Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal: Neoplasms composed of primordial GERM CELLS of embryonic GONADS or of elements of the germ layers of the EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the gonads or present in an embryo or FETUS.Bread: Baked food product made of flour or meal that is moistened, kneaded, and sometimes fermented. A major food since prehistoric times, it has been made in various forms using a variety of ingredients and methods.Triticum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is the source of EDIBLE GRAIN. A hybrid with rye (SECALE CEREALE) is called TRITICALE. The seed is ground into FLOUR and used to make BREAD, and is the source of WHEAT GERM AGGLUTININS.Wheat Germ Agglutinins: Lectins purified from the germinating seeds of common wheat (Triticum vulgare); these bind to certain carbohydrate moieties on cell surface glycoproteins and are used to identify certain cell populations and inhibit or promote some immunological or physiological activities. There are at least two isoforms of this lectin.Testis: The male gonad containing two functional parts: the SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES for the production and transport of male germ cells (SPERMATOGENESIS) and the interstitial compartment containing LEYDIG CELLS that produce ANDROGENS.Food-Processing Industry: The productive enterprises concerned with food processing.Spermatogenesis: The process of germ cell development in the male from the primordial germ cells, through SPERMATOGONIA; SPERMATOCYTES; SPERMATIDS; to the mature haploid SPERMATOZOA.Germ Layers: The three primary germinal layers (ECTODERM; ENDODERM; and MESODERM) developed during GASTRULATION that provide tissues and body plan of a mature organism. They derive from two early layers, hypoblast and epiblast.Food, Fortified: Any food that has been supplemented with essential nutrients either in quantities that are greater than those present normally, or which are not present in the food normally. Fortified food includes also food to which various nutrients have been added to compensate for those removed by refinement or processing. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Tooth Germ: The collective tissues from which an entire tooth is formed, including the DENTAL SAC; ENAMEL ORGAN; and DENTAL PAPILLA. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Testicular Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the TESTIS. Germ cell tumors (GERMINOMA) of the testis constitute 95% of all testicular neoplasms.Cereals: Seeds from grasses (POACEAE) which are important in the diet.Amorphophallus: A plant genus of the family ARACEAE. Members contain konjac glucomannan (MANNANS) and SEROTONIN.Spermatozoa: Mature male germ cells derived from SPERMATIDS. As spermatids move toward the lumen of the SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES, they undergo extensive structural changes including the loss of cytoplasm, condensation of CHROMATIN into the SPERM HEAD, formation of the ACROSOME cap, the SPERM MIDPIECE and the SPERM TAIL that provides motility.Soybeans: An annual legume. The SEEDS of this plant are edible and used to produce a variety of SOY FOODS.Germinoma: A malignant neoplasm of the germinal tissue of the GONADS; MEDIASTINUM; or pineal region. Germinomas are uniform in appearance, consisting of large, round cells with vesicular nuclei and clear or finely granular eosinophilic-staining cytoplasm. (Stedman, 265th ed; from DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, pp1642-3)Spermatogonia: Euploid male germ cells of an early stage of SPERMATOGENESIS, derived from prespermatogonia. With the onset of puberty, spermatogonia at the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubule proliferate by mitotic then meiotic divisions and give rise to the haploid SPERMATOCYTES.Fagopyrum: A plant genus of the family POLYGONACEAE that is used as an EDIBLE GRAIN. Although the seeds are used as cereal, the plant is not one of the cereal grasses (POACEAE).Sertoli Cells: Supporting cells projecting inward from the basement membrane of SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES. They surround and nourish the developing male germ cells and secrete ANDROGEN-BINDING PROTEIN and hormones such as ANTI-MULLERIAN HORMONE. The tight junctions of Sertoli cells with the SPERMATOGONIA and SPERMATOCYTES provide a BLOOD-TESTIS BARRIER.Seminiferous Tubules: The convoluted tubules in the TESTIS where sperm are produced (SPERMATOGENESIS) and conveyed to the RETE TESTIS. Spermatogenic tubules are composed of developing germ cells and the supporting SERTOLI CELLS.Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Gonads: The gamete-producing glands, OVARY or TESTIS.Spermatocytes: Male germ cells derived from SPERMATOGONIA. The euploid primary spermatocytes undergo MEIOSIS and give rise to the haploid secondary spermatocytes which in turn give rise to SPERMATIDS.Fish Flour: A flour made of pulverized, dried fish or fish parts.Spermatids: Male germ cells derived from the haploid secondary SPERMATOCYTES. Without further division, spermatids undergo structural changes and give rise to SPERMATOZOA.Secale cereale: A hardy grain crop, rye, grown in northern climates. It is the most frequent host to ergot (CLAVICEPS), the toxic fungus. Its hybrid with TRITICUM is TRITICALE, another grain.Typhaceae: A plant family of the order Typhales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons) that contains a single genus, Typha, that grows worldwide.Cooking: The art or practice of preparing food. It includes the preparation of special foods for diets in various diseases.Nutritive Value: An indication of the contribution of a food to the nutrient content of the diet. This value depends on the quantity of a food which is digested and absorbed and the amounts of the essential nutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrate, minerals, vitamins) which it contains. This value can be affected by soil and growing conditions, handling and storage, and processing.Food Industry: The industry concerned with processing, preparing, preserving, distributing, and serving of foods and beverages.Seminoma: A radiosensitive, malignant neoplasm of the testis, thought to be derived from primordial germ cells of the sexually undifferentiated embryonic gonad. There are three variants: classical (typical), the most common type; anaplastic; and spermatocytic. The classical seminoma is composed of fairly well differentiated sheets or cords of uniform polygonal or round cells (seminoma cells), each cell having abundant clear cytoplasm, distinct cell membranes, a centrally placed round nucleus, and one or more nucleoli. In the female, a grossly and histologically identical neoplasm, known as dysgerminoma, occurs. (Dorland, 27th ed)Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Beetles: INSECTS of the order Coleoptera, containing over 350,000 species in 150 families. They possess hard bodies and their mouthparts are adapted for chewing.Glutens: Prolamins in the endosperm of SEEDS from the Triticeae tribe which includes species of WHEAT; BARLEY; and RYE.Dietary Fiber: The remnants of plant cell walls that are resistant to digestion by the alimentary enzymes of man. It comprises various polysaccharides and lignins.alpha-Amylases: Enzymes that catalyze the endohydrolysis of 1,4-alpha-glycosidic linkages in STARCH; GLYCOGEN; and related POLYSACCHARIDES and OLIGOSACCHARIDES containing 3 or more 1,4-alpha-linked D-glucose units.Meiosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division, occurring during maturation of the GERM CELLS. Two successive cell nucleus divisions following a single chromosome duplication (S PHASE) result in daughter cells with half the number of CHROMOSOMES as the parent cells.Oogenesis: The process of germ cell development in the female from the primordial germ cells through OOGONIA to the mature haploid ova (OVUM).Weevils: BEETLES in the family Curculionidae and the largest family in the order COLEOPTERA. They have a markedly convex shape and many are considered pests.Respiratory Hypersensitivity: A form of hypersensitivity affecting the respiratory tract. It includes ASTHMA and RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Phytic Acid: Complexing agent for removal of traces of heavy metal ions. It acts also as a hypocalcemic agent.Food Analysis: Measurement and evaluation of the components of substances to be taken as FOOD.