Urolithiasis: Formation of stones in any part of the URINARY TRACT, usually in the KIDNEY; URINARY BLADDER; or the URETER.Urinary Calculi: Low-density crystals or stones in any part of the URINARY TRACT. Their chemical compositions often include CALCIUM OXALATE, magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite), CYSTINE, or URIC ACID.Calcium Oxalate: The calcium salt of oxalic acid, occurring in the urine as crystals and in certain calculi.Kidney Calculi: Stones in the KIDNEY, usually formed in the urine-collecting area of the kidney (KIDNEY PELVIS). Their sizes vary and most contains CALCIUM OXALATE.Renal Colic: A severe intermittent and spasmodic pain in the lower back radiating to the groin, scrotum, and labia which is most commonly caused by a kidney stone (RENAL CALCULUS) passing through the URETER or by other urinary track blockage. It is often associated with nausea, vomiting, fever, restlessness, dull pain, frequent urination, and HEMATURIA.Urinary Bladder Calculi: Stones in the URINARY BLADDER; also known as vesical calculi, bladder stones, or cystoliths.Magnesium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain magnesium as an integral part of the molecule.Nephrolithiasis: Formation of stones in the KIDNEY.Hypercalciuria: Excretion of abnormally high level of CALCIUM in the URINE, greater than 4 mg/kg/day.Hyperoxaluria: Excretion of an excessive amount of OXALATES in the urine.Oxalates: Derivatives of OXALIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that are derived from the ethanedioic acid structure.Lithotripsy: The destruction of a calculus of the kidney, ureter, bladder, or gallbladder by physical forces, including crushing with a lithotriptor through a catheter. Focused percutaneous ultrasound and focused hydraulic shock waves may be used without surgery. Lithotripsy does not include the dissolving of stones by acids or litholysis. Lithotripsy by laser is LITHOTRIPSY, LASER.Cystinuria: An inherited disorder due to defective reabsorption of CYSTINE and other BASIC AMINO ACIDS by the PROXIMAL RENAL TUBULES. This form of aminoaciduria is characterized by the abnormally high urinary levels of cystine; LYSINE; ARGININE; and ORNITHINE. Mutations involve the amino acid transport protein gene SLC3A1.Ureterolithiasis: Formation of stones in the URETER.Ureteroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the ureter.Nephrocalcinosis: A condition characterized by calcification of the renal tissue itself. It is usually seen in distal RENAL TUBULAR ACIDOSIS with calcium deposition in the DISTAL KIDNEY TUBULES and the surrounding interstitium. Nephrocalcinosis causes RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Flank Pain: Pain emanating from below the RIBS and above the ILIUM.Urinalysis: Examination of urine by chemical, physical, or microscopic means. Routine urinalysis usually includes performing chemical screening tests, determining specific gravity, observing any unusual color or odor, screening for bacteriuria, and examining the sediment microscopically.Nephrostomy, Percutaneous: The insertion of a catheter through the skin and body wall into the kidney pelvis, mainly to provide urine drainage where the ureter is not functional. It is used also to remove or dissolve renal calculi and to diagnose ureteral obstruction.Dysuria: Painful URINATION. It is often associated with infections of the lower URINARY TRACT.Calcium Citrate: A colorless crystalline or white powdery organic, tricarboxylic acid occurring in plants, especially citrus fruits, and used as a flavoring agent, as an antioxidant in foods, and as a sequestrating agent. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Tunisia: A country in northern Africa between ALGERIA and LIBYA. Its capital is Tunis.Hyperoxaluria, Primary: A genetic disorder characterized by excretion of large amounts of OXALATES in urine; NEPHROLITHIASIS; NEPHROCALCINOSIS; early onset of RENAL FAILURE; and often a generalized deposit of CALCIUM OXALATE. There are subtypes classified by the enzyme defects in glyoxylate metabolism.Potassium Citrate: A powder that dissolves in water, which is administered orally, and is used as a diuretic, expectorant, systemic alkalizer, and electrolyte replenisher.Libya: A country in northern Africa, bordering the Mediterranean Sea, between Egypt, Tunisia, and Algeria, having southern border with Chad, Niger, and Sudan. Its capital is Tripoli.Uric Acid: An oxidation product, via XANTHINE OXIDASE, of oxypurines such as XANTHINE and HYPOXANTHINE. It is the final oxidation product of purine catabolism in humans and primates, whereas in most other mammals URATE OXIDASE further oxidizes it to ALLANTOIN.Urography: Radiography of any part of the urinary tract.Ureteral Calculi: Stones in the URETER that are formed in the KIDNEY. They are rarely more than 5 mm in diameter for larger renal stones cannot enter ureters. They are often lodged at the ureteral narrowing and can cause excruciating renal colic.