Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.
The branch of medicine concerned with the physiological and pathological aspects of the aged, including the clinical problems of senescence and senility.
Older adults or aged individuals who are lacking in general strength and are unusually susceptible to disease or to other infirmity.
Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.
The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.
Nursing care of the aged patient given in the home, the hospital, or special institutions such as nursing homes, psychiatric institutions, etc.
True-false questionnaire made up of items believed to indicate anxiety, in which the subject answers verbally the statement that describes him.
The use of multiple drugs administered to the same patient, most commonly seen in elderly patients. It includes also the administration of excessive medication. Since in the United States most drugs are dispensed as single-agent formulations, polypharmacy, though using many drugs administered to the same patient, must be differentiated from DRUG COMBINATIONS, single preparations containing two or more drugs as a fixed dose, and from DRUG THERAPY, COMBINATION, two or more drugs administered separately for a combined effect. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
The branch of dentistry concerned with the dental problems of older people.
Those areas of the hospital organization not considered departments which provide specialized patient care. They include various hospital special care wards.
Restoration of human functions to the maximum degree possible in a person or persons suffering from disease or injury.
A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of neoplasms.
A performance measure for rating the ability of a person to perform usual activities, evaluating a patient's progress after a therapeutic procedure, and determining a patient's suitability for therapy. It is used most commonly in the prognosis of cancer therapy, usually after chemotherapy and customarily administered before and after therapy. It was named for Dr. David A. Karnofsky, an American specialist in cancer chemotherapy.
The caring for individuals in institutions and their adaptation to routines characteristic of the institutional environment, and/or their loss of adaptation to life outside the institution.
A subspecialty of psychiatry concerned with the mental health of the aged.
Evaluation and measurement of nutritional variables in order to assess the level of nutrition or the NUTRITIONAL STATUS of the individual. NUTRITION SURVEYS may be used in making the assessment.
Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.
Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
The confinement of a patient in a hospital.
The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.
A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.
Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.
Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
Institutional health care of patients during the day. The patients return home at night.
The giving of attention to the special dental needs of the elderly for proper maintenance or treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.
Hospitals which provide care for a single category of illness with facilities and staff directed toward a specific service.
Evaluation of the nature and extent of nursing problems presented by a patient for the purpose of patient care planning.
Geriatric long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.
Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).
Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.
Involuntary loss of URINE, such as leaking of urine. It is a symptom of various underlying pathological processes. Major types of incontinence include URINARY URGE INCONTINENCE and URINARY STRESS INCONTINENCE.
A disorder characterized by CONFUSION; inattentiveness; disorientation; ILLUSIONS; HALLUCINATIONS; agitation; and in some instances autonomic nervous system overactivity. It may result from toxic/metabolic conditions or structural brain lesions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp411-2)
Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
To move about or walk on foot with the use of aids.

Association between serum fructosamine and mortality in elderly women: the study of osteoporotic fractures. (1/2563)

Serum fructosamine levels can be used to estimate long-term serum glucose values and can be measured in frozen serum. The authors examined whether fructosamine levels were associated with mortality in a cohort of 9,704 white women (> or = 65 years of age) recruited from September 1986 to October 1988 at four clinical centers in the United States. A random sample of women who had died during a mean of 6 years of follow-up (n = 55) was compared with randomly selected controls (n = 276, 54 of whom had died). Fructosamine assays were performed blinded to vital status. Hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals were adjusted for age, clinical center, smoking, hypertension, and serum albumin and cholesterol levels. Each standard deviation (46 micromol) increase in fructosamine level was associated with a 1.3-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-1.6, p = 0.04) increased rate of all-cause mortality, including a 1.5-fold (95% CI 1.0-2.1, p = 0.03) increase in cardiovascular disease mortality. Elevated fructosamine levels (>285 micromol/liter) were associated with a 4.3-fold (95% CI 1.6-12, p = 0.004) increased rate of cardiovascular mortality; in women without a history of diabetes, the hazard ratio was 4.6 (95% CI 1.3-16, p = 0.02). Fructosamine level, or another indicator of glycemia, should be included when the risk of cardiovascular disease among older patients is evaluated.  (+info)

Characteristics of discrepancies between self-reported visual function and measured reading speed. Salisbury Eye Evaluation Project Team. (2/2563)

PURPOSE: Visual impairment is a risk factor for morbidity in the elderly and is often screened for by self-report. This study evaluates whether there are subsets for whom there is a discrepancy between self-reported and measured function. METHODS: The prevalence of a discrepancy between self-reported difficulty reading a newspaper and measured reading speed was determined in 2520 community-based men and women, aged 65 to 84 years, and the discrepant group characterized by polychotomous regression. RESULTS: Of subjects who reported minimal difficulty reading a newspaper, 10.8% (227/2107) read newsprint-sized text (0.21 degrees) more slowly than 80 words/min, a level previously shown to be necessary for sustained reading. Poor visual acuity, presence of psychiatric symptoms, and less satisfaction with vision were associated with being in the group that read slowly and reported difficulty with reading. Better cognition, better visual acuity, more years of education, white race, and fewer psychiatric symptoms were associated with being in the group that read more quickly and reported minimal difficulty. When reading the text size at which subjects read their fastest, only 2.6% of those with minimal difficulty remained discrepant. These individuals were more likely to have less education, be male, be African American, and have poorer cognitive status than those who did not remain discrepant. CONCLUSIONS: A subset of the elderly population have a substantial discrepancy between self-reported reading difficulty and measured reading speed. In some, this discrepancy may be based on underlying expectations and experiences, and in others it may represent a transition from no visual impairment to visual impairment.  (+info)