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Insect Proteins: Proteins found in any species of insect.Cottonseed Oil: Oil obtained from the seeds of Gossypium herbaceum L., the cotton plant. It is used in dietary products such as oleomargarine and many cooking oils. Cottonseed oil is commonly used in soaps and cosmetics.Starch: Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.Methoprene: Juvenile hormone analog and insect growth regulator used to control insects by disrupting metamorphosis. Has been effective in controlling mosquito larvae.Gametogenesis: The process of germ cell development from the primordial GERM CELLS to the mature haploid GAMETES: ova in the female (OOGENESIS) or sperm in the male (SPERMATOGENESIS).Amaranthus: A plant genus, in the family AMARANTHACEAE, best known as a source of high-protein grain crops and of Red Dye No. 2 (AMARANTH DYE). Tumbleweed sometimes refers to Amaranthus but more often refers to SALSOLA.Ovary: The reproductive organ (GONADS) in female animals. In vertebrates, the ovary contains two functional parts: the OVARIAN FOLLICLE for the production of female germ cells (OOGENESIS); and the endocrine cells (GRANULOSA CELLS; THECA CELLS; and LUTEAL CELLS) for the production of ESTROGENS and PROGESTERONE.Food Hypersensitivity: Gastrointestinal disturbances, skin eruptions, or shock due to allergic reactions to allergens in food.Gliadin: Simple protein, one of the prolamines, derived from the gluten of wheat, rye, etc. May be separated into 4 discrete electrophoretic fractions. It is the toxic factor associated with CELIAC DISEASE.Avena sativa: A plant species of the family POACEAE that is widely cultivated for its edible seeds.Biological Availability: The extent to which the active ingredient of a drug dosage form becomes available at the site of drug action or in a biological medium believed to reflect accessibility to a site of action.Teratoma: A true neoplasm composed of a number of different types of tissue, none of which is native to the area in which it occurs. It is composed of tissues that are derived from three germinal layers, the endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. They are classified histologically as mature (benign) or immature (malignant). (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1642)Wheat Hypersensitivity: Allergic reaction to wheat that is triggered by the immune system.Food Technology: The application of knowledge to the food industry.Seminiferous Epithelium: The epithelium lining the seminiferous tubules composed of primary male germ cells (SPERMATOGONIA) and supporting SERTOLI CELLS. As SPERMATOGENESIS proceeds, the developing germ cells migrate toward the lumen. The adluminal compartment, the inner two thirds of the tubules, contains SPERMATOCYTES and the more advanced germ cells.Allergens: Antigen-type substances that produce immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Dysgerminoma: A malignant ovarian neoplasm, thought to be derived from primordial germ cells of the sexually undifferentiated embryonic gonad. It is the counterpart of the classical seminoma of the testis, to which it is both grossly and histologically identical. Dysgerminomas comprise 16% of all germ cell tumors but are rare before the age of 10, although nearly 50% occur before the age of 20. They are generally considered of low-grade malignancy but may spread if the tumor extends through its capsule and involves lymph nodes or blood vessels. (Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1646)Prebiotics: Non-digestible food ingredients mostly of a carbohydrate base that improve human health by selectively stimulating the growth and/or activity of existing BACTERIA in the COLON.Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.Arabia: The great peninsula of southwest Asia comprising most of the present countries of the Middle East. It has been known since the first millennium B.C. In early times it was divided into Arabia Petraea, the northwest part, the only part ever conquered, becoming a Roman province; Arabia Deserta, the northern part between Syria and Mesopotamia; and Arabia Felix, the main part of the peninsula but by some geographers restricted to modern Yemen. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p63)Digestion: The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.Air Pollutants, Occupational: Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.Embryo, Nonmammalian: The developmental entity of a fertilized egg (ZYGOTE) in animal species other than MAMMALS. For chickens, use CHICK EMBRYO.Soybean Proteins: Proteins which are present in or isolated from SOYBEANS.Juvenile Hormones: Compounds, either natural or synthetic, which block development of the growing insect.Inhalation Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents by inhaling them.Fermentation: Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Skin Tests: Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.Musa: A plant genus of the family Musaceae, order Zingiberales, subclass Zingiberidae, class Liliopsida.Vegetable Proteins: Proteins which are present in or isolated from vegetables or vegetable products used as food. The concept is distinguished from PLANT PROTEINS which refers to non-dietary proteins from plants.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Oogonia: Euploid female germ cells of an early stage of OOGENESIS, derived from primordial germ cells during ovarian differentiation. Oogonia undergo MEIOSIS and give rise to haploid OOCYTESIntradermal Tests: Skin tests in which the sensitizer is injected.Endodermal Sinus Tumor: An unusual and aggressive tumor of germ-cell origin that reproduces the extraembryonic structures of the early embryo. It is the most common malignant germ cell tumor found in children. It is characterized by a labyrinthine glandular pattern of flat epithelial cells and rounded papillary processes with a central capillary (Schiller-Duval body). The tumor is rarely bilateral. Before the use of combination chemotherapy, the tumor was almost invariably fatal. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1189)Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Genes, Insect: The functional hereditary units of INSECTS.Amylose: An unbranched glucan in starch.Hymenolepiasis: Infection with tapeworms of the genus Hymenolepis.