Philadelphia Chromosome: An aberrant form of human CHROMOSOME 22 characterized by translocation of the distal end of chromosome 9 from 9q34, to the long arm of chromosome 22 at 22q11. It is present in the bone marrow cells of 80 to 90 per cent of patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia (LEUKEMIA, MYELOGENOUS, CHRONIC, BCR-ABL POSITIVE).PhiladelphiaChromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Chromosomes: In a prokaryotic cell or in the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell, a structure consisting of or containing DNA which carries the genetic information essential to the cell. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Chromosomes, Human, 21-22 and Y: The short, acrocentric human chromosomes, called group G in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 21 and 22 and the Y chromosome.Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive: Clonal hematopoetic disorder caused by an acquired genetic defect in PLURIPOTENT STEM CELLS. It starts in MYELOID CELLS of the bone marrow, invades the blood and then other organs. The condition progresses from a stable, more indolent, chronic phase (LEUKEMIA, MYELOID, CHRONIC PHASE) lasting up to 7 years, to an advanced phase composed of an accelerated phase (LEUKEMIA, MYELOID, ACCELERATED PHASE) and BLAST CRISIS.Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl: Translation products of a fusion gene derived from CHROMOSOMAL TRANSLOCATION of C-ABL GENES to the genetic locus of the breakpoint cluster region gene on chromosome 22. Several different variants of the bcr-abl fusion proteins occur depending upon the precise location of the chromosomal breakpoint. These variants can be associated with distinct subtypes of leukemias such as PRECURSOR CELL LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA-LYMPHOMA; LEUKEMIA, MYELOGENOUS, CHRONIC, BCR-ABL POSITIVE; and NEUTROPHILIC LEUKEMIA, CHRONIC.Chromosome Aberrations: Abnormal number or structure of chromosomes. Chromosome aberrations may result in CHROMOSOME DISORDERS.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22: A specific pair of GROUP G CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosome Banding: Staining of bands, or chromosome segments, allowing the precise identification of individual chromosomes or parts of chromosomes. Applications include the determination of chromosome rearrangements in malformation syndromes and cancer, the chemistry of chromosome segments, chromosome changes during evolution, and, in conjunction with cell hybridization studies, chromosome mapping.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.Karyotyping: Mapping of the KARYOTYPE of a cell.X Chromosome: The female sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and all female gametes in human and other male-heterogametic species.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Translocation, Genetic: A type of chromosome aberration characterized by CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE and transfer of the broken-off portion to another location, often to a different chromosome.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6: A specific pair GROUP C CHROMSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17: A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, 6-12 and X: The medium-sized, submetacentric human chromosomes, called group C in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 and the X chromosome.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 7: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Genetic Linkage: The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME.Chromosome Disorders: Clinical conditions caused by an abnormal chromosome constitution in which there is extra or missing chromosome material (either a whole chromosome or a chromosome segment). (from Thompson et al., Genetics in Medicine, 5th ed, p429)Benzamides: BENZOIC ACID amides.Blast Crisis: An advanced phase of chronic myelogenous leukemia, characterized by a rapid increase in the proportion of immature white blood cells (blasts) in the blood and bone marrow to greater than 30%.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21: A specific pair of GROUP G CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Sex Chromosomes: The homologous chromosomes that are dissimilar in the heterogametic sex. There are the X CHROMOSOME, the Y CHROMOSOME, and the W, Z chromosomes (in animals in which the female is the heterogametic sex (the silkworm moth Bombyx mori, for example)). In such cases the W chromosome is the female-determining and the male is ZZ. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Chromosomes, Human: Very long DNA molecules and associated proteins, HISTONES, and non-histone chromosomal proteins (CHROMOSOMAL PROTEINS, NON-HISTONE). Normally 46 chromosomes, including two sex chromosomes are found in the nucleus of human cells. They carry the hereditary information of the individual.Chromosome Deletion: Actual loss of portion of a chromosome.Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic, Atypical, BCR-ABL Negative: A myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative disorder characterized by myelodysplasia associated with bone marrow and peripheral blood patterns similar to CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKEMIA, but cytogenetically lacking a PHILADELPHIA CHROMOSOME or bcr/abl fusion gene (GENES, ABL).Chromosomes, Human, Pair 19: A specific pair of GROUP F CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 10: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcr: Proto-oncogene protein bcr is a serine-threonine kinase that functions as a negative regulator of CELL PROLIFERATION and NEOPLASTIC CELL TRANSFORMATION. It is commonly fused with cellular abl protein to form BCR-ABL FUSION PROTEINS in PHILADELPHIA CHROMOSOME positive LEUKEMIA patients.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 16: A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4: A specific pair of GROUP B CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.PiperazinesPyrimidines: A family of 6-membered heterocyclic compounds occurring in nature in a wide variety of forms. They include several nucleic acid constituents (CYTOSINE; THYMINE; and URACIL) and form the basic structure of the barbiturates.Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma: A neoplasm characterized by abnormalities of the lymphoid cell precursors leading to excessive lymphoblasts in the marrow and other organs. It is the most common cancer in children and accounts for the vast majority of all childhood leukemias.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 5: One of the two pairs of human chromosomes in the group B class (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 4-5).Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13: A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence: A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Bacterial: Structures within the nucleus of bacterial cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.Chromosome Segregation: The orderly segregation of CHROMOSOMES during MEIOSIS or MITOSIS.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 12: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Chromosomes, Plant: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.Cytogenetics: A subdiscipline of genetics which deals with the cytological and molecular analysis of the CHROMOSOMES, and location of the GENES on chromosomes, and the movements of chromosomes during the CELL CYCLE.Chromosomes, Mammalian: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of MAMMALS.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15: A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 20: A specific pair of GROUP F CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18: A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Leukemia, Myeloid: Form of leukemia characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of the myeloid lineage and their precursors (MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS) in the bone marrow and other sites.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Leukemia, Myeloid, Accelerated Phase: The phase of chronic myeloid leukemia following the chronic phase (LEUKEMIA, MYELOID, CHRONIC-PHASE), where there are increased systemic symptoms, worsening cytopenias, and refractory LEUKOCYTOSIS.Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic-Phase: The initial phase of chronic myeloid leukemia consisting of an relatively indolent period lasting from 4 to 7 years. Patients range from asymptomatic to those exhibiting ANEMIA; SPLENOMEGALY; and increased cell turnover. There are 5% or fewer blast cells in the blood and bone marrow in this phase.Lod Score: The total relative probability, expressed on a logarithmic scale, that a linkage relationship exists among selected loci. Lod is an acronym for "logarithmic odds."Chromosomes, Human, Pair 14: A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Fungal: Structures within the nucleus of fungal cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.Genes, abl: Retrovirus-associated DNA sequences (abl) originally isolated from the Abelson murine leukemia virus (Ab-MuLV). The proto-oncogene abl (c-abl) codes for a protein that is a member of the tyrosine kinase family. The human c-abl gene is located at 9q34.1 on the long arm of chromosome 9. It is activated by translocation to bcr on chromosome 22 in chronic myelogenous leukemia.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Chromosomes, Human, X: The human female sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and all female gametes in humans.Chromosomes, Artificial, Bacterial: DNA constructs that are composed of, at least, a REPLICATION ORIGIN, for successful replication, propagation to and maintenance as an extra chromosome in bacteria. In addition, they can carry large amounts (about 200 kilobases) of other sequence for a variety of bioengineering purposes.Chromosome Pairing: The alignment of CHROMOSOMES at homologous sequences.Chromosomes, Artificial, Yeast: Chromosomes in which fragments of exogenous DNA ranging in length up to several hundred kilobase pairs have been cloned into yeast through ligation to vector sequences. These artificial chromosomes are used extensively in molecular biology for the construction of comprehensive genomic libraries of higher organisms.Chromosomes, Human, 1-3: The large, metacentric human chromosomes, called group A in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 1, 2, and 3.Chromosomes, Human, Y: The human male sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and none of the female gametes in humans.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Chromosome Painting: A technique for visualizing CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS using fluorescently labeled DNA probes which are hybridized to chromosomal DNA. Multiple fluorochromes may be attached to the probes. Upon hybridization, this produces a multicolored, or painted, effect with a unique color at each site of hybridization. This technique may also be used to identify cross-species homology by labeling probes from one species for hybridization with chromosomes from another species.Gene Rearrangement: The ordered rearrangement of gene regions by DNA recombination such as that which occurs normally during development.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Chromosome Breakage: A type of chromosomal aberration involving DNA BREAKS. Chromosome breakage can result in CHROMOSOMAL TRANSLOCATION; CHROMOSOME INVERSION; or SEQUENCE DELETION.Blotting, Southern: A method (first developed by E.M. Southern) for detection of DNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.Chromosomes, Human, 16-18: The short, submetacentric human chromosomes, called group E in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 16, 17, and 18.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Hybrid Cells: Any cell, other than a ZYGOTE, that contains elements (such as NUCLEI and CYTOPLASM) from two or more different cells, usually produced by artificial CELL FUSION.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Chromosomes, Human, 13-15: The medium-sized, acrocentric human chromosomes, called group D in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 13, 14, and 15.Leukemia, Neutrophilic, Chronic: A rare myeloproliferative disorder that is characterized by a sustained, mature neutrophilic leukocytosis. No monocytosis, EOSINOPHILIA, or basophilia is present, nor is there a PHILADELPHIA CHROMOSOME or bcr-abl fusion gene (GENES, ABL).Metaphase: The phase of cell nucleus division following PROMETAPHASE, in which the CHROMOSOMES line up across the equatorial plane of the SPINDLE APPARATUS prior to separation.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Cytogenetic Analysis: Examination of CHROMOSOMES to diagnose, classify, screen for, or manage genetic diseases and abnormalities. Following preparation of the sample, KARYOTYPING is performed and/or the specific chromosomes are analyzed.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Crosses, Genetic: Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.Oncogenes: Genes whose gain-of-function alterations lead to NEOPLASTIC CELL TRANSFORMATION. They include, for example, genes for activators or stimulators of CELL PROLIFERATION such as growth factors, growth factor receptors, protein kinases, signal transducers, nuclear phosphoproteins, and transcription factors. A prefix of "v-" before oncogene symbols indicates oncogenes captured and transmitted by RETROVIRUSES; the prefix "c-" before the gene symbol of an oncogene indicates it is the cellular homolog (PROTO-ONCOGENES) of a v-oncogene.Haplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.Ring Chromosomes: Aberrant chromosomes with no ends, i.e., circular.Chromosome Inversion: An aberration in which a chromosomal segment is deleted and reinserted in the same place but turned 180 degrees from its original orientation, so that the gene sequence for the segment is reversed with respect to that of the rest of the chromosome.Quantitative Trait Loci: Genetic loci associated with a QUANTITATIVE TRAIT.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Hobbies: Leisure activities engaged in for pleasure.Chromosomes, Human, 4-5: The large, submetacentric human chromosomes, called group B in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 4 and 5.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Chromosome Positioning: The mechanisms of eukaryotic CELLS that place or keep the CHROMOSOMES in a particular SUBNUCLEAR SPACE.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Remission Induction: Therapeutic act or process that initiates a response to a complete or partial remission level.Loss of Heterozygosity: The loss of one allele at a specific locus, caused by a deletion mutation; or loss of a chromosome from a chromosome pair, resulting in abnormal HEMIZYGOSITY. It is detected when heterozygous markers for a locus appear monomorphic because one of the ALLELES was deleted.Protein-Tyrosine Kinases: Protein kinases that catalyze the PHOSPHORYLATION of TYROSINE residues in proteins with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Recombination, Genetic: Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.X Chromosome Inactivation: A dosage compensation process occurring at an early embryonic stage in mammalian development whereby, at random, one X CHROMOSOME of the pair is repressed in the somatic cells of females.Centromere: The clear constricted portion of the chromosome at which the chromatids are joined and by which the chromosome is attached to the spindle during cell division.Heterozygote: An individual having different alleles at one or more loci regarding a specific character.Genes, Tumor Suppressor: Genes that inhibit expression of the tumorigenic phenotype. They are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. When tumor suppressor genes are inactivated or lost, a barrier to normal proliferation is removed and unregulated growth is possible.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)Meiosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division, occurring during maturation of the GERM CELLS. Two successive cell nucleus divisions following a single chromosome duplication (S PHASE) result in daughter cells with half the number of CHROMOSOMES as the parent cells.Leukemia, Lymphoid: Leukemia associated with HYPERPLASIA of the lymphoid tissues and increased numbers of circulating malignant LYMPHOCYTES and lymphoblasts.Chromosomes, Insect: Structures within the CELL NUCLEUS of insect cells containing DNA.Proto-Oncogenes: Normal cellular genes homologous to viral oncogenes. The products of proto-oncogenes are important regulators of biological processes and appear to be involved in the events that serve to maintain the ordered procession through the cell cycle. Proto-oncogenes have names of the form c-onc.Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-abl: Non-receptor tyrosine kinases encoded by the C-ABL GENES. They are distributed in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. c-Abl plays a role in normal HEMATOPOIESIS especially of the myeloid lineage. Oncogenic transformation of c-abl arises when specific N-terminal amino acids are deleted, releasing the kinase from negative regulation.Exons: The parts of a transcript of a split GENE remaining after the INTRONS are removed. They are spliced together to become a MESSENGER RNA or other functional RNA.Chromosomes, Human, 19-20: The short, metacentric human chromosomes, called group F in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 19 and 20.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Aneuploidy: The chromosomal constitution of cells which deviate from the normal by the addition or subtraction of CHROMOSOMES, chromosome pairs, or chromosome fragments. In a normally diploid cell (DIPLOIDY) the loss of a chromosome pair is termed nullisomy (symbol: 2N-2), the loss of a single chromosome is MONOSOMY (symbol: 2N-1), the addition of a chromosome pair is tetrasomy (symbol: 2N+2), the addition of a single chromosome is TRISOMY (symbol: 2N+1).Genes: A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length: Variation occurring within a species in the presence or length of DNA fragment generated by a specific endonuclease at a specific site in the genome. Such variations are generated by mutations that create or abolish recognition sites for these enzymes or change the length of the fragment.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Gene Deletion: A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.Genome, Human: The complete genetic complement contained in the DNA of a set of CHROMOSOMES in a HUMAN. The length of the human genome is about 3 billion base pairs.Mitosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division by means of which the two daughter nuclei normally receive identical complements of the number of CHROMOSOMES of the somatic cells of the species.DNA Probes: Species- or subspecies-specific DNA (including COMPLEMENTARY DNA; conserved genes, whole chromosomes, or whole genomes) used in hybridization studies in order to identify microorganisms, to measure DNA-DNA homologies, to group subspecies, etc. The DNA probe hybridizes with a specific mRNA, if present. Conventional techniques used for testing for the hybridization product include dot blot assays, Southern blot assays, and DNA:RNA hybrid-specific antibody tests. Conventional labels for the DNA probe include the radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin. The use of DNA probes provides a specific, sensitive, rapid, and inexpensive replacement for cell culture techniques for diagnosing infections.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Genes, Dominant: Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE both in the homozygous and the heterozygous state.Chromosome Structures: Structures which are contained in or part of CHROMOSOMES.Neoplasm, Residual: Remnant of a tumor or cancer after primary, potentially curative therapy. (Dr. Daniel Masys, written communication)Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Genes, Recessive: Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE only in the homozygous state.Trisomy: The possession of a third chromosome of any one type in an otherwise diploid cell.Genetic Heterogeneity: The presence of apparently similar characters for which the genetic evidence indicates that different genes or different genetic mechanisms are involved in different pedigrees. In clinical settings genetic heterogeneity refers to the presence of a variety of genetic defects which cause the same disease, often due to mutations at different loci on the same gene, a finding common to many human diseases including ALZHEIMER DISEASE; CYSTIC FIBROSIS; LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE DEFICIENCY, FAMILIAL; and POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASES. (Rieger, et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed; Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Homozygote: An individual in which both alleles at a given locus are identical.Multigene Family: A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Linkage Disequilibrium: Nonrandom association of linked genes. This is the tendency of the alleles of two separate but already linked loci to be found together more frequently than would be expected by chance alone.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma: A leukemia/lymphoma found predominately in children and adolescents and characterized by a high number of lymphoblasts and solid tumor lesions. Frequent sites involve LYMPH NODES, skin, and bones. It most commonly presents as leukemia.DNA Mutational Analysis: Biochemical identification of mutational changes in a nucleotide sequence.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.DNA, Satellite: Highly repetitive DNA sequences found in HETEROCHROMATIN, mainly near centromeres. They are composed of simple sequences (very short) (see MINISATELLITE REPEATS) repeated in tandem many times to form large blocks of sequence. Additionally, following the accumulation of mutations, these blocks of repeats have been repeated in tandem themselves. The degree of repetition is on the order of 1000 to 10 million at each locus. Loci are few, usually one or two per chromosome. They were called satellites since in density gradients, they often sediment as distinct, satellite bands separate from the bulk of genomic DNA owing to a distinct BASE COMPOSITION.Proto-Oncogene Proteins: Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.Interferon-alpha: One of the type I interferons produced by peripheral blood leukocytes or lymphoblastoid cells. In addition to antiviral activity, it activates NATURAL KILLER CELLS and B-LYMPHOCYTES, and down-regulates VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR expression through PI-3 KINASE and MAPK KINASES signaling pathways.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Cosmids: Plasmids containing at least one cos (cohesive-end site) of PHAGE LAMBDA. They are used as cloning vehicles.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Genome-Wide Association Study: An analysis comparing the allele frequencies of all available (or a whole GENOME representative set of) polymorphic markers in unrelated patients with a specific symptom or disease condition, and those of healthy controls to identify markers associated with a specific disease or condition.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Protein Kinase Inhibitors: Agents that inhibit PROTEIN KINASES.Abnormalities, MultipleGenetic Loci: Specific regions that are mapped within a GENOME. Genetic loci are usually identified with a shorthand notation that indicates the chromosome number and the position of a specific band along the P or Q arm of the chromosome where they are found. For example the locus 6p21 is found within band 21 of the P-arm of CHROMOSOME 6. Many well known genetic loci are also known by common names that are associated with a genetic function or HEREDITARY DISEASE.Genomic Imprinting: The variable phenotypic expression of a GENE depending on whether it is of paternal or maternal origin, which is a function of the DNA METHYLATION pattern. Imprinted regions are observed to be more methylated and less transcriptionally active. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Gene Dosage: The number of copies of a given gene present in the cell of an organism. An increase in gene dosage (by GENE DUPLICATION for example) can result in higher levels of gene product formation. GENE DOSAGE COMPENSATION mechanisms result in adjustments to the level GENE EXPRESSION when there are changes or differences in gene dosage.Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid: Sequences of DNA or RNA that occur in multiple copies. There are several types: INTERSPERSED REPETITIVE SEQUENCES are copies of transposable elements (DNA TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS or RETROELEMENTS) dispersed throughout the genome. TERMINAL REPEAT SEQUENCES flank both ends of another sequence, for example, the long terminal repeats (LTRs) on RETROVIRUSES. Variations may be direct repeats, those occurring in the same direction, or inverted repeats, those opposite to each other in direction. TANDEM REPEAT SEQUENCES are copies which lie adjacent to each other, direct or inverted (INVERTED REPEAT SEQUENCES).Quantitative Trait, Heritable: A characteristic showing quantitative inheritance such as SKIN PIGMENTATION in humans. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.ThiazolesCell Transformation, Neoplastic: Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.Consanguinity: The magnitude of INBREEDING in humans.Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Nondisjunction, Genetic: The failure of homologous CHROMOSOMES or CHROMATIDS to segregate during MITOSIS or MEIOSIS with the result that one daughter cell has both of a pair of parental chromosomes or chromatids and the other has none.Gene Frequency: The proportion of one particular in the total of all ALLELES for one genetic locus in a breeding POPULATION.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Telomere: A terminal section of a chromosome which has a specialized structure and which is involved in chromosomal replication and stability. Its length is believed to be a few hundred base pairs.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Introns: Sequences of DNA in the genes that are located between the EXONS. They are transcribed along with the exons but are removed from the primary gene transcript by RNA SPLICING to leave mature RNA. Some introns code for separate genes.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Down Syndrome: A chromosome disorder associated either with an extra chromosome 21 or an effective trisomy for chromosome 21. Clinical manifestations include hypotonia, short stature, brachycephaly, upslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthus, Brushfield spots on the iris, protruding tongue, small ears, short, broad hands, fifth finger clinodactyly, Simian crease, and moderate to severe INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY. Cardiac and gastrointestinal malformations, a marked increase in the incidence of LEUKEMIA, and the early onset of ALZHEIMER DISEASE are also associated with this condition. Pathologic features include the development of NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES in neurons and the deposition of AMYLOID BETA-PROTEIN, similar to the pathology of ALZHEIMER DISEASE. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p213)Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Gene Amplification: A selective increase in the number of copies of a gene coding for a specific protein without a proportional increase in other genes. It occurs naturally via the excision of a copy of the repeating sequence from the chromosome and its extrachromosomal replication in a plasmid, or via the production of an RNA transcript of the entire repeating sequence of ribosomal RNA followed by the reverse transcription of the molecule to produce an additional copy of the original DNA sequence. Laboratory techniques have been introduced for inducing disproportional replication by unequal crossing over, uptake of DNA from lysed cells, or generation of extrachromosomal sequences from rolling circle replication.Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid: The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.Monosomy: The condition in which one chromosome of a pair is missing. In a normally diploid cell it is represented symbolically as 2N-1.Kinetochores: Large multiprotein complexes that bind the centromeres of the chromosomes to the microtubules of the mitotic spindle during metaphase in the cell cycle.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Clone Cells: A group of genetically identical cells all descended from a single common ancestral cell by mitosis in eukaryotes or by binary fission in prokaryotes. Clone cells also include populations of recombinant DNA molecules all carrying the same inserted sequence. (From King & Stansfield, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute: Clonal expansion of myeloid blasts in bone marrow, blood, and other tissue. Myeloid leukemias develop from changes in cells that normally produce NEUTROPHILS; BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and MONOCYTES.Drug Resistance, Neoplasm: Resistance or diminished response of a neoplasm to an antineoplastic agent in humans, animals, or cell or tissue cultures.Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone: Nucleoproteins, which in contrast to HISTONES, are acid insoluble. They are involved in chromosomal functions; e.g. they bind selectively to DNA, stimulate transcription resulting in tissue-specific RNA synthesis and undergo specific changes in response to various hormones or phytomitogens.Chromosome Walking: A technique with which an unknown region of a chromosome can be explored. It is generally used to isolate a locus of interest for which no probe is available but that is known to be linked to a gene which has been identified and cloned. A fragment containing a known gene is selected and used as a probe to identify other overlapping fragments which contain the same gene. The nucleotide sequences of these fragments can then be characterized. This process continues for the length of the chromosome.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Chromosomes, Artificial, Human: DNA constructs that are composed of, at least, all elements, such as a REPLICATION ORIGIN; TELOMERE; and CENTROMERE, required for successful replication, propagation to and maintainance in progeny human cells. In addition, they are constructed to carry other sequences for analysis or gene transfer.Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational: Variation in a population's DNA sequence that is detected by determining alterations in the conformation of denatured DNA fragments. Denatured DNA fragments are allowed to renature under conditions that prevent the formation of double-stranded DNA and allow secondary structure to form in single stranded fragments. These fragments are then run through polyacrylamide gels to detect variations in the secondary structure that is manifested as an alteration in migration through the gels.Chromosomal Instability: An increased tendency to acquire CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS when various processes involved in chromosome replication, repair, or segregation are dysfunctional.Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.Pseudogenes: Genes bearing close resemblance to known genes at different loci, but rendered non-functional by additions or deletions in structure that prevent normal transcription or translation. When lacking introns and containing a poly-A segment near the downstream end (as a result of reverse copying from processed nuclear RNA into double-stranded DNA), they are called processed genes.Chromosome Fragility: Susceptibility of chromosomes to breakage leading to translocation; CHROMOSOME INVERSION; SEQUENCE DELETION; or other CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE related aberrations.Spindle Apparatus: A microtubule structure that forms during CELL DIVISION. It consists of two SPINDLE POLES, and sets of MICROTUBULES that may include the astral microtubules, the polar microtubules, and the kinetochore microtubules.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Uniparental Disomy: The presence in a cell of two paired chromosomes from the same parent, with no chromosome of that pair from the other parent. This chromosome composition stems from non-disjunction (NONDISJUNCTION, GENETIC) events during MEIOSIS. The disomy may be composed of both homologous chromosomes from one parent (heterodisomy) or a duplicate of one chromosome (isodisomy).Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Chromosome Duplication: An aberration in which an extra chromosome or a chromosomal segment is made.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Diploidy: The chromosomal constitution of cells, in which each type of CHROMOSOME is represented twice. Symbol: 2N or 2X.

