (drugster.info)
  • To explore the clinical effects of debridement and bone autografting combined with proximal femoral anatomical plate in treating benign tumor in proximal femur. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • From January 2010 to October 2014, 30 patients with benign tumor in proximal femur were treated with debridement, autogenic ilium, autogenic ilium and allogeneic bone implant, and anatomic plate fixation. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • 37 patients(p.) (19 males and 18 females aged 27-59 years average 30) with benign giant cells tumor of femur in 13, tibia in 11, radius in 6, spine in 3, humerus in 2, 1 fibula and 1 os calci were treated by our group between 1972 and 1994. (nicoledelepine.fr)
  • bones affections especially rachitic enlargement of femur in infants. (hpathy.com)
  • A tumor of bone characterized by massive destruction of the end (epiphysis) of a long bone. (drugster.info)
  • Chondroblastomas (Codman tumors) arises from epiphysis. (radiologydefinition.com)
  • What benign bone neoplasms can present on the epiphysis of a bone? (brainscape.com)
  • Pulmonary metastasis of benign giant cell tumor of bone. (medscape.com)
  • Because of the lack of suitable in vivo models of giant cell tumor of bone (GCT), little is known about its underlying fundamental pro-tumoral events, such as tumor growth, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath are associated with degenerative joint disease, especially in the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint. (medscape.com)
  • Benign giant cell tumors of bone, which most commonly affect people in their 20s and 30s, occur in the epiphyses and distal epiphyseal- metaphyseal area. (merckmanuals.com)
  • On the left a giant cell tumor of the distal radius with ill-defined margins, destruction of the subchondral bone plate and extension towards the soft tissues. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • Rare case of giant cell tumour on dorsal aspect of tendon sheath in distal interphalangeal joint of middle finger left hand: case report. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath is associated with arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint [2] and occasionally with rheumatoid arthritis [3]. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • This video discusses the case presentation of a 23-year-old woman with a large, fungating giant cell tumor of the distal radius. (aaos.org)
  • Chondrosarcoma and CMF, however, may each have mild expansion of cortical bone. (medscape.com)
  • However, mucinous material, nuclear atypia, and multiple pleomorphic or multinuclear cartilage cells all suggest chondrosarcoma. (medscape.com)
  • Patients with multiple hereditary osteochondromas have more tumors and are more likely to develop a chondrosarcoma than patients with a single osteochondroma. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Function was evaluated using the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society 1993 rating scale (MSTS 1993), and disability was measured using the Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS). (springer.com)
  • The functional outcome of the patients was assessed using the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) scoring system. (ac.ir)
  • Cytotoxicity of phenol to musculoskeletal tumours. (jbstjournal.com)
  • Bone tumors are a relatively infrequent finding in musculoskeletal radiology. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Swelling may occur, as well, if the tumor has been growing for a long time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath most commonly occur in patients aged 30-50 years, with a peak incidence in those aged 40-50 years. (medscape.com)
  • Central collection of archival tumor with which to later study the frequency of expression and/or mutation of kinases inhibited by dasatinib will occur. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Primary malignant brain tumors make up from 10% to 30% of adult cancers and about 20% in children, but any of these tumors may occur at any age. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Giant cell tumors most often occur in young adults when skeletal bone growth is complete. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Eupatorium Perf - it is an excellent remedy for bone pains occur in fever, bony pain associated with marked restlessness. (hpathy.com)
  • Near total replacement of the pancreas with cysts in a patient with Von Hippel Lindau Disease Abstract: Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease can affect various organ systems of the body and is associated with tumors and visceral cysts. (ipl.org)
  • INTRODUCTION: Giant cell tumours are the second commonest tumours in the hand after ganglion cysts. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • DISCUSSION: The second commonest tumour of the hand is giant cell tumour after ganglion cysts. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • osteomas in the skull -thyroid cancers -epidermoid cysts -fibromas -desmoid tumors in approx. (brainscape.com)