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Zinc Oxide: A mild astringent and topical protectant with some antiseptic action. It is also used in bandages, pastes, ointments, dental cements, and as a sunblock.Dietary Proteins: Proteins obtained from foods. They are the main source of the ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS.Lupinus: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that is a source of SPARTEINE, lupanine and other lupin alkaloids.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Sex Differentiation: The process in developing sex- or gender-specific tissue, organ, or function after SEX DETERMINATION PROCESSES have set the sex of the GONADS. Major areas of sex differentiation occur in the reproductive tract (GENITALIA) and the brain.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.UzbekistanThioglycosidesMicronutrients: Essential dietary elements or organic compounds that are required in only small quantities for normal physiologic processes to occur.Absorption: The physical or physiological processes by which substances, tissue, cells, etc. take up or take in other substances or energy.Physicochemical Processes: Physical reactions involved in the formation of or changes in the structure of atoms and molecules and their interactions.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Insect Repellents: Substances causing insects to turn away from them or reject them as food.Guam: An island in Micronesia, east of the Philippines, the largest and southernmost of the Marianas. Its capital is Agana. It was discovered by Magellan in 1521 and occupied by Spain in 1565. They ceded it to the United States in 1898. It is an unincorporated territory of the United States, administered by the Department of the Interior since 1950. The derivation of the name Guam is in dispute. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p471)RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Radioallergosorbent Test: An in vitro allergen radioimmunoassay in which allergens are coupled to an immunosorbent. The coupled allergens bind the IgE in the sera of patients which in turn binds radioisotope-labeled anti-IMMUNOGLOBULIN E antibodies.Octamer Transcription Factor-3: An octamer transcription factor that is expressed primarily in totipotent embryonic STEM CELLS and GERM CELLS and is down-regulated during CELL DIFFERENTIATION.Iron, Dietary: Iron or iron compounds used in foods or as food. Dietary iron is important in oxygen transport and the synthesis of the iron-porphyrin proteins hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochromes, and cytochrome oxidase. Insufficient amounts of dietary iron can lead to iron-deficiency anemia.Oocytes: Female germ cells derived from OOGONIA and termed OOCYTES when they enter MEIOSIS. The primary oocytes begin meiosis but are arrested at the diplotene state until OVULATION at PUBERTY to give rise to haploid secondary oocytes or ova (OVUM).Pediococcus: A genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacteria whose growth is dependent on the presence of a fermentable carbohydrate. No endospores are produced. Its organisms are found in fermenting plant products and are nonpathogenic to plants and animals, including humans.Sapotaceae: A plant family of the order Ebenales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida that are tropical trees which have elongate latex cells. Several members bear sweet edible fruits and produce triterpenoid saponins.Peptones: Derived proteins or mixtures of cleavage products produced by the partial hydrolysis of a native protein either by an acid or by an enzyme. Peptones are readily soluble in water, and are not precipitable by heat, by alkalis, or by saturation with ammonium sulfate. (Dorland, 28th ed)Iron: A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 6, Group A, Member 1: An orphan nuclear receptor expressed mainly in the GERM CELLS of GONADS. It functions as a transcription factor that binds to a direct repeat of the sequence AGGTCA and may play a role in the regulation of EMBRYOGENESIS and germ cell differentiation.Cultured Milk Products: Milk modified with controlled FERMENTATION. This should not be confused with KAFFIR LIME or with KAFFIR CORN.Infertility, Male: The inability of the male to effect FERTILIZATION of an OVUM after a specified period of unprotected intercourse. Male sterility is permanent infertility.Intestine, Large: A segment of the LOWER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT that includes the CECUM; the COLON; and the RECTUM.Folic Acid: A member of the vitamin B family that stimulates the hematopoietic system. It is present in the liver and kidney and is found in mushrooms, spinach, yeast, green leaves, and grasses (POACEAE). Folic acid is used in the treatment and prevention of folate deficiencies and megaloblastic anemia.Metamorphosis, Biological: Profound physical changes during maturation of living organisms from the immature forms to the adult forms, such as from TADPOLES to frogs; caterpillars to BUTTERFLIES.RNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins that bind to RNA molecules. Included here are RIBONUCLEOPROTEINS and other proteins whose function is to bind specifically to RNA.Phosphines: Inorganic or organic compounds derived from phosphine (PH3) by the replacement of H atoms. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Caenorhabditis elegans: A species of nematode that is widely used in biological, biochemical, and genetic studies.Pupa: An inactive stage between the larval and adult stages in the life cycle of insects.Molting: Periodic casting off FEATHERS; HAIR; or cuticle. Molting is a process of sloughing or desquamation, especially the shedding of an outer covering and the development of a new one. This phenomenon permits growth in ARTHROPODS, skin renewal in AMPHIBIANS and REPTILES, and the shedding of winter coats in BIRDS and MAMMALS.In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.Pulicaria: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Members contain pulicanadienes and other cytotoxic SESQUITERPENES.Foods, Specialized: Foods and beverages prepared for use to meet specific needs such as infant foods.Gossypol: A dimeric sesquiterpene found in cottonseed (GOSSYPIUM). The (-) isomer is active as a male contraceptive (CONTRACEPTIVE AGENTS, MALE) whereas toxic symptoms are associated with the (+) isomer.Ovum: A mature haploid female germ cell extruded from the OVARY at OVULATION.Nepeta: A genus of the LAMIACEAE family. It is known for its mild calming effect and for the way cats are attracted to the aroma.RNA Interference: A gene silencing phenomenon whereby specific dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) trigger the degradation of homologous mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). The specific dsRNAs are processed into SMALL INTERFERING RNA (siRNA) which serves as a guide for cleavage of the homologous mRNA in the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX. DNA METHYLATION may also be triggered during this process.