*Chronic neutrophilic leukemia

Most importantly, the Philadelphia chromosome and other BCR/ABL fusion genes are not detected. This is a rare disease, with ... Of these cases, an equal male:female ratio was observed, with cases typically seen in older adults. Elaine Sarkin Jaffe, Nancy ... and the absence of the Philadelphia chromosome or a BCR/ABL fusion gene. The most common clinical finding is hepatosplenomegaly ... See OHSU 2013 findings of gene CSF3R, mutation p. T6181 The majority (90%) of cases have not had detectable cytogenetic ...

*Oncogene

Another example of an oncogene is the Bcr-Abl gene found on the Philadelphia chromosome, a piece of genetic material seen in ... This type of mutation in a dividing stem cell in the bone marrow leads to adult leukemia ... gene. When these two chromosome fragments fuse the genes also fuse creating a new gene: "BCR-ABL". This fused gene encodes for ... and it is a fusion of parts of DNA from chromosome 22 and chromosome 9. The broken end of chromosome 22 contains the "BCR" gene ...

*Clara D. Bloomfield

Bloomfield, CD; Peterson, LC; Yunis, JJ; Brunning, RD (1977). "The Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1) in adults presenting with ... gene mutations and deregulated expression of genes and microRNAs) that occur in adults with acute myeloid leukemia. Dr. ... For example, Dr Bloomfield was involved in the discovery of the Philadelphia chromosome in patients with acute lymphoblastic ... Bloomfield focused on the study of chromosome abnormalities in cancers of the hematopoietic system (leukemias and lymphomas). ...

*Imatinib

The FDA has approved imatinib for use in adults with relapsed or refractory Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute ... myeloproliferative diseases associated with platelet-derived growth factor receptor gene rearrangements, aggressive systemic ... both in adults and children. The drug is approved in multiple contexts of Philadelphia chromosome-positive CML, including after ... After the Philadelphia chromosome mutation and hyperactive bcr-abl protein were discovered, the investigators screened chemical ...

*Leukemoid reaction

However, at present the test of choice in adults to distinguish CML is an assay for the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome ... either via cytogenetics and FISH, or via PCR for the BCR/ABL fusion gene. The LAP (Leukocyte Alkaline Phosphatase) score is ...

*Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

1x109/L No Philadelphia chromosome or BCR-ABL1 fusion gene No rearrangement of PDGFRA or PDGFRB gene 1.5x109/L. Presence of two ... In adults, blood cells are formed in the bone marrow, by a process that is known as haematopoiesis. In CMML, there are ... no Philadelphia chromosome or mutations in the PDGFRA or PDGFRB gene should be present, the blast count must be 10% and 1x109/L ... Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. ISBN 0-7817-7023-8. Wayne W. Grody; Naeim, Faramarz (2008). ...

*ERG (gene)

This is analogous to another translocation, the Philadelphia chromosome. This results in fusion gene products, which can have ... Adult mice heterozygous for the Mld2 mutation have hematopoietic stem cell defects. This means that when the ERG gene was not ... Rao VN, Modi WS, Drabkin HD, Patterson D, O'Brien SJ, Papas TS, Reddy ES (Nov 1988). "The human erg gene maps to chromosome 21 ... "Gene Cards". Ohno T, Ouchida M, Lee L, Gatalica Z, Rao VN, Reddy ES (Oct 1994). "The EWS gene, involved in Ewing family of ...

*Philadelphia chromosome

This gene is the ABL1 gene of chromosome 9 juxtaposed onto the BCR gene of chromosome 22, coding for a hybrid protein: a ... in adult and 2-10% in pediatric cases) and occasionally in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). The chromosomal defect in the ... The Philadelphia chromosome is designated Ph (or Ph') chromosome and designates the shortened chromosome 22. It arises from the ... The Philadelphia chromosome or Philadelphia translocation is a specific genetic abnormality in chromosome 22 of leukemia cancer ...

*Virtual karyotype

These include: A translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22, known as the Philadelphia chromosome, occurs in about 20% of adult ... In these tumors, the INI1 gene (SMARCB1)on chromosome 22q functions as a classic tumor suppressor gene. Inactivation of INI1 ... chromosome 1) to smallest (chromosome 22), with the sex chromosomes (X and Y) shown last. Historically, karyotypes have been ... The abnormality targets the ATM gene and occurs infrequently in CLL (5-10%). Trisomy 12, an additional chromosome 12, is a ...

*John H. Healey

Philadelphia: Lippincott-Raven,2000:47:358-361. Healey JH, Kennedy JG. Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors About the Knee. The Adult ... Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 50 (8): 644-53. doi:10.1002/gcc.20886. PMC 3264678 . PMID 21584898. Osborne TS, Ren L, Healey JH, et ... Philadelphia PA 2003: Chapter 33:495-520. Kang L, Manoso MW, Boland PJ, Healey JH, Athanasian EA (November 2010). "Features of ... Townsend: Sabiston Textbook of Surgery, 16/E. Philadelphia, W.B. Saunders 2000:511-532. Healey JH. Paget's Disease of Bone. In ...

*Retinoblastoma protein

... the protein is encoded by the RB1 gene located on chromosome 13-more specifically, 13q14.1-q14.2. If both alleles of this gene ... "Interaction of BCR-ABL with the retinoblastoma protein in Philadelphia chromosome-positive cell lines". Int. J. Hematol. 65 (2 ... Temporarily and precisely turning off Rb in adult mammals with damaged hair cells may lead to propagation and therefore ... This states that only one working allele of a tumour suppressor gene is necessary for its function (the mutated gene is ...

*XY sex-determination system

... called the X chromosome and Y chromosome, code for sex. In these species, one or more genes are present on their Y chromosome ... But this work shows that the activity of a single gene, FOXL2, is all that prevents adult ovary cells turning into cells found ... Schoenwolf, Gary C. (2009). "Development of the Urogenital system". Larsen's human embryology (4th ed.). Philadelphia: ... an X chromosome and a Y chromosome act to determine the sex of offspring, often due to genes located on the Y chromosome that ...

*SNAI2

... and chromosome map location on 8q". Genomics. 51 (3): 468-71. doi:10.1006/geno.1998.5367. PMID 9721220. "Entrez Gene: SNAI2 ... Widely expressed in human tissues, SLUG is most notably absent in peripheral blood leukocytes, adult liver, and both fetal and ... Carlson BM (2013). Human Embryology and Developmental Biology (5th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Health Sciences. pp. 101- ... Zinc finger protein SNAI2 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the SNAI2 gene. This gene encodes a member of the Snail ...

*XYY syndrome

The increased gene dosage of three X/Y chromosome pseudoautosomal region (PAR1) SHOX genes has been postulated as a cause of ... Children and young adults with sex chromosome aneuploidy: follow-up, clinical and molecular studies. Birth defects original ... Plewig, Gerd; Kligman, Albert M. (2000). Acne and rosacea (3rd ed.). Philadelphia: Springer-Verlag. p. 377. ISBN 3-540-66751-2 ... This tall (that chromosome), intelligent (that chromosome again), functionally nonviolent (that chromosome still again) fellow ...

*Spinal muscular atrophy

Human chromosome 5 contains two nearly identical genes at location 5q13: a telomeric copy SMN1 and a centromeric copy SMN2. In ... Type IV, adult-onset SMA usually means only mobility impairment and does not affect life expectancy. In all SMA types, ... The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Infant Test of Neuromuscular Disorders) in SMA1; and either the Motor Function Measure ... Sometimes it is also called gene conversion, because it attempts to convert the SMN2 gene functionally into SMN1 gene. The ...

*Carbonic anhydrase III, muscle specific

1987). "Human muscle carbonic anhydrase: gene structure and DNA methylation patterns in fetal and adult tissues". Genes Dev. 1 ... the human CAIII gene is located on the same chromosome as the closely linked CAI and CAII genes". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A ... 1990). "Immunocytochemical study of an eye with proliferative vitreoretinopathy and retinal tacks". Retina (Philadelphia, Pa ... Carbonic anhydrase 3 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the CA3 gene. Carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII) is a member of a ...

*Anencephaly

The CART1 gene to chromosome 12q21.3-q22 has been mapped. Also, it has been found that mice homozygous for deficiency in the ... His kidneys were later transplanted into an adult in Leeds. Teddy's twin, Noah, was born healthy. There are four different ... 2008). Family medicine obstetrics (3rd ed.). Philadelphia: Mosby Elsevier. ISBN 0-323-04306-2. [page needed] Shaffer, Lisa G.; ... Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics (18th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier. ISBN 1-4377-0755-6. "Beloved Vitoria Blog". ...

*Thymus

The gene that codes for the enzyme called ADA (adenine deaminase), is located on chromosomes 20. The HIV virus causes an ... In children the thymus is grayish-pink in colour and in adults it is yellow. The thymus consists of two lobes, merged in the ... Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger. Swiss embryology (from UL, UB, and UF) qblood/lymphat03 Venturi, S, Venturi. M (2009). "Iodine, ... The stock of T-lymphocytes is built up in early life, so the function of the thymus is diminished in adults. It is largely ...

*Adrenocortical carcinoma

... tumor suppressor genes located on chromosomes 17p, 13q respectively, may be changed. The genes h19, insulin-like growth factor ... Among adults presenting with hormonal syndromes, Cushing's syndrome alone is most common, followed by mixed Cushing's and ... Philadelphia: Lippincott-Raven. ISBN 0-7817-4865-8. CS1 maint: Uses editors parameter (link) Savarese, Diane MF; Lynnette K ... They are located on chromosome 11p. Expression of the h19 gene is markedly reduced in both nonfunctioning and functioning ...

*Human placental lactogen

Like human growth hormone, hPL is encoded by genes on chromosome 17q22-24. It was identified in 1963. hPL molecular mass is ... J. Larry Jameson; Leslie J. De Groot (25 February 2015). Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric E-Book. Elsevier Health Sciences. ... 150-. ISBN 978-1-4613-3688-4. Guyton and Hall (2005). Textbook of Medical Physiology (11 ed.). Philadelphia: Saunders. p. 1033 ... An enhancer for the human placental lactogen gene is found 2 kb downstream of the gene and participates in the cell-specific ...

*Acute lymphoblastic leukemia

... gene that combines two factors that promote blood cell development and the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene of the Philadelphia chromosome ... Adult chemotherapy regimens mimic those of childhood ALL; however, are linked with a higher risk of disease relapse with ... This move can result in placing a gene from one chromosome that promotes cell division to a more actively transcribed area on ... Cases in older patients are more likely to result from chromosomal abnormalities (e.g., the Philadelphia chromosome) that make ...

*Burkitt's lymphoma

Philadelphia chromosome t(9 ABL; 22 BCR). *Acute myeloblastic leukemia with maturation t(8 RUNX1T1;21 RUNX1) ... Gene targets[edit]. Unique genetic alterations promote cell survival in Burkitt lymphoma, distinct from other types of lymphoma ... Burkitt's lymphoma is uncommon in adults, where it has a worse prognosis.[3] ... All types of Burkitt lymphoma are characterized by dysregulation of the c-myc gene by one of three chromosomal translocations.[ ...

