Genomics: The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.Databases, Genetic: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Genome, Bacterial: The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.Genome: The genetic complement of an organism, including all of its GENES, as represented in its DNA, or in some cases, its RNA.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Genome, Plant: The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Expressed Sequence Tags: Partial cDNA (DNA, COMPLEMENTARY) sequences that are unique to the cDNAs from which they were derived.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Molecular Sequence Annotation: The addition of descriptive information about the function or structure of a molecular sequence to its MOLECULAR SEQUENCE DATA record.Synteny: The presence of two or more genetic loci on the same chromosome. Extensions of this original definition refer to the similarity in content and organization between chromosomes, of different species for example.Genome, Human: The complete genetic complement contained in the DNA of a set of CHROMOSOMES in a HUMAN. The length of the human genome is about 3 billion base pairs.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Proteomics: The systematic study of the complete complement of proteins (PROTEOME) of organisms.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Databases, Nucleic Acid: Databases containing information about NUCLEIC ACIDS such as BASE SEQUENCE; SNPS; NUCLEIC ACID CONFORMATION; and other properties. Information about the DNA fragments kept in a GENE LIBRARY or GENOMIC LIBRARY is often maintained in DNA databases.Genome, Fungal: The complete gene complement contained in a set of chromosomes in a fungus.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Individualized Medicine: Therapeutic approach tailoring therapy for genetically defined subgroups of patients.Metagenomics: The genomic analysis of assemblages of organisms.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Database Management Systems: Software designed to store, manipulate, manage, and control data for specific uses.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing: Techniques of nucleotide sequence analysis that increase the range, complexity, sensitivity, and accuracy of results by greatly increasing the scale of operations and thus the number of nucleotides, and the number of copies of each nucleotide sequenced. The sequencing may be done by analysis of the synthesis or ligation products, hybridization to preexisting sequences, etc.Genetic Research: Research into the cause, transmission, amelioration, elimination, or enhancement of inherited disorders and traits.Multigene Family: A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Databases, Protein: Databases containing information about PROTEINS such as AMINO ACID SEQUENCE; PROTEIN CONFORMATION; and other properties.Genetics, Medical: A subdiscipline of human genetics which entails the reliable prediction of certain human disorders as a function of the lineage and/or genetic makeup of an individual or of any two parents or potential parents.Quantitative Trait Loci: Genetic loci associated with a QUANTITATIVE TRAIT.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Contig Mapping: Overlapping of cloned or sequenced DNA to construct a continuous region of a gene, chromosome or genome.Chromosomes, Artificial, Bacterial: DNA constructs that are composed of, at least, a REPLICATION ORIGIN, for successful replication, propagation to and maintenance as an extra chromosome in bacteria. In addition, they can carry large amounts (about 200 kilobases) of other sequence for a variety of bioengineering purposes.Conserved Sequence: A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.Pharmacogenetics: A branch of genetics which deals with the genetic variability in individual responses to drugs and drug metabolism (BIOTRANSFORMATION).Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Genome, Insect: The genetic complement of an insect (INSECTS) as represented in its DNA.Computer Graphics: The process of pictorial communication, between human and computers, in which the computer input and output have the form of charts, drawings, or other appropriate pictorial representation.Gene Library: A large collection of DNA fragments cloned (CLONING, MOLECULAR) from a given organism, tissue, organ, or cell type. It may contain complete genomic sequences (GENOMIC LIBRARY) or complementary DNA sequences, the latter being formed from messenger RNA and lacking intron sequences.Genetics: The branch of science concerned with the means and consequences of transmission and generation of the components of biological inheritance. (Stedman, 26th ed)Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Proteome: The protein complement of an organism coded for by its genome.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Gene Regulatory Networks: Interacting DNA-encoded regulatory subsystems in the GENOME that coordinate input from activator and repressor TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS during development, cell differentiation, or in response to environmental cues. The networks function to ultimately specify expression of particular sets of GENES for specific conditions, times, or locations.Systems Biology: Comprehensive, methodical analysis of complex biological systems by monitoring responses to perturbations of biological processes. Large scale, computerized collection and analysis of the data are used to develop and test models of biological systems.Genome, Archaeal: The genetic complement of an archaeal organism (ARCHAEA) as represented in its DNA.Gene Order: The sequential location of genes on a chromosome.Genome, Helminth: The genetic complement of a helminth (HELMINTHS) as represented in its DNA.Transcriptome: The pattern of GENE EXPRESSION at the level of genetic transcription in a specific organism or under specific circumstances in specific cells.Comparative Genomic Hybridization: A method for comparing two sets of chromosomal DNA by analyzing differences in the copy number and location of specific sequences. It is used to look for large sequence changes such as deletions, duplications, amplifications, or translocations.Systems Integration: The procedures involved in combining separately developed modules, components, or subsystems so that they work together as a complete system. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Gene Duplication: Processes occurring in various organisms by which new genes are copied. Gene duplication may result in a MULTIGENE FAMILY; supergenes or PSEUDOGENES.Oryza sativa: Annual cereal grass of the family POACEAE and its edible starchy grain, rice, which is the staple food of roughly one-half of the world's population.Genome, Protozoan: The complete genetic complement contained in a set of CHROMOSOMES in a protozoan.Metabolic Networks and Pathways: Complex sets of enzymatic reactions connected to each other via their product and substrate metabolites.Microbiology: The study of microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, algae, archaea, and viruses.Sequence Analysis, Protein: A process that includes the determination of AMINO ACID SEQUENCE of a protein (or peptide, oligopeptide or peptide fragment) and the information analysis of the sequence.Gene Transfer, Horizontal: The naturally occurring transmission of genetic information between organisms, related or unrelated, circumventing parent-to-offspring transmission. Horizontal gene transfer may occur via a variety of naturally occurring processes such as GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; and TRANSFECTION. It may result in a change of the recipient organism's genetic composition (TRANSFORMATION, GENETIC).Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Genetic Privacy: The protection of genetic information about an individual, family, or population group, from unauthorized disclosure.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Genome-Wide Association Study: An analysis comparing the allele frequencies of all available (or a whole GENOME representative set of) polymorphic markers in unrelated patients with a specific symptom or disease condition, and those of healthy controls to identify markers associated with a specific disease or condition.Crops, Agricultural: Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.Physical Chromosome Mapping: Mapping of the linear order of genes on a chromosome with units indicating their distances by using methods other than genetic recombination. These methods include nucleotide sequencing, overlapping deletions in polytene chromosomes, and electron micrography of heteroduplex DNA. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 5th ed)Chromosomes, Plant: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.Nutrigenomics: The study of the relationship between NUTRITIONAL PHYSIOLOGY and genetic makeup. It includes the effect of different food components on GENE EXPRESSION and how variations in GENES effect responses to food components.Biotechnology: Body of knowledge related to the use of organisms, cells or cell-derived constituents for the purpose of developing products which are technically, scientifically and clinically useful. Alteration of biologic function at the molecular level (i.e., GENETIC ENGINEERING) is a central focus; laboratory methods used include TRANSFECTION and CLONING technologies, sequence and structure analysis algorithms, computer databases, and gene and protein structure function analysis and prediction.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.National Human Genome Research Institute (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts and supports research into the mapping of the human genome and other organism genomes. The National Center for Human Genome Research was established in 1989 and re-named the National Human Genome Research Institute in 1997.Genetic Testing: Detection of a MUTATION; GENOTYPE; KARYOTYPE; or specific ALLELES associated with genetic traits, heritable diseases, or predisposition to a disease, or that may lead to the disease in descendants. It includes prenatal genetic testing.Genetic Techniques: Chromosomal, biochemical, intracellular, and other methods used in the study of genetics.Structural Homology, Protein: The degree of 3-dimensional shape similarity between proteins. It can be an indication of distant AMINO ACID SEQUENCE HOMOLOGY and used for rational DRUG DESIGN.Sorghum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The grain is used for FOOD and for ANIMAL FEED. This should not be confused with KAFFIR LIME or with KEFIR milk product.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Adaptation, Biological: Changes in biological features that help an organism cope with its ENVIRONMENT. These changes include physiological (ADAPTATION, PHYSIOLOGICAL), phenotypic and genetic changes.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Toxicogenetics: The study of existing genetic knowledge, and the generation of new genetic data, to understand and thus avoid DRUG TOXICITY and adverse effects from toxic substances from the environment.Data Mining: Use of sophisticated analysis tools to sort through, organize, examine, and combine large sets of information.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Metabolomics: The systematic identification and quantitation of all the metabolic products of a cell, tissue, organ, or organism under varying conditions. The METABOLOME of a cell or organism is a dynamic collection of metabolites which represent its net response to current conditions.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Open Reading Frames: A sequence of successive nucleotide triplets that are read as CODONS specifying AMINO ACIDS and begin with an INITIATOR CODON and end with a stop codon (CODON, TERMINATOR).Molecular Biology: A discipline concerned with studying biological phenomena in terms of the chemical and physical interactions of molecules.Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.

Analysis of flanking sequences from dissociation insertion lines: a database for reverse genetics in Arabidopsis. (1/10766)

We have generated Dissociation (Ds) element insertions throughout the Arabidopsis genome as a means of random mutagenesis. Here, we present the molecular analysis of genomic sequences that flank the Ds insertions of 931 independent transposant lines. Flanking sequences from 511 lines proved to be identical or homologous to DNA or protein sequences in public databases, and disruptions within known or putative genes were indicated for 354 lines. Because a significant portion (45%) of the insertions occurred within sequences defined by GenBank BAC and P1 clones, we were able to assess the distribution of Ds insertions throughout the genome. We discovered a significant preference for Ds transposition to the regions adjacent to nucleolus organizer regions on chromosomes 2 and 4. Otherwise, the mapped insertions appeared to be evenly dispersed throughout the genome. For any given gene, insertions preferentially occurred at the 5' end, although disruption was clearly possible at any intragenic position. The insertion sites of >500 lines that could be characterized by reference to public databases are presented in a tabular format at http://www.plantcell. org/cgi/content/full/11/12/2263/DC1. This database should be of value to researchers using reverse genetics approaches to determine gene function.  (+info)

Microbial genomics: from sequence to function. (2/10766)

The era of genomics (the study of genes and their function) began a scant dozen years ago with a suggestion by James Watson that the complete DNA sequence of the human genome be determined. Since that time, the human genome project has attracted a great deal of attention in the scientific world and the general media; the scope of the sequencing effort, and the extraordinary value that it will provide, has served to mask the enormous progress in sequencing other genomes. Microbial genome sequencing, of particular interest to the community studying emerging infectious diseases, prompted the series of articles presented in the following pages. These articles review technological and scientific advances that have occurred since publication of the Haemophilus influenzae genome sequence in July 1995; that was the first demonstration that an entire genome sequence could be deciphered by a "shotgun" approach, i.e., the sequencing and assembly of random fragments of the genome. This is now the method of choice for sequencing of most other genomes, including human (as performed by Celera Genomics).  (+info)

Genomics and bacterial pathogenesis. (3/10766)

Whole-genome sequencing is transforming the study of pathogenic bacteria. Searches for single virulence genes can now be performed on a genomewide scale by a variety of computer and genetic techniques. These techniques are discussed to provide a perspective on the developing field of genomics.  (+info)

Comparative genomics and understanding of microbial biology. (4/10766)