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Zinc Sulfate: A compound given in the treatment of conditions associated with zinc deficiency such as acrodermatitis enteropathica. Externally, zinc sulfate is used as an astringent in lotions and eye drops. (Reynolds JEF(Ed): Martindale: The Extra Pharmacopoeia (electronic version). Micromedex, Inc, Englewood, CO, 1995)Cryptorchidism: A developmental defect in which a TESTIS or both TESTES failed to descend from high in the ABDOMEN to the bottom of the SCROTUM. Testicular descent is essential to normal SPERMATOGENESIS which requires temperature lower than the BODY TEMPERATURE. Cryptorchidism can be subclassified by the location of the maldescended testis.Rhizome: Root-like underground horizontal stem of plants that produces shoots above and roots below. Distinguished from true roots which don't have buds and nodes. Similar to true roots in being underground and thickened by storage deposits.Cycas: A plant genus of the family Cycadaceae, order Cycadales, class Cycadopsida, division CYCADOPHYTA of palm-like trees. It is a source of CYCASIN, the beta-D-glucoside of methylazoxymethanol.Iron Carbonyl Compounds: Complex of iron atoms chelated with carbonyl ions.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Ecdysterone: A steroid hormone that regulates the processes of MOLTING or ecdysis in insects. Ecdysterone is the 20-hydroxylated ECDYSONE.Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Embryo, Mammalian: The entity of a developing mammal (MAMMALS), generally from the cleavage of a ZYGOTE to the end of embryonic differentiation of basic structures. For the human embryo, this represents the first two months of intrauterine development preceding the stages of the FETUS.Anemia, Iron-Deficiency: Anemia characterized by decreased or absent iron stores, low serum iron concentration, low transferrin saturation, and low hemoglobin concentration or hematocrit value. The erythrocytes are hypochromic and microcytic and the iron binding capacity is increased.Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins: Proteins from the nematode species CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS. The proteins from this species are the subject of scientific interest in the area of multicellular organism MORPHOGENESIS.Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Hymenolepis diminuta: A species of tapeworm (TAPEWORMS) infecting RATS and MICE but rarely causing disease in humans. Its life cycle involves RODENTS as the definitive host and BEETLES as the intermediate host.Zinc: A metallic element of atomic number 30 and atomic weight 65.38. It is a necessary trace element in the diet, forming an essential part of many enzymes, and playing an important role in protein synthesis and in cell division. Zinc deficiency is associated with ANEMIA, short stature, HYPOGONADISM, impaired WOUND HEALING, and geophagia. It is known by the symbol Zn.Stem Cells: Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Lactobacillales: An order of gram-positive bacteria in the class Bacilli, that have the ability to ferment sugars to lactic acid. They are widespread in nature and commonly used to produce fermented foods.Mediastinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MEDIASTINUM.Neural Tube Defects: Congenital malformations of the central nervous system and adjacent structures related to defective neural tube closure during the first trimester of pregnancy generally occurring between days 18-29 of gestation. Ectodermal and mesodermal malformations (mainly involving the skull and vertebrae) may occur as a result of defects of neural tube closure. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, pp31-41)Immunoglobulin E: An immunoglobulin associated with MAST CELLS. Overexpression has been associated with allergic hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Hot Temperature: Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.Rhinitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA, the mucous membrane lining the NASAL CAVITIES.Amylases: A group of amylolytic enzymes that cleave starch, glycogen, and related alpha-1,4-glucans. (Stedman, 25th ed) EC 3.2.1.-.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Plant Preparations: Material prepared from plants.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.RNA, Messenger, Stored: Messenger RNA that is stored in a masked state for translation at a later time. Distinguish from RNA, UNTRANSLATED which refers to non-messenger RNA, i.e. RNA that does not code for protein.Crosses, Genetic: Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.Carcinoma, Embryonal: A highly malignant, primitive form of carcinoma, probably of germinal cell or teratomatous derivation, usually arising in a gonad and rarely in other sites. It is rare in the female ovary, but in the male it accounts for 20% of all testicular tumors. (From Dorland, 27th ed & Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1595)Oryza sativa: Annual cereal grass of the family POACEAE and its edible starchy grain, rice, which is the staple food of roughly one-half of the world's population.Pluripotent Stem Cells: Cells that can give rise to cells of the three different GERM LAYERS.Foodborne Diseases: Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.Cell Lineage: The developmental history of specific differentiated cell types as traced back to the original STEM CELLS in the embryo.Intestinal Absorption: Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.Sex Determination Analysis: Validation of the SEX of an individual by inspection of the GONADS and/or by genetic tests.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Retroperitoneal NeoplasmsDietary Carbohydrates: Carbohydrates present in food comprising digestible sugars and starches and indigestible cellulose and other dietary fibers. The former are the major source of energy. The sugars are in beet and cane sugar, fruits, honey, sweet corn, corn syrup, milk and milk products, etc.; the starches are in cereal grains, legumes (FABACEAE), tubers, etc. (From Claudio & Lagua, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Dictionary, 3d ed, p32, p277)Cannibalism: Eating other individuals of one's own species.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Body Patterning: The processes occurring in early development that direct morphogenesis. They specify the body plan ensuring that cells will proceed to differentiate, grow, and diversify in size and shape at the correct relative positions. Included are axial patterning, segmentation, compartment specification, limb position, organ boundary patterning, blood vessel patterning, etc.Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Hordeum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The EDIBLE GRAIN, barley, is widely used as food.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Dermatitis, Occupational: A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.Arachis hypogaea: A plant species of the family FABACEAE that yields edible seeds, the familiar peanuts, which contain protein, oil and lectins.Bromelains: Protein-digesting and milk-clotting enzymes found in PINEAPPLE fruit juice and stem tissue. Enzymes from the two sources are distinguished as fruit bromelain and stem bromelain. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.4.22.4.Disorders of Sex Development: In gonochoristic organisms, congenital conditions in which development of chromosomal, gonadal, or anatomical sex is atypical. Effects from exposure to abnormal levels of GONADAL HORMONES in the maternal environment, or disruption of the function of those hormones by ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS are included.Fabaceae: The large family of plants characterized by pods. Some are edible and some cause LATHYRISM or FAVISM and other forms of poisoning. Other species yield useful materials like gums from ACACIA and various LECTINS like PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS from PHASEOLUS. Many of them harbor NITROGEN FIXATION bacteria on their roots. Many but not all species of "beans" belong to this family.Leydig Cells: Steroid-producing cells in the interstitial tissue of the TESTIS. They are under the regulation of PITUITARY HORMONES; LUTEINIZING HORMONE; or interstitial cell-stimulating hormone. TESTOSTERONE is the major androgen (ANDROGENS) produced.Mentha: Mentha is a genus of the mint family (LAMIACEAE). It is known for species having characteristic flavor and aroma.Embryonic Development: Morphological and physiological development of EMBRYOS.Ferrous Compounds: Inorganic or organic compounds that contain divalent iron.Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis: Electrophoresis in which various denaturant gradients are used to induce nucleic acids to melt at various stages resulting in separation of molecules based on small sequence differences including SNPs. The denaturants used include heat, formamide, and urea.Hypersensitivity, Immediate: Hypersensitivity reactions which occur within minutes of exposure to challenging antigen due to the release of histamine which follows the antigen-antibody reaction and causes smooth muscle contraction and increased vascular permeability.Wheat Germ Agglutinin-Horseradish Peroxidase Conjugate: The lectin wheatgerm agglutinin conjugated to the enzyme HORSERADISH PEROXIDASE. It is widely used for tracing neural pathways.Anaphylaxis: An acute hypersensitivity reaction due to exposure to a previously encountered ANTIGEN. The reaction may include rapidly progressing URTICARIA, respiratory distress, vascular collapse, systemic SHOCK, and death.Manihot: A plant genus of the family EUPHORBIACEAE that is perennial with conspicuous, almost palmate leaves like those of RICINUS but more deeply parted into five to nine lobes. It is a source of a starch after removal of the cyanogenic glucosides. The common name of Arrowroot is also used with Maranta (MARANTACEAE). The common name of yuca is also used for YUCCA.Genome, Insect: The genetic complement of an insect (INSECTS) as represented in its DNA.Caseins: A mixture of related phosphoproteins occurring in milk and cheese. The group is characterized as one of the most nutritive milk proteins, containing all of the common amino acids and rich in the essential ones.Sperm Count: A count of SPERM in the ejaculum, expressed as number per milliliter.Food: Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.GuatemalaIron Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of iron that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Fe atoms with atomic weights 52, 53, 55, and 59-61 are radioactive iron isotopes.Flour: Ground up seed of WHEAT.Pachytene Stage: The stage in the first meiotic prophase, following ZYGOTENE STAGE, when CROSSING OVER between homologous CHROMOSOMES begins.Hymenolepis: A genus of small tapeworms of birds and mammals.Chimera: An individual that contains cell populations derived from different zygotes.Trypsin Inhibitors: Serine proteinase inhibitors which inhibit trypsin. They may be endogenous or exogenous compounds.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Household Products: Substances or materials used in the course of housekeeping or personal routine.
flour = 41 mg. *orange = 40 mg. *human milk = 33 mg. *rice, white, long-grain, parboiled, enriched, cooked = 19 mg ... wheat germs = 72 mg. *pigeon peas = 62.7 mg. *chickpeas = 53.1 mg. *eggs, boiled = 50 mg ...
... and millet flours among other grains; Baking Ingredients, such as wheat germ and wheat gluten; Baking mixes, such as bread ... Products include: Breakfast Foods, including cold and hot cereals, granola, and pancake/waffle mixes; Flours, including white, ...
The Company made its Hercules brown flour at the North Warehouse which was also used to store and pack flour until the early ... Bran, wheat-germ and wheatfeed, which are milling by-products, also sold, the last for incorporation in animal feeds. From the ... 1850 City Flour Mills built for Joseph & Jonah Hadley, millers. Brick building. Stonegrinding and flour-dressing machines, ... Priday, Metford and Company Limited was a family-run company that produced flour at the City Flour Mills, Gloucester, England ...
Whole wheat flours that contain raw wheat germ, instead of toasted germ, have higher levels of glutathione, and thus are said ... Glutathione is also found in whole wheat flour, in particular in the wheat germ. ... Toasted wheat germ will not have the same ... By allowing the germ and all but the outer, coarser layers of broad bran to mix in with the flour, we get the sweet-tasting ... of fine flour, 16 of brown meal, and 10 of bran. Jacob Bell, ed. (1857-58). The Pharmaceutical journal and Transactions. XVII. ...
The word "farina" is Latin, meaning meal or flour. It is made from the germ and endosperm of the grain, which is milled to a ... In commercially-available farina the bran and most of the germ are removed. Cream of Wheat, Malt-O-Meal, and Farina Mills are ...
1972). "Composition of Air-classified Defatted Com and Wheat-Germ Flours" (PDF). Cereal Chemistry. 49 (5): 499-507. "Nutrition ... Amaranth grain is deficient in essential amino acids such as leucine and threonine - both of which are present in wheat germ. ... Content - Wheat Germ Crude per 100 g". Conde Nast for the USDA National Nutrient Database, Release SR-21. 2014. Retrieved 1 ...
Less processed dough conditioners include sprouted- or malted-grain flours, soy, milk, wheat germ, potatoes, gluten, yeast, and ... Malted, diastatic flours are not typically added by manufacturers to whole-wheat flours. Robertson et al. point out that some ... Lecithin added at a rate of 0.25-to-0.6% of the flour weight acts as a dough conditioner. Based on total weight, egg yolk ... In the United States the maximum level of addition to flour is 45 ppm for ADA, 75 ppm for potassium bromate, and 200 ppm for ...
Also, soaking the corn in lye kills the seed's germ, which keeps it from sprouting while in storage. Finally, in addition to ... People consume hominy in intact kernels, grind it into sand-sized particles for grits, or into flour. In Mexican cooking, ... to make a sort of porridge with corn starch or flour to thicken the mixture and condensed milk, vanilla, and nutmeg. ...
The milling process separates the grain into four distinct physical components: the germ, flour, fine grits, and coarse grits. ... Because of the differential swelling of germ and endosperm, the germ becomes more flexible and resilient during tempering while ... The main objective of the dry milling process is to separate the endosperm, which is mainly composed of starch, from the germ ... The objective of degermination in corn dry milling is to break down kernel to pericarp, endosperm and germ. Beall operation is ...
... nutritional content of flour ground with the wheat germ intact was a vast improvement over flour ground without the wheat germ ... However, the presence of wheat germ also meant that the flour would spoil quickly, especially in the heat of summer. A local ... Kittitas Valley farmers brought their wheat crops to the Thorp Mill in wagons, and the grain was ground into flour, bran, or ... The railroad also provided local farmers with an easy means to sell their flour throughout the Puget Sound region. Although its ...