*Flavin-containing monooxygenase 3

"Localization of genes encoding three distinct flavin-containing monooxygenases to human chromosome 1q". Genomics. 16 (1): 85-9 ... S)-Nicotine N-1'-oxide formation can also be used as a highly stereoselective probe of human FMO3 function for adult humans ... Philadelphia, USA: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. pp. 646-648. ISBN 9781609133450. Retrieved 11 September ... FMO3 is the most abundantly expressed FMO in the adult human liver [12]. Its structure and function and the implications of its ...

*JAG1

Located on human chromosome 20, the JAG1 gene is expressed in multiple organ systems in the body and causes the autosomal ... Mutations in JAG1 were first discovered to be responsible for ALGS by researchers at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia ... and leucocytes in the adult. In a developing embryo JAG1 expression is concentrated around the pulmonary artery, mesocardium, ... Gene. 576 (1 Pt 3): 381-4. doi:10.1016/J.GENE.2015.10.065. PMC 4673022 . PMID 26548814. CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Prognostic impact of pretreatment cytogenetics in adult Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the era of minimal residual disease. AU - Issa, Ghayas C.. AU - Kantarjian, Hagop M.. AU - Yin, C. Cameron. AU - Qiao, Wei. AU - Ravandi, Farhad. AU - Thomas, Deborah. AU - Short, Nicholas J.. AU - Sasaki, Koji. AU - Garcia-Manero, Guillermo. AU - Kadia, Tapan M.. AU - Cortes, Jorge E.. AU - Daver, Naval. AU - Borthakur, Gautam. AU - Jain, Nitin. AU - Konopleva, Marina. AU - Khouri, Issa. AU - Kebriaei, Partow. AU - Champlin, Richard E.. AU - Pierce, Sherry. AU - OBrien, Susan M.. AU - Jabbour, Elias. PY - 2017/2/1. Y1 - 2017/2/1. N2 - BACKGROUND: The introduction of novel prognostic factors such as minimal residual disease (MRD) and genomic profiling has led to the reevaluation of the role of cytogenetics and other conventional factors in risk stratification for acute lymphoblastic ...
Find Trigger Point Acupuncture Acupuncturists in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, help from Philadelphia Trigger Point Acupuncture Acupuncturists for Trigger Point Acupuncture Acupuncture in Philadelphia
Find Qigong Acupuncturists in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, help from Philadelphia Qigong Acupuncturists for Qigong Acupuncture in Philadelphia
Find Facial Acupuncture Acupuncturists in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, help from Philadelphia Facial Acupuncture Acupuncturists for Facial Acupuncture in Philadelphia.
Find Korean Acupuncture Acupuncturists in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, help from Philadelphia Korean Acupuncture Acupuncturists for Korean Acupuncture in Philadelphia.
Compare 18 white collar crime attorneys in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania on Justia. Comprehensive profiles including fees, education, jurisdictions, awards, publications and social media.
Compare 1000 attorneys in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania on Justia. Comprehensive profiles including fees, education, jurisdictions, awards, publications and social media.
CBD Oil Spray 99% Pure Philadelphia, CBD Oil Spray Energy Philadelphia, CBD Oil Spray Anti Stress Philadelphia, CBD Oil Spray Energy Philadelphia, CBD Oil Spray Weight Loss Philadelphia, CBD Oil Spray For Pets Philadelphia, CBD Oil Spray Sleep Philadelphia, CBD Oil Spray Sleep Philadelphia, CBD Oil Spray Weight Loss Philadelphia, CBD Oil Spray Anti Stress Philadelphia
Improved early event-free survival with imatinib in Philadelphia chromosome - Positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A Childrens Oncology Group Study Academic Article ...
Philadelphia dental implants with Stephan A. Inker, D.D.S - Contact us at (855) 404-2889 for an affordable Philadelphia tooth implant dentist near you in the Philadelphia, East Philadelphia, Bensalem, Lower Bucks County, Eastern Montgomery County and Philadelphia County, PA area with Stephan Inker, D.D.S. Learn about the clear choices between denture implants, single implants and mini implants. Youll also find excellent local dental care for Dental Anesthesia, Implant Dentures, Aesthetic Dentistry, Dental Hygiene Treatment, General Dentistry and Root Canal.
Health,...Greater Philadelphia Region Healthcare Nonprofits to Receive Up to ... ...PHILADELPHIA June 16 /- The GlaxoSmithKline IMPACT Award... ...,GlaxoSmithKline,13th,Annual,IMPACT,Awards,Seek,Nonprofits,Providing,Access,to,Healthcare,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current medical news,latest medicine news
At the 59th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting & Exposition, Hunger et al presented data from the phase II CA180-372 study in pediatric patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with dasatinib (Sprycel) added to a chemotherapy regimen modeled on a Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster high-risk backbone (Abstract 98). The combination demonstrated an event-free survival rate (the studys primary endpoint) of 65.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 57.7-73.7) and an overall survival rate of 91.5% (95% CI = 84.2-95.5) at 3 years. Dasatinib and chemotherapy were generally well tolerated in pediatric Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL patients.. "Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia remains a high-risk leukemia type," said lead study author Stephen Hunger, ...
Even in the tyrosine kinase inhibitor era, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is regarded as standard care for adult Philadelphia (Ph) positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this retrospective national study, we have reviewed the outcome after HSCT in Sweden for adult Ph-positive ALL between 2000 and 2009. In total, 51 patients with median age 42 (range 20-66) years underwent HSCT. Mainly allogeneic HSCT was performed (24 related donor, 24 unrelated donor and one cord blood), and only two patients were treated with an autologous HSCT. The 5-year OS was 51 (37-64) %. The probabilities of morphological relapse and non-relapse mortality (NRM) at 5 years were 36 (23-49) and 18 (9-29) %, respectively. For the allogeneic transplanted, the 5-year OS was for patients ,40 years 70 (50-90) % and for patients ,= 40 years 34 (16-52) %, p = 0.002. The 5-year probability of NRM was for patients ,40 years 10 (2-28) % ...
The Pathways to Desistance study was a multi-site study that followed 1,354 serious juvenile offenders from adolescence to young adulthood in two locales between the years 2000 and 2010. Enrolled into the study were adjudicated youths from the juvenile and adult court systems in Maricopa County (Phoenix), Arizona (N=654) and Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania (N=700).Respondents were enrolled and baseline interviews conducted from November 2000 to January 2003. Follow-up interviews were then scheduled with the respondents at 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 48, 60, 72 and 84 months past their baseline interview.The enrolled youth were at least 14 years old and under 18 years old at the time of their committing offense and were found guilty of a serious offense (predominantly felonies, with a few exceptions for some misdemeanor property offenses, sexual assault, or weapons offenses). The baseline interview was conducted within 75 days of the youths adjudication hearing. For youths in the adult system, ...
The Pathways to Desistance study was a multi-site study that followed 1,354 serious juvenile offenders from adolescence to young adulthood in two locales between the years 2000 and 2010. Enrolled into the study were adjudicated youths from the juvenile and adult court systems in Maricopa County (Phoenix), Arizona (N=654) and Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania (N=700).Respondents were enrolled and baseline interviews conducted from November 2000 to January 2003. Follow-up interviews were then scheduled with the respondents at 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 48, 60, 72 and 84 months past their baseline interview.The enrolled youth were at least 14 years old and under 18 years old at the time of their committing offense and were found guilty of a serious offense (predominantly felonies, with a few exceptions for some misdemeanor property offenses, sexual assault, or weapons offenses). The baseline interview was conducted within 75 days of the youths adjudication hearing. For youths in the adult system, ...
Get an online background check instant in any state, county or city of United States. Philadelphia County Bench Warrant Search. Including Criminal Records, Public Records, Court Records, Arrest Records and More. Hamilton County Tennessee Public Records Search.
Vacant land has recently mostly attracted interest for its ecological and social importance, or its planning possibilities. In this paper, we investigate vacant land in a fast-growing city in an emerging country, namely Cape Town in South Africa. In so doing, we are also pleading for vacant land to be taken seriously as a theoretical notion. When investigating urban fragmentation, we need to examine what lies (and happens) between the urban splinters. We therefore use the Cape Town case as a lens to propose a working definition of vacant land (as space out of place that disrupts the urban fabric and its logic) and visual methods with which to approach it.
The Union League of Philadelphia, founded in 1862 as a Patriotic Society to support the policies of Abraham Lincoln, is today a private members-only club. Founded by Philadelphia society, it remains a bastion of the elite; among its 3,300 members are leaders in business, academia, law, medicine, politics, religion and the arts. Members gather to socialize, dine, network, attend events, exercise and relax in the 1865 Second Empire-style building. The club is ranked first on the Five Star Platinum Club list. The Union League of Philadelphia is the oldest and most prominent of the remaining loyalty leagues. Founded in 1862 as a patriotic society to support the Union and the policies of President Abraham Lincoln, it laid the philosophical foundation of other Union Leagues across a nation torn by Civil War. It has given loyal support to the American military in all conflicts since. Its motto is "Love of Country Leads." As in 1862, its members prize tradition and ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Philadelphia chromosome‐negative chronic myelogenous leukemia with rearrangement of the breakpoint cluster region. Long term follow‐up results. AU - Cortes, Jorge E.. AU - Talpaz, Moshe. AU - Beran, Miloslav. AU - OBrien, Susan M.. AU - Rios, Mary B.. AU - Stass, Sanford. AU - Kantarjian, Hagop M.. PY - 1995/1/15. Y1 - 1995/1/15. N2 - Background. Five to 10% of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) do not have the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph), but one‐third of them have rearrangements of the breakpoint cluster region (BCR‐positive). Methods. The authors analyzed the characteristics, treatment response, and prognosis of 23 patients with BCR‐positive, Ph‐negative CML, and compared them with patients with Ph‐positive CML, Ph‐negative BCR‐negative CML and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) treated during the same period. Results. Seventeen patients had early chronic phase CML, 3 ...
Learn more about major accidents to affect the Philadelphia metropolitan area by reading through our weekly report. Remember that if your family has been affected by a preventable accident, our lawyers are here to provide legal guidance.
Philadelphia [http://philadelphiausa.travel], located in Southeastern Pennsylvania, in the Mid-Atlantic region, is the fifth most-populous city in the United States. Often referred to as Philly, the city is coterminous with Philadelphia County. Philadelphia sits adjacent to the New Jersey and Delaware borders, and as such, its metropolitan area encompasses counties in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware.
SILVER SPRING, Md. - The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new drug for treating a rare type of leukemia, the agency said Thursday.. The FDA approved South San Francisco, Calif.-based Talon Therapeutics Marqibo (vincristine sulfate liposome), an injectable drug for Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblasic leukemia, or Ph-negative ALL. The drug, which consists of the widely used anti-cancer drug vincristine encased within a liposome - a drug delivery system made of a material similar to cell membranes - is approved for patients whose leukemia has returned twice or more or has progressed after two or more regimens of therapy.. According to the National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, more than 6,000 people will be diagnosed with ALL this year, and 1,440 will die from it. The disease is a rapidly progressing form of blood and bone marrow cancer more common in children than adults.. ...
The FDA approved South San Francisco, Calif.-based Talon Therapeutics Marqibo (vincristine sulfate liposome), an injectable drug for Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblasic leukemia, or Ph-negative ALL. The drug, which consists of the widely used anti-cancer drug vincristine encased within a liposome - a drug delivery system made of a material similar to cell membranes - is approved for patients whose leukemia has returned twice or more or has progressed after two or more regimens of therapy.. According to the National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, more than 6,000 people will be diagnosed with ALL this year, and 1,440 will die from it. The disease is a rapidly progressing form of blood and bone marrow cancer more common in children than adults.. ...
Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a hematopoietic stem cell disorder included in the broader diagnostic category of myeloproliferative neoplasms, associated with fusion by BCR gene at chromosome 22q11 to ABL1 gene at chromosome 9q34 with the formation of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. In 2–10% of CML cases, the fusion gene arises in connection with a variant translocation, involving chromosomes 9, 22, and one or more different chromosomes; consequently, the Ph chromosome could be masked within a complex chromosome rearrangement. In cases with variant Ph translocation a deletion on der(9) may be more frequently observed than in cases with the classical one. Herein we describe a novel case of ...
Hi, Im newly diagnosed with melanoma in situ and new to the Philadelphia area. Can someone recommend a Philadelphia area physician? A dermatologist made my diagnosis and Id like to schedule my next appointment with a skilled surgeon. Thanks very much!
Hi, Im newly diagnosed with melanoma in situ and new to the Philadelphia area. Can someone recommend a Philadelphia area physician? A dermatologist made my diagnosis and Id like to schedule my next appointment with a skilled surgeon. Thanks very much!
On December 3, 2014, blinatumomab (Blincyto) was granted accelerated approval for use in treating Philadelphia chromosome-negative relapsed or refractory B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).1,2. Supporting Trial. Approval was based on results of a single-arm trial in 185 patients showing achievement of durable complete remission/complete remission with partial hematologic recovery. Blinatumomab was administered by continuous infusion for 4 weeks of a 6-week cycle. In the first cycle, the initial dose was 9 µg/d for week 1, then 28 µg/d for the remaining 3 weeks. The target dose of 28 µg/d was administered in cycle 2 and subsequent cycles starting on day 1 of each cycle.. Among treated patients, the median age was 39 years (range, 18-79 years), 34% had undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation prior to receiving blinatumomab, and 17% had received more than two prior salvage therapies.. Complete remission/complete remission with partial ...