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Urethral Obstruction: Partial or complete blockage in any part of the URETHRA that can lead to difficulty or inability to empty the URINARY BLADDER. It is characterized by an enlarged, often damaged, bladder with frequent urges to void.Cola: A plant genus of the family STERCULIACEAE. This is the source of the kola nut which contains CAFFEINE and is used in popular beverages.Newfoundland and Labrador: Province of Canada consisting of the island of Newfoundland and an area of Labrador. Its capital is St. John's.Amino Acid Transport Systems, Basic: Amino acid transporter systems capable of transporting basic amino acids (AMINO ACIDS, BASIC).Cystine: A covalently linked dimeric nonessential amino acid formed by the oxidation of CYSTEINE. Two molecules of cysteine are joined together by a disulfide bridge to form cystine.Cellular Phone: Analog or digital communications device in which the user has a wireless connection from a telephone to a nearby transmitter. It is termed cellular because the service area is divided into multiple "cells." As the user moves from one cell area to another, the call is transferred to the local transmitter.Mobile Applications: Computer programs or software installed on mobile electronic devices which support a wide range of functions and uses which include television, telephone, video, music, word processing, and Internet service.Computers, Handheld: A type of MICROCOMPUTER, sometimes called a personal digital assistant, that is very small and portable and fitting in a hand. They are convenient to use in clinical and other field situations for quick data management. They usually require docking with MICROCOMPUTERS for updates.Repetition Priming: A type of procedural memory manifested as a change in the ability to identify an item as a result of a previous encounter with the item or stimuli.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Adipose Tissue: Specialized connective tissue composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It is the site of stored FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. In mammals, there are two types of adipose tissue, the WHITE FAT and the BROWN FAT. Their relative distributions vary in different species with most adipose tissue being white.Cyclic AMP: An adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to both the 3'- and 5'-positions of the sugar moiety. It is a second messenger and a key intracellular regulator, functioning as a mediator of activity for a number of hormones, including epinephrine, glucagon, and ACTH.Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A family of percutaneous techniques that are used to manage CORONARY OCCLUSION, including standard balloon angioplasty (PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL CORONARY ANGIOPLASTY), the placement of intracoronary STENTS, and atheroablative technologies (e.g., ATHERECTOMY; ENDARTERECTOMY; THROMBECTOMY; PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL LASER ANGIOPLASTY). PTCA was the dominant form of PCI, before the widespread use of stenting.Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary: Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Coronary Artery Disease: Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.HELLP Syndrome: A syndrome of HEMOLYSIS, elevated liver ENZYMES, and low blood platelets count (THROMBOCYTOPENIA). HELLP syndrome is observed in pregnant women with PRE-ECLAMPSIA or ECLAMPSIA who also exhibit LIVER damage and abnormalities in BLOOD COAGULATION.Creatine Kinase: A transferase that catalyzes formation of PHOSPHOCREATINE from ATP + CREATINE. The reaction stores ATP energy as phosphocreatine. Three cytoplasmic ISOENZYMES have been identified in human tissues: the MM type from SKELETAL MUSCLE, the MB type from myocardial tissue and the BB type from nervous tissue as well as a mitochondrial isoenzyme. Macro-creatine kinase refers to creatine kinase complexed with other serum proteins.Clinical Laboratory Techniques: Techniques used to carry out clinical investigative procedures in the diagnosis and therapy of disease.Anemia, Aplastic: A form of anemia in which the bone marrow fails to produce adequate numbers of peripheral blood elements.Pancreatitis: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS. Pancreatitis is classified as acute unless there are computed tomographic or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic findings of CHRONIC PANCREATITIS (International Symposium on Acute Pancreatitis, Atlanta, 1992). The two most common forms of acute pancreatitis are ALCOHOLIC PANCREATITIS and gallstone pancreatitis.Rhabdomyolysis: Necrosis or disintegration of skeletal muscle often followed by myoglobinuria.Alanine Transaminase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-alanine and 2-oxoglutarate to pyruvate and L-glutamate. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.6.1.2.
Genetic analysis to determine which mutation associated with the disease may be present. Currently genotyping is not available ... Alpha lipoic acid treatment prevents cystine urolithiasis in a mouse model of cystinuria', suggesting that a high dose of the ... "Alpha-lipoic acid prevents kidney stones in mouse model of rare genetic disease: Research leads to clinical trial for ... "α-Lipoic acid treatment prevents cystine urolithiasis in a mouse model of cystinuria". Nature Medicine. 23 (3): 288-290. doi: ...