The cap surface is smooth, matte, and is finely pruinose-as if coated with very fine flour. The gills, which have an adnate ... Spores are roughly elliptical, smooth, thick-walled with a germ pore, and measure 10-12 by 5-9 μm. The basidia (spore-bearing ... Its odor is both farinaceous (like freshly ground flour) and fungal, while its taste is bitter, with a cucumber aftertaste. The ...
In the United States, B-vitamin deficiencies became common in the first half of the 20th century due to white flour consumption ... In 1884, Takaki Kanehiro (1849-1920), a surgeon general in the Japanese navy, rejected the previous germ theory for beriberi ... As of 2016, about 85 countries had passed legislation mandating fortification of wheat flour with at least some nutrients, and ... Refining grain removes its bran and germ, and thus subtracts its naturally occurring vitamins and minerals. ...
The semolina is then ground into flour. This greatly simplifies the process of separating the endosperm from the bran and germ ... Different grades of flour can thus be produced. Semolina made from durum wheat is yellow in color. Semolina is often used as ... As the wheat is fed into the mill, the rollers flake off the bran and germ while the starch (or endosperm) is cracked into ... As an alternative to corn meal, semolina can be used to flour the baking surface to prevent sticking. In bread making, a small ...
... is found in the germ and aleurone layer of grains, and milling results in the reduction of this vitamin in white ... flour. The heating that occurs before most freezing and canning processes are other methods that may result in the loss of ...
A wheat berry, or wheatberry, is a whole wheat kernel (except for the hull/husk), composed of the bran, germ, and endosperm. ... If wheat berries are milled, whole-wheat flour is produced. Wheat berries are the primary ingredient in an Eastern European ... a dish made with boiled wheat berries Graham flour Rejuvelac, a fermented drink made from sprouted grain The Complete Guide to ...
By allowing the germ and all but the outer, coarser layers of broad bran to mix in with the flour, we get the sweet-tasting ... white flour. By 1912 it was more widely known that brown meal included the germ, which lent a characteristic sweetness. In 1889 ... this latter consisting of 3 parts fine bran and 17 parts white flour. Percy A. Amos (1912). Processes of flour manufacture. ... In making these part of the starch of the flour is changed by being mixed with the malt extract and water and kept for some ...
... without germ or bran), salt, water, and yeast leavening. Bread flour or other high gluten flours are preferred to create the ... bagels sold by Costco in Japan, are the same as in the U.S. At its most basic, traditional bagel dough contains wheat flour ( ... because of the presence in the dough of ingredients that supplant wheat flour in the original. Traditional bagels in North ...
Organic wheat is still stone-ground in small flour mills across Wales. The slow grinding of the flour retains the wheat germ in ... Smaller wing feathers would be used for brushing flour or oatmeal while baking. Goose meat was also used in cawl and Michaelmas ... In Ceredigion, Felin Ganol, at Llanrhystud, is an example of a restored flour mill that retains its original machinery. It is ...
Sons Ltd to find a trading name for their patent flour which was rich in wheat germ. Grime won £25 when he coined the word from ... GB 189905961 Smith, Richard A New or Improved Method or Process for Treating the Germ of Wheat for Food Purposes. 1900-02-17 ... Hovis Ltd is a British company that produces flour and bread. The brand originated in Macclesfield, Cheshire, in 1886, and ... Hovis specialises in high wheatgerm wholemeal flour, the bread being baked independently. It also produces the Nimble brand ...
Bob found a commercial flour mill in Oregon City that was for sale, painted it red, and went back into the flours business. ... used quartz millstones that operate at lower temperatures and blend the germ, its oil, the bran, and the endosperm, preserving ... They were the one of the first flour mills to open up labs that tested their products to certify organic and gluten-free ... The business that is now Bob's Red Mill began producing stone ground flours and cereals for the local area. In 1978, Moore sold ...
... bread has twice as much magnesium as white bread because the magnesium-rich germ and bran are removed when white flour is ... Following are some foods and the amount of magnesium in them: Black-eyed peas (1/2 cup) = 45 mg Buckwheat flour (100g (4 oz ... Sperazza, J. M.; Spremulli, L. L. (1983). "Quantitation of cation binding to wheat germ ribosomes: influences on subunit ...
It is made into a flour product called tsampa that is still a staple in Tibet. The flour is roasted and mixed with butter and ... Diamond, Jared M. (1997). Guns, germs, and steel: the fates of human societies. New York: W.W. Norton. p. 141. ISBN 0-393-03891 ... including flour, flakes similar to oatmeal, and grits. Barley meal, a wholemeal barley flour lighter than wheat meal but darker ... In the Pulitzer Prize-winning book Guns, Germs, and Steel, Jared Diamond proposed that the availability of barley, along with ...
Adding powdered milk and soy flour to bread increases its protein content, and restoring the germ to refined white flour ...
For example, wheat endosperm is ground into flour for bread (the rest of the grain is included as well in whole wheat flour), ... germ) and seed coat (bran) removed. The processed grain has a lower quality of nutrition. Endosperm thus has an important role ... In some cases (e.g. wheat, rice) the endosperm is selectively retained in food processing (commonly called white flour), and ...
It might be more accurate to use the term "acorn meal", although a meal is a coarser, less refined version of flour. Both flour ... The heart, or germ, of the kernel is removed and used for producing acorn oil, which is comparable in flavor and quality to ... Acorn soba noodles or in Korean, dotori guksu (hangul: 도토리국수) are made from acorn flour and a combination of grain-based flours ... They were then ground into flour using a saddle quern and milling stone. It is unknown exactly where acorn noodles were first ...