We have followed one patient with Philadelphia (Ph)-negative chronic myelogenous leukemia and identified an additional four patients from the literature who showed the rearrangement in the breakpoint cluster region (bcr) on chromosome 22 characteristic of Ph-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia. The clinical course of these five patients was similar to that of Ph-positive patients, with easily controlled leukocyte counts, a prolonged benign phase, and prolonged survival. Furthermore, we have shown, for the first time, that bcr rearrangement in Ph-negative chronic myelogenous leukemia can result in expression of the aberrant 210-kilodalton bcr-abl fusion protein, which has been strongly implicated in Ph-positive leukemogenesis. Research data pertaining to possible cytogenetic mechanisms leading to production of p210bcr-abl in the absence of the Ph chromosome are reviewed. Molecular analysis ...
Looking for information on Dog Ectropion in Philadelphia? We have compiled a list of businesses and services around Philadelphia that should help you with your search. We hope this page helps you find information on Dog Ectropion in Philadelphia.
Philadelphia [http://philadelphiausa.travel], located in Southeastern Pennsylvania, in the Mid-Atlantic region, is the fifth most-populous city in the United States. Often referred to as Philly, the city is coterminous with Philadelphia County. Philadelphia sits adjacent to the New Jersey and Delaware borders, and as such, its metropolitan area encompasses counties in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware.
PHILADELPHIA - A new study from Penn Medicine epidemiologists that looked at four years of bed bug reports to the city of Philadelphia found that infestations have been increasing and were at their highest in August and lowest in February. The findings, published ahead of print on January 8 in the Journal of Medical Entomology, point to two possible peak times to strike and eliminate the bugs. "There is surprisingly very little known about seasonal trends among bed bug populations," said Michael Z. Levy, PhD, assistant professor in the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (CCEB), who mapped the bed bug hotspots in Philadelphia in an effort to find more effective ways to control them. "We found a steep and significant seasonal cycle in bed bug reporting, and suspect that bed bugs have different levels of mobility depending on the season, and that their population size may fluctuate throughout the year." Warm weather could be a driver for ...
Find Acupuncture Specialists in Philadelphia, PA 19146. Acupuncture Specialist reviews, phone number, address and map. Find the best Acupuncture Specialist in Philadelphia, PA 19146
Find Acupuncture Specialists in Philadelphia, PA 19148. Acupuncture Specialist reviews, phone number, address and map. Find the best Acupuncture Specialist in Philadelphia, PA 19148
Looking for information on Dog Ceroid Lipofuscinosis in Philadelphia? We have compiled a list of businesses and services around Philadelphia that should help you with your search. We hope this page helps you find information on Dog Ceroid Lipofuscinosis in Philadelphia.
APA Citation Wapner, Jessica. () The Philadelphia chromosome :a genetic mystery, a lethal cancer, and the improbable invention of a lifesaving treatment MLA Citation Wapner, Jessica. The Philadelphia Chromosome: A Genetic Mystery, A Lethal Cancer, And The Improbable Invention Of A Lifesaving Treatment. : . Print.. These citations may not conform precisely to your selected citation style. Please use this display as a guideline and modify as needed.. ...
Find the flavor that satisfies your sweet tooth at Freds Water Ice, a lovely ice cream shop in the Philadelphia region of Philadelphia. Children are more than welcome to dine at this ice cream shop, where theres something for everyone on the menu. Wanna soak up the sun? Come grab a bite at Freds Water Ice and sit out on their gorgeous patio.Save your formal dress for another occasion ? a nice top is the perfect fit for Freds Water Ices business casual code. For those in a hurry, the ice cream shop lets you take your grub to go.You can leave your car curbside with nearby street parking. Freds Water Ice offers parking for all diners, including those who travel by bike.Treat yourself to an affordable meal at Freds Water Ice and save some cash for another day. Dont leave the dollar bills at home ? youll need cash at Freds Water Ice. When you need something to cool you off, pay Freds Water Ice a visit and treat yourself to some tasty ice cream.
Serial quantitation of BCR-ABL mRNA levels is an important indicator of therapeutic response for patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia and Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, but there is substantial variation in the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction methodologies used by different testing laboratories. To help improve the comparability of results between centers we sought to develop accredited reference reagents that are directly linked to the BCR-ABL international scale. After assessment of candidate cell lines, a reference material panel comprising 4 different dilution levels of freeze-dried preparations of K562 cells diluted in HL60 cells was prepared. After performance evaluation, the materials were assigned fixed percent BCR-ABL/control gene values according to the International Scale. A recommendation that the 4 materials be established as the first World Health Organization International ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Recent advances in Philadelphia chromosome-positive malignancies. T2 - the potential role of arsenic trioxide.. AU - ODwyer, Michael E.. AU - La Rosée, Paul. AU - Nimmanapalli, Ramedivi. AU - Bhalla, Kapil N.. AU - Druker, Brian. PY - 2002/4. Y1 - 2002/4. N2 - Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is characterized by the presence of the Bcr-Abl fusion gene, which encodes a constitutively active tyrosine kinase that has been strongly implicated as the sole oncogenic abnormality in early-stage CML. Treatment with the specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate has achieved excellent results in CML, at all stages of the disease. However, limitations to the successful use of imatinib mesylate as a single agent include the problem of resistance, seen chiefly in patients with advanced-phase disease. This review summarizes the clinical results to date with imatinib mesylate and briefly discusses the problem of resistance ...
malignancies of blast cells with few identifying characteristics. When cytochemical stains became available, it was possible to divide these objectively into myeloid malignancies and acute leukemias of lymphoid cells. Acute leukemias of lymphoid cells have been subdivided based on morphologic characteristics by the French-American-British (FAB) group (Table 110-2). Using this system, lymphoid malignancies of small uniform blasts (e.g., typical childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia) were called L1, lymphoid malignancies with larger and more variable size cells were called L2, and lymphoid malignancies of uniform cells with basophilic and sometimes vacuolated cytoplasm were called L3 (e.g., typical Burkitts lymphoma cells). Acute leukemias of lymphoid cells have also been subdivided based on immunologic (i.e., T cell vs. B cell) and cytogenetic abnormalities (Table 110-2). Major cytogenetic subgroups include the t(9;22) (e.g., Philadelphia ...
Huan, Chen,Liu, Kai-Yan,Xu Lan-ping,et al. Comparative Survival of Haploidentical and Matched Related Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia[J]. BLOOD,2014,124(21 ...
PRIMARY OBJECTIVES:. I. To determine whether the rate of leukemia relapse can be decreased for patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis (CML-BC) and Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL) responsive to imatinib mesylate (or either dasatinib or nilotinib for patients who have imatinib-resistant disease or who are intolerant of imatinib) followed by nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) compared to historical controls given high-dose conventional allogeneic HSCT or chemotherapy.. II. To determine whether the rate of transplantation-related mortality (TRM) can be decreased for patients with CML-BC and Ph+ ALL responsive to imatinib mesylate (or dasatinib or nilotinib) followed by nonmyeloablative HSCT compared to historical controls given high-dose conventional allogeneic HSCT or chemotherapy.. SECONDARY OBJECTIVES:. I. To evaluate whether donor ...
Introduction: The BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase induces malignant transformation of B cells at the pre-B cell checkpoint and induces Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL). In a genome-wide search, we identified FOXM1 as a transcription factor that is specifically upregulated at the pre-B cell checkpoint. FOXM1 is a forkhead box transcription factor and a key regulator of cell growth by promoting cell cycle progression. Results: We transformed murine pre-B cells with a retroviral BCR-ABL1 expression vector and observed upregulation of Foxm1 protein levels. Consistent with this, FOXM1 protein levels in patient-derived Ph+ ALL samples are ∼10-fold higher than in healthy B cells and B cell precursors (n=5; P=0.01). In a cohort of 83 Ph+ ALL patients, the FOXM1 promoter region was significantly de-methylated compared to normal pre-B cells (n=12; P=2.4x10e-7). In order to evaluate a potential predictive value of FOXM1 expression in ALL ...
Because galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase has been reported to be elevated in the blood of patients with mongolism (21 trisomy), assay of this enzyme in the erythrocytes and leukocytes was performed in patients with the Philadelphia chromosome. Twenty normal individuals and 16 patients with the Ph1 chromosome were studied; 15 of the latter had chronic myelogenous leukemia and 1 had an unusual myeloproliferative disorder. The mean leukocyte enzyme level in the Ph1 group was not different from that in the normal group. The mean erythrocyte enzyme level in the Ph1 group was higher than that in the normal group; this difference might have been due to a younger population of red cells in the Ph1 patients.. To interpret the results, three postulates are presented. First, the relationship between chromosome 21 and this enzyme activity may be obscured by other controlling factors. Second, the ...
Tasigna (nilotinib) is approved in more than 122 countries for the treatment of chronic phase and accelerated phase Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (Ph+ CML) in adult patients resistant or intolerant to at least one prior therapy, including Glivec (imatinib), and in more than 110 countries for the treatment of adult patients with newly diagnosed Ph+ CML in chronic phase. Tasigna is approved in the European Union (EU) for the treatment of Ph+ CML in the chronic phase in pediatric patients with resistance or intolerance to prior therapy including Glivec and for the treatment of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed Ph+ CML in the chronic phase.. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION for TASIGNA® (nilotinib) Capsules Use with caution in patients with uncontrolled or significant cardiac disease and in patients who have or may develop prolongation of QTc. Low levels of potassium or magnesium must be corrected prior to Tasigna ...
Recent improvements in cell purification and transplantation techniques have contributed to the identification of cell populations known as tumor-initiating cells (TIC). This discovery has led to the cancer stem cell hierarchy concept, which holds that tumors are organized as a hierarchy of malignant tissues sustained by such TIC. However, this concept remains controversial. In this review, we examine recent advances in cancer stem cell research that have been generated from studies of Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome-positive leukemia. The abnormal Ph chromosome, which arises from a translocation creating the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene, is most commonly associated with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and precursor B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Examination of the pathophysiology of these diseases has provided interesting insights into not only the hierarchy of leukemia stem cells but ...
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Bosulif (bosutinib) to treat adults with newly-diagnosed chronic phase Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (Ph+ CML).Indications: Bosulif is a kinase inhibitor indicated for the treatment of adult patients with newly-diagnosed chronic phase Ph+ CML.Dosage and administration: 400 mg orally once daily with food.
Experience the multi-million dollar renovation of the Sheraton Philadelphia Downtown Hotel. Guests will enjoy an expansive revitalization of the hotels lobby and restaurant, new state-of-the-art Sheraton Fitness Center as well as a redesign of meeting spaces and the Liberty Ballroom. Idyllically located in the heart of Philadelphia, minutes away from the Philadelphia Convention Center and world-class art museums, the hotels dynamic, split level, multi-functional meeting spaces boasts high-ceilings with enhanced lighting, new wall coverings, carpet, décor and furniture. The bright redesign serves as the backdrop to an inspirational atmosphere for groups seeking a multitude of downtown Philadelphia space and size requirements. The Liberty Ballroom, which boasts more than 20,000+ square feet and is the second-largest of its kind in Philadelphia, along with The Horizons Ballroom located on the hotel rooftop, compliment the ...
Looking for information on Dog Hydrocephalus in Philadelphia? We have compiled a list of businesses and services around Philadelphia that should help you with your search. We hope this page helps you find information on Dog Hydrocephalus in Philadelphia.
Looking for information on Dog Osteosarcoma in Philadelphia? We have compiled a list of businesses and services around Philadelphia that should help you with your search. We hope this page helps you find information on Dog Osteosarcoma in Philadelphia.
Lymphocyte malignancies encompass a broad range of diseases, from cancers with good prognoses to rapidly advancing disease. Lymphocyte malignancies occur because of problems in the differentiation of immune cells and are associated with various clinical and histological findings. They are common among children aged 15 years or younger and only 20% of lymphocyte malignancies occur in adults. Although acute lymphoblastic leukemia has a complete recovery rate of 80% among children, it has a high relapse rate among adults, possibly because acute lymphoblastic leukemia is frequently accompanied by antibiotic resistance and chromosomal abnormalities with poor prognoses in adults. The Philadelphia translocation occurs frequently in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and is closely associated with prognosis. The Philadelphia chromosome is a genetic abnormality ...
Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals, an academic medical center within the Jefferson Health System, serves patients in Philadelphia and the surrounding communities in the Delaware Valley. Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals and Thomas Jefferson University are partners in providing excellent clinical and compassionate care for our patients in the Philadelphia region, educating the health professionals of tomorrow in a variety of disciplines and discovering new knowledge that will define the future of clinical care.. ...
