Hydrogel: A network of cross-linked hydrophilic macromolecules used in biomedical applications.Hydrogels: Water swollen, rigid, 3-dimensional network of cross-linked, hydrophilic macromolecules, 20-95% water. They are used in paints, printing inks, foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Biocompatible Materials: Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.Contact Lenses, Hydrophilic: Soft, supple contact lenses made of plastic polymers which interact readily with water molecules. Many types are available, including continuous and extended-wear versions, which are gas-permeable and easily sterilized.Polyethylene Glycols: Polymers of ETHYLENE OXIDE and water, and their ethers. They vary in consistency from liquid to solid depending on the molecular weight indicated by a number following the name. They are used as SURFACTANTS, dispersing agents, solvents, ointment and suppository bases, vehicles, and tablet excipients. Some specific groups are NONOXYNOLS, OCTOXYNOLS, and POLOXAMERS.Tissue Engineering: Generating tissue in vitro for clinical applications, such as replacing wounded tissues or impaired organs. The use of TISSUE SCAFFOLDING enables the generation of complex multi-layered tissues and tissue structures.Tissue Scaffolds: Cell growth support structures composed of BIOCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS. They are specially designed solid support matrices for cell attachment in TISSUE ENGINEERING and GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION uses.Polyvinyl Alcohol: A polymer prepared from polyvinyl acetates by replacement of the acetate groups with hydroxyl groups. It is used as a pharmaceutic aid and ophthalmic lubricant as well as in the manufacture of surface coatings artificial sponges, cosmetics, and other products.Hexuronic Acids: Term used to designate tetrahydroxy aldehydic acids obtained by oxidation of hexose sugars, i.e. glucuronic acid, galacturonic acid, etc. Historically, the name hexuronic acid was originally given to ascorbic acid.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Glucuronic Acid: A sugar acid formed by the oxidation of the C-6 carbon of GLUCOSE. In addition to being a key intermediate metabolite of the uronic acid pathway, glucuronic acid also plays a role in the detoxification of certain drugs and toxins by conjugating with them to form GLUCURONIDES.Gelatin: A product formed from skin, white connective tissue, or bone COLLAGEN. It is used as a protein food adjuvant, plasma substitute, hemostatic, suspending agent in pharmaceutical preparations, and in the manufacturing of capsules and suppositories.Alginates: Salts of alginic acid that are extracted from marine kelp and used to make dental impressions and as absorbent material for surgical dressings.Silicones: A broad family of synthetic organosiloxane polymers containing a repeating silicon-oxygen backbone with organic side groups attached via carbon-silicon bonds. Depending on their structure, they are classified as liquids, gels, and elastomers. (From Merck Index, 12th ed)Contact Lenses, Extended-Wear: Hydrophilic contact lenses worn for an extended period or permanently.Acrylic ResinsPolyhydroxyethyl Methacrylate: A biocompatible, hydrophilic, inert gel that is permeable to tissue fluids. It is used as an embedding medium for microscopy, as a coating for implants and prostheses, for contact lenses, as microspheres in adsorption research, etc.Poloxamer: A nonionic polyoxyethylene-polyoxypropylene block co-polymer with the general formula HO(C2H4O)a(-C3H6O)b(C2H4O)aH. It is available in different grades which vary from liquids to solids. It is used as an emulsifying agent, solubilizing agent, surfactant, and wetting agent for antibiotics. Poloxamer is also used in ointment and suppository bases and as a tablet binder or coater. (Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed)Acrylamides: Colorless, odorless crystals that are used extensively in research laboratories for the preparation of polyacrylamide gels for electrophoresis and in organic synthesis, and polymerization. Some of its polymers are used in sewage and wastewater treatment, permanent press fabrics, and as soil conditioning agents.Cells, Immobilized: Microbial, plant, or animal cells which are immobilized by attachment to solid structures, usually a column matrix. A common use of immobilized cells is in biotechnology for the bioconversion of a substrate to a particular product. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Polyesters: Polymers of organic acids and alcohols, with ester linkages--usually polyethylene terephthalate; can be cured into hard plastic, films or tapes, or fibers which can be woven into fabrics, meshes or velours.Rheology: The study of the deformation and flow of matter, usually liquids or fluids, and of the plastic flow of solids. The concept covers consistency, dilatancy, liquefaction, resistance to flow, shearing, thixotrophy, and VISCOSITY.Contact Lenses: Lenses designed to be worn on the front surface of the eyeball. (UMDNS, 1999)Porosity: Condition of having pores or open spaces. This often refers to bones, bone implants, or bone cements, but can refer to the porous state of any solid substance.Microspheres: Small uniformly-sized spherical particles, of micrometer dimensions, frequently labeled with radioisotopes or various reagents acting as tags or markers.AcrylatesChitosan: Deacetylated CHITIN, a linear polysaccharide of deacetylated beta-1,4-D-glucosamine. It is used in HYDROGEL and to treat WOUNDS.Delayed-Action Preparations: Dosage forms of a drug that act over a period of time by controlled-release processes or technology.Elastic Modulus: Numerical expression indicating the measure of stiffness in a material. It is defined by the ratio of stress in a unit area of substance to the resulting deformation (strain). This allows the behavior of a material under load (such as bone) to be calculated.Methacrylates: Acrylic acids or acrylates which are substituted in the C-2 position with a methyl group.Mechanical Phenomena: The properties and processes of materials that affect their behavior under force.Bandages, Hydrocolloid: Dressings comprised of a self-adhesive matrix to which hydrophilic absorbent particles are embedded. The particles consist of CELLULOSE derivatives; calcium ALGINATES; PECTINS; or GELS. The utility is based on providing a moist environment for WOUND HEALING.Hyaluronic Acid: A natural high-viscosity mucopolysaccharide with alternating beta (1-3) glucuronide and beta (1-4) glucosaminidic bonds. It is found in the UMBILICAL CORD, in VITREOUS BODY and in SYNOVIAL FLUID. A high urinary level is found in PROGERIA.Cell Culture Techniques: Methods for maintaining or growing CELLS in vitro.Nanofibers: Submicron-sized fibers with diameters typically between 50 and 500 nanometers. The very small dimension of these fibers can generate a high surface area to volume ratio, which makes them potential candidates for various biomedical and other applications.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Biomimetic Materials: Materials fabricated by BIOMIMETICS techniques, i.e., based on natural processes found in biological systems.Contact Lens Solutions: Sterile solutions used to clean and disinfect contact lenses.Injections: Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.Drug Carriers: Forms to which substances are incorporated to improve the delivery and the effectiveness of drugs. Drug carriers are used in drug-delivery systems such as the controlled-release technology to prolong in vivo drug actions, decrease drug metabolism, and reduce drug toxicity. Carriers are also used in designs to increase the effectiveness of drug delivery to the target sites of pharmacological actions. Liposomes, albumin microspheres, soluble synthetic polymers, DNA complexes, protein-drug conjugates, and carrier erythrocytes among others have been employed as biodegradable drug carriers.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Polymers: Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).Silicone Elastomers: Polymers of silicone that are formed by crosslinking and treatment with amorphous silica to increase strength. They have properties similar to vulcanized natural rubber, in that they stretch under tension, retract rapidly, and fully recover to their original dimensions upon release. They are used in the encapsulation of surgical membranes and implants.Absorbable Implants: Implants constructed of materials designed to be absorbed by the body without producing an immune response. They are usually composed of plastics and are frequently used in orthopedics and orthodontics.Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Bone-marrow-derived, non-hematopoietic cells that support HEMATOPOETIC STEM CELLS. They have also been isolated from other organs and tissues such as UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD, umbilical vein subendothelium, and WHARTON JELLY. These cells are considered to be a source of multipotent stem cells because they include subpopulations of mesenchymal stem cells.Cross-Linking Reagents: Reagents with two reactive groups, usually at opposite ends of the molecule, that are capable of reacting with and thereby forming bridges between side chains of amino acids in proteins; the locations of naturally reactive areas within proteins can thereby be identified; may also be used for other macromolecules, like glycoproteins, nucleic acids, or other.Viscosity: The resistance that a gaseous or liquid system offers to flow when it is subjected to shear stress. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Sodium Benzoate: The sodium salt of BENZOIC ACID. It is used as an antifungal preservative in pharmaceutical preparations and foods. It may also be used as a test for liver function.Tissue Adhesives: Substances used to cause adherence of tissue to tissue or tissue to non-tissue surfaces, as for prostheses.Biofouling: Process by which unwanted microbial, plant or animal materials or organisms accumulate on man-made surfaces.Biomimetics: An interdisciplinary field in materials science, ENGINEERING, and BIOLOGY, studying the use of biological principles for synthesis or fabrication of BIOMIMETIC MATERIALS.Particle Size: Relating to the size of solids.Implants, Experimental: Artificial substitutes for body parts and materials inserted into organisms during experimental studies.Bandages: Material used for wrapping or binding any part of the body.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Skin Physiological Processes: Biological activities and functions of the SKIN.Dextrans: A group of glucose polymers made by certain bacteria. Dextrans are used therapeutically as plasma volume expanders and anticoagulants. They are also commonly used in biological experimentation and in industry for a wide variety of purposes.Polymethacrylic Acids: Poly-2-methylpropenoic acids. Used in the manufacture of methacrylate resins and plastics in the form of pellets and granules, as absorbent for biological materials and as filters; also as biological membranes and as hydrogens. Synonyms: methylacrylate polymer; poly(methylacrylate); acrylic acid methyl ester polymer.Tissue Culture Techniques: A technique for maintaining or growing TISSUE in vitro, usually by DIFFUSION, perifusion, or PERFUSION. The tissue is cultured directly after removal from the host without being dispersed for cell culture.
  • As a unique type of scaffolds, hydrogels have been frequently used for TE because of their similar 3D structures to the native extracellular matrix (ECM), as well as their tunable biochemical and biophysical properties to control cell functions such as cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. (frontiersin.org)
  • Among of different types of scaffolds, hydrogels have attracted more and more attention in the TE field owing to their similarity to in vivo cellular microenvironment and tunable physiochemical properties ( Drury and Mooney, 2003 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Aside from the specific materials used in certain applications such as orthopedics, dental implants and artificial vascular materials, the focus of this chapter is on the role of naturally occurring hydrogels to develop biofibres with the final use as biocompatible templates for the purpose of drug delivery systems or the building blocks of tissue scaffolds. (intechopen.com)
  • The work builds on the team's previous research with hydrogel scaffolds, which create a structure to support tissue growth and accelerate wound healing. (nsf.gov)
  • Second, they seeded the hydrogel scaffolds with endothelial cells that make up blood vessel structure along with nerve progenitor cells from the brain. (medgadget.com)
  • Five groups of hydrogel compositions were designed to investigate the influence of the oxidation degree of ADA and hydrogels concentration on the properties of printed scaffolds. (envisiontec.com)
  • Formulated hydrogels were also bioprinted with the living cells (EA.hy926), and the scaffolds printed were then subject to the cell culture for 7 days. (envisiontec.com)
  • Our results illustrate that the scaffolds bioprinted from 10%ADA70-GEL30 hydrogels had the best homogenous cell distribution and also the highest cell viability. (envisiontec.com)
  • Biomimetic hydrogel scaffolds for MCS growth offer a broad spectrum of biophysical and biochemical cues that help to recapitulate the behavior of natural extracellular matrix, essential for regulating cancer cell behavior. (sciencemag.org)
  • In vitro models include cancer cell culture within porous scaffolds, hydrogels, paper stacks, or microfluidic (MF) channels to name just a few ( 9 ). (sciencemag.org)