The sequences of close to 30 microbial genomes have been completed during the past 5 years, and the sequences of more than 100 genomes should be completed in the next 2 to 4 years. Soon, completed microbial genome sequences will represent a collection of >200,000 predicted coding sequences. While analysis of a single genome provides tremendous biological insights on any given organism, comparative analysis of multiple genomes provides substantially more information on the physiology and evolution of microbial species and expands our ability to better assign putative function to predicted coding sequences.  (+info)

Using DNA microarrays to study host-microbe interactions. (5/10766)

Complete genomic sequences of microbial pathogens and hosts offer sophisticated new strategies for studying host-pathogen interactions. DNA microarrays exploit primary sequence data to measure transcript levels and detect sequence polymorphisms, for every gene, simultaneously. The design and construction of a DNA microarray for any given microbial genome are straightforward. By monitoring microbial gene expression, one can predict the functions of uncharacterized genes, probe the physiologic adaptations made under various environmental conditions, identify virulence-associated genes, and test the effects of drugs. Similarly, by using host gene microarrays, one can explore host response at the level of gene expression and provide a molecular description of the events that follow infection. Host profiling might also identify gene expression signatures unique for each pathogen, thus providing a novel tool for diagnosis, prognosis, and clinical management of infectious disease.  (+info)

Automatic detection of conserved gene clusters in multiple genomes by graph comparison and P-quasi grouping. (6/10766)

We previously reported two graph algorithms for analysis of genomic information: a graph comparison algorithm to detect locally similar regions called correlated clusters and an algorithm to find a graph feature called P-quasi complete linkage. Based on these algorithms we have developed an automatic procedure to detect conserved gene clusters and align orthologous gene orders in multiple genomes. In the first step, the graph comparison is applied to pairwise genome comparisons, where the genome is considered as a one-dimensionally connected graph with genes as its nodes, and correlated clusters of genes that share sequence similarities are identified. In the next step, the P-quasi complete linkage analysis is applied to grouping of related clusters and conserved gene clusters in multiple genomes are identified. In the last step, orthologous relations of genes are established among each conserved cluster. We analyzed 17 completely sequenced microbial genomes and obtained 2313 clusters when the completeness parameter P: was 40%. About one quarter contained at least two genes that appeared in the metabolic and regulatory pathways in the KEGG database. This collection of conserved gene clusters is used to refine and augment ortholog group tables in KEGG and also to define ortholog identifiers as an extension of EC numbers.  (+info)

The gene guessing game. (7/10766)

A recent flurry of publications and media attention has revived interest in the question of how many genes exist in the human genome. Here, I review the estimates and use genomic sequence data from human chromosomes 21 and 22 to establish my own prediction.  (+info)

Featured organism: Danio rerio, the zebrafish. (8/10766)

The zebrafish has long been a favourite model for the study of vertebrate development. Here we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge and resources for the study of this fish, with comments on the future direction of zebrafish genomics from Professor Mark Fishman and Dr Stephen Wilson.  (+info)

Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have discovered a new function of the bodys most important tumor-suppressing protein.. Cold Spring Harbor, NY - Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have discovered a new function of the bodys most important tumor-suppressing protein. Called p53, this protein has been called "the guardian of the genome." It normally comes to the fore when healthy cells sense damage to their DNA caused by stress, such as exposure to toxic chemicals or intense exposure to the suns UV rays. If the damage is severe, p53 can cause a cell to commit preprogrammed cell-death, or apoptosis. Mutant versions of p53 that no longer perform this vital function, on the other hand, are enablers of many different cancers.. Cancer researcher Dr. Raffaella Sordella, a CSHL Associate Professor, and colleagues, today report in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences the discovery of a p53 cousin they call p53Ψ (the Greek letter "psi"). It is a previously ...
Speakers -------- N/A 2010 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Meetings Meetings Axon Guidance, Synaptic Plasticity and Regeneration September 21 - 25 abs due July 2 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Meetings Program, 1 Bungtown Road, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724 Phone 516 367 8346 email [email protected] http://www.cshl.edu/meetings ...
DNA Sudoku pools multitude of DNA samples for sequencing in manner analogous to solving a Sudoku grid. Cold Spring Harbor, NY - A math-based game that has taken the world by storm with its ability to delight and puzzle may now be poised to revolutionize the fast-changing world of genome sequencing and the field of medical genetics, suggests a new report by a team of scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL). The report will be published as the cover story in the July 1st issue of the journal Genome Research.. Combining a 2,000-year-old Chinese math theorem with concepts from cryptology, the CSHL scientists have devised "DNA Sudoku." The strategy allows tens of thousands of DNA samples to be combined, and their sequences-the order in which the letters of the DNA alphabet (A, T, G, and C) line up in the genome-to be determined all at once.. This achievement is in stark contrast to past approaches that allowed only a single DNA sample to be sequenced at a time. It also significantly ...
... COLD SPRING HARBOR N.Y. (Wed. Apr. 4 2007) In their native ...One of the freely available methods (A HREF http://www.cshprotocols....To test the activity of a certain gene during embryonic development m...,Cold,Spring,Harbor,Protocols,highlights,reliable,methods,for,gene,and,protein,analyses,biological,biology news articles,biology news today,latest biology news,current biology news,biology newsletters
Health, ...Cold Spring Harbor N.Y. A constellation of different stem cell popul...Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) led by Associate P...When cells in the skin or anywhere else in the body sense a potentiall... Unfortunately there are a number of genetic events that can bypass se...,CSHL,study,unmasks,a,stem,cell,origin,of,skin,cancer,and,the,genetic,roots,of,malignancy,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current medical news,latest medicine news
Health, ... COLD SPRING HARBOR N.Y. (Tues. Dec. 2 2008) The complexity ... Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages (BMM): Isolation and Applications f...Primary cultures of granule neurons from the cerebellum provide an exc...,Cold,Spring,Harbor,Protocols,features,tissue,culture,methods,for,immune,cells,and,neurons,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current medical news,latest medicine news
Find bipolar disorder therapists, psychologists and bipolar disorder counselors in Cold Spring Harbor, New York. Search now for detailed listings and contact a bipolar disorder therapist in Cold Spring Harbor that fits your needs!
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory - Founded in 1890, CSHL is a private, non-profit institution with research programs in cancer, neuroscience, plant biology, genomics, and bioinformatics and a broad educational mission.
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory - Founded in 1890, CSHL is a private, non-profit institution with research programs in cancer, neuroscience, plant biology, genomics, and bioinformatics and a broad educational mission.
COLD SPRING HARBOR, N.Y. (Sept. 4, 2008) - A variety of organisms-from bacteria and fungi to plants and animals-have biological rhythms, where the timing and duration of fundamental biological processes is naturally adjusted to allow them to adapt and survive, even under fluctuating environmental conditions. In recent years, significant advances have been made to understand the molecular basis of these rhythms and how they translate into modifications in cellular physiology and organismal behavior.. A new book from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Clocks and Rhythms, reviews the latest advances in biological clocks and rhythms across a broad range of species and biological disciplines. Chapters in the book are based on presentations by world-renowned investigators at the 72nd annual Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, which was attended by 316 scientists from more than 20 countries.. "Since the discovery and cloning of the first clock gene, ...
Written and edited by experts in the field, Malaria: Biology in the Era of Eradication, from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, explores recent developments in our understanding of malaria biology and their potential to influence malaria elimination/eradication strategies. The authors describe recent developments in their respective research areas and suggest both how these insights could guide intervention strategy and where critical knowledge gaps remain.
CSHL Press publishes monographs, technical manuals, handbooks, review volumes, conference proceedings, scholarly journals and videotapes. These examine important topics in molecular biology, genetics, development, virology, neurobiology, immunology and cancer biology. Manuscripts for books and for journal publication are invited from scientists world wide.
As one of New Yorks leading research institutions, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is an asset of particular value to New York State. In order to promote a clearer understanding of the multiple ways in which the Laboratory contributes to the life of New York State and its people, CSHL President & CEO Bruce Stillman, Ph.D. asked Appleseed -- a New York City-based economic development consulting firm -- to assess the Labs impact on the states economy -- and in particular, on the economy of Long Island. This report presents the results of Appleseeds analysis. Part Two highlights the impact of CSHL as an enterprise -- as an employer, a buyer of goods and services from New York companies and a sponsor of construction projects. Part Three explores several ways in which research conducted at CSHL contributes to the growth of the states and the regions economy. Part Four of the report describes CSHLs Meetings and Courses Program, which each year brings thousands of the worlds leading scientists to
Browse stories and reviews on Anobii of Biosupplynet Laboratory Research Notebook written by , published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press,U.S. in format Paperback
Students explore illuminating new ways to use fruit fly larvae for neural research at the Drosophila Neurobiology course, at the prestigious Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.
Book now at Grassos in Cold Spring Harbor, NY. Explore menu, see photos and read 1111 reviews: Consistently outstanding across the board from every staff member to every dish I have ever eaten here! The music and ambiance complete the package.
Tom Kucharski from the Teodoro Lab presented a talk at the recent cell cycle meeting at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory entitled: 53BP1 is a novel anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome mitotic substrate and regulator
Book now at Grassos in Cold Spring Harbor, explore menu, see photos and read 1087 reviews: Went for New Years food was great, no wait, music always pleases Friendly staff and service
Fachartikel, Fachpublikationen und wissenschaftliche Papers aus den Journals der Branche: Hier finden Sie Abstracts und Literaturangaben der aktuellen Veröffentlichungen von Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.
... - up-to-the-minute news and headlines. 7thSpace is a online portal covering topics such as Family, Business, Entertainment, Headlines, Recipes and more. A place for the whole family featuring many different sections to chose from.
Because NGS datasets are very large, it is often impossible or inefficient to read them entirely into a computers memory when searching for a specific piece of data. In order to more quickly retrieve the data we are interested in analyzing or viewing, most programs have a way of treating these data files as databases. Database indexes enable one to rapidly pull specific subsets of the data from them.. The Integrative Genomics Viewer is a program for reading several types of indexed database information, including mapped reads and variant calls, and displaying them on a reference genome. It is invaluable as a tool for viewing and interpreting the raw data of many NGS data analysis pipelines. ...
The Mission of HL7 Clinical Genomics Work Group The HL7 Clinical Genomics Work Group (CGWG) supports the HL7 mission to create and promote its standards by enabling the communication between interested parties of clinical and genomic data related to an individual. The focus of the CGWG efforts is the personalization of the genomic data - the so-call omics differences in an individuals genomic - and its association with relevant phenotypic and clinical information. Associations to interpretive/expected phenotypes will be modeled as knowledge that can be utilized to transform an individuals data into meaningful information. CGWG will facilitate the development of common standards for clinical research information management across a variety of organizations -- including national and international government agencies and regulatory bodies, private research efforts, and sponsored research -- and thus the availability of safe and effective therapies by improving the processes and efficiencies associated
International Journal of Plant Genomics is an international, peer-reviewed Open Access journal that publishes novel and advanced original research results of wide interest in all fields of plant genomics, genome technologies and applications of genomic tools in plant breeding. In addition, the journal welcomes field review articles of general interest to plant scientists in plant genomics. Although the journal is dedicated to publish the research results in plant genomics, research articles in genomics of animals or other organisms that are of significance in advancing or potentially applicable to plant genomics are considered for publication in the journal.
Read "Transcriptome profile of the human placenta, Functional & Integrative Genomics" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.
Kim SH, Shin DH, Liu J, Oganesyan V, Chen S, Xu QS, Kim JS, Das D, Schulze-Gahmen U, Holbrook SR, Holbrook EL, Martinez BA, Oganesyan N, DeGiovanni A, Lou Y, Henriquez M, Huang C, Jancarik J, Pufan R, Choi IC, Chandonia JM, Hou J, Gold B, Yokota H, Brenner SE, Adams PD, Kim R. 2005. Structural genomics of minimal organisms and protein fold space. J Struct Funct Genomics 6:63-70. [PubMed],[abstract] ...
Yeast Media Components. All media are formulated as described in the Cold Spring Harbor Lab Manual for Yeast Genetics, Kaiser, C., et al., Methods in Yeast Genetics, (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, 1994) and the Difco Manual 11th ed.. ...
Long Island Biological Association (N.Y.); Biological Laboratory (Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.); Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory of Quantitative Biology.; Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory ...
The LIMR Chemical Genomics Center Inc., a subsidiary of Lankenau Institute for Medical Research in Wynnewood, Pa., was awarded a Grand Challenges Expl ...
Identifying functions for all gene products in all sequenced organisms is a central challenge of the post-genomic era. However, at least 30-50% of the proteins encoded by any given genome are of unknown or vaguely known function, and a large number are wrongly annotated. Many of these unknown proteins are common to prokaryotes and plants. We set out to predict and experimentally test the functions of such proteins. Our approach to functional prediction integrates comparative genomics based mainly on microbial genomes with functional genomic data from model microorganisms and post-genomic data from plants. This approach bridges the gap between automated homology-based annotations and the classical gene discovery efforts of experimentalists, and is more powerful than purely computational approaches to identifying gene-function associations. Among Arabidopsis genes, we focused on those (2,325 in total) that (i) are unique or belong to families with no more than three members, (ii) occur in prokaryotes,
FREMONT, Calif., March 26, 2015-- WaferGen Bio-systems, Inc. announced today an important industrial partnership with Procter& Gamble whereby Procter& Gamble will utilize WaferGens SmartChip MyDesign™ quantitative PCR System to conduct various gene expression and other studies. We are very pleased that, following a thorough evaluation of multiple...
The purpose of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) is to unite investigators around the world to conduct meta- and mega-analyses of genome-wide genomic data for psychiatric disorders. This website provides information about the organization, implementation, and results of the PGC.. The PGC began in early 2007 and has rapidly become a collaborative confederation of most investigators in the field. The PGC includes over 800 investigators from 38 countries. There are samples from more than 900,000 individuals currently in analysis, and this number is growing rapidly. The PGC is the largest consortium and the largest biological experiment in the history of psychiatry.. The PGC is passionate about open, inclusive, participatory, and democratic science. Given the importance of the problems we study, we are committed to rapid progress.. From 2007-11, the PGC focused on autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia. We now include ...
Nearly 150 scientists and industrialists attended a recent meeting outside Cambridge to review progress in the application of genomics to crop plant improvement. The meeting covered a wide range of topics, from genome sequencing methods to marker-assisted breeding for wheat improvement. In her opening address, Julia Goodfellow (Biotechnological and Biological Sciences Research Council, Swindon, UK) described the increasing need for more healthy and nutritious food produced in environmentally sustainable ways and the need to translate the fruits of basic research in model species into crop improvement. The meeting established that such a research pipeline is a high priority and that genomics provides the means to achieve it.. Crop plants often have large and complex genomes; the maize genome, for example, is around 2.5 gigabase pairs (109 base pairs), approximately the same size as that of humans. Richard McCombie (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, New York, USA) described the remarkable progress ...
Once again, the summer course on Marine Ecological & Environmental Genomics (12th edition) will take place at the Station Biologique de Roscoff (France), from June 5th to June 16th 2017.. Aims. Knowledge of marine genomics knowledge is crucial for understanding the marine environment and for an efficient use of its resources. New methods have revolutionized the field, spawning applications in basic research and environmental management. The course will give insight into population, environmental, biodiversity, comparative, evolutionary and functional genomics through lectures, case studies, and computer labs.. Target group Advanced PhD students (at least in their second year) and junior postdocs with a solid knowledge in marine ecological and environmental genomics, phylogenetics and/or population genetics. ...