  • Which medications in the drug class CSF1R Inhibitor are used in the treatment of Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath? (medscape.com)
  • Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath: study of 64 cases and review of literature. (medscape.com)
  • Abimelec P, Cambiaghi S, Thioly D, Moulonguet I, Dumontier C. Subungual giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath. (medscape.com)
  • Ciattaglia G, Filosa G, Bugatti L. Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. (medscape.com)
  • Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. (medscape.com)
  • Hosaka M, Hatori M, Smith R, Kokubun S. Giant cell formation through fusion of cells derived from a human giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. (medscape.com)
  • Multinucleated cells in pigmented villonodular synovitis and giant cell tumor of tendon sheath express features of osteoclasts. (medscape.com)
  • The cells of giant cell tumor of tendon sheath resemble osteoclasts. (medscape.com)
  • Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath is a polyclonal cellular proliferation. (medscape.com)
  • Giant-cell tumor of tendon sheath (benign synovioma) in the hand. (medscape.com)
  • however, to the authors' knowledge, no pathogenetic relation between rheumatoid arthritis and giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath has been demonstrated, and their simultaneous occurrence may be coincidental. (medscape.com)
  • Excised tissue was sent for the histopathological examination and it revealed giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is seen usually between 30 to 50 years of age, more common in females in the ratio of 3:2. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • 100 Localized TGCT is sometimes referred to as localized pigmented villonodular synovitis (L-PVNS), giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCT-TS), nodular tenosynovitis, localized nodular tenosynovitis, and L-TGCT. (wikipedia.org)
  • Non-treatment always leads to destruction of cortical bone, to soft tissue invasion and finally to ulceration of the skin. (atlasgeneticsoncology.org)
  • Hutter and colleagues 9 defined primary malignant GCT as GCT with sarcomatous tissue juxtaposed with zones of typical benign GCT cells. (amjorthopedics.com)
  • By taking a sample of the possibly affected tissue to the laboratory, the doctor can confirm whether you have the giant cell bone tumor or not. (pointclickcares.com)
  • Bone cancer is a relatively rare disease in which cancer cells grow in the bone tissue. (empowher.com)
  • If cells keep dividing uncontrollably when new cells are not needed, a mass of tissue forms, called a growth or tumor. (empowher.com)
  • When cancer starts in bone tissue, it is called primary bone cancer. (empowher.com)
  • A radioactive substance injected into the bloodstream is absorbed by bone tissue, and is then tracked by the bone scan. (empowher.com)
  • removal of a sample of bone tissue to test for cancer cells. (empowher.com)
  • Bone cancer is a growth that destroys normal bone tissue. (denverhealth.org)
  • There is no existing cell line that contains all the cell and tissue tumor components of GCT and thus in vitro testing of anti-tumor agents on GCT is not possible. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Fresh tumor tissue was obtained from 10 patients and homogenized. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 15] K. L. Cooper, J. W. Beabout and D. C. Dahlin, "Giant Cell Tumor: Ossification in Soft-Tissue Implants," Radiology, Vol. 153, No. 3, December 1984, pp. 597-602. (scirp.org)
  • Quantitative tissue volumes from magnetic resonance imaging scans and neurocognitive assessments were obtained for 40 long-term survivors of pediatric brain tumors. (wiley.com)
  • They are caused by cells in the bone that start to divide and multiply uncontrollably, leading to a lump or mass of abnormal tissue. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Multiple myeloma is a malignant tumor of the bone marrow, which is the soft tissue in the middle of bones responsible for producing blood cells. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • As with other types of cancer, lymph cells grow uncontrollably leading to tissue destruction that may spread to the spine (or other places in the body). (spineuniverse.com)
  • ZNF687 is highly expressed during osteoclastogenesis and osteoblastogenesis and is dramatically upregulated in the tumor tissue of individuals with GCT/PDB. (elsevier.com)
  • Plain x-ray of the finger show rounded soft tissue shadow with or without cortical erosion due to pressure effects of tumour. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • 9. Campanacci M. Bone and soft tissue tumors. (ac.ir)
  • Various mixtures of cell types found resembled bone cells, cartilage cells, and connective tissue cells. (readabstracts.com)
  • these tumors account for about 1.2 percent of all soft tissue sarcomas. (readabstracts.com)
