Keloid: A sharply elevated, irregularly shaped, progressively enlarging scar resulting from formation of excessive amounts of collagen in the dermis during connective tissue repair. It is differentiated from a hypertrophic scar (CICATRIX, HYPERTROPHIC) in that the former does not spread to surrounding tissues.Cicatrix, Hypertrophic: An elevated scar, resembling a KELOID, but which does not spread into surrounding tissues. It is formed by enlargement and overgrowth of cicatricial tissue and regresses spontaneously.Acne Keloid: A type of acneiform disorder in which secondary pyogenic infection in and around pilosebaceous structures ends in keloidal scarring. It manifests as persistent folliculitis of the back of the neck associated with occlusion of the follicular orifices. It is most often encountered in black or Asian men.Fibroblasts: Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.Cicatrix: The fibrous tissue that replaces normal tissue during the process of WOUND HEALING.Flurandrenolone: A corticosteroid used topically in the treatment of various skin disorders. It is usually employed as a cream or an ointment, and is also used as a polyethylene tape with an adhesive. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p733)Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Fibrosis: Any pathological condition where fibrous connective tissue invades any organ, usually as a consequence of inflammation or other injury.Genetic Linkage: The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME.Silicone Gels: Synthetic organosiloxane gels that are formed from synthetic polymers of silicone oxide with organic sidechains (polydimethylsiloxane) by lengthening the polymer chains. Unlike silicone elastomers, they are not treated with amorphous silica. They are used as fillers in breast implants.Triamcinolone Acetonide: An esterified form of TRIAMCINOLONE. It is an anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid used topically in the treatment of various skin disorders. Intralesional, intramuscular, and intra-articular injections are also administered under certain conditions.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Cryosurgery: The use of freezing as a special surgical technique to destroy or excise tissue.Triamcinolone: A glucocorticoid given, as the free alcohol or in esterified form, orally, intramuscularly, by local injection, by inhalation, or applied topically in the management of various disorders in which corticosteroids are indicated. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p739)Breast Implants: Implants used to reconstruct and/or cosmetically enhance the female breast. They have an outer shell or envelope of silicone elastomer and are filled with either saline or silicone gel. The outer shell may be either smooth or textured.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.United StatesMichiganAsian Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It was initially established to investigate the broad aspects of human development as a means of understanding developmental disabilities, including mental retardation, and the events that occur during pregnancy. It now conducts and supports research on all stages of human development. It was established in 1962.Infant, Extremely Low Birth Weight: An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1000 grams (2.2 lbs), regardless of GESTATIONAL AGE.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Leiomyoma: A benign tumor derived from smooth muscle tissue, also known as a fibroid tumor. They rarely occur outside of the UTERUS and the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT but can occur in the SKIN and SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE, probably arising from the smooth muscle of small blood vessels in these tissues.Pregnancy, Twin: The condition of carrying TWINS simultaneously.Uterine Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERUS.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Financing, Organized: All organized methods of funding.Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Contracts: Agreements between two or more parties, especially those that are written and enforceable by law (American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). It is sometimes used to characterize the nature of the professional-patient relationship.Training Support: Financial support for training including both student stipends and loans and training grants to institutions.Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.Single Parent: A natural, adoptive, or substitute parent of a dependent child, who lives with only one parent. The single parent may live with or visit the child. The concept includes the never-married, as well as the divorced and widowed.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Single-Parent Family: A household that includes children and is headed by one adult.Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Portraits as Topic: Graphic representations, especially of the face, of real persons, usually posed, living or dead. (From Thesaurus for Graphic Materials II, p540, 1995)Family Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.Search Engine: Software used to locate data or information stored in machine-readable form locally or at a distance such as an INTERNET site.Transforming Growth Factor beta: A factor synthesized in a wide variety of tissues. It acts synergistically with TGF-alpha in inducing phenotypic transformation and can also act as a negative autocrine growth factor. TGF-beta has a potential role in embryonal development, cellular differentiation, hormone secretion, and immune function. TGF-beta is found mostly as homodimer forms of separate gene products TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2 or TGF-beta3. Heterodimers composed of TGF-beta1 and 2 (TGF-beta1.2) or of TGF-beta2 and 3 (TGF-beta2.3) have been isolated. The TGF-beta proteins are synthesized as precursor proteins.Databases, Genetic: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.Transforming Growth Factor beta1: A subtype of transforming growth factor beta that is synthesized by a wide variety of cells. It is synthesized as a precursor molecule that is cleaved to form mature TGF-beta 1 and TGF-beta1 latency-associated peptide. The association of the cleavage products results in the formation a latent protein which must be activated to bind its receptor. Defects in the gene that encodes TGF-beta1 are the cause of CAMURATI-ENGELMANN SYNDROME.Genome, Human: The complete genetic complement contained in the DNA of a set of CHROMOSOMES in a HUMAN. The length of the human genome is about 3 billion base pairs.Transforming Growth Factor beta3: A TGF-beta subtype that plays role in regulating epithelial-mesenchymal interaction during embryonic development. It is synthesized as a precursor molecule that is cleaved to form mature TGF-beta3 and TGF-beta3 latency-associated peptide. The association of the cleavage products results in the formation a latent protein which must be activated to bind its receptor.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).
  • This process, characterized by an abnormal healing of hematoma with the occurrence of scar, implies the coexistence of an autoimmune process probably leading to a genetic factor. (hindawi.com)
  • Abnormal scarring is found to be more frequently occurring in dark skinned individuals, as the keloid scars usually occurs in the places of higher concentration of melanocytes. (skincareguide.com)
  • Keloids are characterized by abnormal and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM). (biomedcentral.com)
  • For instance, African American patients who come to my office are very cautious about their chances of producing a keloid scar (a scar that extends beyond the borders of the original injury). (drsterry.com)
  • The researchers identified 190 statistically significant regions of DNA that were mapped to 152 keloid-specific genes. (dermatologytimes.com)
  • Among 152 unique genes, the researchers identified 10 that demonstrated an increase of the cellular components and regulatory pathways that are keys to keloid development. (dermatologytimes.com)
  • We discourage consanguinous marriages because sometimes there are genes that when they meet a second one to make a pair ( i mean on e from father and one from mom), the babies might show severe genetic diseases although there are also very healthy kids from consanguinous marriages. (healthtap.com)
  • In the current study, we further define the EMT-like phenotype of keloid scars and investigate regulation of EMT-related genes in keloid. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Inhibition of canonical TGF-β1 signaling in keloid keratinocytes significantly inhibited expression of these genes, and TGF-β1 stimulation of normal keratinocytes increased their expression. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Integration of the differentially methylated gene promoters and expressed genes was performed to identify putative epigenetically regulated genes associated with keloid phenotype. (keloidresearch.com)
  • The study results demonstrate how the optimization of gene selection can be used for biological significance in hopes of better understanding keloid pathogenesis and for targeted therapy for keloid disease in the near future," Dr. Jones tells Dermatology Times . (dermatologytimes.com)
  • There is currently no explanation for the underlying pathogenesis of HTSs and keloids. (springer.com)
  • While the first line has always been the use of intralesional triamcinolone, recently intralesional verapamil has also been known to reduce growth of keloids. (msjonline.org)
  • Other biological factors also contribute to keloid development, including the overproduction of certain growth factors and glue-like proteins. (knowfacts.org)