I use cutting-edge genomic technologies to understand the impact of human genetic variation and to understand the genetic causes of musculoskeletal disease Rare Variant Associations Since 2009, I have been working to understand the impact of rare genetics variants, both coding and non-coding on complex traits. Read more → Common Variant Associations Using genotyping microarrays and exome sequencing,…
A central problem in bioinformatics is the analysis of genomic information, leading up to the entire human genome. Research in whole genome analyses include finding genes and pseudogenes, assigning protein structures and functions to known genes, and comparing genomes in terms of a wide variety of features. Closely tied to this work is the development of computational approaches for comparing and characterizing sequences and predicting structure and function (e.g. identifying membrane proteins) from sequence. A major new development is the advent of functional genomics information with standardized experimental information over the entire genome. For example, one of the major types of functional information is genome-wide gene expression data. All members of the Track faculty are interested in the general problem of achieving an integrative and systems understanding of the whole genome.. Yale has a diverse set of activites in the areas of genomics and proteomics that are relevant to ...
NIH Funding Opportunities and Notices in the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts: NHLBI Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium (U01) RFA-HL-09-003. NHLBI
NIH Funding Opportunities and Notices in the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts: Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium (UM1) RFA-HL-15-012. NHLBI
Far-reaching biological achievements, epitomized by the Human Genome Project, are the outcome of fast-growing compilations of vast and complex biological information. In order to analyze the plethora of data gathered, Biology requires the aid of computational interpretation - hence, Computational Biology.. The Computational Genomics Laboratory at Tel Aviv Universitys School of Computer Science, has been researching computational problems related to gene, protein and disease analysis. The labs research interests include gene expression analysis, modeling and dissection of molecular networks, gene regulation, genomic rearrangements and cancer genomics. The methodologies assisting the researchers in their analysis are graph theory, complexity, probability and statistics. Methods and software tools developed by the group are in use by many laboratories around the world.. The lab is supervised by: Prof. Ron Shamir.. ...
Ali Bashashati of BC Cancer Agency, Canada presents technical examples of big data problems seen in cancer genomics research. Topics includes Next-Gen sequencing (NGS), cancer genomics and more from the 2014 IEEE SPS / UBC ICICS Summer School.  More information available at: http://vancouver.ieee.ca/content/ieee-sps-ubc-icics-summer-school-signal-processing-and-machine-learning-big-data
COLD SPRING HARBOR, N.Y. (Monday, June 1, 2009) - High-throughput whole-genome analysis is becoming a standard laboratory approach for investigating cellular processes. Next-generation sequencing is replacing microarrays as the technique of choice for genome-scale analysis, because it offers advantages in both sensitivity and scale. The June issue of Cold Spring Harbor Protocols (www.cshprotocols.org/TOCs/toc6_09.dtl) features Native Chromatin Preparation and Illumina/Solexa Library Construction from Keji Zhao and colleagues at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (http://public.nhlbi.nih.gov/Staff/Home/UserInputForPerson.aspx?OID=895&LabId=lmi). The article describes sample preparation for sequencing of chromatin-immunoprecipitated DNA (ChIP-Seq) to analyze histone modification patterns using native chromatin and the Solexa/Illumina Genome Analyzer. Step-by-step instructions are given for purification of human CD4+ T cells from lymphocytes and chromatin fragmentation using micrococcal ...
Learn about cancer genomics with our educational videos. Clinical Genomics Testing Presented by Dr. Howard Lim, MD, FRCPC. Next generation sequencing | Availability of genomic tests nationally and internationally | Issues and challenges in genomic testing | Managing incidental germline findings
At the base of current genomics research lie the powerful technologies that continuously aim to deliver more data at lower cost. The sequencing boom has driven the creation of an assortment of new companies, as well as heavy investment from existing companies, to provide sequencing solutions, library preparation reagents and bioinformatics support. This was evidenced by the 20 or so companies represented at the meeting.. Scott Brouilette (Illumina) introduced a clever genome phasing solution based on work from Stephen Quakes lab (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University, USA) that relies on sequencing of large DNA fragments (6 to 8 kb) aliquoted at limiting dilution. This allows for segregation of haplotypes and resolution of cases of compound heterozygosity, as well as improved assembly of repetitive regions.. Clive Brown (Oxford Nanopore, UK) provided a much-anticipated update that highlighted the technical hurdles that Oxford Nanopore has had to overcome to produce nanopore ...
UC Davis Childrens Hospital, UC Davis MIND Institute and UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center will host the fourth annual Human Genomics Symposium, a conference that will bring together medical experts and researchers to discuss recent advances in genomic medicine.. The symposium will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 17 in room 1222 of the Education Building on the Sacramento campus of UC Davis, located at 4610 X Street. The symposium is sponsored by UC Davis Health, the UC Davis Office of Continuing Medical Education (CME) and the UC Davis Division of Genomic Medicine. Physicians, nurses, physician assistants, pharmacists and veterinarians are invited to attend the free conference.. The conference aims to analyze and classify the new research and technologies applied at UC Davis, identify ways to apply translational genomics to the UC Davis Health clinical mission, and formulate and synthesize efforts for clinical practice and translational research in genomic medicine at UC ...
The conceptual and practical changes that have taken place in scientific theory and research in relation to genomics have also not yet found their place in the science curriculum, at least not in the Netherlands. It is now a few years since the publication of the human genome, and genomics research is continually generating large and complex data sets that have transformed the study of virtually all life processes (Collins, 2003). Despite this, and although a range of outreach programmes offer a temporary solution, such as the Dutch mobile DNA labs (van Mil, 2007), greater efforts are needed to embed genomics into the standard science curriculum.. Two important characteristics of genomics are immediately apparent for inclusion in new educational materials. First, genomics combines the expertise and techniques of many disciplines-for example, molecular biology, physical sciences and bioinformatics-in order to study genome-environment interactions in relation to phenomena at many biological ...
Early buyers will receive 10% customization on this report.. Until the last decade, application of genomics was restricted to academic research. With the advent of innovative technologies in DNA sequencing and gene expression, the key focus of genomics has shifted to drug discovery and agricultural research. The success of various research projects in utilizing genomic research for personalized medicine and molecular diagnostics is expected to increase the penetration of genetic testing in these application areas. Genomics-related testing also enables researchers to obtain accurate diagnosis of various life-threatening diseases. Moreover, government initiatives and notable pipeline projects on personalized medicine are expected to support this paradigm shift in the coming years.. Inquiry Before Buying: http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Enquiry_Before_Buying.asp?id=613. The governments of several nations have made significant investments in the genomics market to promote genomics technologies in ...
Reverse genetics has been an indispensable tool revolutionising insights into viral pathogenesis and vaccine development. Large RNA virus genomes, such as from Coronaviruses, are cumbersome to clone and manipulate in E. coli due to size and occasional instability1-3. Therefore, an alternative rapid and robust reverse genetics platform for RNA viruses would benefit the research community. Here we show the full functionality of a yeast-based synthetic genomics platform to genetically reconstruct diverse RNA viruses, including members of the Coronaviridae, Flaviviridae and Paramyxoviridae families. Viral subgenomic fragments were generated using viral isolates, cloned viral DNA, clinical samples, or synthetic DNA, and reassembled in one step in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using transformation associated recombination (TAR) cloning to maintain the genome as a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC). T7-RNA polymerase has been used to generate infectious RNA to rescue viable virus. Based on this platform we have been
The Genomics Facility is one of five highly specialized laboratories in the University of Guelphs Advanced Analysis Centre. The AAC is located in the multidisciplinary Summerlee Science Complex which provides a range of capabilities for research and advanced education at the interface of the physical and biological sciences.. The Genomics Facility is designated as an Ontario Genomics Platform Affiliate, OGPA, service facility and operates as a core facility offering molecular biology technology support services and training in DNA sequencing, genotyping, and gene expression analyses to the University of Guelph as well as other academic, government and private sector institutions.. For information about the services we offer view Genomics Services. To check the current bookings view the Genomics Equipment Bookings. ...
This is to announce a new PhD position on Genomics and Bioinformatics at the School of Life Sciences in Wädenswil (Switzerland), close to the Lake of Zürich.. Your project will investigate the re-emerging plant pathogen Xanthomonas hortorum. The aim is to study genomic diversity of the different pathovars within the X. hortorum species-level clade in order to design novel diagnostic methods and to study the molecular base of host-specificity of the individual pathovars. Your work will combine microbiology, MALDI-TOF MS identification, genome sequencing, comparative genomics and innovative computer analyses. You are expected to actively shape the direction of your project and should be highly motivated, creative and curious. Your research could make a significant boost towards rapid identification and understanding of this re-emerging plant pathogen.. For more information, please consult the website ...
Recent advances in DNA sequencing, molecular cloning, and gene editing helped remarkably in understanding the biology of life forms in our nature. Reduced cost and increased speed of DNA sequencing have led to rapid growth of genomics. Functional significance of genomic elements (genes, RNA, proteins, small molecules and phenotype) are still being unravelled in many organisms. The data coming out from large-scale functional genomics studies need to be stored, analyzed and interpreted. This requires a high-end computing facility and data center to cater towards the scientific community. India being a country having the richest biodiversity hotspots in the world, there is huge scope to decode genomes, understand and harness functionality of biodiversity through functional genomics and bio-informatics approaches. Our center aim to carryout large-scale studies in relation to conservation and traditional medicine.. ...
During the past year, the field of cardiovascular genomics has witnessed publication of an unprecedented number of outstanding articles. In addition to large-scale investigations of original hypotheses (eg, pleiotropic effects of height loci on coronary artery disease [CAD]), our community has welcomed seminal functional genomics studies using gene editing, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), and total RNA sequencing. Taken together, these studies have produced valuable insights into mechanisms underlying the observed associations with cardiovascular disease (CVD).. The mission of the Functional Genomics and Translational Biology (FGTB) Council of the American Heart Association (http://www.my.americanheart.org/fgtbcouncil) is to advance new discoveries in the fields of genetics, omics-based approaches, and translational biology, as well as to facilitate their application in cardiovascular health and disease. By creating a multidisciplinary collaborative environment, this Council integrates ...
Non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) are a diverse group of genes that do not encode proteins but function exclusively on the level of RNA and were originally suggested to be remnants of a pre-DNA stage of life known as the RNA world. More recent work, however, has uncovered a rich repertoire of previously unknown families with possible consequences for our understanding of the origin and evolution of the modern RNA infrastructure. The main goal of this thesis was therefore to re-examine the evolutionary history of RNAs and theories regarding the transition from an RNA world in light of recent advances in molecular and computational biology.. Using comparative genomics approaches and sequence data from all domains of life, my work shows that the majority of known RNAs exhibit a highly domain-specific distribution, compatible with an ongoing emergence rather than deep ancestry. Focusing on small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNA), I find that the eukaryote ancestor possessed a complex snoRNA infrastructure, but that ...
Citoxlab is your ideal partner for preclinical and clinical genomics studies, whether you are developing a protein, nucleic acid or cell-based therapeutic..
Sager S, Dolinsky JS, Hershberger RE. Sager S, Dolinsky J.S., Hershberger R.E. Sager, Solomon, et al.Dilated Cardiomyopathy. In: Murray MF, Babyatsky MW, Giovanni MA, Alkuraya FS, Stewart DR. Murray M.F., Babyatsky M.W., Giovanni M.A., Alkuraya F.S., Stewart D.R. Eds. Michael F. Murray, et al.eds. Clinical Genomics: Practical Applications in Adult Patient Care, 1e New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2014. http://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com/content.aspx?bookid=1094§ionid=61900253. Accessed December 12, 2017 ...
International Journal of Genomics is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes research articles as well as review articles in all areas of genome-scale analysis. Topics covered by the journal include, but are not limited to: bioinformatics, clinical genomics, disease genomics, epigenomics, evolutionary genomics, functional genomics, genome engineering, and synthetic genomics.