In the past, the RUCDR contributed samples to a research project concerning the genetic causes of progeria. This study revealed ... Tischfield's lab investigates [autism], alcohol addiction and dihydroxyadenine urolithiasis and cystinuria, kidney diseases ... Professor Tischfield's research at Rutgers University focuses on the genetic basis of complex diseases that are caused by many ... In recent years Tischfield's research has turned to the genetic basis neuropsychaitric disorders such as Autism, Tourette ...
Genetic analysis to determine which mutation associated with the disease may be present. Currently genotyping is not available ... Alpha lipoic acid treatment prevents cystine urolithiasis in a mouse model of cystinuria', suggesting that a high dose of the ... "Alpha-lipoic acid prevents kidney stones in mouse model of rare genetic disease: Research leads to clinical trial for ... lysine and ornithine in relation to genetic findings in patients with cystinuria treated with sulfhydryl compounds". Urological ...
Treatment of urolithiasis[edit]. Fast diagnosis and treatment of acute obstructive urolithiasis may prevent the development of ... "Amateurs are trying genetic engineering at home". Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. Retrieved 2009-02-17 ... "Melamine-Contaminated Powdered Formula and Urolithiasis in Young Children". New England Journal of Medicine. 360 (11): 1067-74 ...
16: "Uric Acid Urolithiasis".. In Stoller & Meng 2007, pp. 299-308.. *^ Nephrolithiasis~Overview at eMedicine § Pathophysiology ... rare genetic disorder. Pink/yellow. Radio-opaque. Cystine, an amino acid (one of the building blocks of protein), leaks through ... 8: Urolithiasis". In Litwin, MS; Saigal, CS. Urologic Diseases in America (NIH Publication No. 07-5512) (PDF). Bethesda, ... Kidney stone disease, also known as urolithiasis, is when a solid piece of material (kidney stone) occurs in the urinary tract. ...
Knoll T, Pearle MS (2012). Clinical Management of Urolithiasis (in ਅੰਗਰੇਜ਼ੀ). Springer Science & Business Media. p. 21. ISBN ... Genetic and environmental factors[2]. ਜਾਂਚ ਕਰਨ ਦਾ ਤਰੀਕਾ. Based on symptoms, urine testing, medical imaging[2]. ...
Genetic predisposition[edit]. The APOL1 gene has been proposed as a major genetic risk locus for a spectrum of nondiabetic ... Other genetic illnesses affect kidney function, as well. Overuse of common drugs such as ibuprofen, and acetaminophen ( ...
... as well as congenital or genetic conditions such as polycystic kidney disease. ...
Perhaps the most difficult aspect of membranous glomerulonephritis is deciding which people to treat with immunosuppressive therapy as opposed to simple "background" or anti-proteinuric therapies. A large part of this difficulty is due to a lack of ability to predict which people will progress to end-stage kidney disease, or kidney disease severe enough to require dialysis. Because the above medications carry risk, treatment should not be initiated without careful consideration as to risk/benefit profile. Of note, corticosteroids (typically Prednisone) alone are of little benefit. They should be combined with one of the other 5 medications, each of which, along with prednisone, has shown some benefit in slowing down progression of membranous nephropathy. It must be kept in mind, however, that each of the 5 medications also carry their own risks, on top of prednisone. The twin aims of treating membranous nephropathy are first to induce a remission of the nephrotic syndrome and second to prevent ...
Increasing access to, and use of, genome profiling may provide opportunity for diagnosis based on presentation and genetic risk ... as it may be due to either genetic susceptibility or poor health management among people of Afro-Caribbean descent.[2] ...
A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection that affects part of the urinary tract.[1] When it affects the lower urinary tract it is known as a bladder infection (cystitis) and when it affects the upper urinary tract it is known as a kidney infection (pyelonephritis).[9] Symptoms from a lower urinary tract infection include pain with urination, frequent urination, and feeling the need to urinate despite having an empty bladder.[1] Symptoms of a kidney infection include fever and flank pain usually in addition to the symptoms of a lower UTI.[9] Rarely the urine may appear bloody.[6] In the very old and the very young, symptoms may be vague or non-specific.[1][10] The most common cause of infection is Escherichia coli, though other bacteria or fungi may rarely be the cause.[2] Risk factors include female anatomy, sexual intercourse, diabetes, obesity, and family history.[2] Although sexual intercourse is a risk factor, UTIs are not classified as sexually transmitted infections (STIs).[11] ...
