ShrewsTupaiidae: The only family of the order SCANDENTIA, variously included in the order Insectivora or in the order Primates, and often in the order Microscelidea, consisting of five genera. They are TUPAIA, Ananthana (Indian tree shrew), Dendrogale (small smooth-tailed tree shrew), Urogale (Mindanao tree shrew), and Ptilocercus (pen-tailed tree shrew). The tree shrews inhabit the forest areas of eastern Asia from India and southwestern China to Borneo and the Philippines.Tupaia: A genus of tree shrews of the family TUPAIIDAE which consists of about 12 species. One of the most frequently encountered species is T. glis. Members of this genus inhabit rain forests and secondary growth areas in southeast Asia.Insectivora: An order of insect eating MAMMALS including MOLES; SHREWS; HEDGEHOGS and tenrecs.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Moles: Any of numerous burrowing mammals found in temperate regions and having minute eyes often covered with skin.Hantavirus: A genus of the family BUNYAVIRIDAE causing HANTAVIRUS INFECTIONS, first identified during the Korean war. Infection is found primarily in rodents and humans. Transmission does not appear to involve arthropods. HANTAAN VIRUS is the type species.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.WyomingNevadaEncyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)MontanaPinus ponderosa: A plant species of the genus PINUS that contains isocupressic acid.Desert Climate: A type of climate characterized by insufficient moisture to support appreciable plant life. It is a climate of extreme aridity, usually of extreme heat, and of negligible rainfall. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Juniperus: A plant genus of the family CUPRESSACEAE. The species are slow growing coniferous evergreen trees or shrubs.Amoebida: An order of ameboid protozoa that is commonly uninucleate and possess mitochondria. Most organisms are nonpathogenic.Yucca: A genus (and common name) in the AGAVACEAE family. It is known for SAPONINS in the root that are used in SOAPS.Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Food Chain: The sequence of transfers of matter and energy from organism to organism in the form of FOOD. Food chains intertwine locally into a food web because most organisms consume more than one type of animal or plant. PLANTS, which convert SOLAR ENERGY to food by PHOTOSYNTHESIS, are the primary food source. In a predator chain, a plant-eating animal is eaten by a larger animal. In a parasite chain, a smaller organism consumes part of a larger host and may itself be parasitized by smaller organisms. In a saprophytic chain, microorganisms live on dead organic matter.Phytoplankton: Free-floating minute organisms that are photosynthetic. The term is non-taxonomic and refers to a lifestyle (energy utilization and motility), rather than a particular type of organism. Most, but not all, are unicellular algae. Important groups include DIATOMS; DINOFLAGELLATES; CYANOBACTERIA; CHLOROPHYTA; HAPTOPHYTA; CRYPTOMONADS; and silicoflagellates.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Diatoms: The common name for the phylum of microscopic unicellular STRAMENOPILES. Most are aquatic, being found in fresh, brackish, and salt water. Diatoms are noted for the symmetry and sculpturing of their siliceous cell walls. They account for 40% of PHYTOPLANKTON, but not all diatoms are planktonic.Motion Sickness: Disorder caused by motion, as sea sickness, train sickness, car sickness, air sickness, or SPACE MOTION SICKNESS. It may include nausea, vomiting and dizziness.Nuclear Energy: Energy released by nuclear fission or nuclear fusion.Monodelphis: A genus of short-tailed OPOSSUMS in the family Didelphidae found in South American, chiefly Brazil. They are opossums least well-adapted to arboreal life.Opossums: New World marsupials of the family Didelphidae. Opossums are omnivorous, largely nocturnal and arboreal MAMMALS, grow to about three feet in length, including the scaly prehensile tail, and have an abdominal pouch in which the young are carried at birth.Bermuda: A British colony in the western North Atlantic Ocean about 640 miles east southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. It comprises a group of about 300 islands of which only about 20 are inhabited. It is called also the Bermuda Islands or the Bermudas. It was named for the Spanish explorer Juan Bermudez who visited the islands in 1515. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p140 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p61)Chiroptera: Order of mammals whose members are adapted for flight. It includes bats, flying foxes, and fruit bats.Hantavirus Infections: Infections with viruses of the genus HANTAVIRUS. This is associated with at least four clinical syndromes: HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL SYNDROME caused by viruses of the Hantaan group; a milder form of HFRS caused by SEOUL VIRUS; nephropathia epidemica caused by PUUMALA VIRUS; and HANTAVIRUS PULMONARY SYNDROME caused by SIN NOMBRE VIRUS.Spiders: Arthropods of the class ARACHNIDA, order Araneae. Except for mites and ticks, spiders constitute the largest order of arachnids, with approximately 37,000 species having been described. The majority of spiders are harmless, although some species can be regarded as moderately harmful since their bites can lead to quite severe local symptoms. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, p508; Smith, Insects and Other Arthropods of Medical Importance, 1973, pp424-430)Genetics, Medical: A subdiscipline of human genetics which entails the reliable prediction of certain human disorders as a function of the lineage and/or genetic makeup of an individual or of any two parents or potential parents.Silk: A continuous protein fiber consisting primarily of FIBROINS. It is synthesized by a variety of INSECTS and ARACHNIDS.