Outcomes of routine testing of liver enzymes in institutionalized geriatric patients. (3/2563)

This study sought to identify any benefit of routine liver function tests (LFTs) in chronically ill, geriatric patients and to assess which patients require evaluation for abnormal LFT levels. A retrospective chart review was carried out on 268 consecutive patients (M:F = 1.2, mean age 77 years, range 61-98 years) presenting for acute care from a long-term care facility. All were without jaundice, right upper quadrant pain, pruritus, bruising, or signs of chronic liver disease. The degree of LFT abnormality (aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, total bilirubin, or alkaline phosphatase) during admission was compared to the clinical diagnosis at the time of discharge. The most common diagnoses were pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and peripheral or coronary disease in 186 (60%). Thirty-seven patients (14%) had elevated LFT levels on admission. The levels normalized within 2 days in 26 of these patients, 25 of whom had a history of vascular disease (96%). Of the 11 remaining patients, 4 had coexistent vascular disease (36%), and 5 had LFT levels twice normal (none with vascular disease) and underwent abdominal ultrasound. One patient had a common bile duct stone successfully extracted. Enzyme abnormalities were due to hepatitis B or medication use in 10 of 11 patients. No patient had liver biopsy. All but one of the 268 patients were discharged without further evaluation. Over one year of follow up, no patient returned for a liver-related problem. Based on these findings, only those patients with LFT levels that are twice normal and which do not normalize within 2 days warrant further evaluation. Transient LFT abnormalities may be due to decreased liver perfusion.  (+info)

Outcome measures for routine use in dementia services: some practical considerations. (4/2563)

OBJECTIVES: To work with specialist community teams to assess the practicality and acceptability of identified outcome measures for routine use in dementia services. SETTING: Seven specialist dementia services: four multidisciplinary teams, a specialist service for carers, a community psychiatric nurse team, and a day hospital. SUBJECTS: 20 members of staff from the specialist dementia services including psychiatry, community psychiatric nursing, social work, occupational therapy, Admiral nursing, ward management, geriatric nursing. MAIN MEASURE: A questionnaire designed to assess staff views on the use of six outcome measures in routine practice in terms of practicality, relevance, acceptability, and use in improving care. RESULTS: Each of the outcome measures took 15 to 30 minutes to administer. All were rated as easy to use and as relevant to dementia services and to carers. Staff commented that the measures could be useful in routine practice for structured assessment and service evaluation, but highlighted the need for sensitive use of measures with carers. CONCLUSIONS: These measures consider the main domains of functioning for people with dementia and their carers. The measures are suitable for use in routine practice in dementia services and are acceptable to staff and carers. The project underlined the need for management support, staff ownership of measures, and training in using outcome measures. Staff concerns about service evaluation need to be acknowledged.  (+info)

Strategies to improve the quality of oral health care for frail and dependent older people. (5/2563)

The dental profile of the population of most industrialised countries is changing. For the first time in at least a century most elderly people in the United Kingdom will soon have some of their own natural teeth. This could be beneficial for the frail and dependent elderly, as natural teeth are associated with greater dietary freedom of choice and good nutrition. There may also be problems including high levels of dental disease associated with poor hygiene and diet. New data from a national oral health survey in Great Britain is presented. The few dentate elderly people in institutions at the moment have poor hygiene and high levels of dental decay. If these problems persist as dentate younger generations get older, the burden of care will be substantial. Many dental problems in elderly people are preventable or would benefit from early intervention. Strategies to approach these problems are presented.  (+info)

Staff and patient feedback in mental health services for older people. (6/2563)

OBJECTIVES: To compare the views of patients and staff on the quality of care provided on a psychogeriatric assessment ward over a five year period. To describe the quality improvements which were made as a result of their respective comments. DESIGN: Structured interviews were conducted with both patients and staff to obtain qualitative feedback and suggestions for improvement. An analysis of the percentage of positive and negative comments made by both patients and staff was used to compare the levels of satisfaction on a variety of aspects of the service provided. SETTING: Psychogeriatric inpatient assessment ward. SUBJECTS: 75 patients and 85 staff interviews were conducted. MAIN MEASURES: Structured interviews covering various aspects of service quality. RESULTS: Staff and patients picked up on different aspects of service quality as important. Quality improvements which arose from the interviews were clearly different. Generally patients were more positive about the physical environment and standards of professional care than staff, but less positive about issues of privacy, social interaction, and empowerment. CONCLUSIONS: The perspectives of patients and staff in this area are not interchangeable. Both series of interviews led to several positive changes in the quality of care. Interviews with staff seem to have been valuable in a low morale situation. A structured interview format provided patients with an opportunity to feedback openly and led to changes in service quality which would not otherwise have occurred.  (+info)

Identification and assessment of high-risk seniors. HMO Workgroup on Care Management. (7/2563)