Some HLA alleles have been suspected along with complement phenotypes as being genetic factors. Non-aggressive Berger's disease ...
This test measures the changes in body weight, urine output, and urine composition when fluids are withheld to induce dehydration. The body's normal response to dehydration is to conserve water by concentrating the urine. Those with DI continue to urinate large amounts of dilute urine in spite of water deprivation. In primary polydipsia, the urine osmolality should increase and stabilize at above 280 Osm/kg with fluid restriction, while a stabilization at a lower level indicates diabetes insipidus.[10] Stabilization in this test means, more specifically, when the increase in urine osmolality is less than 30 Osm/kg per hour for at least three hours.[10] Sometimes measuring blood levels of ADH toward the end of this test is also necessary, but is more time consuming to perform.[10] To distinguish between the main forms, desmopressin stimulation is also used; desmopressin can be taken by injection, a nasal spray, or a tablet. While taking desmopressin, a patient should drink fluids or water only ...
"Genetic Factors in Diabetic Nephropathy". Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 2 (6): 1306-1316. doi ...
Alport syndrome - a genetic disorder causing recurrent microscopic hematuria with proteinuria, hearing loss, and progressive ... Polycystic kidney disease - a genetic disorder that causes cysts in the kidney[8] ...
Most small stones are passed spontaneously and only pain management is required. Above 5 mm the rate of spontaneous stone passage decreases.[3] NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), such as diclofenac[4] or ibuprofen, and antispasmodics like butylscopolamine are used. Although morphine may be administered to assist with emergency pain management, it is often not recommended as morphine is very addictive and raises ureteral pressure, worsening the condition. Vomiting as well is considered an important adverse effect of opioids, mainly with pethidine.[5] Oral narcotic medications are also often used. There is typically no antalgic position for the patient (lying down on the non-aching side and applying a hot bottle or towel to the area affected may help). Larger stones may require surgical intervention for their removal, such as shockwave lithotripsy, ureteroscopy or percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Patients can also be treated with alpha blockers[6] in cases where the stone is located in ...
Genetic disorders: congenital nephrotic syndrome is a rare genetic disorder in which the protein nephrin, a component of the ...
Numerous studies over a long period of time clearly indicate that male circumcision contributes to the development of urethral stricture. Among circumcised males, reported incidence of meatal stricture varies. Griffiths et al. (1985) reported an incidence of 2.8 percent.[8] Sörensen & Sörensen (1988) reported 0 percent.[9] Cathcart et al. (2006) reported an incidence of 0.55 percent.[10] Yegane et al. (2006) reported an incidence of 0.9 percent.[11] Van Howe (2006) reported an incidence of 7.29 percent.[2] In Van Howe's study, all cases of meatal stenosis were among circumcised boys. Simforoosh et al. (2010) reported an incidence of 0.55 percent. [12] According to Emedicine (2016), the incidence of meatal stenosis runs from 9 to 20 percent.[6] Frisch & Simonsen (2016) placed the incidence at 5 to 20 percent of circumcised boys.[1] ...
... is any of various forms of kidney disease (nephropathy). In an old and broad sense of the term, it is any nephropathy,[1] but in current usage the term is usually restricted to a narrower sense of nephropathy without inflammation or neoplasia,[2] in which sense it is distinguished from nephritis, which involves inflammation. It is also defined as any purely degenerative disease of the renal tubules.[1] Nephrosis is characterized by a set of signs called the nephrotic syndrome.[2] Nephrosis can be a primary disorder or can be secondary to another disorder.[2] Nephrotic complications of another disorder can coexist with nephritic complications. In other words, nephrosis and nephritis can be pathophysiologically contradistinguished, but that does not mean that they cannot occur simultaneously.. Types of nephrosis include amyloid nephrosis and osmotic nephrosis.. ...
The exact pathologic mechanism for RCN is unclear, however the onset of small vessel pathology is likely an important aspect in the cause of this condition. In general the renal cortex is under greater oxygen tension and more prone to ischemic injury, especially at the level of the proximal collecting tubule, leading to its preferential damage in a sudden drop in perfusion. Rapidly corrected acute renal ischemia leads to acute tubular necrosis, from which complete recovery is possible, while more prolonged ischemia may lead to RCN. Pathologically, the cortex of the kidney is grossly atrophied with relative preservation of the gross structure of the medulla. The damage is usually bilateral owing to its underlying systemic causes, and is most frequently associated with pregnancy (,50% of cases).[1] It accounts for 2% of all cases of acute kidney failure in adults and more than 20% of cases of acute kidney failure during late pregnancy.[15][16]. ...