  • Bone cancer describes a malignant tumor of the bone that destroys healthy bone tissue. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Surgery aims to remove the tumor and some of the bone tissue that surrounds it. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Metaplastic breast carcinoma is a rare entity of breast cancer expressing epithelial and/or mesenchymal tissue within the same tumor. (biomedcentral.com)
  • invasion or invasion or invasiveness is the spatial expansion of the tumor through uncontrolled mitosis, in the sense that the neoplasm invades the space occupied by adjacent tissue, thereby pushing the other tissue aside and eventually compressing the tissue. (ipl.org)
  • A test in which tissue samples are removed from the body and examined under a microscope to determine if cancer or other abnormal cells are present. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • TGCT tumors often develop from the lining of joints (also known as synovial tissue). (wikipedia.org)
  • This causes colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) cells to accumulate in the joint tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • WHO Classification of Tumours of Soft Tissue and Bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Metastases are considered benign, are histologically identical to the primary tumor [ 8 ], and rarely contribute to death in the majority of patients [ 7 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Our results provide a needed framework to incorporate primary tumor heterogeneity in investigating the evolution of resistance. (nature.com)
  • The three established breast cancer expression biomarkers-estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2-are discordant between the primary tumor and the residual tumor after neoadjuvant therapy in 5-40% of cases that do not achieve a pathologic complete response (pCR, defined as absence of remaining invasive cancer) 5 , 6 . (nature.com)
  • The presence of tumor is the indication for surgery. (medscape.com)
  • Surgery remains the only definitive therapy, but a majority of patients have unresectable tumors at presentation, Chawla and colleagues noted. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Surgery is the treatment of choice if the tumor is determined to be resectable. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with tumors that are not amenable to surgery are treated with radiation therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • XGEVA represents a much needed treatment option for patients who suffer from giant cell tumor of bone that can't be adequately treated with surgery. (amgen.com)
  • Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) is a bone void filler used in orthopaedic surgery. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Depending on where the tumor is, specific surgery such as laminectomy and corpectomy can be done. (pointclickcares.com)
  • We present a GCT of the temporal bone in a 26 year old male which was treated with radical surgery with a good outcome. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Surgery is a common option for bone cancer. (denverhealth.org)
  • A Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Study," Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery British Volume, Vol. 88, No. 4, April 2006, pp. 531-535. (scirp.org)
  • 7] P. J. McGrath, "Giant-Cell Tumour of Bone: An Analysis of Fifty-Two Cases," Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery British Volume, Vol. 54, No. 2, May 1972, pp. 216-229. (scirp.org)
  • A Demographic, Clinical, and Histopa-thological Study of All Cases Recorded in the Swedish Cancer Registry for the Years 1958 through 1968," Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery American Volume, Vol. 57, No. 2, March 1975, pp. 167-73. (scirp.org)
  • 13] S. P. Scully, M. A. Ghert, D. Zurakowski, R. C. Thomp-son and M. C. Gebhardt, "Pathologic Fracture in Osteo-sarcoma: Prognostic Importance and Treatment Implica-tions", Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery American Vo-lume, Vol. 84, No. 1, January 2002, pp. 49-57. (scirp.org)
  • A surgery to remove a tumor can be quite simple like removing a lipoma which is superficial all the way to a very complex surgery like the whipple which is used to remove tumors in the pancreas. (healthtap.com)
  • What's the recovery after bone tumor surgery? (healthtap.com)
  • Depends on many factors: what bone is affected, type of surgery , age and health status of the patient, etc. (healthtap.com)
  • What's the recovery process like after bone tumor surgery? (healthtap.com)
  • What is the definition or description of: tumor surgery? (healthtap.com)
  • Are there side effects of germ cell tumor surgery? (healthtap.com)
  • Why might a person die suddenly 3 weeks after having a successful brain tumor surgery? (healthtap.com)
  • Cement is recommended in intralesional surgery of giant cell tumors: a Scandinavian Sarcoma Group study of 294 patients followed for a median time of 5 years. (ac.ir)
  • Intralesionalsurgery is the most favored kind of surgery for giant-cell tumors of the bone. (jbstjournal.com)