  • Although there have been many efforts to improve the response rate of conventional hydrogels, there is still no proven method to fabricate a polymer gel with a fast response time on a macroscopic scale. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Although conventional hydrogels show limited changes in the equilibrium swelling with the change of the surrounding environment, polyelectrolyte hydrogels show various unique responses to environmental stimuli including electrically-induced chemomechanical contraction similar to biological responses [ 14 - 17 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • While hardly impacting materials stiffness (just producing a 1.5-fold upsurge in the plateau modulus) the entanglements remarkably result in hydrogels using a toughness of 65 0 J m-3 and extensibility to approximately 3 0 anatomist strain which enables the preparation of challenging yet gentle tissue simulants. (exposed-skin-care.net)
  • These flesh-like properties have motivated the research and development of self-healing hydrogels in fields such as reconstructive tissue engineering as scaffolding, as well as use in passive and preventive applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Meanwhile, this hydrogel shows increased viability and reduced apoptosis of rat mesenchymal stem cells, and excellent tissue adhesive ability in vivo . (rsc.org)
  • The hydrogel was loaded with BMP-4 and used as a scaffold for rat cranial bone tissue engineering. (rsc.org)
  • Thus, this cytocompatible, injectable and self-healing hydrogel with tunable properties can be used as a scaffold for cranial bone tissue engineering and promote bone formation. (rsc.org)
  • Hydrogels are made of polymer networks swollen with water and have applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering . (phys.org)
  • In a similar way, the structures and physiochemical properties of hydrogels provide critical cues to control the functions of embedded cells and thus guide tissue regeneration. (frontiersin.org)
  • And then, the approaches to tune the structure and physiochemical properties of hydrogels and their effects on cell functions and tissue regeneration are compared. (frontiersin.org)
  • Hydrogel materials have shown a great promise to be used as templates for tissue engineering and implantable devices. (intechopen.com)
  • Among the many production techniques available, advanced fiber processing, such as coaxial and triaxial spinning of natural hydrogels, has attracted a great deal of attention because the basic core-sheath structure provides a drug delivery system capable of delivering high concentrations of drug for localized drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. (intechopen.com)
  • This review offers an overview of the recent and contemporary research regarding physiochemical properties of cellulose-based hydrogels along with their applications in multidisciplinary areas including biomedical fields such as drug delivery, tissue engineering and wound healing, healthcare and hygienic products as well as in agriculture, textiles and industrial applications as smart materials. (springer.com)
  • An improved hydrogel adhesive, particularly adapted for adhesion and contact to tissue. (google.com.au)
  • It has been discovered that partially dehydrated hydrogels, in which the hydrogel polymers contain controlled cross-linking, exhibit excellent adhesive properties, particularly in attaching to moist body tissue. (google.com.au)
  • Aggressive adhesion develops during the initial phase of tissue contact when the hydrogel is hydrating or rehydrating. (google.com.au)
  • Although many adhesive applications, particularly those involving tissue, are included within the purview of the hydrogel compositions of this invention, a preferred use is found as an adhesive for attaching pacing leads to heart tissue, particularly epicardial tissue and other moist internal tissue. (google.com.au)
  • Polymeric networks that retain and absorb substantial amount of water or biological fluids and resemble as a biological tissue are defined as hydrogels. (intechopen.com)
  • Contact Guidance by Microstructured Gelatin Hydrogels for Prospective Tissue Engineering Applications. (bioportfolio.com)
  • In this project, we are tuning the properties of hydrogels from poly(ethylene glycol) derivatives to achieve compatibility with muscle tissue as well as optimal light guiding and distribution for optogenetic applications at the heart. (spie.org)