... (ATN) is a medical condition involving the death of tubular epithelial cells that form the renal tubules of the kidneys. ATN presents with acute kidney injury (AKI) and is one of the most common causes of AKI.[1] Common causes of ATN include low blood pressure and use of nephrotoxic drugs.[1] The presence of "muddy brown casts" of epithelial cells found in the urine during urinalysis is pathognomonic for ATN.[2] Management relies on aggressive treatment of the factors that precipitated ATN (e.g. hydration and cessation of the offending drug). Because the tubular cells continually replace themselves, the overall prognosis for ATN is quite good if the cause is corrected, and recovery is likely within 7 to 21 days.[1]. ...
... (diabetic kidney disease) (DN)[1] is the chronic loss of kidney function occurring in those with diabetes mellitus. It is a serious complication, affecting around one-quarter of adult diabetics in the United States. It usually is slowly progressive over years. [2] Pathophysiologic abnormalities in DN begin with long-standing poorly controlled blood glucose levels. This is followed by multiple changes in the filtration units of the kidneys, the nephrons. (There are normally about 3/4-1 1/2 million nephrons in each adult kidney).[3] Initially, there is constriction of the efferent arterioles and dilation of afferent arterioles, with resulting glomerular capillary hypertension and hyperfiltration; this gradually changes to hypofiltration over time.[4] Concurrently, there are changes within the glomerulus itself: these include a thickening of the basement membrane, a widening of the slit membranes of the podocytes, an increase in the number of mesangial cells, and an increase in ...
നെഫ്രോട്ടിക് സിൻഡ്രം വന്ന രോഗികളുടെ വൃക്കയിലെ 'പോഡോസൈറ്റ്സ്'ൽ വളരെ ചെറിയ സുഷിരങ്ങൾ ഉണ്ടാവുകയും അതു വഴി ആൽബുമിൻ നഷ്ടപ്പെടുകയും ചെയ്യുന്നു.എന്നാൽ ഈ സുഷിരങ്ങൾ വഴി രക്തകോശങ്ങൾ കടന്നു പോവുകയില്ല. മൂത്രത്തിലൂടെ ആൽബുമിൻ നഷ്ടപ്പെടുന്നതിനാൽ രക്തത്തിൽ ആൽബുമിൻറെ അളവ് കുറയുകയും അത് ശരീര കലകളിൽ നീർക്കെട്ടിനു കാരണമാവുകയും ചെയ്യുന്നു. രക്തത്തിൽ ആൽബുമിൻറെ അളവ് കുറയുമ്പോൾ കരൾ ...
Treatment of urolithiasisEdit. Fast diagnosis and treatment of acute obstructive urolithiasis may prevent the development of ... "Amateurs are trying genetic engineering at home". Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. Retrieved 2009-02-17 ... "Melamine-Contaminated Powdered Formula and Urolithiasis in Young Children". New England Journal of Medicine. 360 (11): 1067-74 ...
Tubular and genetic disorders associated with kidney stones. This concise review summarizes our current understanding and the ... Urolithiasis in Pregnancy. Urolithiasis in pregnancy is a major health concern and can potentially affect the well-being of ... Urolithiasis in Pregnancy: Beyond the Abstract Urolithiasis in pregnancy is a major health concern and can potentially affect ... Update on Surgical Management of Pediatric Urolithiasis. Urolithiasis has always been a fascinating disease, even more so in ...
Taguchi K, Yasui T, Milliner DS, Hoppe B, Chi T. Genetic Risk Factors for Idiopathic Urolithiasis: A Systematic Review of the ... Genetic changes can increase the risk of developing kidney stones, often acting in combination with a variety of environmental ... What are the different ways in which a genetic condition can be inherited? ...
Several factors can contribute to development of urolithiasis. These include:. * Genetic factors like the altered urate ... Diagnosis of Urolithiasis in Dogs. Diagnostic tests are needed to identify urolithiasis as the cause of your pets symptoms and ... Overview of Urolithiasis (Stones in the Urinary Tract) in Dogs. Urolithiasis refers to the formation of stones (calculi or ... Urolithiasis (stones in the urinary tract) in Dogs. 10 Sep, 2015 Dr. Debra Primovic - DVM 298,046 Views ...
Urolithiasis. 2019 Sep 12. doi: 10.1007/s00240-019-01157-7. [Epub ahead of print] ... Association of vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and risk of urolithiasis: results of a genetic epidemiology study and ... Polymorphisms of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene have been associated with risk of urolithiasis, but, with inconsistent results ... No associations were evident for VDR ApaI, BsmI and TaqI polymorphic variants and urolithiasis risk after correction for ...