  • Radiotherapy , chemotherapy , and surgery can all be used to treat bone cancer. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • eliminate the cancer cells that remained behind after surgery. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • author={R M MERLE D'AUBIGNE and J P DEJOUANY}, journal={The Journal of bone and joint surgery. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The differentials of rheumatoid arthritis, herpes viral infection, giant cell carcinoma, carcinosarcoma, mesothelioma, radiotherapy, granulomatous inflammation, and surgical intervention were considered as they have been rarely associated with the presence of giant cells in pleural effusions. (cytojournal.com)
  • The cancer is treated by surgical removal of the tumor followed by radiation or chemotherapy. (readabstracts.com)
  • Functional MRI can map the brain function surrounding a tumor to help design a surgical approach that removes the tumor while avoiding damage to areas critical for normal functioning. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • On the right a giant cell tumor in the proximal tibia with somewhat better defined margin and non-interrupted cortical bone. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • The primary objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that, among survivors of pediatric brain tumors, the association between reduced volumes of normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and intellectual/academic achievement deficits can be explained by patient problems with memory and attention. (wiley.com)
  • Neoplastic brain tumors may be benign or malignant. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Usually the onset of symptoms is insidious, with brain tumors frequently misdiagnosed. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Hispathology The pathological characteristic or features of Angiocentric Glioma are quite similar to other types of brain tumors such as astrocytomas and ependymomas. (ipl.org)
  • Symptoms of bone cancer vary, depending on the location and size of the tumor. (empowher.com)
  • The size of the tumor and its location will affect the symptoms. (denverhealth.org)
  • RANKL potentiates the osteoclast differentiation of monocytes leading to the lytic nature of the tumor [ 12 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Some patients may be asymptomatic until they develop a pathologic fracture at the site of the tumor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Piecemeal total removal of the tumor was achieved with temporary clamping of the right ECA. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A drain was left in the large dead space created by the removal of the tumor. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Total removal of the tumor was impossible, and partial reduction was achieved after percutaneous computed tomography-guided radiofrequency, local instillation of triamcinolone, and oral propranolol. (aappublications.org)
  • Diffuse-type giant cell tumor is relatively rare than localized giant cell tumor. (bvsalud.org)
  • Moreover, diffuse type giant cell tumor is common in intraarticular area, rarely occurs at intramuscular or subcutaneous layer. (bvsalud.org)
  • Giant cell tumours of the soft tissues are of two types, the commonest being the localised variant and rare one being the diffuse variant. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • 102 Classification for TGCT encompasses two subtypes that can be divided according to site - within a joint (intra-articular) or outside of the joint (extra-articular) - and growth pattern (localized or diffuse) of the tumor(s).:100:361 Localized and diffuse subsets of TGCT differ in their prognosis, clinical presentation, and biological behavior, but share a similar manner of disease development. (wikipedia.org)
  • Benign bone tumors include benign giant cell tumors of bone , chondroblastomas , chondromyxoid fibromas , enchondromas , nonossifying fibromas , osteoblastomas , osteochondromas , and osteoid osteomas . (merckmanuals.com)
  • In these cases especially brown tumour of hyperparathyreoidism should be considered, which may look histologically identical. (atlasgeneticsoncology.org)
  • Histologically, an ABC is made up of large, blood-filled vascular spaces and a highly vascular stroma with multinucleated giant cells, hemosiderin deposition, and histiocytes. (medscape.com)
  • Rarely, a giant cell tumor of bone may metastasize to the lung, even though it remains histologically benign. (merckmanuals.com)
  • characterized histologically by columnar cells organized in a ductlike configuration interspersed with spindle-shaped cells and an amyloidlike deposition that gradually undergoes dystrophic calcification. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Pathologic fracture is present in 5-10% of giant cell tumours. (atlasgeneticsoncology.org)
  • A pathological fracture could occasionally be the first sign of this tumour. (atlasgeneticsoncology.org)
  • Between 1992 and 2008, we treated 35 patients with giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone, seven of the 35 pre-sented with a pathological fracture. (scirp.org)