  • Li R, Liang J, He Y, Qin J, He H, Lee S, Pang Z, Wang J. Sustained Release of Immunosuppressant by Nanoparticle-anchoring Hydrogel Scaffold Improved the Survival of Transplanted Stem Cells and Tissue Regeneration. (thno.org)
  • The nanoparticle-anchoring hydrogel scaffold is promising for localized immunosuppressant release, thereby can enhance the survival of transplanted cells and finally lead to successful tissue regeneration. (thno.org)
  • Nanocomposite hydrogels that are enforced with carbon-based nanomaterials are mechanically tough and electrically conducive, which make them suitable for use in biomedicine, tissue engineering, drug delivery, biosensing, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, even though these nanocomposite hydrogels demonstrate some functions of human tissue in lab environments, more research is needed to ensure their utility as tissue replacement. (wikipedia.org)
  • I hope that demonstrating the ease with which this can be done will help get a lot of other people interested in making more realistic printable hydrogels with mechanical properties that are even closer to human tissue. (7thspace.com)
  • In all cases, their crosslinked counterparts had decreased swellabilities suggesting that, the crosslinked chitosan hydrogels can be used for a more controlled delivery of drugs and as efficient materials for tissue engineering. (omicsonline.org)
  • Hydrogels based on natural polymers are currently receiving a great deal of interest, and are notable for controlled delivery of bioactive molecules and tissue engineering [ 2 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • Advanced wound dressings (for example, alginate, film, foam, hydrocolloid and hydrogel dressings) regulate the wound surface by retaining moisture or absorbing exudate, so protecting the wound base and tissue surrounding the wound. (nice.org.uk)
  • Researchers use an enhanced technique to pattern unaltered cells within a 3D hydrogel, allowing them to recreate complex biological tissue for regenerative medicine. (vectorsjournal.org)
  • In some cases, this is sufficient, but regenerated tissues or grafts generally fair better and last longer when their ability to mimic actual tissue is enhanced. (vectorsjournal.org)
  • Engineering artificial protein hydrogels for medical applications needs precise control over their mechanical properties including stiffness toughness extensibility and stability within the physiological environment. (exposed-skin-care.net)
  • Launch Artificially engineered proteins hydrogels have already been investigated for regenerative medication tissues anatomist as well as other biomedical applications widely.1-3 Advances in molecular biology and proteins biosyntheses allow specific control of the proteins structure enabling bottom-up style of the gel mechanical properties. (exposed-skin-care.net)
  • As a result, hydrogels, self-healing alike, develop characteristic firm yet elastic mechanical properties. (wikipedia.org)
  • Study on a new polymer/graphene oxide/clay double network hydrogel with improved response rate and mechanical properties. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • If the two methods were combined together, the mechanical properties of hydrogels should be significantly improved because of the synergetic effect. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • We found that the DN hydrogels exhibited extraordinary swelling/deswelling and mechanical properties because of their unique organic (polymer) and inorganic (GO and clay) network. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Our results show that both materials possess the same phase (fibrillar and lamellar) before and after freeze-casting but the mechanical properties are absolutely the opposite: the fibrillar hydrogel provides a brittle, highly anisotropic, macroporous fibrous solid while the lamellar hydrogel provides a soft, spongy, solid foam with isotropic Young's moduli of several kPa, in the same order of magnitude as some soft living tissues. (rsc.org)
  • In addition, these products generally have a variable composition as well as variable mechanical properties. (amsbio.com)
  • Recently studies have been done on hydrogels with mechanical properties and superporous, self-healing, self-assembling, and stimuli-sensitive hydrogels [ 1 - 3 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Hydrophobic aggregate is critical to improving the mechanical properties of hydrogels by stress dissipation mechanisms. (hindawi.com)
  • Self-assembled nanofibrous hydrogels offer unique physical/mechanical properties and can easily be loaded with a diverse range of payloads. (harvard.edu)