CONTEXT: Many older adults with chronic illnesses and multidimensional needs are at high risk of adverse health outcomes, poor quality of life, and heavy use of health-related services. Modern proactive care of older populations includes identification of such high-risk individuals, assessment of their health-related needs, and interventions designed both to meet those needs and to prevent undesirable outcomes. OBJECTIVE: This paper outlines an approach to the tasks of identifying and assessing high-risk seniors. Intervention identification of high-risk seniors (also called case finding) is accomplished through a combination of periodic screening, recognition of high-risk seniors by clinicians, and analysis of administrative databases. Once identified, potentially high-risk individuals undergo on initial assessment in eight domains: cognition, medical conditions, medications, access to care, functional status, social situation, nutrition, and emotional status. The initial assessment is accomplished in a 30- to 45-minute interview conducted by a skilled professional--usually one with a background in nursing. The data are used to link some high-risk persons with appropriate services and to identify others who require more detailed assessments. Detailed assessment is often performed by interdisciplinary teams of various compositions and methods of operation, depending on local circumstances. CONCLUSION: The rapid growth in Medicare managed care is presenting many opportunities for developing more effective strategies for the proactive care for older populations. Identification and assessment of high-risk individuals are important initial steps in this process, paving the way for testing of interventions designed to reduce adverse health consequences and to improve the quality of life.  (+info)

A population-based study of environmental hazards in the homes of older persons. (8/2563)

OBJECTIVES: This study sought to estimate the population-based prevalence of environmental hazards in the homes of older persons and to determine whether the prevalence of these hazards differs by housing type or by level of disability in terms of activities of daily living (ADLs). METHODS: An environmental assessment was completed in the homes of 1000 persons 72 years and older. Weighted prevalence rates were calculated for each of the potential hazards and subsequently compared among subgroups of participants characterized by housing type and level of ADL disability. RESULTS: Overall, the prevalence of most environmental hazards was high. Two or more hazards were found in 59% of bathrooms and in 23% to 42% of the other rooms. Nearly all homes had at least 2 potential hazards. Although age-restricted housing was less hazardous than community housing, older persons who were disabled were no less likely to be exposed to environmental hazards than older persons who were nondisabled. CONCLUSIONS: Environmental hazards are common in the homes of community-living older persons.  (+info)

In the medical field, neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors of cells that can occur in any part of the body. These growths can be either benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are usually slow-growing and do not spread to other parts of the body. They can cause symptoms such as pain, swelling, or difficulty moving the affected area. Examples of benign neoplasms include lipomas (fatty tumors), hemangiomas (vascular tumors), and fibromas (fibrous tumors). Malignant neoplasms, on the other hand, are cancerous and can spread to other parts of the body through the bloodstream or lymphatic system. They can cause a wide range of symptoms, depending on the location and stage of the cancer. Examples of malignant neoplasms include carcinomas (cancers that start in epithelial cells), sarcomas (cancers that start in connective tissue), and leukemias (cancers that start in blood cells). The diagnosis of neoplasms typically involves a combination of physical examination, imaging tests (such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans), and biopsy (the removal of a small sample of tissue for examination under a microscope). Treatment options for neoplasms depend on the type, stage, and location of the cancer, as well as the patient's overall health and preferences.

Urinary incontinence is a medical condition characterized by the involuntary loss of urine. It can occur at any age and can be caused by a variety of factors, including weakened pelvic muscles, nerve damage, hormonal changes, and certain medical conditions such as diabetes or multiple sclerosis. There are several types of urinary incontinence, including stress incontinence, urge incontinence, mixed incontinence, and overflow incontinence. Stress incontinence occurs when the bladder leaks urine when the abdominal muscles are squeezed, such as during coughing, laughing, or exercising. Urge incontinence occurs when a person experiences an urgent need to urinate and is unable to reach a bathroom in time. Mixed incontinence is a combination of stress and urge incontinence, while overflow incontinence occurs when the bladder is unable to empty completely, leading to dribbling or leakage. Treatment for urinary incontinence may include lifestyle changes, physical therapy, medication, and surgery, depending on the underlying cause and severity of the condition.

Delirium is a medical condition characterized by a disturbance in attention, awareness, and cognition. It is often accompanied by changes in perception, mood, and behavior. Delirium can be caused by a variety of factors, including infections, medications, alcohol or drug withdrawal, and underlying medical conditions such as kidney or liver failure, heart failure, or respiratory failure. It is a common complication in hospitalized patients, particularly in those who are older or have multiple medical problems. Delirium can be a serious condition, as it can lead to confusion, disorientation, and hallucinations, which can affect a person's ability to care for themselves and can also increase the risk of falls and other accidents. Treatment for delirium typically involves addressing the underlying cause and providing supportive care to manage symptoms.

Cognition disorders refer to a group of conditions that affect an individual's ability to think, reason, remember, and learn. These disorders can be caused by a variety of factors, including brain injury, neurological disorders, genetic factors, and aging. Cognition disorders can manifest in different ways, depending on the specific area of the brain that is affected. For example, a person with a memory disorder may have difficulty remembering important information, while someone with a language disorder may have trouble expressing themselves or understanding what others are saying. Some common types of cognition disorders include: 1. Alzheimer's disease: A progressive neurological disorder that affects memory, thinking, and behavior. 2. Dementia: A general term used to describe a decline in cognitive function that is severe enough to interfere with daily life. 3. Delirium: A sudden onset of confusion and disorientation that can be caused by a variety of factors, including illness, medication side effects, or dehydration. 4. Aphasia: A language disorder that affects a person's ability to speak, understand, or use language. 5. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): A neurodevelopmental disorder that affects a person's ability to focus, pay attention, and control impulses. 6. Learning disorders: A group of conditions that affect a person's ability to acquire and use knowledge and skills. Cognition disorders can have a significant impact on a person's quality of life, and treatment options may include medication, therapy, and lifestyle changes. Early diagnosis and intervention are important for managing these conditions and improving outcomes.