... partly defatted wheat germ, enriched farina, or enriched flour.. Enriched macaroni products with fortified protein-similar to ... Flour is first mounded on a flat surface and then a well in the pile of flour is created. Egg is then poured into the well and ... Rice flour, or legumes such as beans or lentils, are sometimes used in place of wheat flour to yield a different taste and ... Grain flours may also be supplemented with cooked potatoes.[33][34]. Other additions to the basic flour-liquid mixture may ...
buttermilk, baking soda, flaxseed, oat bran, wheat germ, wheat bran, graham flour, +eggs, +sunflower seed, +salt, +sugar, + ... Results 1-10 of 53,455 for recipes with flaxseed, graham flour, wheat bran, oat bran, wheat germ, buttermilk, baking soda ( ... baking soda, buttermilk, oat bran, wheat germ, +vegetable oil, +brown sugar, +flour, +salt, +eggs, +oatmeal, +blueberries ... baking soda, buttermilk, oat bran, wheat germ, +safflower oil, +brown sugar, +flour, +salt, +eggs, +oatmeal, +blueberries ...
The germ can be added to white or brown flour to make wheatgerm flour and is always present, naturally, in Wholemeal flours. ... Pastry Flour. Pastry flour is a soft wheat flour. Soft flours have a reduced gluten level and a relatively low protein content ... Brown Flour. A flour with an 85% extraction rate - or a flour with 15% of the wholegrain extracted. (See wholemeal flour). Very ... All-purpose Flour. Flour with a protein level of 10-12%. Ideal for general baking purposes. Higher protein flours make firmer, ...
... durum flour/wheat; enriched flour; farina; gluten; seitan; semolina; spelt; wheat bran; wheat germ; wheat starch; or whole ... Sufferers of Celiac Disease cannot eat foods made with all-purpose flour; bleached flour; bran; bread crumbs; couscous; ... Gliadin is what enables bread to rise properly while glutenin is the major protein in wheat flour, making up 47 percent of the ... Montina and nut flours. The Celiac Disease Foundation is a good resource for information about gluten-free foods. ...
... soy flour; spinach; wheat germ; whole grains; iron-fortified cereals. ... fights germs and other foreign substances that enter the body.. Third Category: Hemolytic Anemias. Hemolytic anemias are caused ...
General Mills is voluntarily recalling some bags of its Gold Medal Unbleached Flour because of salmonella concerns. The 5-pound ... General Mills recalls some flour over salmonella concerns. Posted 6:30 AM, January 24, 2019, by Associated Press ... MINNEAPOLIS (AP) - General Mills is voluntarily recalling some bags of its Gold Medal Unbleached Flour because of salmonella ... General Mills says all other types of Gold Medal Flour are not affected. ...
1. In a large bowl, mix all the dry ingredients: the coconut flour, almond meal, baking powder and salt. ... A good and delicious example is this Coconut Flour Almond Meal Pancakes Recipe from MindBodyGreen:30 ... 2 Wheat-based flours and byproducts that also contain high quantities of this protein include:3,4,5,6 ... White flour. • Whole wheat flour. • Graham flour. • Triticale. • Wheat germ. • Wheat bran ...
Pastry flour Semolina Wheat germ * The Everything Nutrition Book The Everything Nutrition Book ...
Corn Germ Oil Wholesale, Corn Suppliers - AlibabaThe oil pressing unit as the main stage, to make the vegetable seeds flake in ... Starch and Flour Industry , Corn Starch , Flour. Some of this corn starch is dried and packaged for use in food products. which ... The germ is passed to germ drier which is finally sent to oil extraction unit. The germ contains 45 per cent oil and the rest ... Wholesale Germs - Germs Manufacturers, Suppliers - EC21. This corn germ oil pressing machine adopts advanced crushing craft, ...
Whole Wheat Pastry: Flour Substitutions * How Much Omega-3 Is in Salmon? ... Wheat germ is the part of the lower section of the wheat plants embryo. It is surrounded by bran and endosperm. Wheat germ is ... Grow and harvest your own wheat germ to add to baked goods, top cereals or create a healthier batter for chicken. ...
Sift flours, wheat germ, salt, baking soda, cinnamon and baking powder together. Beat eggs, adding oil and sugar gradually ... Turn out onto lightly floured surface and knead in enough whole-wheat flour, about 3/4 cup, to make smooth dough. Lightly oil ... Combine all-purpose flour, yeast, brown sugar and salt in large bowl of electric mixer. Combine water, milk powder and 1/4 cup ... Combine cornmeal, flour, chili powder, baking powder and salt in large bowl. Add milk mixture and stir just until dry ...
Wheat Germ Wheat germ is the reproductive part of the plant that is separated during the milling process. It is a good source ... Wheat Flour Wheat flour is the finely ground product derived from the milling of wheat. It is an excellent source of dietary ... Rye flour has a hearty taste and and is rich with nutrients. It is an excellent source of dietary fiber. ... Wheat germ offers a concentrated source of Vitamin E, folic acid, phosphorus, thiamine, zinc, magnesium, and essential fatty ...
... wheat germ, flax seed, and whole oats to help support milk production for lactating mothers. ... Mix flour, brewers yeast, wheat germ, baking soda, salt, and cream of tartar in a separate bowl; add to butter mixture and ... And yes, husbands can eat them too! I have to hide these from my hubby when I make them! The brewers yeast, wheat germ, flax ...
TRITICUM VULGARE (WHEAT) FLOUR LIPIDS. TRITICUM VULGARE (WHEAT GERM) FLOUR LIPIDS. None Identified. ... Wheat Germ) Flour Lipids, Persea Gratissima (Avocado) Oil, Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate (Vitamin C), Glycine Soja (Soybean) Sterol ...
Mix flours, wheat germ and salt in large bowl. Cut in butter with 2 knives, then work with fingers to form crumbs. Make well in ... Stir in flour and cook 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat. Stir in hot water and bread crumbs. Bring soup back to boil, ... Place flour in large mixing bowl. Rub in butter with fingers until mixture forms crumbs. Stir in sugar, ginger and nutmeg. Make ... Stir, gradually drawing in flour to form stiff dough. If dough seems dry, add 1 or 2 spoonfuls more cream. Knead dough lightly ...
These breastmilk cookies are packed with flaxseed meal, oats, brewers yeast, molasses, and wheat germ ... 2 tbs wheat germ. *1 organic egg. *1 tsp organic vanilla. *1/2 cup organic oat flour ... Step 1: Mix water with flaxseed and wheat germ. In a bowl, mix the 2 tbs of flaxseed meal and 2 tbs of wheat germ with warm ... In a bowl, mix the 2 tbs of flaxseed meal and 2 tbs of wheat germ with warm water. Let sit for 5 minutes. Using a mixer, blend ...