  • First, they created a "micro-scaffold" of a macroporous hydrogel polymer. (medgadget.com)
  • In the present study, the sustained release of immunosuppressant for the purpose of improving the survival of stem cells was successfully realized by a nanoparticle-anchoring hydrogel scaffold we developed. (thno.org)
  • The cytotoxicity of the scaffold against EPCs was also measured compared with free tacrolimus-loaded hydrogel. (thno.org)
  • 4 - 7 The HydroCoil Embolic System (HES) (MicroVention, Aliso Viejo, Calif) was designed to improve packing attenuation/volumetric filling with an expansile hydrogel that should fill more of the aneurysm lumen than standard platinum coils, 8 , 9 improve aneurysm stability and durability, and provide a scaffold to initiate neointima formation and healing. (ajnr.org)
  • In a study recently published in Advanced Materials , the team, led by Professor Robert Mauck, director of the McKay Lab and a professor of orthopaedic surgery and bioengineering, developed a new way to rebuild complex biological tissues using a modified technique that allows them to deliberately place unaltered cells within a 3D hydrogel scaffold. (vectorsjournal.org)
  • The analysis proposed in the study is able to more accurately predict biocompatibility (cytocompatibility) of hydrogels. (phys.org)
  • This chapter presents a novel fabrication method using a wet-spinning process that allows for the routine production of multifunctional coaxial hydrogel fibers that take advantage of the encapsulating properties of a hydrogel core while also promoting good cell growth and biocompatibility via the use of bio-friendly material in the sheath. (intechopen.com)
  • With the growing environmental concerns and an emergent demand, researchers throughout the globe are concentrating particularly on naturally derived hydrogels due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability and abundance. (springer.com)
  • The hydrogel 3D structure, porosity, swelling behavior, stability, gel strength, as well as biodegradability, nontoxicity, and biocompatibility are properties which are widely variable and easily adjusted, making them suitable for many versatile applications, especially in the field of medicine and biotechnology. (springer.com)
  • Chitosan-based hydrogels have been reported to exhibit good biocompatibility, low degradation and processing ease. (omicsonline.org)
  • Dynamic acylhydrazone bonds afford the hydrogel injectability and self-healing ability, while DA click chemistry facilitates the employment of covalent crosslinking for stabilization in vivo and modulating hydrogel properties in vivo . (rsc.org)
  • We therefore use deformable substrata (ECM-coated hydrogels) to model the stiffness of tissues that cells inhabit in vivo. (upenn.edu)
  • The immobilization of RNPs in hydrogel was measured in vitro and in vivo , including the Brownian motion and cumulative leakage of RNPs and the in vivo retention of injected RNPs with hydrogel. (thno.org)
  • The in vivo retention of injected RNPs with hydrogel was obviously longer than that of NPs with hydrogel. (thno.org)
  • Compared with free tacrolimus-loaded hydrogel, the immune responses were significantly reduced and the survival of EPCs was greatly improved both in vitro and in vivo . (thno.org)
  • Finally, in vivo cranial defect experiments showed improved remediation efficiency when using the nHA hybrid MC hydrogel to carry BMSCs. (bvsalud.org)
  • The resulting hydrogel has an oxygen permeability of at least about 120 Barrers, a water content of at least about 20 weight percent, and a modulus from. (google.com)
  • The resulting hydrogel has an oxygen permeability of at least about 120 Barrers, a water content of at least about 20 weight percent, and a modulus from 40 to 57 g/mm 2 . (google.com)
  • 3. The hydrogel of claim 1 having a modulus from 70 to 92 g/mm 2 . (google.com)
  • To investigate surface topography, the scientists used an atomic force microscope , followed by microindentation to measure the Young's modulus (E) of the hydrogels, where they calculated average (E) using JPK data processing software . (phys.org)
  • Many eye care professionals have assumed that hydrogel lenses must be less comfortable than SiHy lenses due to their higher modulus. (coopervision.com)
  • How much modulus affects any potential comfort differences between hydrogel and SiHy is still unclear. (coopervision.com)