  • Overall, 72 percent of patients had objective tumor response, per protocol defined criteria, including 25 percent of patients who had an objective tumor response according to modified RECIST(Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors). (amgen.com)
  • abstract = "Background: Giant cell tumor of bone accounts for 4{\%} to 5{\%} of primary bone tumors. (elsevier.com)
  • Metachronous Multicentric Giant cell tumor: a case report ABSTRACT Multicentric giant cell tumors represent less than 1% of all giant cell tumors of bones. (ipl.org)
  • abstract = "Paget disease of bone (PDB) is a skeletal disorder characterized by focal abnormalities of bone remodeling, which result in enlarged and deformed bones in one or more regions of the skeleton. (elsevier.com)
  • abstract = "Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a multifunctional cytokine whose role in osteoclastic bone resorption has not been clearly defined. (elsevier.com)
  • The exact origin is still unknown, but data obtained from ultrastructural analyses and cell cultures, as well as novel molecular data, suggest that the stromal cell, or mononuclear spindle cell, is neoplastic. (atlasgeneticsoncology.org)
  • Therefore, some suggest that stromal cell tumour is a better name, because this fits more precisely the concept of the mononuclear spindled cell (stromal cell) as neoplastic. (atlasgeneticsoncology.org)
  • The spindle-shaped mononuclear cells are regarded as neoplastic. (atlasgeneticsoncology.org)
  • In contrast, the mononuclear histiocytic cells (MNHC) and multinucleated giant cell (MNGC) fractions are secondarily recruited and comprise the non-neoplastic cell population. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several of these abnormalities have previously been described in the benign giant cell tumors supporting a direct relationship between these benign and malignant neoplastic counterparts. (nebraska.edu)
  • Histopathological examination revealed a neoplasm composed of numerous osteoclast like giant cells amidst a background of mononuclear plump spindle cells suggestive of a GCT [Fig. 5 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Mixture of three cellular components composites the tumour: tumoral spindle shaped mononuclear cells, reactive rounded mononuclear cells and diffusely scattered osteoclast type giant cells. (atlasgeneticsoncology.org)
  • In most patients, the tumors are slow to develop, but may recur locally in as many as 50% of cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Giant cell tumor (GCT) of the bone or osteoclastoma is generally a benign and locally invasive tumor that occurs close to the joint of a mature bone. (cytojournal.com)
  • Giant-cell tumor of the bone (GCTOB), is a relatively uncommon tumor of the bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Malignancy in giant-cell tumor is uncommon and occurs in about 2% of all cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Giant cell tumor of the bone is a relatively uncommon tumor that is characterized by the presence of multinucleated giant cells . (drugster.info)
  • Tumor-induced osteomalacia/rickets is uncommon in children and is challenging for physicians to diagnose. (aappublications.org)
  • Complementary radiotherapy was performed because of the incomplete tumor remotion. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Radiotherapy, machine pictured here, is commonly used for treating bone cancer and other forms of cancer. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Radiotherapy works by damaging the DNA inside the tumor cells, preventing them from reproducing. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • OUTLINE: All patients undergo bone marrow or stem cell harvest (investigator option) no later than 12 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. (knowcancer.com)
  • In the absence of treatment, the continued and unchecked tumour growth leads to complete destruction of the bone, physical deformity and the possibility of loss of limb. (springer.com)
  • After an average follow-up of 20 months, three patients whose tumors shrunk during treatment experienced regrowth. (unm.edu)
  • Genomic changes observed across treatment may result from either clonal evolution or geographically disparate sampling of heterogeneous tumors. (nature.com)
  • Here we use computational modeling based on analysis of fifteen primary breast tumors and find that apparent clonal change between two tumor samples can frequently be explained by pre-treatment heterogeneity, such that at least two regions are necessary to detect treatment-induced clonal shifts. (nature.com)
  • Two tumors underwent clonal replacement with treatment, and mathematical modeling indicates these two tumors had resistant subclones prior to treatment and rates of resistance-related genomic changes that were substantially larger than previous estimates. (nature.com)
  • These results raise the possibility that treatment-induced selective pressure may lead to the outgrowth of resistant subclones undetected in the pre-treatment tumor 9 . (nature.com)