Philadelphias pension and health care costs for city employees are increasing at a much faster rate than the citys revenue, according to a report released yesterday by the Pew Charitable Trusts and the Economy League of Greater Philadelphia.. By 2012, the city is expected to pay more than $1 billion, or about 28% of its budget, to cover pension obligations and health care benefits. This is an increase from 16% in 1998, according to the report titled "Philadelphias Quiet Crisis: The Rising Cost of Employee Benefits.". "The quiet crisis of Philadelphias mounting employee pension and health care costs threatens to drain the resources needed to tackle other problems facing the city," said Pews managing director of information and civics initiatives, Donald Kimelman. "While there are no quick and easy solutions, there are fiscally responsible steps the city can take today to ameliorate the problem while remaining fair to municipal workers.". ...
The Philadelphia Belt Line Railroad (reporting mark PBL) owns a 2.66-mile (4.28 km) long railroad line running along the Delaware River waterfront in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was created in 1889 to allow any Philadelphia railroad to access the waterfront. The railroad, which does not operate any trains itself, is currently maintained by Conrail Shared Assets Operations and used by CSX Transportation and Norfolk Southern Railway. The Philadelphia Belt Line Railroad is a non-operating railroad and simply exists as a real estate holding company. The trackage of the railroad is used by CSX Transportation and Norfolk Southern Railway to access the Philadelphia waterfront. PBLs tracks are leased to Conrail Shared Assets Operations, who provides maintenance to the line. North of South Street, Conrail, which serves as a switching company for CSX and Norfolk Southern, has exclusive use of the line. Currently, there is little ...
Philadelphia, PA - The Hepatitis C Allies of Philadelphia (HepCAP), a program of the Health Federation of Philadelphia (HFP), recently received an $2.2 million research grant from Gilead Sciences, Inc. to create a new initiative designed to improve systems for Hepatitis C (HCV) screening, linkage to care, treatment and cure in order to eliminate Hepatitis C among individuals who use injection drugs. Entitled C Change, the 30 month study will investigate if HCV treatment and cure rates increase due to system enhancements, such as the addition of care navigators which help link patients to care. C Change will also measure patient-centered outcomes to more clearly identify barriers to and facilitators of linkage to care and cure.. The research grant will enable HepCAP to hire navigators to work with eight Philadelphia sites - six Pennsylvania Substance Use Disorder Centers of Excellence (CoE) and two associated sites. CoEs are funded by the ...
Xarelto is a medication which thins the blood. Xarelto has been shown to cause excessive bleeding resulting in serious injury and sometimes death. There is no way to stop the bleeding. Xarelto lawyers are filing lawsuits against the manufacturer for lack of warnings regarding their medication. In December 2014, the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation (JPML) centralized all federal Xarelto lawsuits into one court in the Eastern District of Louisiana. At the time, about 50 product liability lawsuits were pending in the court. That number has now increased to about 400. Not long after the Xarelto MDL was established, Philadelphia consolidated all state Xarelto lawsuits into a mass tort in the Philadelphia County Court of Common Pleas. What started as about 70 cases has now increased to about 200. Defendants Resisted Formation of Mass Tort Plaintiffs involved in Xarelto lawsuits claim that Johnson & Johnson subsidiary Janssen Pharmaceuticals and Bayer Healthcare ...
Xarelto is a medication which thins the blood. Xarelto has been shown to cause excessive bleeding resulting in serious injury and sometimes death. There is no way to stop the bleeding. Xarelto lawyers are filing lawsuits against the manufacturer for lack of warnings regarding their medication. In December 2014, the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation (JPML) centralized all federal Xarelto lawsuits into one court in the Eastern District of Louisiana. At the time, about 50 product liability lawsuits were pending in the court. That number has now increased to about 400. Not long after the Xarelto MDL was established, Philadelphia consolidated all state Xarelto lawsuits into a mass tort in the Philadelphia County Court of Common Pleas. What started as about 70 cases has now increased to about 200. Defendants Resisted Formation of Mass Tort Plaintiffs involved in Xarelto lawsuits claim that Johnson & Johnson subsidiary Janssen Pharmaceuticals and Bayer Healthcare ...
DISEASE CHARACTERISTICS: Diagnosis of chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome positive OR Bcr/Abl positive Refractory to or intolerant of interferon alfa therapy Failure to achieve complete response for at least 1 month after at least 6 months of interferon alfa therapy OR At least 65% Ph chromosome positivity in bone marrow after at least 1 year of interferon alfa therapy OR At least 30% increase in Ph chromosome positive bone marrow cells in samples taken at least 1 month apart or increase to at least 65% while receiving interferon alfa therapy OR At least 100% increase in WBC count to at least 20,000/mm3 in samples taken at least 2 weeks apart while receiving interferon alfa therapy OR At least grade 3 nonhematologic toxicity persisting for more than 2 weeks while receiving interferon alfa therapy (must be more than 3 months from time of diagnosis) No ...
Welcome to the Naturecast Products Local Pages. Here you will find local resources about Growth Hormone in New Philadelphia, OH and some related products that may be of interest to you. For your convenience, we have also compiled a list of businesses and services around New Philadelphia, including Vitamin and Nutritional Supplement Stores, Nutritionist, and Personal Trainers that should help with your search. Before you take a look at the local resources, please browse through our competitively priced products that you could order from the comfort of your own home.
Where: Free Library of Philadelphia. The Prevent Cancer Foundation, one of the nations leading voluntary health organizations and only nonprofit solely focused on cancer prevention and early detection, is currently leading a national, multi-year education campaign called Think About the Link®, to raise awareness of the connection between viruses and cancer. Our goals include increasing screening rates for all three viruses, vaccination rates for human papillomavirus (HPV) and hepatitis B, and awareness of treatment options available for hepatitis B and hepatitis C.. As part of our campaign efforts in Philadelphia, PA, we are partnering with the Hepatitis B Foundation, Hepatitis C Allies of Philadelphia and Hep B United to host a summit on Friday, May 19, from 9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. at the Free Library of Philadelphia - Parkway Central Location. The summit will educate attendees about the link between hepatitis B, hepatitis C and liver cancer; ...
Book the Embassy Suites Philadelphia - Airport - The Embassy Suites Philadelphia - Airport is located a mile from the Philadelphia International airport and six minutes from downtown Philadelphia.
Theres two weeks left before the Philadelphia Career Fair on Thursday, November 9, 2017. Heres a flyer to remind you of the upcoming event, Philadelphia Career Fair Flyer. Help your community out and post this flyer or forward it to a friend who may be looking for a job or career change.. Choice Career Fairs is focused on connecting you with local hiring employers and recruiters. Register early and prepare to meet and interview with dozens of Philadelphia employers. Want to see jobs currently available in your area? Visit our jobs page.. Philadelphia Career Fair ...
abstract = "In the present study we combined interferon (IFN) and hydroxyurea (HU) treatment, intensive chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) in newly diagnosed chronic myelogenous leukemia patients aged below 56 years, not eligible for allogeneic SCT. Patients who had an HLA-identical sibling donor and no contraindication went for an allogeneic SCT (related donor, RD). After diagnosis, patients not allotransplanted received HU and IFN to keep WBC and platelet counts low. After 6 months patients with Ph-positive cells still present in the bone marrow received 1-3 courses of intensive chemotherapy. Those who became Ph-negative after IFN+HU or after 1-3 chemotherapy courses underwent autologous SCT. Some patients with poor cytogenetic response were allotransplanted with an unrelated donor (URD). IFN+HU reduced the percentage of Ph-positive metaphases in 56{\%} of patients, and 1 patient became Ph-negative. After one or two intensive ...
We report a 34 year old man who developed bilateral ptosis and predominantly respiratory, truncal and bulbar weakness, and a high titer of anti acetylcholine receptor antibodies along with a diagnosis of Philadelphia chromosome positive Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML). The temporal relationship suggests a possible association.. ...
Abstract Background and Objectives Chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders. They are heterogeneous in symptoms and mainly consist of Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) and negative (Ph-). The Ph- group includes polycythemia Vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), primary myelofibrosis (PMF) and other rare disorders. In the latter ...
Background: The discovery of somatic acquired mutations of JAK2 (V617F) in Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-negative MPNs) including polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) has not only improved rational disease classification and prognostication but also brings new understanding insight into the pathogenesis of diseases. Dosage effects of the JAK2 (V617F) allelic burden in Ph-negative MPNs may partially influence clinical presentation, disease progression, and treatment outcome. Material and Methods: Pyrosequencing was performed to detect JAK2 (V617F) and MPL (W515K/L) and capillary electrophoresis to identify CALR exon 9.0 mutations in 100.0 samples of Ph-negative MPNs (38.0 PV, 55 ET, 4 PMF, and 3 MPN-U). Results: The results showed somatic mutations of JAK2 (V617F) in 94.7% of PV, 74.5% of ET, 25.0% of PMF, and all MPN-U. A high proportion of JAK2 (V617F) mutant allele burden (mutational load | 50.0%) ...
Provided(PHILADELPHIA) - Authorities seized at least 450 kilograms of cocaine at the Port of Philadelphia on Tuesday morning, according to a source familiar with the massive drug bust.. Bricks of the white powdery substance were stuffed in duffel bags found in a shipping container aboard the MSC Desiree, which was traveling from Colombia to Europe, the source told ABC News. Federal and local authorities inspected the container after noticing the bolts on the door had been tampered with, the source said.. The total amount of cocaine, approximately 992 pounds, has a street value of about $18 million, and is the most ever seized in Philadelphia, according to the source. Last week, authorities confiscated 3,200 pounds of cocaine, with a street value of $77 million, that had been hidden behind boxes of dried fruit aboard a cargo ship at the Port of New York and New Jersey. It was the largest coke bust at the port in a quarter century.. Federal agents have been ...
Philadelphia PA Wrongful Death Attorneys also serving Southern New Jersey. The law firm of Shaffer & Gaier is comprised of professional wrongful death lawyers in the Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey areas. In Philadelphia call 215-751-0100, or in New Jersey at 856-429-0970.
As the epidemic of community violence swells in U.S. cities, one promising place for intervention and prevention of future violence is the emergency departments of hospitals. More than 25 hospitals nationwide have adopted a public health approach to helping victims of violence with programs that aim to prevent future violent injuries, not just treat them.. In Philadelphia, that public health approach is about to reach a much larger public: Healing Hurt People, a trauma-informed hospital-based violence intervention program developed at Drexel University, is expanding its reach at an unprecedented city-wide level. Efforts are underway to offer the program soon at Temple University Hospital in North Philadelphia, with further expansion planned for Einstein Medical Center Philadelphia and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania later in 2015-2016. The program currently operates in partnership with the emergency departments of Hahnemann University Hospital ...
Book now at Fork Restaurant - Philadelphia in Philadelphia, explore menu, see photos and read 3295 reviews: A great value for savory, unique tastes. The tasting menu allows people to experiment with flavors that they would typically not pair. The experience...
PHILADELPHIA) - Jefferson Health hospitals and specialties ranked among the best in the annual U.S. News & World Report 2016-2017 Best Hospitals rankings. Thomas Jefferson University Hospital ranked 2nd in the Philadelphia metro area and 3rd in Pennsylvania. Abington Hospital - Jefferson Health ranked 4th in the Philadelphia region and 7th in the state.. "Jefferson Health is honored to be named to U.S. News & World Reports Best Hospitals rankings. This years list shows the level of excellence across our clinical enterprise," said Stephen K. Klasko, M.D., MBA, President and CEO of Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Health. "While this distinction points to our exceptional quality and safety, it is our physicians, nurses, health professionals and other employees steadfast commitment to our patients that truly differentiates us. We are gratified but not satisfied, as we continue on our relentless campaign to transform the patient and student experience ...
The FDA warns that retrievable Bard IVC filters are likely to fracture or move if left in place, puncturing or damaging the heart or lungs and causing serious injuries and death - read complete Philadelphia Bard IVC filter lawsuit information for individuals or family members in Philadelphia who have suffered from serious health problems as a result of Bard IVC filter side effects
Philadelphia has taken what most savvy travelers would call a "safety" issue and turning it into a legal one … sort of. The city is issuing warnings to pedestrians who walk down the street and text or play on their smartphones.. The practice, while annoying to other pedestrians and motorists who may suffer from your lack of paying attention, isnt illegal, but highly discouraged.. "Pedestrians may be reminded to be more aware of their surroundings; however, there are no citations issued by the PPD for texting while walking," said Rina Cutler, Philadelphia Deputy Mayor for Transportation and Public Utilities, in a statement obtained by NBC Philadelphia.. The only offense for which one can receive a ticket is jaywalking.. The city is using grant money to fund the cost of increased enforcement.. What do you think, friends of the City of Brotherly Love? Should texting and walking be a ticket-able or warn-able offense? Will you be more cognizant of your texting ...