COLD SPRING HARBOR, N.Y. (Tues., Sept. 1, 2009) - Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is an invaluable method for studying the interactions between proteins and DNA on a genome-wide scale. ChIP can be used to determine whether a transcription factor interacts with a candidate target gene, and is used to monitor the presence of histones with posttranslational modifications at specific genomic locations. The results are often extremely useful for investigating the functions of specific transcription factors or histone modifications. In the September issue of Cold Spring Harbor Protocols (www.cshprotocols.org/TOCs/toc9_09.dtl), Michael Carey (portal.ctrl.ucla.edu/biological-chemistry/institution/personnel?personnel_id=45403), Craig Peterson (www.umassmed.edu/pmm/faculty/peterson.cfm), and Stephen Smale (dgsom.healthsciences.ucla.edu/institution/personnel?personnel_id=45693) present Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP), an optimized protocol for use in mammalian cells. The article is freely ...
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The National Genomics Center for Wildlife and Fish Conservation is a state-of-the art facility for advanced research providing expertise in DNA sequencing and environmental and forensic DNA sampling.
Read "From population genetics to population genomics of forest trees: Integrated population genomics approach, Russian Journal of Genetics" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.
Evolutionary genomics is a relatively new research field with the ultimate goal of understanding the underlying evolutionary and genetic mechanisms for the emergence of genome complexity under changing environments. It stems from an integration of high throughput data from functional genomics, statistical modeling and bioinformatics, and the procedure of phylogeny-based analysis.
Evolutionary genomics is a relatively new research field with the ultimate goal of understanding the underlying evolutionary and genetic mechanisms for the emergence of genome complexity under changing environments. It stems from an integration of high throughput data from functional genomics, statistical modeling and bioinformatics, and the procedure of phylogeny-based analysis.
The growing advances in DNA sequencing tools have made analyzing the human genome cheaper and faster. While such analyses are intended to identify complex variants, related to disease susceptibility and efficacy of drug responses, they have blurred the definitions of mutation and polymorphism. In the era of personal genomics, it is critical to establish clear guidelines regarding the use of a reference genome. Nowadays DNA variants are called as differences in comparison to a reference. In a sequencing project Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and DNA mutations are defined as DNA variants detectable in >1 % or <1 % of the population, respectively. The alternative use of the two terms mutation or polymorphism for the same event (a difference as compared with a reference) can lead to problems of classification. These problems can impact the accuracy of the interpretation and the functional relationship between a disease state and a genomic sequence. We propose to solve this nomenclature dilemma by
Reams, A.B. & Roth, J.R., 2015. Mechanisms of gene duplication and amplification In "DNA Recombination". Editors: Stephen Kowalczykowski, Neil Hunter, and Wolf Heyer, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, NY.. Reams, A. B. E. Kofoid, N. Duleba, and J. R. Roth, 2014. "Recombination and annealing pathways compete for substrates in making rrn duplications in Salmonella enterica" Genetics, 196:119-135. Quiñones-Soto S., A. B. Reams, and J.R. Roth, 2012. "Pathways of genetic adaptation: Multi-step origin of mutants under selection without induced mutagenesis in Salmonella enterica" Genetics, 192:987-999.. Reams, A. B. E. Kofoid, E. Kugelberg, and J. R. Roth, 2012. "Formation of duplications by multiple pathways with and without recombination (RecA)" Genetics, 192:397-415.. Reams, A. B., E. Kofoid, M. Savageau, and J. R. Roth, 2010. "Duplication frequency in a population rapidly approaches steady state with or without recombination" Genetics, 184:1077-1094.. Roth, J. R., E. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Characterization of a murine cellular SV40 T antigen in SV40-transformed cells and uninfected embryonal carcinoma cells. AU - Linzer, D. I H. AU - Maltzman, W.. AU - Levine, A. J.. PY - 1979/12/1. Y1 - 1979/12/1. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0018692275&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0018692275&partnerID=8YFLogxK. M3 - Article. C2 - 6253135. AN - SCOPUS:0018692275. VL - 44. SP - 215. EP - 224. JO - Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology. JF - Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology. SN - 0091-7451. IS - 1. ER - ...
Molecular Cloning A Laboratory Manual, 3rd ed. Joseph Sambrook and David W. Russell. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, 2001. 3 vols., 2288 pp. $295, £231. ISBN 0-87969-576-5. Paper, $195, £149. ISBN 0-87969-577-3.. This new edition of a classic compendium of protocols for biomolecular research is accompanied by a Web site that represents the likely future of efforts to provide researchers and students with up-to-date descriptions of reliable methods for carrying out experiments.. ...
Techniques for isolating and modifying specific nucleic acids and proteins are well known to those skilled in the art. In accordance with the present invention, conventional molecular biology, microbiology, and recombinant DNA techniques within the skill of the art can be used. Such techniques are explained fully in the literature. See, for example, Sambrook, Fritsch and Maniatis, Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual, 2nd Edition, Cold Spring Harbor, N .; Y. : Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, 1989 ("Sambrook et al., 1989" herein); DNA Cloning. A Practical Approach, Volume I and Volume II (D.N. Glover edit, 1985); Oligonucleotide Synthesis (M. J. Gait edit, 1984); Nucleic Acid Hybridization [B. D. Hames and S.H. J. et al. Higgins (1985)]; Transcribation And Translation [B. D. Hames and S.H. J. et al. Edited by Higgins (1984)]; Animal Cell Culture [R. I. Freshney edited (1986)]; Immobilized Cells And Enzymes [IRL Press, (1986)]; Perbal, A Practical Guide To Molecular Cloning (1984); Ausubel, ...
Although I am fully convinced of the truth of the views given in this volume, I by no means expect to convince experienced naturalists whose minds are stocked with a multitude of facts all viewed, during a long course of years, from a point of view directly opposite to mine. It is so easy to hide our ignorance under such expressions as "plan of creation," "unity of design," etc., and to think that we give an explanation when we only restate a fact. Any one whose disposition leads him to attach more weight to unexplained difficulties than to the explanation of a certain number of facts will certainly reject the theory. ...
books.google.comhttps://books.google.com/books/about/Abstracts_of_papers_presented_at_the_199.html?id=vAFKAQAAIAAJ&utm_source=gb-gplus-shareAbstracts of papers presented at the 1996 meeting on gene therapy ...
Call for Papers, Posters, and Demonstrations Session on Genome-wide Analysis and Comparative Genomics at the Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing 2003 The sequencing of over 800 complete genomes presents unprecedented opportunities for biological discovery as well as new technical challenges for the computational sciences.This session calls for papers on novel computational algorithms and biological applications in genome-wide analysis and comparative genomics. The session will bring together researchers from the biological, computational and mathematical fields with the goal of sharing new research ideas and achieving a better understanding of the current issues and challenges. The analysis of complete genomes and the comparison of multiple complete genomes are leading to deep biological insights in a variety of areas.However, many of the computational problems in analyzing, aligning and comparing large genomes, and the mathematical questions arising from the interpretation of the analyses and ...
Burge, C. B., Tuschl, T. and Sharp, P.A. Splicing of precursors to mRNAs by the spliceosomes. In RNA World II, R. Gesteland, T. Cech, and J. Atkins, eds., Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, NY, pp. 525-560 (1999) Dredge BK, Polydorides AD, Darnell RB. The splice of life: alternative splicing and neurological disease. Nat Rev Neurosci. 2001 Jan;2(1):43-50. Hastings ML, Krainer AR. Pre-mRNA splicing in the new millennium. Curr Opin Cell Biol. 2001 Jun;13(3):302-9. Maniatis T, Reed R. An extensive network of coupling among gene expression machines. Nature. 2002 Apr 4;416(6880):499-506. Nilsen, T.W. RNA/RNA interactions in nuclear pre-mRNA splicing. In: RNA Structure and Function. R. Simons and M. Grunberg-Manago eds., Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, NY, pp. 279-307 (1998). Staley JP, Guthrie C. Mechanical devices of the spliceosome: motors, clocks, springs, and things. Cell. 1998 Feb 6;92(3):315-26. Tollervey D, Caceres JF. RNA processing marches on. Cell. 2000 Nov 22;103(5):703-9. ...
Explore the billions of dollars special interest groups are spending on lobbying in Washington, D.C., -- and on what -- at OpenSecrets.org.
Dr. Esther M. Zimmer Lederberg worked with A. Hollaender at the NIH, moving to Yale after getting an M.A. at Stanford University (acknowledging the guidance of G. W. Beadle and E. L. Tatum). During summers, she worked on radiation-induced reverse mutation in at Cold Spring Harbor with A. Hollaender and M. Demerec. At the Osborn Botanical Laboratory at Yale, she did further research on radiation-induced reverse mutation in Neurospora with N. Giles. Her thesis advisor for her Ph.D. was the chairman of the Genetics Department, R. A. Brink. (See "The Emergence of Bacterial Genetics", by T. Brock, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, 1990, p. 88). ...
Campbell, M. P., Aoki-Kinoshita, K. F., Lisacek, F., York, W. S. & Packer, N. H., 2017, Essentials of glycobiology. Varki, A., Cummings, R. D., Esko, J. D., Stanley, P., Hart, G. W., Aebi, M., Darvill, A. G., Kinoshita, T., Packer, N. H., Prestegard, J. H., Schnaar, R. L. & Seeberger, P. H. (eds.). 3rd ed. Cold Spring Harbor, New York: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, p. 667-679 13 p.. Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding › Textbook contribution ...
Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. - As most good students realize, repeated studying produces good memory. Those who study a lot realize, further, that what they learn tends to be preserved longer in memory if they space out learning sessions between rest intervals. Neuroscientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have now discovered how this so-called "spacing effect" is controlled in the brain at the level of individual molecules.. Led by Professor Yi Zhong, Ph.D., the CSHL team has found that a protein called SHP-2 phosphatase controls the spacing effect by determining how long resting intervals between learning sessions need to last so that long-lasting memories can form. The study, carried out in a fruit fly model, will appear online in the journal Cell on October 2.. "Although there are many theories that explain the spacing effect at the psychological level and hundreds of studies that back them up, there has not been any understanding of this phenomenon at the neurobiological level," says ...
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Love, W. E., Klock, P. A., Lattman, E. E., Padlan, E. A., Ward, K. B., & Hendrickson, W. A. (1972). The structures of lamprey and bloodworm hemoglobins in relation to their evolution and function. In Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology (Vol. 36, pp. 349-357). Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press. ...
Robinson, C. and Guille, M. 1999. Immunohistochemistry of Xenopus embryos. Methods Mol. Biol. 127: 89-97. Sive, H.L., Grainger, R.M., and Harland, R.M. 2000. Early development of Xenopus laevis: A laboratory manual. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, NY. Becker, B.E and Gard, D.L. 2006. Visualization of the cytoskeleton in Xenopus oocytes and eggs by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Methods Mol. Biol. 322: 69-86. ...
In this study we set out to determine the role of PPARα in the small intestine using genomics tools. We find that PPARα is very well expressed in the small intestine in both mouse and human. PPARα expression is highest in villus cells and peaks in the proximal jejunum. Activation of PPARα results in altered expression of a large set of genes involved in a variety of pathways, including intestinal lipid handling, cell cycle, differentiation, apoptosis, and host defense. These data suggest an important role for PPARα in the regulation of gene expression in the small intestine.. Under control (fed) conditions we observed few changes in gene expression between wild-type and PPARα null mice. Only 21 genes were significantly altered, most of which are involved in lipid metabolism. These observations are in accordance with numerous studies showing that the effect of PPARα deletion becomes mainly noticeable under conditions of metabolic stress, and does not a priori imply that the physiological ...
Jie Xiao, Johan Elf, Gene-Wei Li, Ji Yu and X. Sunney Xie, Imaging Gene Expression in Living Cells at the Single-Molecule Level in Single Molecule Techniques A Laboratory Manual Edited by Paul R. Selvin and Taekjip Ha, Chapter 7, p. 150, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, 2008 ...
Environmental factors in human growth and development. Banbury Report 11. Edited by V. R. Hunt, M. K. Smith, and D. Worth. Cold Spring Harbor, NY: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. 1982. xx + 570 pp., figures, tables, references, indices. $62.50 (cloth ...
Genomics is a relatively new field of research, which began in earnest late in the twentieth century, although the basis of DNA was discovered more than a century earlier. The recent progressions made in genomics research have opened up exciting possibilities for genomics applications in other fields, some of which may offer health and medical benefits.
by Elio | The American Society for Microbiology has designated the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories on New Yorks Long Island as a Milestone in Microbiology site. This is the ASMs way of recognizing locations where important microbiological history was made. For previous sites so honored click here. Cold Spring Harbor has in fact…
Venter Shares Award with James D. Watson, Marilyn & James Simons and Sherry Lansing at Gala New York City Event ROCKVILLE, Md., Nov. 12 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/
Advanced Techniques in Molecular Neuroscience, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory 2015 Course, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, United States, June 30 - July 16, 2015
Advances in high throughput genomic technologies are laying the foundations for the goal of precision medicine to be realized (Christensen et al. 2015; Aronson and Rehm 2015). Decreasing costs and the capacity to generate larger volumes of human genomics data at faster rates are enabling population level genomics studies to be conducted (Goldfeder et al. 2017; Prokop et al. 2018). However, most of the current population level genomics studies and data generated to date, have a significant population representational bias with the majority of genome sequences being derived from European and North American ancestry, these are regions that have been early adopters of genomic technologies (Popejoy and Fullerton 2016; Prokop et al. 2018). African researchers, in general, have been late adopters of high-throughput technologies for use in population genomics due to more limited resources and funding. To address this critical gap in scientific knowledge about African genomics and population variation, ...