Urolithiasis. 2013;41:187-96. doi: 10.1007/s00240-013-0566-7.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar ... The genetic composition of Oxalobacter formigenes and its relationship to colonization and calcium oxalate stone disease. ... This chapter describes the genetic and in vitro aspects of microbial oxalate metabolism, and reviews in vivo trials involving ... insights into understanding the rarity of urolithiasis in the black group. J Appl Microbiol. 2012;113:418-28. doi: 10.1111/j. ...
... urolithiasis, is one the oldest known disease affecting human throughout different civilizations and times. The exact ... Danpure CJ (2000) Genetic disorders and urolithiasis. Urol Clin N Am 27(2):287-299CrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Kohri K et al (1991) Epidemiology of urolithiasis in the elderly. Int Urol Nephrol 23(5):413-421PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Smith LH (1989) The medical aspects of urolithiasis: an overview. J Urol 141(3 Pt 2):707-710PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar ...
Genetic factors of polygenic urolithiasis.. Urologia 2020.. View More Results provided by: ...
Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center resources: Renal Tubular Acidosis Renal Tubular Acidosis, Distal Renal Tubular ... Urolithiasis. Urinary Calculi. Calculi. Pathological Conditions, Anatomical. Renal Tubular Transport, Inborn Errors. Metabolism ... Genetic Diseases, Inborn. Furosemide. Fludrocortisone. Diuretics. Natriuretic Agents. Physiological Effects of Drugs. Sodium ...
disease-associated stones (eg hyperparathyroidism, genetic conditions). *anatomical abnormalities (eg single kidney, PUJ ... Urolithiasis, or urinary tract stones, is the aggregation of crystals in the urine, most commonly composed of calcium oxalate.1 ... Some patients with urolithiasis do not require emergency treatment, but are likely to experience ongoing pain and potentially ... A low-protein diet can help reduce recurrence of urolithiasis.19. Metabolic screening for patients who are at high risk or have ...
Genetic Risk Factors for Idiopathic Urolithiasis: A Systematic Review of the Literature and Causal Network Analysis. ... or worsening urolithiasis. The purpose of our investigation was to evaluate the relationship between MCCs and urolithiasis. ... on the course of calcium urolithiasis (CU) is not fully understood, particularly in young patients where genetic background has ... It has an incidence of 1 in 7000 worldwide making it one of the most common genetic disorders in man. Published November 3, ...
Many have concurrent calcium-containing urolithiasis (bladder or kidney stones). As the hypercalcemia becomes more profound, ... Genetic testing for Primary Hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) in the Keeshond. Dogs have two thyroid glands, one on each side of the ... The Keeshond PHPT genetic test identifies dogs that are positive for the PHPT gene; the dog may not have the disease currently ... Because the trait is autosomal dominant, it may be eliminated from breeding dogs through genetic testing. The result can be ...
Canine cystine urolithiasis. Cause, detection, treatment, and prevention. Vet Clin N Am Sm Anim Pract. 1999;29(1):193-211, xiii ... Urolithiasis in dogs. II: breed prevalence, and interrelations of breed, sex, age, and mineral composition. Am J Vet Res. 1998; ... Additional genetic or environmental factors may play a role for cystinuria in Mastiffs. This variant SLC3A1 allele is not found ... And finally, these and future studies will have an impact on the genetic control of cystinuria in future generations of dogs. ...
Urolithiasis: caused by genetic defects in the renal absorption of amino acids ...
Urolithiasis: caused by genetic defects in the renal absorption of amino acids ...
Genetic Study of Nephrolithiasis in Gouty Diathesis. Conditions: Nephrolithiasis Intervention: Genetic Analyses, Genetic ...
Recurrent urolithiasis and/or progressive nephrocalcinosis are PH hallmarks and can... ... patients overproduce oxalate because of rare genetic errors in glyoxylate metabolism. ... Total plasma oxalate concentration (free oxalate plus protein-associated oxalate) was measured at the Genetic and Metabolic ... Recurrent urolithiasis and/or progressive nephrocalcinosis are PH hallmarks and can lead to kidney damage, systemic oxalosis ...
We conclude that the VEGF gene Bst U I polymorphism is a suitable genetic marker of urolithiasis. ... Our aim was to investigate a polymorphism of the CDH-1 gene 3-UTR as a possible genetic marker in the search for the genetic ... Copy number variations (CNVs), which constitute a substantial portion of genetic variability and structural genetic variants, ... Aug, 2003 , Pubmed ID: 12893367 To use the Bst U I polymorphism as a genetic marker in the search for the association between ...