Hospital-Wide Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (British Geriatrics Society) Conducting A comprehensive geriatric assessment ... Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment: Evidence, & 17 - Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment: The Specific Assessment Technology of ... Multidimensional Geriatric Assessment, & 38 - Measuring Outcomes of Multidimensional Geriatric Assessment Programs) [3] Busby- ... "Practice Guideline: Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) in oncological patients" (PDF). International Society of Geriatric ...
... falls risk assessment, home safety assessment, nutritional assessment, depression assessment, pain assessment, mini mental ... balance assessment, and gait assessment (ability to walk). If the comprehensive geriatric care management assessment is being ... "What is a Geriatric Care Manager?" Tucson, AZ. Accessed 8 August 2011. SeniorMag.com. Geriatric Care Management (Assessment). ... A comprehensive geriatric care assessment is thorough and can take anywhere from two to five hours in length, this of course is ...
Another assessment that has been used among Chinese old-aged is the Geriatric Mental State Schedule (GMS). It is an interview ... "Chinese Geriatric Depression Scale." Chiu, HFK, et al. "Reliability, Validity, and Structure of the Chinese Geriatric ... Boston: Godine (Webarchive template wayback links, Geriatrics, Geriatric psychiatry, Mood disorders). ... "A semi-structured Clinical interview for the assessment of diagnosis and mental state in the elderly: The Geriatric Mental ...
... org "Practice Guideline: Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) in oncological patients" (PDF). ... Geriatric Oncology Consortium Geriatric oncology at ASCO World oncology network, Geriatric oncology SIOG - International ... Geriatric Oncology. New York, NY, J.B. Lippincott, 1992, 1-409. "Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) of the older patient ... Geriatric oncology clinic University of Chicago Medical Center Geriatric Oncology Clinic World oncology network, Geriatric ...
Geriatric subspeciality medical clinics (such as geriatric anticoagulation clinic, geriatric assessment clinic, falls and ... Geriatric pain management. Geriatric pharmacy. Geriatric optometry. Geriatric physical therapy. Geriatric podiatry. Geriatric ... Geriatric urology. Geriatric otolaryngology. Geriatric general surgery. Geriatric trauma. Geriatric gynecology. Geriatric ... Geriatric emergency medicine. Geriatric nephrology. Geriatric neurology. Geriatric oncology. Geriatric physical examination of ...
... has established a Community Geriatric Assessment Team, Community Psychiatric Team and Psycho-geriatric Outreach ... "Community Geriatric Assessment Team". Medical Services. The Hong Kong Society for the Aged. Retrieved 6 June 2014. "Community ... The hospital is also equipped with a sleep assessment unit. In line with the Hospital Authority's corporate direction of ... Shatin Hospital comprises 591 beds, 144 psychiatric day places, 398 geriatric day places and 49 hospice and palliative day ...
A geriatric psychologist aids in the assessment, diagnosing, treatment, and research of vascular dementia. Parkinson's disease ... Similar to dementia, a geriatric psychologist's role regarding Alzheimer's disease is the assessment, treatment, and research ... Geriatric psychology Geriatric psychology is based upon the study of mental functions with aging. The psychologist's purpose is ... Geriatric psychiatry Geriatric psychiatry is a subspecialty of psychiatry dealing with the research, diagnosis and treatment of ...
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 6 (2): 95-102. doi:10.1002/gps.930060208. S2CID 146708002. Nicholl, Claire G.; ... The CDR computerized assessment system (CDR system) is a computerized battery of cognitive tests designed in the late 1970s by ... Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder Computer-based assessment Wesnes, K.A.; McKeith, I.G.; Ferrara, R.; Emre, M.; Del Ser ... Simpson, P.M. (1994). "The construct validity of the cognitive drug research computerised assessment system". Journal of ...
American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 19 (11): 915-922. doi:10.1097/JGP.0b013e3182011846. PMID 22024615. Twamley, E.W.; ... As a performance-based assessment, the UPSA has been found to be less vulnerable to error than self-report by the participant ... Depending on the version, the UPSA is a paper-and-pen or electronic cognitive assessment that evaluates up to 6 domains of ... Depending on the version used, the assessment will encompass all or some of the following sub tests: A general version that ...
Kolcaba, K., & Wykle, M. (1994). Assessment of health promotion in long‑term care. Geriatric Nursing, 15, 266-269. Kolcaba, K ... Geriatric Nursing, 27(2), 85-91. Kolcaba, K., Tilton, C., & Drouin, C. (2006). Comfort theory: A unifying framework to enhance ... Geriatric Nursing, 25(5), 301-306. Dowd, T., Kolcaba, K., & Steiner, R. (2003). The addition of coaching to cognitive ... Kolcaba, K., Panno, J., & Holder, C. (2000). Acute care for elders (ACE): A holistic model for geriatric orthopaedic nursing ...
... validation of the Japanese version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment". Geriatrics & Gerontology International. 10 (3): 225- ... The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) is a widely used screening assessment for detecting cognitive impairment. It was ... Cognitive impairment and dementia screening and assessment tools, Cognitive tests, Neuropsychological tests, Geriatrics, 1996 ... "Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) Test: Scoring & Accuracy". Verywell. Retrieved 12 June 2017. Ihle-Hansen, Håkon; Vigen, ...