  • During a study of rodentborne hemorrhagic fever viruses performed in Guinea in 2002-2004, 32 shrews of the genus Crocidura were collected and screened for hantavirus RNA by reverse transcription-PCR ( 5 ). (cdc.gov)
  • n. from the white-toothed shrew, Crocidura suaveolens collected in Turkmenistan. (zin.ru)
  • Cestoda : Hymenolepididae) in the lesser white-toothed shrew,Crocidura suaveolens from Tsushima Island,Japan. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Preble's shrew ( Sorex preblei ) is a small shrew distributed across the Great Basin of the United States and southern British Columbia in Canada. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other small mammals that live in the same ecosystem as the Preble's Shrew include Sorex cinereus, S. haydeni, S. merriami, S. monticolus, S. nanus, and S. vagrans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Preble's Shrews have been collected in Montana in close association with Sorex cinereus, and S. monticolus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The impoverishment of the shrew fauna of Europe during the Late Pliocene and Early Pleistocene caused by the extinction of the Pliocene taxa and the appearance of more numerous species of the genus Sorex are presented. (palaeo-electronica.org)
  • 2013-04-21 00:00:00 The contact points of four karyotypic races (St. Petersburg, Moscow, Seliger and West Dvina) of the common shrew Sorex araneus L. were studied at the Valdai Hills (European Russia) in an area unimpeded by geographic barriers. (deepdyve.com)
  • Little is known about the phylogenetic relationships and population genetic structure of the Arizona shrew ( Sorex arizonae ), a small mammal restricted to a few mountainous areas in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. (scielo.org.mx)
  • Morphometric variation of the common shrew Sorex araneus Linnaeus, 1758 was studied in the gucki M yn/Popielno hybrid zone in north-eastern Poland. (media.pl)
  • The common shrew Sorex araneus Linnaeus, 1758 is characterised by a large chromosomal variability. (media.pl)
  • Based on a study of morphometric measurements of 67 shrews captured in the nothern Far East of the USRR and of relevant literature, the presence in the Palaearctic was established of only one shrew species of the subgenus Otisorex, namely Sorex cinereus K e r r, 1792. (rcin.org.pl)
  • In terms of species diversity , the shrew family is the fourth most successful of the mammal families, with over 300 species, being rivaled only by the muroid families Muridae and Cricetidae and the bat family Vespertilionidae. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Elephant shrews were not closely related to shrews or to other mammal groups like rabbits, with which they had sometimes been lumped. (berkeley.edu)
  • Controlling for sampling biases, calculating per capita origination and extinction rates of boundary-crossers and estimating survival probabilities using capture-mark-recapture (CMR) methods, we found the recurring pattern that large mammal genera and species have higher origination and extinction rates, and therefore shorter durations. (pnas.org)
  • From skeletal remains found among centuries-old owl pellets, Museum scientists have recovered the first DNA sample of the extinct Caribbean mammal genus Nesophontes . (nhm.ac.uk)
  • This exceptional position of the Tan826 sequence within the tree is consistent with its detection in a shrew instead of a rodent host. (cdc.gov)
  • The giant pitcher plants of the genus Nepenthes (p... ...seen a rodent inside one. (neatorama.com)
  • Hantavirus, a genus of rodent- and insectivore-borne viruses in the family Bunyaviridae , is a group of emerging zoonotic pathogens. (frontiersin.org)
  • Comprehensive cross-amplification of microsatellite multiplex sets across the rodent genus Microtus. (ivb.cz)
  • New species of the genus Pseudhymenolepis (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae) from the white-toothed shrew. (zin.ru)
  • Problems of morphology of alive eggs, the structure of the uterus and host specificity of some species of the genus Pseudhymenolepis are discussed. (zin.ru)