The only phenotypic manifestation of cystinuria is cystine urolithiasis, which often recurs throughout an affected individuals ... How should patients with cystine stone disease be evaluated and treated in the twenty-first century?. Urolithiasis. 2016 Feb. ... Molecular genetics of cystinuria: identification of four new mutations and seven polymorphisms, and evidence for genetic ... VII International Symposium on Urolithiasis. Cairns, Australia. New York, NY: Plenum; 1992. 168. ...
Urolithiasis. kidney stone;asymptomatic until passes into the lower urinary tract Calculi can form in kidney (nephrolithiasis) ... not entirely understood May be metabolic disorders Genetic link - family history Ca+ Cause of Stone Formation:. 75% (may be ...
Urolithiasis-a study of drinking water hardness and genetic factors. Journal of chronic diseases, 1980, 33(11-12):727-31. ... Family studies have indicated an appreciable genetic contribution to the tendency to urolithiasis [27]. Several disorders that ... and prevalence of urolithiasis [35]. Correspondingly, in a population of vegetarians, the prevalence of urolithiasis was lower ... Bacteria associated with urolithiasis. Seventy-eight stones were submitted for culture, 19 were infected and 59 were sterile. ...
Cystitis and urolithiasis cause changes in urine color, stranguria, pollakiuria, inappetence, and lethargy. Urinalysis with ... Genetic or dietary factors may contribute to the high prevalence. Nephritis, tubular necrosis, nephrocalcinosis, ... The etiology is not known; however, genetic and nutritional causes have been suggested. Affected hedgehogs are typically ≥ 3 yr ...
The condition is genetic. *Diabetes - Diabetes usually affects older dogs and is the inadequate control by the body of the ... Urolithiasis - This condition is where stones formed from calcium form in the bladder. They may not cause any clinical signs ... This condition has not yet been proven to be inherited but there is a high level of suspicion that there is a genetic component ... There is a large genetic component and dogs can be scored. Ideally only dogs with a score of 0 should be used for breeding. ...
Genetic Factors in Kidney and Cardiovascular Disease: African Americans with two copies of certain variants of the APOL1 gene ... urolithiasis, and vesicoureteral reflux; Development of novel diagnostic tools and improved therapies, including tissue ... Genetic liver disease; HIV and liver; Cell injury, repair, fibrosis and inflammation in the liver; Liver cancer; Liver ... biosynthesis and genetic regulation of hemoglobin; as well as Research on the etiology, pathogenesis, and therapeutic ...
The 1st Bi-Annual Meeting of the EAU Section of Urolithiasis convened in London from 7-10 September, delivering a varied ... He noted on the remarkable genetic diversity between breeds of dogs, but also the close similarity within the same breed. In- ... Dogs are particularly useful for genetic research, as the genome assembly was sequenced and assembled in 2004. Catchpole points ... The surgical side of urolithiasis was also well-represented in the scientific programme. Several hands-on training workshops ...
Higher Visceral Fat Ratio Seen With Recurring Urolithiasis Publish Date July 13, 2018 ... Diet explains little of the variation in serum urate levels in the general population, while genetic factors make a greater ...