3 cups wheat germ 2 cups rolled oats 1 cup wheat bran 1 cup sesame seeds 1/2 cup flour 1/4 cup oil 1 cup raisins Optional: ... 3 cups wheat germ. 2 cups rolled oats. 1 cup wheat bran. 1 cup sesame seeds. 1/2 cup flour. 1/4 cup oil. 1 cup raisins. ...
Oil Press and Oil Refinery Machine Supplier is one of the best Best selling 100TPD wheat roller flour milling plant ... wheat germ oil extract. Processing material:. Wheat, barley, corn, highland barley,. Processing capacity:. 10-3000T/D. ... According to Capacity of wheat flour making machine. Dimension(L*W*H):. According to Capacity of wheat flour making machine. ... 2) Sifter: to separate the flour, bran and other by-product, also separate large size and small size to ensure flour quality. ...
GoodMills Innovation launches high spermidine wheat germ. July 27, 2020. * Loryma develops binding system for authentic meat ... The flour can be used by food manufacturers to create a gluten-free, fat-free and almost carbohydrate-free noodle, ramen or ... Japanese company develops noodle flour made from trees. Posted By: News Deskon: December 09, 2015. In: Environment, Food, ... The noodle flour is made from the wood pulp of trees. © Okimenshi ...
Daks Molasses Wheat Germ Bread (Bread Machine) flour, molasses, +yeast, +wheat germ, +bran, +vegetable oil, +beer, +egg whites ... molasses, walnut, flour, +allspice, +yeast, +cranberries, +bread flour, +salt, +sour cream, +sugar, +water ... molasses, flour, walnut, +baking powder, +baking soda, +carrot, +cinnamon, +eggs, +raisins, +sugar, +salt, +vanilla extract, + ... flour, molasses, walnut, +allspice, +baking soda, +brown sugar, +cinnamon, +dates, +eggs, +vegetable oil, +zucchini ...
... whole-wheat flour, raisins, nuts, and chocolate chips take top billing in these jumbo, wholesome, take-me-along (skiing, ... Can you tell me if I would use these with the flour ratios or would I use these to replace the wheat germ? Has anyone tried one ... Mix the flours, wheat germ, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon in a separate bowl. Stir the dry ingredients into the creamed ... Wheat germ, whole-wheat flour, raisins, nuts, and chocolate chips take top billing in these jumbo, wholesome, take-me-along ( ...
1 cup unbleached white flour 1/2 cup vanilla soy protein powder 1/2 cup wheat germ 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon baking soda 8 ... Measure the flour, protein powder, wheat germ, salt & baking soda in a medium sized bowl. Mix well; set aside.. In a large bowl ... 1 cup unbleached white flour. 1/2 cup vanilla soy protein powder. 1/2 cup wheat germ. 1 teaspoon salt. 1 teaspoon baking soda. ... Add half the flour mixture into the wet mixture & mix well. Add the remaining flour mixture & mix well. Add the chocolate chips ...
Triticum vulgare (wheat) flour lipids. *Triticum vulgare (wheat) germ extract. *Triticum vulgare (wheat) germ oil ...
Wheat germ*Whole-grain flour. Vitamin B6 is important because its involved in more than 100 enzyme reactions in the bodys ... The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) began requiring manufacturers to add folic acid to enriched breads, cereals, flours, ...
3 Reasons to Say No to Wheat Germ. Modern dietary dogma considers wheat germ to be a nutritious addition to the diet. However, ... Keto Gravy (no starch or flour thickeners). This fast, easy and nutritious recipe for keto gravy is thickened without the use ... of starch or grain-based flour. It takes only 10 minutes to make and contains only 3… ...
Wheat bran, wheat germ, and barley. *Grits and bran cereal. *White corn flour and buckwheat flour ...
  • Raw or lightly cooked eggs can contain Salmonella , a germ that causes food poisoning. (cdc.gov)
  • Eating uncooked flour or raw eggs can make you sick. (cdc.gov)
  • Keep raw foods such as flour or eggs separate from ready-to-eat foods. (cdc.gov)
  • Wash your hands with running water and soap after handling flour, raw eggs, or any surfaces they have touched. (cdc.gov)
  • As you can see the benefits of wheat germ are quite substantial and it is particularly high in vitamin E - an antioxidant which is good for the skin and has anti-aging properties. (sparkpeople.com)
  • This provides fresh flour with the benefits of wheat germ and fiber without spoilage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Incidentally, all purpose flour or maida has been consumed for time immemorial, so the sudden hype about preference for whole wheat flour instead of refined flour has left many people confused. (medindia.net)
  • Self-rising flour (also called "Self-raising flour") is an all-purpose flour that has a leavening agent blended into it for convenience. (wikibooks.org)
  • The kinds of flour used in cooking include all-purpose flour (known as plain outside North America), self-rising flour (known as self-raising outside North America), and cake flour including bleached flour. (wikipedia.org)
  • The research of this technology Best Supplier LD Brand wheat germ extract powder changed the record of using heterogeneous catalyst in old technologies, breaking the history of only having national standard biodiesel but no European standard biodiesel.Our company Shandong Leader Machinery Co.,ltd. regards "quality is life"as our enterprise spirit. (acahome.org)
  • We adopt highly abrasive materials and advanced processing technique of Best Supplier LD Brand wheat germ extract powder, making the devices have long service life and wear-proof performance. (acahome.org)
  • Rapeseed Oil Extraction , Corn Germ Oil Extraction , Oil Press Production Line , Wheat Germ Oil Nutrition and Health Fat , Oil Biological Active Component , Wheat Vitamin E. Health Oil, Latest Stainless Steel Oil Press Machine with Big Capacity. (tmtworldwide.org)
  • Oil Refinery Your position: Home Oil making machine Vegetable oil machines oil machine Corn oil is also called corn oil, corn germ oil, which is extracted from corn germ. (tmtworldwide.org)
  • Requirements for Corn Germ Oil Production Line cake ,steam ,water. (ipras.org)
  • This is our new Corn Germ Oil Production Line ,if you need,please contact us freely. (ipras.org)
  • http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=61g+sesame+seeds+flour&a=*EAC.Expan. (vegweb.com)