  • An 8-fold decrease in hydrogel modulus correlated to a greater than 30-fold increase in the elimination phase half-life for these particles. (pnas.org)
  • CITATION: "3D Printing of a Double Network Hydrogel with a Compression Strength and Elastic Modulus Greater than that of Cartilage," Feichen Yang, Vaibhav Tadepalli and Benjamin J. Wiley. (7thspace.com)
  • In the case of polymeric hydrogels, cross-linking ensures a good stability towards harsh conditions (fast cooling at temperatures as low as −80 °C) employed during ice-templating. (rsc.org)
  • In recent years, many researchers have been synthesized superabsorbent polymeric hydrogels with the ability to hold a large amount of water and biological fluid in their cross-linked polymeric network structure. (springer.com)
  • Their experimental findings conclude that the resistance to fatigue crack propagation after prolonged cycles of loads is the energy required to fracture a single layer of polymer chains (i.e., the intrinsic fracture energy of the hydrogel) (Fig. 1A), which is unaffected by the additional dissipation mechanisms introduced in tough hydrogels. (imechanica.org)
  • By substituting the values of these parameters into Eq. (1), we can evaluate the typical range of the fatigue resistance of hydrogels with conventional polymer networks on the order of 1-100 J/m^ 2 , which is far below fracture energies of tough hydrogels on the order of 1,000 J/m^ 2 . (imechanica.org)
  • Here we review the intrinsic mechanisms of a wide variety of tough hydrogels developed over the past few decades. (nih.gov)
  • A matrix that combines various mechanisms is constructed for the first time to guide the design of next-generation tough hydrogels. (nih.gov)
  • The demineralized bone powder range from about 25 to about 30% of the weight of the composition and the cortical bone rods range from 5% to about 10% of the weight of the composition with the carrier being selected from the high molecular weight hydrogel in aqueous solution having a high molecular weight over 700,000 Daltons and ranging from about 2.0% to about 5.0% by weight of the carrier solution. (google.de)
  • Cell viability was high (75-80% viable) in microbeads, but was marginally lower than in bulk hydrogels of corresponding composition (85-90% viable). (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • A method of fabricating hydrogel particles within liposomes, which entails: a) encapsulating an effective amount of each of one or more hydrogel substances and one or more release agents in liposomes in a liquid medium, b) removing any unencapsulated hydrogel substances and release agents from the liquid. (google.co.uk)
  • 2. The hydrogel particles of claim 1, which further comprise one or more entrapped substances therein selected from the group consisting of drugs, vitamins, growth factors, hormones, peptides, polypeptides, proteins and oligonucleotides, which are entrapped by entrapping said substances in said hydrogel particles during formation thereof. (google.co.uk)
  • Unlike commercially available E. coli membrane particles covalently bound to the pH reporting dye pHrodo, pHrodo encapsulated in self-assembled hydrogel-fibers internalizes into macrophages at both physiologic (37°C) and sub-physiologic (4°C) temperatures through an energy-independent, passive process. (harvard.edu)
  • The task of the New Materials and Supramolecular Spectroscopy research team at the Faculty of Sciences and Technology of the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) has been to provide an answer to this problem by using intelligent nano-hydrogels - small particles capable of detecting diseased cells and releasing the medication only where required. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Products utilized in moist wound care generally fit better around different wound shapes and sizes and are more resistant to environmental inhibitors and foreign particles. (reportsnreports.com)
  • Various methods of employing plastics, such as, for example hydrogels from co-polymers of glycol methacrylate and glycol-bis-methacrylate for prosthetic purposes are known. (google.ca)
  • 7. Method according to claim 6, in which the said solution of a water-soluble salt of barium, aluminum or zinc includes as swelling agent for the said hydrogel, methanol, ethanol, acetone, ethylene glycol monomethyl ether, or dimethylformamide. (google.ca)
  • The MAPTrix HyGel TM hydrogel products are composed of two components: MAPTrix TM ECM, a mussel adhesive protein based extracellular matrix (ECM) mimetic and, MAPTrix TM Link, a multi-arm polyethylene glycol derivative. (amsbio.com)