Find individual business listings for businesses located within the city of Philadelphia in Pennsylvania. All Ice Hockey listings in Philadelphia, pa. YellowPagesGoesGreen.org provides an environmentally friendly search engine and directory vigorously supporting the green movement.
Dog acupuncture helps with dogs musculoskeletal problems, skin problems, respiratory problems, and gastrointestinal problems. It targets acupuncture points to achieve healing effects. Read on to gain access to pet stores in Philadelphia, PA and other expert resources that give access to expertise on dog acupuncture.
Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia (CML) - Epidemiology Forecast to 2025 Size and Share Published in 2017-09-20 Available for US$ 2750 at Researchmoz.us
Learn more about Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia at TriStar Southern Hills DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ...
Start-up company Micromet owned the intellectual property rights, and when it was acquired these were transferred to Amgen, which now markets Blincyto in the United States following the drugs approval by the FDA. Prof. Thomas Sommer, interim Scientific Director at MDC, says: "The MDCs basic research has borne fruit. The path to drug approval is often a long and difficult one, but the example set by Blinatumomab and other promising MDC projects show that we are on the right track.". Blincyto is used to treat B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (full name: Philadelphia chromosome-negative precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or pre-B-cell ALL). In the U.S., Blincyto was granted breakthrough therapy designation for treating this specific type of leukemia. Patients suffering from the disease usually have a prognosis of only a few months survival time. The drug signifies new hope for these patients. It will be used in situations where conventional ...
Key words. Myelofibrosis (MF), including primary myelofibrosis (PMF) and MF secondary to essential thrombocythemia (ET) or polycythemia vera (PV), is a chronic Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasm associated with progressive bone marrow fibrosis.1 Many patients with MF experience new or worsening anemia during disease progression. Varying from study to study, 35% to 54% of patients with PMF have been reported to have anemia (i.e., hemoglobin ,10 g/dL) at the time of diagnosis.2-5 Anemia adversely affects overall survival (OS), and is included as a key negative prognostic factor in validated prognostic scoring systems for patients with PMF, which were developed before the introduction of Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor therapy.2,3,5 Ruxolitinib, a JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor, improved OS compared with placebo and best available therapy in patients with intermediate-2 or high-risk MF5 in the phase 3 COntrolled MyeloFibrosis Study With ORal JAK ...
Class: Biological Therapy. Generic Name: Blinatumomab. Trade Name: Blincyto®. For which conditions is this drug approved? Blincyto is approved for treatment of a certain type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL): Philadelphia chromosome-negative relapsed or refractory B-cell precursor acute ALL.. What is the mechanism of action? Blincyto is a type of drug known as a monoclonal antibody. Monoclonal antibodies target and attach to cancer cells, which tells the immune system to destroy the cancer. Specifically, Blincyto targets a protein called CD19 thats found on the surface of B-cell leukemia cells. Another protein, CD3, thats found on the surface of T-cell lymphocytes (part of the immune system), then connects with CD19 to destroy the cancer cells.. How is Blincyto typically given (administered)? Blincyto is given by intravenous (IV) infusion into your vein using an infusion pump. One treatment cycle includes a continuous IV infusion for ...
Descripci n Forgotten Books, 2017. Hardback. Condición: New. Language: English . This book usually ship within 10-15 business days and we will endeavor to dispatch orders quicker than this where possible. Brand New Book. Excerpt from Short History of the Yellow Fever, That Broke Out in the City of Philadelphia, in July, 1797: With a List of the Dead; Of the Donations for the Relief of the Poor, and a Variety of Other Interesting Particulars The citizens became more early aware of their danger than in 17 9 3 and the fpeedy flight of many thoufands of them into the country, feems to have been the chief caule why the mortality of this contagion has been/{o much leis violent than that of the former. By the way; though not fo generally known as to create alarm, it is true, that in the fall of r 794, Philadelphia had a tranfient vifit from this fatal fcourge. A fmall number of perlons, perhaps twenty or thirty, died of it. The unexpected intervention of one or two ...
Health, ... Carol Nelson Shepherd presented at this years Pennsylvania Associa...Philadelphia PA (PRWEB) September 10 2009 -- Feldman Shepherd Wohl... ...According to Lisa Ginsberg program attorney at PaAJ Carols s...,Philadelphia,Attorney,Carol,Nelson,Shepherd,Presents,at,the,2009,Pennsylvania,Association,for,Justice,Master,Series,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current medical news,latest medicine news
Employees at Philadelphia Exposition in Philadelphia, may have been exposed to asbestos which can lead to mesothelioma and other asbestos related diseases.
Health, ... Highly regarded plaintiffs attorneys among just five percent of la...Philadelphia PA (Lexis Nexis) June 19 2009 -- Galfand Berger a Phil...The three honored attorneys from the firm are: ... ...,Three,Attorneys,from,Philadelphia's,Galfand,Berger,Honored,as,Pennsylvania,Super,Lawyers,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current medical news,latest medicine news
Chiriboga CA. HIV, fetal alcohol and drug effects, and the battered child. In: Rowland LP, Pedley TA, eds. Merritts Neurology . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2009. Layzer RB, Rowland LP. Muscle cramps and stiffness. Merritts Neurology . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2009:chap 145. Patterson MC, Johnson WG. Lysosomal and other storage diseases. In: Rowland LP, Pedley TA, eds. Merritts Neurology . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2009. Scher MS, Diagnosis and treatment of neonatal seizures. In: Perlman JM, ed. Neurology: Neonatal Questions and Controversies . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 8. Thwaites LC, Yen LM. Tetanus, In: Farrar J, Hotez PJ, Junghanss T, Kang G, Lalloo D, White NJ, eds. Mansons Tropical Diseases . 23rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 32. ...
Arora S, Flower OJ. Spinal injuries. In: Bersten AD, Soni N, eds. Ohs Intensive Care Manual. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2014:chap 78. Bryce TN. Spinal cord injury. In: Cifu DX, ed. Braddoms Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 49. Dalzell K, Nouri A, Fehlings MG. The timing of management of spinal cord injuries. In: Browner BD, Jupiter JB, Krettek C, Anderson PA, eds. Skeletal Trauma: Basic Science, Management, and Reconstruction. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 32. Kaji AH, Newton EJ, Hockberger RS. Spinal injuries. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosens Emergency Medicine. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 43. Snyder LA, Tan L, Gerard C, Fessler RG. Spinal cord trauma. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy SL, eds. Bradleys Neurology in Clinical Practice. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...
Bedossa P, Paradis V, Zucman-Rossi J. Cellular and molecular techniques. In: Burt AD, Ferrell LD, Hubscher SG, eds. MacSweens Pathology of the Liver. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 2.. Berk PD, Korenblat KM. Approach to the patient with jaundice or abnormal liver tests. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 147.. Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Liver biopsy (percutaneous liver biopsy) - diagnostic. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:727-729.. Squires JE, Balistreri WF. Manifestations of liver disease. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 355.. Wedemeyer H. Hepatitis C. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtrans Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. ...
Bhatt U, Lagnado R, Dua HS. Follicular conjunctivitis. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duanes Ophthalmology. 2013 ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2013:vol 4;chap0 7. Rubenstein JB, Tannan A. Allergic conjunctivitis. In: Yanoff M, Duker JS, eds. Ophthalmology. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 4.7. Rubenstein JB, Tannan A. Conjunctivitis: infectious and noninfectious. In: Yanoff M, Duker JS, eds. Ophthalmology. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 4.6. Snyder RW, Slade DS. Antibiotic therapy for ocular infection. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duanes Ophthalmology. 2013 ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2013:vol 4;chap 26. Wright JL, Wightman JM. Red and painful eye. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosens Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 22. Yanoff M, Cameron ...
Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Chromosome, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Disease, Family, Growth, Inhibition, Kinase, Kinases, Leukemia, Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Leukemia, Myeloid Leukemia, Patients, Philadelphia Chromosome, Platelet, Platelet-derived Growth Factor, Platelet-derived Growth Factor Receptor
Wallman, A. A,, Hochstein, L. , Colaninno, P. , Scardamaglia, M. et al.. Rapid diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis by using Roche AMPLCORimycobacterium tuberculosis PCR test. J . Clin. Microbiol. 33, 1832-1834 (1995). , Rae, P. M. , Huguenel, E. , Lyga, A. , Rapid identification of microorganisms by nucleic acid hybridization after labeling the test sample. Anal. Biochem. 177, 85-89 (1989). , Riggs, M. , Eastman, P. , ef a l . Hybridization protection assay: A rapid, sensitive, and specific method for detection of Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias. 10. Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy: Current Diagnostics . . . . . . . . 11. Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Current Diagnostics 12. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and Acute Leukern 13. Human Papilloma Virus: Current Diagnostics . . . 14. Perspective on the Evaluation of Molecular Diagnos 15. Software Applications to Molecular Diagnostics . . . . .......... 16. Quality Assurance: Science and ...
Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec; Novartis) has been successfully employed in the treatment of Philadelphia-positive chronic myeloid leukaemia (Ph+ CML) (Deininger et al, 2005). Although imatinib restores a polyclonal haemopoiesis in over 90% of patients, development of clonal chromosome abnormalities in Ph-negative cells (Ph) clonal evolution) occurs in about 15% of cases with a complete cytogenetic remission (CCR). This phenomenon has been very rarely observed in patients treated with interferon-a and/or cytotoxic agents. As the biological and clinical significance of these clones are still unclear, we investigated two cases of CML in chronic phase, not previously treated with genotoxic agents or drugs, in which imatinib therapy lead to the emergence of Ph) clones characterised by an abnormality initially disclosed in the Ph+ cells, a picture found only in two other cases in the literature (Gozzetti et al, 2003; Royer-Pokora et al, 2003). In ...
In 2015, 2-year-old Dilon had a spinal cord stroke due to complications from surgery, causing paralysis from the waist down. "Life completed turned upside down," said Valarie, Dilons mother. Hospitals in Dilons native New Mexico had no experience with pediatric spinal cord injuries, according to his mother, who even searched for resources in Colorado and all over the U.S. "They just told me this is your new life, get used to it. I would ask questions and all they could say was we dont know. I had lost all hope until I saw a commercial for Shriners Hospitals for Children on television." Valarie called the number she saw in the advertisement on television which was a donation hotline. The operator was able to redirect her to a patient services line and they connected her to our Philadelphia Shriners Hospital. Since Dilons first visit with us in May 2016, his appointments include bouts of therapy that feature our TheraStride, a body-weight support treadmill system that helps the nervous ...
Physicians within Jeffersons Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases provide comprehensive care for patients with diabetes, hormone related illnesses, obesity, and thyroid nodules and goiters.. Rated as a Center of Excellence for Diabetes by Philadelphia magazine, Jefferson endocrinologists provide comprehensive care for patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.. Moreover, we offer expert evaluation and management of other hormonal and glandular disorders involving the thyroid, pituitary, parathyroid and adrenal glands, as well as osteoporosis, other bone disorders and calcium metabolism and disorders of cholesterol and triglyceride metabolism.. Jeffersons Comprehensive Weight Management Program focuses on more than a target weight. Our highly trained medical staff will work with you to devise a customized plan for a healthier and more active lifestyle.. Whether you are living with an obesity-related health condition or you are simply frustrated with the limitations on ...
Hunt KK, Mittendorf EA. Diseases of the breast. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 34.. Kaiser U, Ho KKY. Pituitary physiology and diagnostic evaluation. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology. 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 8.. Leitch AM, Ashfaq R. Discharges and secretions of the nipple. In: Bland KI, Copeland EM, Klimberg VS, Gradishar WJ, eds. The Breast: Comprehensive Management of Benign and Malignant Disorders. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 4.. Sandadi S, Rock DT, Orr JW, Valela FA. Breast diseases: detection, management, and surveillance of breast disease. In: Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Lentz GM, Valea FA, eds. Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 15. ...
List of research reports recently added to the Prison Policy Initiatives Research ClearinghouseThe National Archives at Philadelphia The National Archives at Philadelphia maintains the historically significant records of the Federal Agencies and Courts dating. Ard. The National Archives at Philadelphia The National Archives at Philadelphia maintains the historically significant records of the Federal Agencies and Courts dating. learn about Inventors and Inventions: B. Tracy Huling, From Invisible Punishment: The Collateral Consequences of Mass Imprisonment Marc Mauer and Meda Chesney. AKELITE Bakelite (also called catalin) is a plastic, a dense synthetic polymer (a phenolic resin) that was used to make jewelry. Can also mean that some government polices can be too. Ard. Building a Prison Economy in Rural America. Doctors Kenneth and Mamie Clark and "The Doll Test" In the 1940s, psychologists Kenneth and Mamie Clark designed and conducted a ...
For over twenty-five years, OBrien & Ryan, LLP, has represented entities and individuals in state and federal courts throughout Pennsylvania and New Jersey. We remain on the leading edge of technological advances in both the office and courtroom settings. We are comprised of attorneys selected for their wide range of legal experience and strong commitment to their clients. The size of the firm allows each client to enjoy personal and consistent attention.