  • a name given to certain species of the genus Begonia, which have immense one-sided leaves. (mshaffer.com)
  • The application of species delimitation methods and an accurate dating strategy to the genus Neomys helped to clarify its controversial taxonomy. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Here, we review the taxonomy of the genus Cyclopes using an integrative approach that combines morphological, morphometric and molecular data. (deepdyve.com)
  • We, therefore, aim to clarify many issues concerning the taxonomy, distribution and conservation status of the valid taxa and describe new previously unrecognized species for the genus. (deepdyve.com)
  • Currently, only a single species is recognized for the genus Cyclopes didactylus (Linnaeus 1758), although a remarkable genetic diversity was recently described for the group (Coimbra et al. (deepdyve.com)
  • The genus Cyclopes has a convoluted nomenclatural history, with Cyclopes didactylus being originally described as Myrmecophaga didactyla by Linnaeus (1758). (deepdyve.com)
  • Brongniart (1792) misspelled the name as Mirmecophaga, while Gray (1821) was the first to use the current name for the genus, Cyclopes, indicating Myrmecophaga didactyla Linnaeus, 1758 as the type. (deepdyve.com)
  • We report the recovery of hantavirus RNA of a novel sequence from a shrew, collected in Guinea, West Africa. (cdc.gov)
  • Nucleotide sequence comparisons between Tan826 and other representatives of the genus Hantavirus showed very low sequence identity values, ranging from 67.7% (Andes virus) to 72.3% (Puumala virus). (cdc.gov)
  • Gray ellipsoids indicate the 3 major hantavirus groups (panels A and C) or different genera of the Bunyaviridae family (panel B). We used 412 nt (137 aa) of the L segment (nucleotide position 2956-3367, amino acid position 974-1110) and 147 aa (nucleotide position 685-1111, amino acid position 217-364) of the putative nucleoprotein. (cdc.gov)
  • Serological relationships among viruses in the Hantavirus genus, family Bunyaviridae. (ajtmh.org)
  • Since the recognition of hantavirus as the agent responsible for haemorrhagic fever in Eurasia in the 1970s and, 20 years later, the descovery of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in the Americas, the genus Hantavirus has been continually described throughout the World in a variety of wild animals. (mdpi.com)
  • Members of both genera can cause life-threatening diseases in humans: arena-viruses cause hemorrhagic fevers in the Americas and Africa, and hantaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Asia and Europe and hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome in the Americas. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • The resulting trees generally concur with previously published evolutionary hypotheses for small-eared shrews. (usgs.gov)
  • Known occurrences, collected specimens and observations of Otter shrews. (eol.org)
  • A shrew opossum has five digits on each foot, the two small outer toes of the forefeet with blunt nails, the remaining three equipped with curved, sharp, strong claws. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The tail of the Chilean shrew opossum swells up with stored fat for the southern winter months. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Females do not have pouches and have four nipples, except for females of the Chilean shrew opossum, which have seven nipples, the seventh located on the midline of the underbelly. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The gray-bellied shrew opossum, the blackish shrew opossum, and the silky shrew opossum are found in isolated, separated populations in the mountains of the Western Andes, from Colombia and Venezuela in the north and southwards through Ecuador, Peru, and Argentina. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The Incan shrew opossum inhabits southern Peru, while the Chilean shrew opossum lives along the south-central coast of Chile and on the close offshore Chilean island of Chiloé, plus another population in Argentina. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The gray-bellied shrew opossum, the blackish shrew opossum, the silky shrew opossum, and the Incan shrew opossum live in dense vegetation in cool, rainy mountain forests and meadows, from 4,500 to 12,000 feet (1,500 to 4,000 meters) above sea level . (encyclopedia.com)