  • The aforementioned hydrogels have proved outstanding characteristics for applications in human organisms and, moreover, they possess the additional advantage of having been subjected for many years to a great number of tests which have fully proved their physiological harmlessness. (google.ca)
  • Usually, such kind of hydrogel systems can be served as functional materials with potential applications in the fields of drug delivery, microlenses, sensors, and so forth. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Strategies toward the design of anti-fatigue-fracture hydrogels have remained critical needs and central challenges for long-term applications of hydrogels in devices and machines. (imechanica.org)
  • Taking the opportunity of this journal club, we would like to discuss i) design principle for fatigue-resistant hydrogels, ii) symptoms of interfacial fatigue of hydrogel adhesions, iii) design principle for fatigue-resistant hydrogel adhesions, and iv) applications of fatigue-resistant hydrogels and hydrogel adhesions. (imechanica.org)
  • This review summarizes the very recent progress of hydrogels used for TE applications. (frontiersin.org)
  • This review summarizes the latest developments of functional hydrogels for TE applications. (frontiersin.org)
  • Biopolymer hydrogels can be manipulated and crafted for numerous applications leading to a tremendous boom in research during recent times in scientific communities. (springer.com)
  • These hydrogels also hold a great promise for applications in agricultural activity, as smart materials and some other useful industrial purposes. (springer.com)
  • However, hydrogels with high toughness play critical roles in many plant and animal tissues as well as in diverse engineering applications. (nih.gov)
  • Hydrogel implants can contain several distinct gel fillers which have been used in medicine for many years in a variety of applications. (breast-plastic-surgery.org)
  • The functionalities of the hydrogel make it have more widely potential applications in chemical sensitive response materials. (hindawi.com)
  • Accordingly stimuli-sensitive hydrogels have potential applications in drug carriers by determining the selected solute, removing toxins, recycling, and separating products related to the industrial process. (hindawi.com)
  • Therefore, by combining hydrophobic segments with the reversible switch systems, the intelligent hydrogel with sense of chemical changes can be applied in a wide range of applications. (hindawi.com)
  • For example, a graphene hydrogel, made from the self-assembly of graphene oxide sheets via a hydrothermal process, had a 3D porous structure, high specific surface area (530 m 2 g −1 ) and large pore volume (0.66 cm 3 g −1 ), and consequently showed great promise for CO 2 adsorption and separation applications 13 . (nature.com)
  • Mario Casolaro, Ilaria Casolaro (2016) Stimuli-Responsive Hydrogels Bearing amino acid Residues: a Potential Platform for Future Therapies. (omicsonline.org)
  • The newly created flare-responsive hydrogel is made from triglycerol monostearate (TG-18), a compound from the Food and Drug Administration's list of "generally recognized as safe" compounds. (womenfitness.net)
  • The stimulus-sensitivity of hydrogels allow for a responsive release system where the hydrogels can be designed to deliver the drug in response to changes in condition of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tacrolimus, as a typical immunosuppressant, was encapsulated in RNPs (T-RNPs) that were anchored to the hydrogel and its release behavior were studied. (thno.org)
  • b,c) Adhesion of HUVEC cells on collagen and fibrin gels onto top surfaces of 2D hydrogel-coated plates (b) and bulk hydrogel (c), which is measured by CCK-8 assay 2 hrs after seeding. (phys.org)
  • proposed a new, semi-flexible model-based analysis to understand cell adhesion to hydrogels using the well characterized collagen and fibrin polymers. (phys.org)
  • They measured the rate of cell adhesion on diverse concentrations of collagen and fibrin hydrogels in 2-D, and quantified cell adhesion using the cell counting kit 8 (CCK-8). (phys.org)
  • Due to the polymeric domains created by crosslinking in the gel microstructure, hydrogels are not homogenous within the selected solvent system. (wikipedia.org)
  • They introduced a new method of semi-flexible, model-based analysis to confirm that chain flexibility mediated the hydrogel microstructure as a critical factor that allowed cell adhesion at the cell-material interface. (phys.org)