... Personalized Medicine Tumor Board Question: given all we know about a patient, what is the "optimal" treatment? The Cancer Genome Atlas Project (TCGA) SNP Structural variations DNA methylation Gene expression microRNA expression Paired samples/unpaired samples Data Processing Challenges Contamination Subclones Biological questions • Changes in genes between cancer and normals • Disease heterogeneity, subtypes • Joint modeling, mechanisms Integrative approach Meta-analytical approach PARADIGM: PAthway Recognition Algorithm using Data Integration on Genomic Models Xpxn = Wpx(k-1) Z(k-1)xn + epxn cov(e) = diag(ψ1, ψ2,…, ψp) Non-negative matrix factorization XMxN = WMxK x HKxN All matrix entries are nonnegative Minimize X1: an M x N1 matrix X2: an M x N2 matrix X3: an M x N3 matrix X1 = W x H1 X2 = W x H2 X3 = W x H3 TCGA and GWAS, and ENCODE Cancer Treatment Examples http://discover.nci.nih.gov/cellminer/ Gene expression data: HG-U133A chip, mapped to ...
Peking Univeristy, Apr. 11, 2014: One of the most important challenges in the research of life sciences is to attribute physiological functions precisely to responsible genes. Despite the rapid development of toolkits to manipulate individual genes, large-scale screening methods based on the complete loss of gene expression are still missing. A research team led by Prof. Wei Wensheng of the College of Life Sciences, in collaboration with Prof. Huang Yanyi of Biodynamic Optical Imaging Centre (BIOPIC), developed a groundbreaking technique that achieves high-throughput functional genomics in eukaryotes.. Arrayed and pooled screens using RNAi libraries targeting either human or mouse genomes have already been developed and widely used for systematic genetic studies in mammalian cells. However, its limitations are increasingly apparent. In particular, RNAi-based down-regulation of any particular gene expression is not always sufficient to cause phenotypical changes of interest. Taking advantage of ...
The term "genome" originated in 1930; it was used to denote the totality of genes on all chromosomes in the nucleus of a cell. Incredibly, DNA was not identified as the genetic material of all living organisms until 1944. The genetic code was elucidated in 1961 and with these fundamental insights in hand, it was possible to contemplate the concept that biological organisms had a blueprint consisting of finite numbers of genes. The sequence of these genes encoded all of the information required to specify the reproduction, development, and adult function of an individual organism. The massive interest and commitment of resources in both the public and private sectors flows from the generally-held perception that genomics will be the single most fruitful approach to the acquisition of new information in basic and applied biology in the next several decades ...
Background: It is anticipated that cancer risk prediction tools, including those with genomic risk information, will increasingly be used to communicate personalised cancer risk to the public. Receiving information on personal genomic risk of cancer might encourage conversations about cancer prevention and early detection with family, friends and health professionals, but few studies have examined this.. Aims: To explore participant communication about personal genomic risk of melanoma to family, friends and health professionals, using a mixed-methods approach, and to examine results according to participants genomic risk category (low, average, high).. Methods: We conducted a study examining the impact of giving information on personalised genomic risk of melanoma to the public. Participants (n=101) received a personalised booklet presenting their melanoma genomic risk based on variants in 21 genes, together with telephone-based genetic counselling and generic educational materials. They ...
|p||i|BMC Medical Genomics|/i| is an open access journal publishing original peer-reviewed research articles in all aspects of functional genomics, genome structure, genome-scale population genetics, epigenomics, proteomics, systems analysis, and pharmacogenomics in relation to human health and disease.|/p||p||i|BMC Medical Genomics|/i| is part of the |i|BMC|/i| series which publishes subject-specific journals focused on the needs of individual research communities across all areas of biology and medicine. We do not make editorial decisions on the basis of the interest of a study or its likely impact. Studies must be scientifically valid; for research articles this includes a scientifically sound research question, the use of suitable methods and analysis, and following community-agreed standards relevant to the research field.|/p||p|Specific criteria for other article types can be found in the submission guidelines.|/p||p||i|BMC series - open, inclusive and trusted.|/i||/p|
Computational Genomics. Lecture 1, Tuesday April 1, 2003. Biology in One Slide. High Throughput Biology. DNA Sequencing. …ACGTGACTGAGGACCGTG CGACTGAGACTGACTGGGT CTAGCTAGACTACGTTTTA TATATATATACGTCGTCGT ACTGATGACTAGATTACAG ACTGATTTAGATACCTGAC TGATTTTAAAAAAATATT…. High Throughput...
The agricultural applications of genomics have been underway for some time in the form of genetically-modified crops. Energy applications of genomics are in development using synthetic biology to generate fossil fuel replacements and are estimated to be ready for commercial launch in 2011. The public health application of genomics is especially promising, using genomics to further understand and eradicate disease. Genetic information is already starting to be medically actionable and is likely to become increasingly useful over time. Its two main current uses are in pharmacogenomics, personalized therapeutics, categorizing drug responders and non-responders for tailored treatment, and in routing higher-risk individuals to earlier screenings for chronic diseases such as prostate cancer and breast cancer. It is estimated that each individual is in the upper 5% risk tier for at least one chronic disease and that $100,000 per person per condition could be saved as a result of earlier detection. By ...
Genomics can revolutionize breeding and research, but for this to become a reality, scientists must be allowed to focus on the research problem, and not on the technology. The CEG is enabling this possible by making the highly sophisticated equipment required for this research available to scientists.. By offering genotyping and sequencing service on cost-to-cost basis, coupled with support in data analysis and interpretation, CEG is committed to enhance adoption of genomics in breeding programmes to increase yield.. CEGs Vision is to make it possible for agricultural breeding & research programs to fully utilize modern genomics tools in developing countries.. ...
Driven by new technologies for data acquisition, integrative genomic studies comprising large numbers of samples are poised to revolutionize the way we approach...
The NGI together with Nederlands Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek (NWO) announces the publication of GenomiX, a magazine that introduces genomics by the youth in a modern way. [4] The aim is to increase elementary scientific knowledge of the youth. 700.000 issues have been folded into mainstream youth magazines. This way NGI hopes to reach 75 percent of the youngsters between 12 and 14 years old. Although NGI makes the magazine sound objective by using terms like information and scientific knowledge, the NGI is clearly a genomics promoting organisation as their mission statement reveals. In addition to the GenomiX magazine the NGI launched the website www.genomics.nl aimed at the same group of young people. Without disclosing the evident pro-genomics attitude of the makers, the website provides a seemingly neutral, flashy and spectacular view on genomics. ...
The GOMED programme aims to provide a platform for clinicians to tap into the rich and varied expertise of CSIR-IGIB in disease genomics to solve clinical problems. The Institute brings to table its pioneering expertise in genomics in the country, demonstrated over almost a decade through the Indian Genome variation project, the sequencing of first Indian personal genome and ongoing clinical genomics efforts in rare and common diseases with a large number of public and private healthcare institutions in the country.
The GOMED programme aims to provide a platform for clinicians to tap into the rich and varied expertise of CSIR-IGIB in disease genomics to solve clinical problems. The Institute brings to table its pioneering expertise in genomics in the country, demonstrated over almost a decade through the Indian Genome variation project, the sequencing of first Indian personal genome and ongoing clinical genomics efforts in rare and common diseases with a large number of public and private healthcare institutions in the country.
Regulatory networks control gene expression and serve as decision-making circuits within an organism. As functional elements, transcription factor binding sites often evolve at a much slower rate than neutral sequences, and therefore they often stand out from the surrounding sequences by virtue of their greater levels of conservation. This property enables the recognition of these conserved elements through comparative genomics. In addition, expression data (both microarray and RNA-seq data) can be used to infer co-expression of genes that are possibly co-regulated and protein-DNA interaction studies (such as ChIP-seq) can be used to identify specific binding of a transcription factor at the promoter regions of its target genes. Capitalizing on the availability of extensive knowledge on comparative and functional genomics, we are interested in employing a systems biology approach to reconstruct regulatory networks that identify the relationships between key transcription factors and their target ...
eISSN: 1179-5697. Triggered: 2017 Gene Expression to Genetical Genomics, published by SAGE Publications This journal has now been triggered from the CLOCKSS Archive. In keeping with its unique mandate, CLOCKSS is proud to offer continuing and public access to volumes 1-3 & 6-8 of the Gene Expression to Genetical Genomics. ...
Introduction to chemical genomics / Paul R. Caron -- Chemistry for chemical genomics / Lutz Weber -- Computer-aided design of small molecules for chemical genomics / Philip M. Dean -- Design, synthesis, and screening of biomimetic ligands for affinity chromatography / Ana Cecília A. Roque, Geeta Gupta, and Christopher R. Lowe -- The role and application of in silico docking in chemical genomics research / Aldo Jongejan ... [et al.] -- Synthesis of complex carbohydrates and glyconjugates: enzymatic synthesis of globotetraose using #-1,3-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase LgtD from Haemophilus infuenzae strain Rd / Kang Ryu ... [et al.] -- High-throughput cloning for proteomics research / Sharon A. Doyle -- Screening for the expression of soluble recombinant protein in Escherichia coli / Sharon A. Doyle -- High-throughput purification of hexahistidine-tagged proteins expressed in Escherichia coli / Michael B. Murphy and Sharon A. Doyle -- The wheat germ cell-free expression system: methods for ...
Mono- and Stereopictres of 5.0 Angstrom coordination sphere of Zinc atom in PDB 1tiy: X-Ray Structure of Guanine Deaminase From Bacillus Subtilis Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium Target SR160
September 26, 2011 /Press Release/ -- Eric Schadt, PhD, a visionary in the use of computational biology in genomics, has joined The Mount Sinai Medical Center to lead the Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology. The Institute is the hub of genomics research at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, collaborating with 13 other disease-oriented and core-technology-based institutes. Dr. Schadts appointments as Director of the Institute, the Jean C. and James W. Crystal Professor of Genomics, and Chair of the Department of Genetics and Genomics Sciences began August 1, 2011. "Mount Sinai is one of only a handful of research institutions around the country focusing on computational biology in genomics," said Dennis. S. Charney, MD, Anne and Joel Ehrenkranz Dean of Mount Sinai School of Medicine and the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs of The Mount Sinai Medical Center. "With Eric Schadt at the helm, Mount Sinai will be at the forefront of the revolution in genetics and genomic sciences, ...
The Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) was a USA based project that aimed at accelerating discovery in structural genomics and contribute to understanding biological function. Funded by the U.S. National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) between 2000 and 2015, its aim was to reduce the cost and time required to determine three-dimensional protein structures and to develop techniques for solving challenging problems in structural biology, including membrane proteins. Over a dozen research centers have been supported by the PSI for work in building and maintaining high-throughput structural genomics pipelines, developing computational protein structure prediction methods, organizing and disseminating information generated by the PSI, and applying high-throughput structure determination to study a broad range of important biological and biomedical problems. The project has been organized into three separate phases. The first phase of the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI-1) spanned from ...
Relationship of SGIV to other iridoviruses.Conservation of synteny and of gene order can give insights to assess structural conservation among the viral genomes within the family Iridoviridae. Conservation of synteny refers to a pair of genomes in which at least some of the genes are located at similar map positions regardless of the gene order or the presence of intervening genes. When the evolutionary distance is large, scrambling of the gene order and the presence of nonsyntenic intervening genes become frequent (23). Therefore, it is necessary to account for these features when studying iridovirus evolution.. To make comparisons between SGIV and five other iridovirus genomes (ATV, TFV, LCDV, ISKNV, or CIV), we shifted the starting coordinates and set the start codon (ATG) of MCPs as the first base for all viral genomes. We also altered sense and antisense strands on ATV, LCDV, ISKNV, and CIV genomes in order to get the same nucleotide order on MCPs individually. However, none of the ...
Next generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized molecular biology by making whole genome sequencing projects possible for any species. Low coverage whole genome shotgun sequencing has proven a valuable approach for rapid and easy acquisition of a large amount of sequence data at relatively low cost. Low coverage data is useful for marker acquisition as well as the assembly of plastid genomes [20, 21, 31-33]. Despite its power, few examples of the application of NGS on de novo assembly of plant mitochondrial genomes have been reported. Recently Straub and colleagues [22] attempted to assemble the milkweed mitochondrial genome using Illumina data from unenriched whole genome DNA. The assembly resulted in a partial mitochondrial genome assembly of 115 contigs. Here we demonstrate how 454 data from whole genome DNA library can be used for a complete de novo assembly of the mitochondrial genome of Daucus carota. Adequate coverage, sufficient read length, and application of a ...
It turns out that marsupials do not just make more genes for cathelicidin proteins, they also make more potent ones. Two cathelicidin proteins from the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) were able to kill two different antibiotic-resistant bacteria (Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) [1].. A team of Australian researchers argued the Tasmanian devils may have an even greater need than wallabies for strong, broad-spectrum antimicrobials [1]. Offspring are born after only 30 days of gestation and weigh only 0.3 grams [1]. To get an idea of just how small this is, a paper clip weighs around 1 gram. Add to this highly altricial start the observation that Tasmanian devils lead a very aggressive lifestyle (they are not called devils for nothing), resulting in cuts and bites that require pathogen protection. If the calm tammar wallaby makes such potent proteins, what about the truculent Tasmanian devil?. To address this question, researchers Emma Peel and her colleagues began by searching ...