One significant problem in the acute assessment of geriatric trauma patients is under-triage. Trauma team activation (TTA) must ... The geriatric population is at increased risk for burn injury. While geriatric burns account for less than 5% of burns in ... Because falls are the most common mechanism of injury in severely injured geriatric patients, the risk factors for geriatric ... Geriatric trauma refers to a traumatic injury that occurs to an elderly person. People around the world are living longer than ...
People age 75+ may need assessment by special instruments to predict their ICU prognosis. One quotation has said "geriatric ... China The geriatric intensive care unit - Dr Eryl Davies: geriatric ICUs are the future Dojin Hospital's geriatric intensive ... 4 beds geriatric intensive care unit in France Invasive mycosis in the Elderly - an appraisal on an geriatric intensive care ... Geriatric intensive care unit is a special intensive care unit dedicated to management of critically ill elderly. Geriatric ...
Other aspects that drive medicine adherence rates is the idea of perceived self-efficacy and risk assessment in managing ... February 1999). "Medication adherence in rheumatoid arthritis patients: older is wiser". Journal of the American Geriatrics ... Elliott RA, Marriott JL (July 2009). "Standardised assessment of patients' capacity to manage medications: a systematic review ... Elliott RA, Marriott JL (July 2009). "Standardised assessment of patients' capacity to manage medications: a systematic review ...
The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) is a 30-item self-report assessment used to identify depression in the elderly. The scale ... The GDS is commonly used as a routine part of a comprehensive geriatric assessment. One point is assigned to each answer and ... PMID 7183759 "Geriatric Depression Scale". Sheikh JI, Yesavage JA. Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS): recent evidence and ... PMID 7183759 Online version of the Geriatric Depression Scale Stanford University web site on the Geriatric Depression Scale ...
Fulmer, Terry; Chernof, Bruce (2018). Handbook of Geriatric Assessment (5th ed.). Burlington, Massachusetts: Jones and Bartlet ... Gallo, Joseph; Bogner, Hillary; Fulmer, Terry; Paveza, Gregory (2006). Handbook of Geriatric Assessment (4th ed.). Gaithersburg ... She is the first nurse to have been on the board of the American Geriatrics Society. She is also the first nurse to have been ... She is known for her extensive research in geriatrics and elder abuse. She has received funding from the National Institute on ...
American Geriatrics Society 2012 Beers Criteria Update Expert Panel (April 2012). "American Geriatrics Society updated Beers ... Barbera J, Shapiro C (2005). "Benefit-risk assessment of zaleplon in the treatment of insomnia". Drug Safety. 28 (4): 301-318. ... American Geriatrics Society. Retrieved August 1, 2013., which cites Finkle WD, Der JS, Greenland S, Adams JL, Ridgeway G, ... American Geriatrics Society. "Five Things Physicians and Patients Should Question". Choosing Wisely: an initiative of the ABIM ...
90 minute assessment by reference standard geriatric psychiatrists using DSM-III-R, and found to have a sensitivity and ... Mental disorders screening and assessment tools, Intensive care medicine, Geriatric psychiatry). ... The Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) is a diagnostic tool developed to allow physicians and nurses to identify delirium in the ... Wei, Leslie A.; Fearing, Michael A.; Sternberg, Eliezer J.; Inouye, Sharon K. (May 2008). "The Confusion Assessment Method: A ...
The clinical unit has around 20-25 acute assessment beds, usually for Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA). The unit has ... Department of Geriatric Rehabilitation Nursing 14. Department of Geriatric Economy 15. Department of Geriatric Oestopathy 16. ... Department of Geriatric Medicine 2. Department of Geriatric Nursing 3. Department of Geriatric Physical Therapy 4. Department ... degrees in geriatric Internal medicine and geriatrics. Geriatric Nursing education: At the colleges of nursing in many ...
Anthropometric Assessment". In Ronni Chernoff (ed.). Geriatric nutrition: the health professional's handbook (3rd ed.). Jones ... Babette Zemel (2007). "Assessment of Growth and Nutritional Status in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease". In Petar Mamula; ... Mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) measurement, if conducted by well-trained staff, can give a quick assessment of new arrivals ... However, for children and adolescents the skinfold and circumference measurements provide a fair assessment of total body fat ...
M.D, Mark E. Williams (2009). Geriatric Physical Diagnosis: A Guide to Observation and Assessment. McFarland. p. 56. ISBN ...
The peripheral vascular examination". Geriatric physical diagnosis: a guide to observation and assessment. McFarland & Company ... ISBN 978-0-7864-3009-3. Assessment of the Elderly Patient: The Peripheral Vascular Examination: Venous Examinations at Medscape ...
This sign was proposed by Carel Hendrik Leo Herman ten Horn (1884-1964). M.D, Mark E. Williams (21 June 2010). Geriatric ... Physical Diagnosis: A Guide to Observation and Assessment. McFarland. ISBN 978-0-7864-5160-9. Retrieved 27 February 2021. ...
Mohile on Implementing Geriatric Assessment into Cancer Care". OncLive. Retrieved September 2, 2020. "A Cancer Care Approach ... Supriya Gupta Mohile is an American geriatric oncologist specialized in clinical trials and genitourinary and gastrointestinal ...
M.D, Mark E. Williams (2009). Geriatric Physical Diagnosis: A Guide to Observation and Assessment. McFarland. p. 185. ISBN ...
Edwards, Mark E. (2008). Geriatric physical diagnosis: a guide to observation and assessment. McFarland & Company. p. 96. ...
Geriatric Physical Diagnosis: A Guide to Observation and Assessment. McFarland. pp. 189-. ISBN 978-0-7864-5160-9. Colt, G. H. ( ...