  • The Chilean shrew opossum inhabits rainy lowland temperate rainforest along the Chilean coast from sea level to 2,270 feet (1,135 meters), preferring dense forest with mossy trees and logs, and soaking wet forest floors. (encyclopedia.com)
  • On the other hand, extreme size differentiation occurs between genetically closely related populations in the Soutpansberg Range, which coincides with the bissection of the mountain range by the dry Sand River Valley, indicating the potential for strong intraspecific phenotypic divergence in these shrews. (sun.ac.za)
  • It is most closely related to the Sulawesi water rat, with both belonging to a larger group, including shrew rats. (laboratoryequipment.com)
  • 2003. A new species of desert shrew, Notiosorex , based on nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data. (utep.edu)
  • 1995). Sin embargo, debido al desarrollo de nuevas técnicas de estudio, tanto en campo como en laboratorio, nuestro entendimiento de los límites entre especies, sus relaciones, y su clasificación están sujetos a cambios rápidos que precisan actualizaciones regulares (ver Groves, 2013). (scielo.org.ar)
  • At these points of contact, the morphometric differentiation of karyotype races was examined in 12 cranial measurements in 190 shrews of a known karyotype. (deepdyve.com)
  • found statistically significant differences in morphometric parameters of shrew skulls in the Novosybirsk/Tomsk hybrid zone. (media.pl)
  • We used a digital X-ray system to extract images of the forefoot skeleton from 101 dried skins of eight taxa (seven species, including two subspecies of one species) of these shrews. (usgs.gov)
  • We sequenced 13 introns and cytochrome b from specimens of the three species currently recognized in this genus including two subspecies of N. anomalus that were originally described as species. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Here, we studied a subspecies of water shrew, Neomys fodiens niethammeri , which is found in a narrow strip of the northern Iberian Peninsula. (nature.com)
  • 1996). Shrews also have sharp incisors and a reputation for having a savage disposition, killing larger animals and eating incessantly to stay alive. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Our analysis of four nuclear genes supported the placement of B. griselda as sister to B. quadraticauda / B. wardi, with the level of divergence between these two clades corresponding to that among genera of Soricinae. (openrepository.com)
  • According to Brown, among the thousands of bones deposited in this 20-foot fissure were those representing 37 genera and 51 species, of which 24 are considered extinct. (hcn.org)
  • Karyotypes of three gerbil species of the genera Tatera and Gerbilliscus from Turkey and Senegal. (ivb.cz)
  • As limited research is carried out in different genera of angiosperm and Nepenthes being one of the highly endangered genus, so it is imperative to study about its taxonomic classification and diversity. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Based on evidence provided by molecular phylogenetics using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, allied with coalescent species delimitation analyses, diagnostic characters of the skull, colour patterns and structures of pelage, we suggest that the genus Cyclopes comprises at least seven species. (deepdyve.com)
  • Worms on the slide N 1631 undoubtedly belong to the genus Microsomacanthus as their scoleces have a rostrum (fig. 3, a, б). (zin.ru)
  • Diversification in North American arid lands: niche conservatism, divergence and expansion of habitat explain speciation in the genus Ephedra. (nlbif.nl)
  • The Preble's shrew ranges from 77-95 mm in total length, tail length of 28-38 mm, hind feet of 7-11 mm and ear length of 8-11 mm. Besides the relatively small body length, the Preble's Shrew has several distinctive cranial characteristics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Seventeen cranial and external measurements in 105 young shrews were analysed. (media.pl)