S E M I N A R: "Computational Methods for Detecting Structural Variants in the Next Generation Sequencing data and its applications" by Asst. Prof. Dr. Emre Karakoç, Medipol University. Despite the ease at which genome sequence data can be generated, most studies and standard computational pipelines to date, focus on the detection of single nucleotide variants and small insertions and deletions(indels). The main reason for this situation is that there are no robust methods for detecting larger indels and structural variations. Here I present novel computational methods for detecting these under estimated variants. In addition I developed computational system biology models using this more complete view of the variant landscape, to detect molecular pathways associated with complex diseases and to understand their etiology. Genomic variants especially structural variants, also contribute significantly to the adaptive evolution and introgression across closely related species. I applied ...
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Genomics[edit]. Two healthy mitochondria from mammalian lung tissue as shown by electron microscopy ...
Genomics[edit]. The sequencing of the whole genome was approved as a priority by National Human Genome Research Institute in ... real-time and comparative genomics". National Human Genome Research Institute. online at http://www.genome.gov/Pages/Research/ ...
Main article: Computational genomics. Computational genomics is a field within genomics which studies the genomes of cells and ... The Human Genome Project is one example of computational genomics. This project looks to sequence the entire human genome into ... Studies show that roughly 97% of the human genome consists of these regions.[10] Researchers in computational genomics are ... This data has now become commonplace, particularly in molecular biology and genomics. Researchers were able to develop ...
Genomics[edit]. The sequencing of the genomes of several species of Agrobacterium has permitted the study of the evolutionary ... Plant Pathogenic Bacteria: Genomics and Molecular Biology. Caister Academic Press. pp. 91-112. ISBN 978-1-904455-37-0.. ... "The Genomics of Agrobacterium: Insights into its Pathogenicity, Biocontrol, and Evolution". In Jackson RW. ...
Genomics[edit]. Main article: Genomics. The relationship between personality and people's own well-being is influenced and ... Plomin, R.; Spinath, F. M. (2004). "Intelligence: genetics, genes, and genomics". Journal of Personality and Social Psychology ... genomics has provided solid evidence that both sex and gender identities are primarily influenced by genes: .mw-parser-output . ...
Genomics and bioinformatics tools to study browning[edit]. Due to the complex nature of adipose tissue and a growing list of ...
Genomics. Plants have some of the largest genomes among all organisms.[73] The largest plant genome (in terms of gene number) ...
Genomics[edit]. Chloroplast genome map of Arabidopsis thaliana.[31][32] Introns are in grey. Some genes consist of 5′ and 3′ ... unique resource for plant biology made possible by the availability of high-throughput transformation and funding for genomics ...
Human genomics studies[edit]. The 1544G-1651G haplotype in the 3'-Untranslated region of the DP2 gene increased the stability ...
DNA sequencing and genomics[edit]. DNA sequencing, one of the most fundamental technologies developed to study genetics, allows ... Genomics can also be considered a subfield of bioinformatics, which uses computational approaches to analyze large sets of ... and parallel private efforts by Celera Genomics led to the sequencing of the human genome in 2003.[35][36] ... The large amount of sequence data available has created the field of genomics, research that uses computational tools to search ...
Genomics[edit]. Comparative genomic analysis has led to the identification of 27 proteins which are present in most species of ...
Genomics[edit]. Main article: Hepatitis E Virus. HEV has three open reading frames (ORFs) encoding two polyproteins (O1 and O2 ... "BMC Genomics. 20 (1): 790. doi:10.1186/s12864-019-6100-8. ISSN 1471-2164. PMC 6820953. PMID 31664890.. ...
Genomics[edit]. Kisspeptin is a product of the KISS1 gene which is cleaved from an initial 145 amino acid peptide to a 54 amino ...
Genomics[edit]. The gene is located on the Watson (plus) strand of the short arm of chromosome 12 (12p13.32). The gene itself ... "Nervous system targets of RNA editing identified by comparative genomics". Science. 301 (5634): 832-6. Bibcode:2003Sci...301.. ...
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The NIH plans to expand its Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project, a genomics resource used by many scientists to study ... The goal of research conducted by the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network is to better understand the ... With four years of additional support, NHGRI builds on a long-standing commitment to developing freely available genomics ... NIH to expand critical catalog for genomics research Monday, February 6, 2017. ...
Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention The Office of Public Health Genomics (OPHG) aims ... to integrate genomics into public health research, policy, and programs, which could improve interventions designed to prevent ...
... links to the Genomics and Health Impact Weekly Scan, Advanced Molecular Detection Clips. Non-Genomics Precision Health ... The Genomics and Precision Health Weekly Update provides the latest on the public health impact of genomics and precision ... Genomics & Health Impact Weekly Scan. The latest information and publications on the impact of human genomics and family ... COVID-19 and Host Genomics Webinar July 23. On July 23 we will host an online webinar entitled: "Impact of Host Genomics on ...
Find a genetics clinicexternal icon using the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics Genetics Clinics Database. ... Content source: Office of Science (OS), Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health ...
Genomics and Precision Health - Precision Public Health: What Is It? - Genomics and Precision Health Blog ... by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Categories genomics, ... by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ... genomics, spatial analysis, big data) in public health practice. But what exactly is precision public health? And why should ...
Nutritional genomics is a science studying the relationship between human genome, nutrition and health. People in the field ... Obesity is one of the most widely studied topics in nutritional genomics. Due to genetic variations among individuals, each ... Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Nutritional_genomics&oldid=867705592" ...
1) Review microbial studies in ecological genomics including manipulation experiments along latitudinal gradients and across ... In the last few years there has been a dramatic increase in studies at LTER sites that have a focus in ecological genomics or ... and explore problems and opportunities with respect to funding in microbial genomics. ... and opportunities inherent in coordinating and funding future cross-site collaborations in microbial ecological genomics, and ...
... and genomics. Some possible topics are: Things to do with DNA DNA and health DNA and the Arts DNA in the News Were really ...
Harris A. Lewin, Gene E. Robinson, W. John Kress, William J. Baker, Jonathan Coddington, Keith A. Crandall, Richard Durbin, Scott V. Edwards, Félix Forest, M. Thomas P. Gilbert, Melissa M. Goldstein, Igor V. Grigoriev, Kevin J. Hackett, David Haussler, Erich D. Jarvis, Warren E. Johnson, Aristides Patrinos, Stephen Richards, Juan Carlos Castilla-Rubio, Marie-Anne van Sluys, Pamela S. Soltis, Xun Xu, Huanming Yang, and Guojie Zhang ...
Population genomics of tumour cells to find positively selected variants, which probably help the tumour to adapt. Put your ... How do genomics technologies offer new opportunities for help prioritizing conservation areas? What would you do? What are ... Experimental design for genomics. Think about the project. And propose an experimental design (samples? replicates? ...
Turkish Centre for Public Health Genomics P3G Consortium - Public Population Project in Genomics [8] Public Health Genomics ... Public health genomics is the use of genomics information to benefit public health. This is visualized as more effective ... American Journal of Public Health Community health Nutritional genomics GRaPH-Int Bellagio Group on Public Health Genomics. " ... "Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of human genomics". Retrieved 3 September 2015. "Genomics and Its Impact on ...
Copyright © 2018 Business Insider Inc. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. ...
Researchers in the field of ecological genomics aim to determine how a genome or a population of genomes interacts with its ... Ecological genomics is trans-disciplinary by nature. Ecologists have turned to genomics to be able to elucidate the mechanistic ... A synthesis of the field of ecological genomics emerges from this volume. Ecological Genomics covers a wide array of organisms ... Integrating Phenotypic Plasticity Within an Ecological Genomics Framework: Recent Insights from the Genomics, Evolution, ...
Next-generation sequencing technology allows us to peer inside the cell in exquisite detail, revealing new insights into biology, evolution, and disease that would have been impossible to discover just a few years ago. The enormous volumes of data produced by NGS experiments present many computational challenges that we are working to address. In this talk, I will discuss some of our algorithmic solutions to two key alignment problems: (1) mapping sequences onto the human genome at very high speed, and (2) mapping and assembling transcripts from RNA-seq experiments. I will also discuss some of the problems that can arise during analysis of exome data, in which the gene-containing portions of the genome are sequenced in an effort to identify mutations responsible for disease. My group has developed algorithms to solve each of these problems, including the widely-used Bowtie program for fast DNA sequence alignment, the TopHat and Cufflinks programs for assembly of genes from transcriptome ...
genomics. Neuron Culture. Tag archives for genomics. 20,000 genes a surprise? Heck, this guy knew that long ago. Posted by ...
... the Connecticut Department of Public Health Genomics Office has published a new version of Cancer Genomics Best Practices for ... Cancer Genomics Best Practices for Connecticut Healthcare Providers With the rise of personalized medicine, and rapid advances ... To request copies of the Family Health History Workbook, Pocket Guide or Poster, email DPH.Genomics@ct.gov Looking for Answers ... Results were published online September 23, 2014 in the Journal of Genetic Counseling . Connecticut BRFSS Genomics Brief: ...
Axygen genomics products are right at home in virtually every area of genomics research-in the U.S. and around the world. ... Genomics. From collection to purification, our comprehensive portfolio of Axygen® products can simplify your workflow across ... No matter how diverse your requirements, stay focused on the complex science of genomics, while we take care of those little ... Genomics. We use cookies to ensure the best experience on our website. ...
... Genetic testing for dogs is big business. It is too easy for companies to sell false hope, ... and director of vertebrate genomics at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...
Bargmann, C. Genomics reaches the synapse. Nature 436, 473-474 (2005) doi:10.1038/436473a ...
Bacteriophage genomics.. Hendrix RW1.. Author information. 1. Pittsburgh Bacteriophage Institute and Department of Biological ...
Genomics in Endocrinology focuses on exciting new advances in endocrinology resulting from DNA microarray studies and includes ... Genomics and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS): The Use of Microarray Analysis to Identify New Candidate Genes ... A volume on the cutting-edge of technology, Genomics in Endocrinology will provide researchers with an authoritative volume on ...
Source for information on Celera Genomics: International Directory of Company Histories dictionary. ... Celera Genomics 45 Guide Drive Rockville, Maryland 20850 United States Telephone: (240) 453-3000 Toll Free: (877) 235-3721 Fax ... Celera Genomics International Directory of Company Histories COPYRIGHT 2006 Thomson Gale. Celera Genomics. 45 Guide Drive. ... Celera Genomics is founded by Dr. J. Craig Venter and the Perkin-Elmer Corporation.. 2000: The dropsophila (fruit fly) sequence ...
Nutritional genomics is the application of high throughput functional genomic technologies in nutrition research. These ... Ruan Elliott ([email protected]), nutritional genomics programme leadera, ... Nutritional genomics. BMJ 2002; 324 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.324.7351.1438 (Published 15 June 2002) Cite this as: BMJ ... components are biologically active and how they exert their effects is being fuelled by the development of nutritional genomics ...
Scholarships for Genome Sciences/Genomics Majors Bullet name award deadline Link • Emmy Noether Award Joe W. and Dorothy ... Matching Genome Sciences/Genomics Colleges Manchester University Four or more years; Private not for profit; $30,450 average ...
The NCIs Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG), within the Center for Cancer Genomics, aims to advance and accelerate genomics ... The field of immunotherapy is rapidly advancing and genomics techniques are being incorporated to add a "precision" approach. ... CGCI supports cutting-edge genomics research on adult and pediatric cancers. Researchers develop and apply advanced sequencing ... It specializes in computational and functional genomics approaches critical for translating next-generation sequencing data, as ...
  • The NCI's Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG), within the Center for Cancer Genomics , aims to advance and accelerate genomics science and enhance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer. (archive.org)
  • TARGET is managed by NCI's Office of Cancer Genomics and Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program. (archive.org)
  • Today, at teaching hospitals, doctors sequence the genes of cancerous cells and compare them to normal host cells, a technology called cancer genomics . (wired.com)
  • Leveraging the advantages of an integrated healthcare system, we have implemented a clinical cancer genomics program to personalize targeted treatment for advanced cancer patients in a community setting. (intermountainhealthcare.org)
  • NGS was performed on fresh or archival tissue and each case was presented at our MTB which consists of experts in oncology and cancer genomics. (intermountainhealthcare.org)
  • Genomics England will allow more patients to benefit from what is already known about cancer genomics, and generate fresh insights that will benefit others in future. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • With the rise of personalized medicine, and rapid advances in genomic sequencing technology and diagnostic testing, healthcare providers and consumers have an increased need for accurate information about genetic testing, genomics, and heritable conditions. (ct.gov)
  • Nutritional genomics is the application of high throughput functional genomic technologies in nutrition research. (bmj.com)
  • The field of genomics now extends far and wide-from establishing a basic understanding about how the human genome works to determining how genomic variation plays a role in human disease, and extending to how to use genomic information in the practice of medicine. (genengnews.com)
  • Discover how Intel is collaborating with the genomics community to transform large datasets into biomedical insights that accelerate personalized care, revolutionizing how genomic workflows get executed, stored, and processed at cloud scale. (intel.com)
  • Functional genomics attempts to understand function at the broadest level (the genomic level). (britannica.com)