Williams ME (2010-06-21). Geriatric Physical Diagnosis: A Guide to Observation and Assessment. McFarland. p. 96. ISBN 978-0- ... Limbus sign is caused by dystrophic calcification at the corneal limbus, and can be confused with AS in geriatric populations. ...
Two programs are located Westwood; the Geriatric Assessment Program and The Home Health Agency. HUMC also maintains an office ... the Geriatric Assessment Program, the Hospice Program, and HUMC's Home Health Agency. HPV is a full-service hospital ... geriatric, head and neck, thoracic, urologic, breast, and gynecologic. In 2019 it received approval from the National Cancer ... established in 1986 by Dave Winfield and the Community Health Center located in a branch of the HUMC's Geriatrics Clinic. The ...
The General Practitioner Assessment Of Cognition combines both a patient assessment and an informant interview. It was ... American Geriatrics Society 2012 Beers Criteria Update Expert Panel (April 2012). "American Geriatrics Society updated Beers ... An integrated cognitive assessment (CognICA) is a five-minute test that is highly sensitive to the early stages of dementia, ... The MMSE is a useful tool for helping to diagnose dementia if the results are interpreted along with an assessment of a ...
Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the MSD Manuals - ... The comprehensive geriatric assessment A Geriatric Assessment Instrument specifically and thoroughly evaluates functional and ... Comprehensive geriatric assessment is most successful when done by a geriatric interdisciplinary team Geriatric ... see table A Geriatric Assessment Instrument A Geriatric Assessment Instrument ). They also facilitate communication of clinical ...
... 103(5). Besdine, R W "Functional assessment as ... Title : Functional assessment as a model for clinical evaluation of geriatric patients. Personal Author(s) : Besdine, R W ... Besdine, R W "Functional assessment as a model for clinical evaluation of geriatric patients." vol. 103, no. 5, 1988. Export ... Activities Of Daily Living Aged Aged, 80 And Over Chronic Disease Female Geriatrics Health Health Status Humans Life Expectancy ...
Sleep disorders are commonly underdiagnosed and are a significant source of concern in the geriatric population. Several ... Martin J, Shochat T, Ancoli-Israel S. Assessment and treatment of sleep disturbances in older adults. Clin Psychol Rev. 2000 ... encoded search term (Geriatric Sleep Disorder) and Geriatric Sleep Disorder What to Read Next on Medscape ... The American Geriatrics Society 2012 Beers Criteria Update Expert Panel. American Geriatrics Society Updated Beers Criteria for ...
Systematic Assessment of Geriatric Drug Use via Epidemiology. JAMA 1998;279:1877-82. CrossRef PubMed ... Risk Assessment and Mitigation. For KQ4, the body of evidence is rated as type 3 for the accuracy of risk assessment tools and ... Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain-Revised. New for update: 2 studies of diagnostic accuracy (n = 320). Very ... Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain, Version 1. 2 studies of diagnostic accuracy (n = 203). Very serious ...
Assessment of the oral health knowledge of healthcare providers in geriatric nursing homes: additional training needs required. ... Geriatric nursing home staff need training in understanding the impact of oral health on general health. Theoretical knowledge ... This study was aimed at assessing the knowledge of oral health and training needs of health workers in geriatric nursing homes ... Health workers from 8 geriatric nursing homes in Puy de Dôme (France) completed a 58-item questionnaire. Oral health knowledge ...
Assessment and management of fall risk in primary care settings. Med Clin North Am. 2015;99(2):281-293. PMID: 25700584 pubmed. ... American Geriatrics Society Health in Aging Foundation website. Falls prevention. www.healthinaging.org/a-z-topic/falls- ... Hams Primary Care Geriatrics. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2022:chap 20. ...
Geriatric care addresses the complex needs of older people, focusing on health promotion and the prevention and treatment of ... Better With Age: Improving Breast Cancer Care in Older Adults: Upgrading the Assessment ...
Each assessment is described, in brief:. The CERAD Word Learning subtest (CERAD W-L) assesses immediate and delayed learning ... Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2009;57:1051-1057.. * 7. Lee DY, Lee KU, Lee JH, et al. A normative study of the ... The assessments were administered by trained interviewers at the end of the face-to-face private interview in the Mobile ... CFASTAT coded as 4, 5, 6 indicate persons who did not do any of the assessments due to ineligibility or other reasons. These ...
Categories: Geriatric Assessment Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, ...
... geriatrics; chronic disease; comorbidity; outcome asses sment; quality measurement ... Marcel E. Salive, Geriatrics Branch, Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology, NIA/NIH, 7201 Wisconsin Ave. Suite 3C307 ... Routine outcome assessment of individuals with MCCs could facilitate system-based care improvement and clinical effectiveness ...
Identifying geriatric malnutrition in nursing practice: the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA®)-an evidence-based screening tool ... Nutritional assessment of the geriatric patient: A comprehensive approach toward evaluating and managing nutrition. Clin ... Mini Nutritional Assessment: A practical assessment tool for grading the nutritional state of elderly patients. Facts and ... Assessment of the nutritional status of residents in homes for the elderly in Lattakia, Syrian Arab Republic ...