  • A retrospective analysis of both metabolic and genomic data was performed for the first 105 pediatric urolithiasis patients who underwent exome sequencing at our hospital from February 2016 to October 2018. (cdc.gov)
  • Home A impressive view Urolithiasis: Therapy · Prevention opening mistakes out a using % at an miniature Computational bunch ErrorDocument for users on June 23, 2018 in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. (walton-green.com)
  • Association of vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and risk of urolithiasis: results of a genetic epidemiology study and comprehensive meta-analy. (cdc.gov)
  • Polymorphisms of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene have been associated with risk of urolithiasis, but, with inconsistent results and lack data from Pakistani population. (cdc.gov)
  • Not all patients with urolithiasis require referral to urology, so it is important to be able to determine which patients can be safely managed conservatively. (racgp.org.au)
  • 1 Department of Pediatric Urology, Children's Urolithiasis Treatment Center of National Health Commission of China, Xinhua Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, 1665 Kongjiang Road, Shanghai, 200092, China. (cdc.gov)
  • Clinical suspicion of urolithiasis should be evaluated with low-dose computed tomography as the first-line imaging modality for nonpregnant, adult patients. (urotoday.com)
  • Hematuria (micro- or macroscopic) should raise clinical suspicion for urolithiasis, particularly if it is associated with renal colic and/or hydronephrosis. (infectiousdiseaseadvisor.com)
  • Combined genetic and epigenetic alterations of the TERT promoter affect clinical and biological behaviour of bladder cancer. (uzh.ch)
  • This was surprising, as one might expect an earlier onset of clinical manifestations of a probable genetic disorder, with the life span of ferrets being reported to be between 5 and 11 years. (umn.edu)
  • 1 - 3 HPRT deficiency (McKusick #308000) is an X-linked defect (Xq26-q27.2) of purine metabolism with considerable genetic and clinical heterogeneity, the biochemical hallmark being increased levels of uric acid in blood and urine. (aappublications.org)
  • Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is a rare genetic disease characterized by excessive oxalate accumulation in plasma and urine, resulting in various phenotypes because of allelic and clinical heterogeneity. (nature.com)
  • Because the trait is autosomal dominant, it may be eliminated from breeding dogs through genetic testing. (cornell.edu)
  • Dogs are particularly useful for genetic research, as the genome assembly was sequenced and assembled in 2004. (uroweb.org)
  • Catchpole points out that "translational research" should yield promising results, as genetic research can be translated in between rats and dogs, and finally be applied to humans. (uroweb.org)
  • He noted on the remarkable genetic diversity between breeds of dogs, but also the close similarity within the same breed. (uroweb.org)
  • Urolithiasis is quite rare in dogs, usually this disease can be found in cats. (entusiastaspastoraleman.com)
  • Genetic factors associated with cystine urolithiasis have not yet been reported in ferrets, but a familial pattern of inheritance determined to be a major underlying factor in cystine urolithiasis in dogs and humans suggests that this may be a factor in ferrets and that the parent stock of ferrets in the present study may have been inbred. (umn.edu)
  • Some people believe that genetic diseases are becoming more common in fcertain purebred dogs due to limited gene pools and close breeding. (walkervillevet.com.au)
  • Genetic test results can be used to help guide medical management of affected dogs, identify dogs at risk even before they form stones, and to inform breeding decisions. (umn.edu)
  • A Canadian based veterinary database of genetic diseases in dogs which provides information to owners and breeders aimed at reducing the incidence of those diseases. (dogbreedhealth.com)
  • The aim of this study was to investigate the association between cystine uroliths in some English bulldogs and the genetic mutations in the SLC3A1 and SLC7A9 genes. (bmj.com)
  • In addition, levels of the vitamin D receptor ( VDR ) and its genetic polymorphisms were also indicated to be associated with idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH) [ 16 , 17 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Several studies analyzed the associations of Vitamin D receptor ( VDR ) polymorphisms with urolithiasis risk in different ethnic groups. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Expression and nuclear activation of the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) are necessary for the effects of vitamin D. Therefore, VDR was implicated in urolithiasis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The search terms were used as follows: (urolithiasis or kidney stone or kidney stone disease) and (Vitamin D receptor or VDR) and (polymorphism or mutation or variant). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Diet explains little of the variation in serum urate levels in the general population, while genetic factors make a greater contribution. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • In the therapy of urolithiasis, both conservative methods are used - with the help of tablets and injections, and surgical - to perform operations to remove stones. (okeydoctors.com)
  • Objectives: To evaluate the pattern of presentations and treatments offered to patients with urolithiasis over the last 2 years at Federal Medical Centre (FMC), Nguru.Materials and Methods: The study is a 2-year retrospective review of patients managed for urolithiasis at FMC Nguru. (who.int)
  • But, the main reason is related to the renal uric acid hypo-excretion, due to genetic and environmental factors such as diuretic use, low dose of aspirin and high alcohol consumption. (medcraveonline.com)
  • In this article, we present evidence-based guidelines regarding urolithiasis, from diagnosis, through to conservative and operative management, and prevention, as a reference for GPs and other primary care physicians. (racgp.org.au)
  • attacks are back here women that can Modify distorted, Mosco is out, but shortcuts that have us out of the view Urolithiasis: Therapy · Prevention of longstanding Scribd into the legacy of the today. (walton-green.com)
  • About W&G offering to PMI, sources need used by odels in an true, synergistic view Urolithiasis: Therapy · Prevention trying a special freedom origin system that brings the third life to get divided and chromosomes did. (walton-green.com)
  • In recent years Tischfield's research has turned to the genetic basis neuropsychaitric disorders such as Autism, Tourette syndrome and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, three disorders on which he has coauthored publications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Canine 2,8-dihydroxyadenine (2,8-DHA) urinary stones are caused by an autosomal recessive genetic disorder. (umn.edu)