  • Our goal has been two-fold: to create foundational genomics resources and capabilities for the community, and to undertake large-scale disease-based projects that pioneer approaches and advance the understanding of the genomic basis of disease and other traits. (broadinstitute.org)
  • Over the past ten years, The Genomics Platform has been the largest producer of human genomic information in the world. (broadinstitute.org)
  • Discover new knowledge through the conduct of innovative research on genomics and ethical issues raised by emerging genomic technologies. (mcw.edu)
  • This month's The Genomics Landscape features stories about The GTEx Project's legacy, which lives on in its now publicly available atlas for studying human genomic variation and how it relates to gene expression. (genome.gov)
  • The fourth such meeting, entitled Genomics and Society: Expanding the ELSI Universe , was funded by NHGRI through a grant to Columbia University Medical Center, and held on the campus of UConn Health and The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine in Farmington, CT. (genome.gov)
  • As genomics becomes increasingly present and relevant in both the public sphere and medical care, there is a clear need to enhance genomic awareness and understanding. (genome.gov)
  • Here are some examples of data formats used in regards to genomics HGNC gene symbols for naming and identifying human genes MGI gene symbols for naming and identifying mouse genes Microarray probe identifiers ORF identifiers in yeast There are a number of genomic data resources already in existence and some larger scale projects planned in the next 3 to 5 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Genomics and Precision Health Weekly Update features the latest information and publications on the public health impact of human genomics and family history, pathogen genomics and advanced molecular detection, machine learning and precision health technologies. (cdc.gov)
  • In our original paper on precision public health, we provided three examples of the use of technologies to better enhance precision in public health, including the use of pathogen genomics, enhanced surveillance and informatics, and targeted interventions. (cdc.gov)
  • Your search for answers in genomics can depend on the difference of one-one genetic variant, one rare transcript, one specialized cell's profile. (bd.com)
  • Since the field of genomics takes into account the entire genome of an organism and not simply its individual genes, the study of latent viral infection falls into this realm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Capitalizing on the availability of extensive knowledge on comparative and functional genomics, we are interested in employing a systems biology approach to reconstruct regulatory networks that identify the relationships between key transcription factors and their target genes. (umass.edu)
  • In Genomics Protocols, 2nd Edition , a team of expert researchers share the most current information in a field that has recently switched emphasis from gene identification to functional genomics and the characterization of genes and gene products. (springer.com)
  • This has led to a deepened understanding of genomics and the role of genes in causing or preventing disease. (news-medical.net)
  • Advanced genomics and genome knowledge of the taxonomically closely related genus Musa will help identify genes and their function. (slideshare.net)
  • Genomics aims at the collective characterization and quantification of genes, which direct the production of proteins with the assistance of enzymes and messenger molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2) Discuss the problems and opportunities inherent in coordinating and funding future cross-site collaborations in microbial ecological genomics, and we will discuss approaches to annotation and deposition molecular datasets and metadata. (google.com)
  • This volume approaches its complex subject with a broad perspective to supply its reader with a vital overview of genomics and its derivative fields, with a focus on pivotal issues such as data analysis. (springer.com)
  • The Europe genomics market is expected to reach US$ 10.1 Bn in 2025 from US$ 4.6 Bn in 2017. (prnewswire.com)
  • [2 ] Of its 300 million euro budget it funds the Centre for Society and Genomics . (sourcewatch.org)
  • The Genomics Facility is one of five highly specialized laboratories in the University of Guelph's Advanced Analysis Centre. (uoguelph.ca)
  • Today, bulding on the development of direct-to-consumer genotyping tests such as those provided by 23andMe and Color Genomics, it is now possible for individuals to access WGS directly. (genengnews.com)
  • Color Genomics, a company founded by Twitter and Google vets, just raised $45 million in a round led by General Catalyst with participation from Bono, Laurene Powell Jobs, and others. (fastcompany.com)
  • Under the auspices of Applera Corporation, Celera Genomics is engaged primarily in the discovery and development of targeted therapeutics for cancer as well as for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Samuel Broder is vice president of medical affairs at Celera Genomics of Rockville, MD, an Applera Corporation business. (uni-protokolle.de)
  • NEW YORK (Reuters) - Google Genomics, the cloud-based computing business that is racing to increase its share of online DNA analytics, on Wednesday began offering a cloud service version of the popular DNA analysis software from the Broad Institute, a biomedical research organization. (reuters.com)
  • The Google Genomics API allows developers to store, process, explore, and share DNA information using Google's cloud infrastructure. (programmableweb.com)
  • Google Genomics implements the API defined by the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health and can be accessed by compliant software. (programmableweb.com)
  • Complete Genomics Inc., a third-generation human genome sequencing company, said Monday it raised $45 million in a fourth round of funding. (bizjournals.com)
  • Mountain View-based Complete Genomics said the round included two new investors, Essex Woodlands Health Ventures, which has an office in Palo Alto, and New York-based OrbiMed Advisors LLC. (bizjournals.com)
  • Complete Genomics also named two new directors, Dr. C. Thomas Caskey of Essex Woodlands Health Ventures and Carl L. Gordon,a founding general partner of OrbiMed. (bizjournals.com)
  • Church is a strong proponent of personal genomics. (genengnews.com)
  • A reader has pointed me to the latest issue of the American Journal of Bioethics , which is devoted to social networking and personal genomics. (wired.com)
  • I'm still working my way through the many interesting articles, but for now I wanted to cover some useful points in the editorial (entitled ' A Pragmatic Consideration of Ethical Issues Relating to Personal Genomics '), which was written by a series of big names from personal genomics company 23andMe , including both co-founders. (wired.com)
  • Not all variants reported by personal genomics companies are only weakly predictive. (wired.com)
  • It's certainly true that the common variants that form the bulk of the markers tested by personal genomics companies tend to be very weakly associated with disease risk, but the authors note that 23andMe and other providers are now reporting on less common genetic variants with much larger effects on disease risk (I've previously discussed 23andMe's move into breast cancer gene testing ). (wired.com)
  • The authors cite Facebook's 'granular customizability of data sharing' as a model for personal genomics, and argue that this customisability in and of itself can have benefits: 'The option-and necessity-of customizing privacy settings can actively engage users to learn about the unintended consequences of sharing. (wired.com)
  • It's worth noting here that the level of genetic literacy of many personal genomics customers is substantially higher than that of the average medical practitioner, so such networks can draw on a fairly hefty knowledge base. (wired.com)
  • In the last few years there has been a dramatic increase in studies at LTER sites that have a focus in ecological genomics or metagenomics. (google.com)
  • 1) Review microbial studies in ecological genomics including manipulation experiments along latitudinal gradients and across time scales. (google.com)
  • Ecological genomics is trans-disciplinary by nature. (springer.com)
  • A synthesis of the field of ecological genomics emerges from this volume. (springer.com)
  • Ecological Genomics covers a wide array of organisms (microbes, plants and animals) in order to be able to identify central concepts that motivate and derive from recent investigations in different branches of the tree of life. (springer.com)
  • Genomics also allows the comparison of one genome with another, leading to insights into possible evolutionary relationships between organisms. (britannica.com)
  • From Liquid Biopsy and Oncology Biomarker Discovery to Metagenomics and Single Cell sequencing, our application-specific products provide researchers with comprehensive solutions to deliver the next wave of innovation in the genomics community. (qiagen.com)
  • Of course, a main driver of precision medicine is better technology (genomics and various omics to all the ways of measuring environmental factors). (cdc.gov)
  • The Handbook of Statistical Genomics focuses on explaining the main ideas, analysis methods and algorithms, citing key recent and historic literature for further details and references. (wiley.com)
  • Melvin Reichman, the president and founder of the LIMR Chemcal Genomics Center, will use the funds to apply the center's unique ultra-high throughput screening technologies (an automated process for conducting hundreds of thousands of biological or chemical screening tests) to discover combination-drug candidates capable of treating drug-resistant malaria. (bizjournals.com)
  • Translational Genomics Research Institute develops early diagnosis and treatment of diseases through molecular medicine. (intel.com)
  • The Genomics Facility is designated as an Ontario Genomics Platform Affiliate, OGPA, service facility and operates as a core facility offering molecular biology technology support services and training in DNA sequencing, genotyping, and gene expression analyses to the University of Guelph as well as other academic, government and private sector institutions. (uoguelph.ca)
  • The knowledge and understanding acquired from genomics research can be applied in a number of different settings, including medicine, biotechnology and social sciences. (news-medical.net)
  • Fungal genomics has been having a pivotal impact on applied research in agriculture, food sciences, natural resource management, pharmaceuticals, and biotechnology, as well as to basic studies in the life sciences. (worldcat.org)
  • They claim that biotechnology coupled with genomics might emerge as the key technology in the 21st century for improving global health and probably even avoiding major political conflicts and wars. (uni-protokolle.de)
  • This workshop will provide an opportunity for LTER scientists to evaluate past research, learn about the current activities of colleagues who work at other sites, and explore problems and opportunities with respect to funding in microbial genomics. (google.com)
  • in this module we will explore the major techniques used in genomics and current views on the genetic diversity and adaptability of microbial pathogenesis. (le.ac.uk)
  • You will learn how genomics increases our understanding of how microbial pathogens evolve to adapt to host environments in the long term (chromosomal organisation and gene content) and in the short term (antigenic variation and phase variation). (le.ac.uk)
  • He joins me to discuss the use of genomics to better understand microbial functions in their environment. (apple.com)
  • Genomics in Endocrinology focuses on exciting new advances in endocrinology resulting from DNA microarray studies and includes a comprehensive introduction to the use of DNA microarrays in endocrinology. (springer.com)
  • A volume on the cutting-edge of technology, Genomics in Endocrinology will provide researchers with an authoritative volume on the most recent advances in monitoring genome function. (springer.com)
  • Advances in genomics have triggered a revolution in discovery-based research to understand even the most currently complex biological systems such as the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Advances in genomics have triggered a revolution in systems biology which facilitates the understanding of complex biological systems such as the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • In preparation for this increase in clinical use of sequencing, the Program of Genomics and Ethics (PGE) has been established at the Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities at the Medical College of Wisconsin supported by the Advancing a Healthier Wisconsin Research and Education Fund. (mcw.edu)
  • Other topics include genomics and clinical care, NHGRI's summer interns and a visit from Native graduate health fellows to the NIH Clinical Center and NHGRI. (genome.gov)
  • Fungal genomics: a tool to explore central metabolism of Aspergillus fumigatus and its role in virulence / Taylor Schoberle and Gregory S. May. (worldcat.org)
  • Explore this solution brief and discover how Intel's reference architecture for genomics clusters designed using Intel® Scalable System Framework (Intel® SSF) can dramatically reduce genome sequencing time as well as significantly reduce total cost of ownership for genomics clusters. (intel.com)
  • If we could design and develop the general toolkit for genomics, the work of many would benefit. (genengnews.com)
  • and director of vertebrate genomics at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts. (nature.com)
  • Listen as leading scientists discuss the impact of genomics with the Illumina Scientific Affairs team. (apple.com)
  • Most Wageningen scientists dealing with genomics no longer focus on collecting raw data on DNA sequences - they are busy interpreting it. (wur.nl)
  • Ecologists have turned to genomics to be able to elucidate the mechanistic bases of the biodiversity their research tries to understand. (springer.com)
  • Population genomics of tumour cells to find positively selected variants, which probably help the tumour to adapt. (google.com)
  • JMP Genomics provides comprehensive tools to analyze rare and common variants, detect differential expression patterns, understand NGS data, discover reliable biomarker profiles, and incorporate pathway information into your analysis workflows. (ncsu.edu)
  • In June, nearly 300 people attended a three-day Congress on the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) of genomics research. (genome.gov)
  • The Genomics Core now offers new applications, such as single-cell RNA sequencing, microbiome profiling and targeted transcriptome resequencing for FFPE samples, using a brand-new Illumina Novaseq, MiSeq and NextSeq. (cedars-sinai.edu)
  • In this class we will discuss recent studies that try to compare and contrast genomics and functional genomics data across species with the goal of identifying the conserved and divergent processes that are active in each of the species being studied. (cmu.edu)
  • Genomics allows the biology of wildlife populations to be explored in great detail, through cutting-edge DNA sequencing technologies. (fed.us)
  • This course introduces you to the basic biology of modern genomics and the experimental tools that we use to measure it. (coursera.org)
  • Suggested text for citation: Library preparation and sequencing (or other analyses, i.e. bioanalyzer assessment, sonication, qRT-PCR) was performed at Scripps Research Florida Genomics Core. (scripps.edu)
  • Genomics is the collective term for a broad spectrum of research techniques used to gain insight into the structure and functioning of the genetic material of plants, animals and micro-organisms. (wur.nl)