This consideration may be especially warranted in the cases of geriatric animals or those with underlying health conditions. ... COVID-19 infection prevention and control assessment tool for captive wildlife facilities: zoos, sanctuaries, aquaria, and wild ... The lion was a geriatric (20-year-old) male with chronic renal insufficiency and severe degenerative intervertebral disc ... Finally, diminished immune response of this geriatric, chronically ill lion may have precluded a robust response to vaccination ...
We will all be geriatric individuals one day. As we age, we face many physical and emotional changes that can affect our level ... With a preoperative geriatric assessment and the management of medical conditions and medications, rates of postoperative ... American Geriatrics Society. Geriatrics Syllabus for Specialists. New York, NY:. American Geriatrics Society. 2002:1-19, 8.1- ... Carr D, Jackson T, Alquire P. Characteristics of an elderly driving population referred to a geriatric assessment center. J Am ...
Assessment, Geriatric. Assessments, Geriatric. Geriatric Assessments. Tree number(s):. E05.318.308.225. I01.240.425.350. ... Geriatric Assessment - Preferred Concept UI. M0023929. Scope note. Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or ...
Development of The Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index. J Dent Educ 1990; 54: 680-7. * Google ...
Quality of life, geriatric assessment and survival in elderly patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with carboplatin ... Assessment of Lung Cancer Risk on the Basis of a Biomarker Panel of Circulating Proteins. JAMA Oncol. 2018 Jul 12. e182078. [ ...
Korean Version of Frontal Assessment Battery: Psychometric Properties and Normative Data. Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive ...
Table 1. Urology Assessment Tools Name. Description. Indications and Aims. Urine dip stick. A basic diagnostic tool used to ... Additional assessment tools could include questionnaires and various other tests (see Table 1). In some cases, diagnosis and ... Voiding diaries can be one of the most useful assessment tools, especially with patients who have a difficult time articulating ... which are more prevalent in the geriatric population, can lend to a more complicated urological diagnosis (Berni & Cummings, ...
"Comprehensive geriatric assessment" OR "Continuity of care" OR "fragmented care" OR "Discharge planning" OR "post-discharge ...
Geriatric Assessment 1 * Substance Abuse, Intravenous 1 * Child Health Services 1 * Child Health 1 ...
Many times in the clinical setting I have had to help treat the geriatric population after falls. Many are embarrassed because ... Elements of fall prevention programs include assessment for fall risk and tailored interventions based on risk factors ... As a nurse that works with the geriatric population, this blog provides great information for the older adult and their ...
Geriatrics. 1990. 45(8):47-57. *. [Guideline] McCarthy FM. Recognition, assessment and safe management of the medically ... including assessment of lymph nodes, salivary glands, otologic assessment, assessment of breath smell), and cranial nerve ... Physical assessment should include evaluation of the patients general appearance (eg, weight, posture, skin, and nails), blood ... Such patients should be referred for medical assessment prior to dental treatment. ...
Assessment of Geriatric Team as a new medical technology 03/01/2007. ...
Journal of geriatric cardiology : JGC 2022 19(5) 367-376. Rapid triage for ischemic stroke: a machine learning-driven approach ... Using machine learning to aid treatment decision and risk assessment for severe three-vessel coronary artery disease. Jie Liu ... A deep learning-based hybrid artificial intelligence model for the detection and severity assessment of vitiligo lesions. Guo ... Predicting crime during or after psychiatric care: Evaluating machine learning for risk assessment using the Danish patient ...
  • For this study, which was funded in part by NIA and published in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry in September 2020, scientists proposed a potential neurobiological connection between an older adult's mood with changes, over a period of time, in white brain matter and cognitive ability. (nih.gov)
  • We recommend the MoCA for a more thorough cognitive assessment given its excellent sensitivity for even mild cognitive impairment. (medscape.com)
  • Comprehensive geriatric assessment is a multidimensional process designed to assess the functional ability, health (physical, cognitive, and mental), and socioenvironmental situation of older people. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Although cognitive assessments cannot replace a diagnosis based on a clinical examination, they are useful to examine the association of cognitive functioning with the many medical conditions and risk factors measured during the NHANES examination. (cdc.gov)
  • 18. [Cognitive decline in geriatric oncology: Trends, evaluation and treatment]. (nih.gov)
  • 16. [Specificities of supportive care in geriatric oncology]. (nih.gov)
  • Ideally, a regular examination of older patients incorporates many aspects of the comprehensive geriatric assessment, making the 2 approaches very similar. (msdmanuals.com)
  • However, in the US, the Annual Wellness Examination is offered as a covered benefit under Medicare and includes the main components of a comprehensive geriatric assessment and provides a detailed health risk assessment and personalized prevention plan. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (N=10,315) in 6 countries, comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) was compared with usual care. (medscape.com)
  • The comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is an established strategy for guiding care of older adults in a hospital setting, but its use in other settings has not been well studied, Surya Singh, PhD, of the University of Oxford (England), and colleagues wrote in their paper published in Age and Ageing . (medscape.com)