  • Importantly, however, it is not clear whether and when observed tumor changes with neoadjuvant therapy reflect treatment-induced clonal evolution rather than pre-existing intra-tumor heterogeneity (ITH). (nature.com)
  • Craniofacial treatment of giant-cell tumors of the sphenoid bone. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Introduction : Treatment of benign giant-cell tumor is difficult. (nicoledelepine.fr)
  • Subjects will undergo tumor imaging every 2 months (8 weeks) for the first 6 months and approximately every 3 months thereafter while on treatment. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Giant cell tumor of bone: its pathologic appearance, grading, supposed variants and treatment. (ac.ir)
  • Cryosurgery in the treatment of giant cell tumors of bone. (jbstjournal.com)
  • Published studies have mainly focused on case reports, and thus there is no consistent treatment strategy for this tumor at this location. (ac.ir)
  • The goal for treatment of a giant cell tumor is to remove the tumor and prevent bone damage. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • bone diseases or disorders, list or types of bone diseases, homeopathy medicine, and homeopathic treatment for bone diseases. (hpathy.com)
  • The defining histologic characteristic of GCT is the presence of a plethora of multinucleated giant cells. (medscape.com)
  • Of the 187 patients whose tumors could be measured, 47 patients had their tumors reduce in size after an average of three months. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Xgeva was approved in 2010 to prevent fractures when cancer has spread to the bones. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Giant cell bone tumor is a benign, non-cancer tumor. (pointclickcares.com)
  • Cancer occurs when cells in the body (in this case bone cells) divide without control or order. (empowher.com)
  • Cancer may form in the bone or spread to the bone from another site in the body. (empowher.com)
  • The sooner bone cancer is treated, the more favorable the outcome. (empowher.com)
  • The cause of primary bone cancer is unknown. (empowher.com)
  • Radiation therapy for bone cancer uses radiation to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. (denverhealth.org)
  • Bone cancer occurs when cells divide without control or order. (denverhealth.org)
  • There may be more risk factors for specific types of bone cancer. (denverhealth.org)
  • 4] D. C. Dahlin, R. E. Cupps and E. W. Johnson Jr., "Giant-Cell Tumor: A Study of 195 Cases," Cancer, Vol. 25, No. 5, May 1970, pp. 1061-1070. (scirp.org)
  • Tumor just means lump or mass, but is often used to describe cancer. (healthtap.com)
  • Primary bone cancer , which is cancer that starts in the bone. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Secondary bone cancer , which is when cancer starts somewhere else and spreads to the bone. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Multiple myeloma usually affects those over the age of 50, and is the most common form of primary bone cancer. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • It can affect any bone in the body and is the most common primary bone cancer, affecting about six people per 100,000 every year . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Plasmacytoma is cancer of the white blood cells (plasma cells) that may become Multiple Myeloma . (spineuniverse.com)
  • What's to know about bone cancer? (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Bone cancer is divided into primary and secondary bone cancer: primary bone cancer forms in the cells of the bone and secondary bone cancer starts elsewhere, eventually spreading to bones. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A range of diagnostic tests can help diagnose bone cancer. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • There are three approaches to treating bone cancer. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • It involves the use of high-energy X-rays or particles to destroy cancer cells. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • More specifically, it refers to the destruction of cancer cells. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Chemotherapy, when used to prevent the return of cancer, is most often used after a tumor has been removed surgically. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In the cohort with surgically salvageable tumors, five (22%) had complete responses, seven (30%) had partial responses, and the remaining 11 had stable disease. (medpagetoday.com)
  • shrink the tumor, making it easier to then surgically remove it. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Tumors that can't be removed surgically can often be controlled and sometimes destroyed with radiation therapy. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Giant cell tumor of bone with selective metastases to mediastinal lymph nodes. (medscape.com)
  • Giant cell tumors of bone are known for their unpredictable behavior characterized occasionally even by metastases. (pdf-paper.com)