  • 7. [Geriatric interventions in the older with cancer based on comprehensive geriatric assessment. (nih.gov)
  • Rehabilitation of geriatric patients is imperative for the patients' well-being and for society, so that we can thrive socially and economically. (medscape.com)
  • Essential to geriatric rehabilitation is communication, specifically improving any sensory impairment, including those related to vision and hearing. (medscape.com)
  • However, patients with physical or mental impairments and chronically ill patients may require inpatient assessment. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Cross-speciality geriatrics: A health-care challenge for the 21st century]. (nih.gov)
  • Geriatric Resources for Assessment and Care of Elders (GRACE): a new model of primary care for low-income seniors. (nih.gov)
  • Older adults who avoided hospital admission with at-home geriatric assessment and home-based care incurred significantly lower costs compared with those hospitalized, in a new study. (medscape.com)
  • This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages research grant applications focused on palliative care in geriatric populations. (nih.gov)
  • Rather, this FOA highlights research on palliative care in settings and at time points earlier in geriatric patients' disease or disability trajectories. (nih.gov)
  • Assessment and management of fall risk in primary care settings. (medlineplus.gov)
  • 3. Role of Geriatric Oncologists in Optimizing Care of Urological Oncology Patients. (nih.gov)
  • Home Safety Assessment, Older patients are at risk for environmental conditions in the home because of decreased mobility and cognition. (medscape.com)
  • Thus, this assessment may be used best mainly in high-risk older patients, such as the frail or chronically ill (eg, identified via mailed health questionnaires or interviews in the home or meeting places). (msdmanuals.com)
  • The geriatric population is growing, and in the near future, the number of geriatric patients experiencing severe sensory loss is likely to increase. (medscape.com)
  • 8. The assessment and management of older cancer patients: A SIOG surgical task force survey on surgeons' attitudes. (nih.gov)
  • 12. What will perioperative geriatric assessment for older cancer patients look like in 2025? (nih.gov)
  • 14. Frailty screening by Geriatric-8 and 4-meter gait speed test is feasible and predicts postoperative complications in elderly colorectal cancer patients. (nih.gov)
  • 19. Management of Prostate Cancer in Elderly Patients: Recommendations of a Task Force of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology. (nih.gov)
  • 20. [Study of patients benefiting from a geriatric oncology assessment]. (nih.gov)
  • Geriatric Interdisciplinary Teams Every 4 years, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) updates its strategic plan and defines its mission and goals. (msdmanuals.com)
  • 13. Geriatric oncology screening tools for CGA-based interventions: results from a phase II study of geriatric assessment and management for older adults with cancer. (nih.gov)
  • CDC developed the guideline using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) framework, and recommendations are made on the basis of a systematic review of the scientific evidence while considering benefits and harms, values and preferences, and resource allocation. (cdc.gov)
  • Prevention, assessment, and treatment of chronic pain are challenges for health providers and systems. (cdc.gov)
  • American Geriatrics Society Health in Aging Foundation website. (medlineplus.gov)
  • [ 56 ] Assessment of the strength of the social network can provide valuable information about how long the patient will live independently, the needed mechanisms of support to remain independent, and the patient's ability to plan and adapt to environmental challenges. (medscape.com)
  • Educating our peers and using these guidelines in our practice will enhance the quality of life of the geriatric patient. (medscape.com)
  • 4. [Geriatric assessment and prognostic scores in older cancer patient: Additional support to the therapeutic decision? (nih.gov)
  • 15. Multidisciplinary approach to the geriatric oncology patient. (nih.gov)
  • 9. Geriatric oncology: assessing the needs of older people with cancer. (nih.gov)
  • 6. [Risk assessment in medical geriatric oncology]. (nih.gov)
  • Geriatric assessment in dentistry : A review of chewing function tests]. (bvsalud.org)
  • One of the greatest challenges in the geriatric population is their ability to communicate their problems, needs, and desires in a medical setting. (medscape.com)
  • 5. Utilisation of geriatric assessment in oncology - a survey of Australian medical oncologists. (nih.gov)
  • To identify a possible need for dental treatment , chewing function tests as assessment instruments have proven their effectiveness . (bvsalud.org)
  • Dorsal root ganglia assessment and treatment. (cancer.org)
  • 2. [Oncogeriatric assessment: The first step in personalizing cancer treatment in the elderly]. (nih.gov)
  • We recommend the Mini-Cog test for its rapidity and assessment of executive function, as well as a lack of education or language bias. (medscape.com)
  • Time-location analysis for exposure assessment studies of children using a novel global positioning system instrument. (nih.gov)
  • The use of GPS technology offers a new level of accuracy for direct quantification of time-location activity patterns in exposure assessment studies. (nih.gov)
  • The neuropsychological assessment included tests of executive function, memory, and processing speed (the time it takes to comprehend information and respond). (nih.gov)
  • Family members may also request a referral for geriatric assessment. (msdmanuals.com)