Correlation between deletion of the CDKN2 gene and tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance in adult Philadelphia chromosome...Correlation between deletion of the CDKN2 gene and tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance in adult Philadelphia chromosome...

Frequency relapses are common in Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph-positive) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) following ... Correlation between deletion of the CDKN2 gene and tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance in adult Philadelphia chromosome- ... Chemotherapy-phased imatinib pulses improve long-term outcome of adult patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute ... Adverse prognostic significance of CD20 expression in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative B-cell precursor acute ...
more infohttps://jhoonline.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13045-016-0270-5

What are the treatment recommendations for Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adults 40...What are the treatment recommendations for Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adults 40...

Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL in the older adult (age ≥40 y): Standard multiagent chemotherapy regimen (eg, CALGB 8811 [ ... FDA approval brings first gene therapy to the United States. U.S. Food & Drug Administration. Available at https://www.fda.gov/ ... Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL in the older adult (age ≥40 y):. * Standard multiagent chemotherapy regimen (eg, CALGB ... Adverse prognostic significance of CD20 expression in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative B-cell precursor acute ...
more infohttps://www.medscape.com/answers/2004705-171047/what-are-the-treatment-recommendations-for-philadelphia-chromosomenegative-acute-lymphoblastic-leukemia-all-in-adults-40-years-or-older

Prognosis and survival for chronic myelogenous leukemia - Canadian Cancer SocietyPrognosis and survival for chronic myelogenous leukemia - Canadian Cancer Society

The Philadelphia chromosome. The most common chromosomal abnormality in people with CML is the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. ... About 95% of adults with CML have leukemia cells with the Ph chromosome. When the Ph chromosome is present, CML is described as ... of chromosomes 9 and 22. This translocation creates the BCR-ABL fusion gene, which leads to the development of CML. ... Other chromosome changes. If there are other chromosome changes or several chromosome changes, the CML usually has a shorter ...
more infohttp://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/leukemia-chronic-myelogenous-cml/prognosis-and-survival/?region=on&p=1

Outcome of treatment in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia-results of the prospective...Outcome of treatment in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia-results of the prospective...

TEL/AML1 fusion gene is a rare event in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Leukemia. 1996;10:1529-1530. ... From 1994 to 2000, 154 adults with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) and/orBCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) ... Adult Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: experience of treatments during a ten-year period. ... Philadelphia chromosome positive adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: characteristics, prognostic factors and treatment outcome. ...
more infohttp://www.bloodjournal.org/content/100/7/2357?ijkey=3ecab78a9d01a912972f9620f816fbf543359c2b&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha&sso-checked=true

A Study of Imatinib Versus Nilotinib in Adult Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive (Ph+) Chronic...A Study of Imatinib Versus Nilotinib in Adult Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive (Ph+) Chronic...

BCR-ABL = fusion gene from BCR (breakpoint cluster region gene/BCR gene product) and ABL (Abelson protooncogene) ... A Study of Imatinib Versus Nilotinib in Adult Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive (Ph+) Chronic ... Randomized Study of Imatinib Versus Nilotinib in Adult Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive (Ph+) ... newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP). ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00471497

A Study of Imatinib Versus Nilotinib in Adult Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive (Ph+) Chronic...A Study of Imatinib Versus Nilotinib in Adult Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive (Ph+) Chronic...

BCR-ABL = fusion gene from BCR (breakpoint cluster region gene/BCR gene product) and ABL (Abelson protooncogene) ... A Study of Imatinib Versus Nilotinib in Adult Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive (Ph+) Chronic ... Randomized Study of Imatinib Versus Nilotinib in Adult Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive (Ph+) ... newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP). ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT00471497?view=record

STI-571 - Chemotherapy Drugs - ChemocareSTI-571 - Chemotherapy Drugs - Chemocare

Newly diagnosed adult and pediatric patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myeloid leukemia (Ph+ CML) in ... Adult patients with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative diseases (MDS/MPD) associated with PDGFR gene rearrangements. ... Adult patients with relapsed or refractory Philadelphia chromosome + acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL). ...
more infohttps://chemocare.com/chemotherapy/drug-info/STI-571.aspx

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML): Introduction - AHealthyMe - Blue Cross Blue Shield of MassachusettsChronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML): Introduction - AHealthyMe - Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts

The change is called the Philadelphia chromosome. It creates an abnormal gene called BCR-ABL. This causes the leukemia cells to ... Home Conditions & Treatments Adult Health Library Adult Health Library. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ... There is a change in a chromosome in the cells of almost all patients with CML. ...
more infohttp://www.ahealthyme.com/Library/DiseasesConditions/Adult/34,25968-1

Small Molecule Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors with BCR-ABL and C-Kit as Targets | OncoLinkSmall Molecule Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors with BCR-ABL and C-Kit as Targets | OncoLink

Newly diagnosed adult patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic phase. ... normally located on chromosome 9, had attached itself to the gene bcr (pronounced "b-c-r") on chromosome 22. The bcr-abl gene ... Adult patients with relapsed or refractory Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL). ... Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Just as with CML, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer ...
more infohttps://www.oncolink.org/cancer-treatment/therapies/targeted/small-molecule-tyrosine-kinase-inhibitors-with-bcr-abl-and-c-kit-as-targets

Chronic neutrophilic leukemia - WikipediaChronic neutrophilic leukemia - Wikipedia

Most importantly, the Philadelphia chromosome and other BCR/ABL fusion genes are not detected. This is a rare disease, with ... Of these cases, an equal male:female ratio was observed, with cases typically seen in older adults. Elaine Sarkin Jaffe, Nancy ... and the absence of the Philadelphia chromosome or a BCR/ABL fusion gene. The most common clinical finding is hepatosplenomegaly ... See OHSU 2013 findings of gene CSF3R, mutation p. T6181 The majority (90%) of cases have not had detectable cytogenetic ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronic_neutrophilic_leukemia

Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - North Kansas City Hospital, Kansas...Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - North Kansas City Hospital, Kansas...

Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; also called acute lymphocytic leukemia) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. This ... Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the bone marrow makes too many lymphocytes (a type of ... Philadelphia chromosome. A piece of chromosome 9 and a piece of chromosome 22 break off and trade places. The bcr-abl gene is ... For example, in Philadelphia chromosome -positive ALL, part of one chromosome switches places with part of another chromosome. ...
more infohttp://www.nkch.org/patients-visitors/health-library/healthwise-document-viewer/?id=ncicdr0000257989

Subtypes and ClassificationSubtypes and Classification

... of adults with ALL have a genetic change or mutation called the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph). This causes 2 genes, BCR and ABL, ... to become 1 fusion gene called BCR-ABL.. The Philadelphia chromosome is found only in the cancerous blood-forming cells, not in ... This means that the same types of treatments used for leukemia with the Philadelphia chromosome may also work for Ph-like ALL. ... The genetic changes found in the leukemia cells of Ph-like ALL act like those linked with the Philadelphia chromosome. But, ...
more infohttps://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/leukemia-acute-lymphocytic-all/subtypes-and-classification

SPRYCEL(R) (dasatinib) Receives CHMP Positive Opinion for the Treatment of Adult ... | PresseportalSPRYCEL(R) (dasatinib) Receives CHMP Positive Opinion for the Treatment of Adult ... | Presseportal

... for the treatment of adult patients with newly ... ... The new chromosome is called the Philadelphia-positive ... chromosome, which contains an abnormal gene called BCR-ABL that signals cells to make too many white blood cells. There is no ... SPRYCEL is also approved for the treatment of adults with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia with ... Receives CHMP Positive Opinion for the Treatment of Adult Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive ...
more infohttps://www.presseportal.de/pm/6703/1704047

Dasatinib excels in worldwide phase II trial against pediatric CML | EurekAlert! Science NewsDasatinib excels in worldwide phase II trial against pediatric CML | EurekAlert! Science News

... caused by the fusion gene BCR-ABL, known as the Philadelphia chromosome. The approval dramatically extended the lives of ... "Despite the fact that there is a common molecular driver - BCR-ABL -- for this disease in adults and in children, the ... Gore points out that because most cancers including CML are more common in adults, it takes fewer collaborating centers to ... In 2002, the FDA approved the drug imatinib as a first-line therapy for adults with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) ...
more infohttps://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-06/uoca-dei053117.php

Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia Therapeutics - Pipeline Analysis 2018Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia Therapeutics - Pipeline Analysis 2018

The resultant abnormal chromosome is known as Philadelphia chromosome. This swapping forms a new gene, BCR-ABL which is the ... Chronic myelocytic leukemia usually occurs in middle-aged or older adults. It occurs due to the swapping of DNA between ... myelocytic leukemia have high incidence rate in men and is the second most common type of cancer occurring in male adults. ...
more infohttps://www.psmarketresearch.com/market-analysis/chronic-myelocytic-leukemia-therapeutics-pipeline-analysis/

Recent Developments in Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia | SpringerLinkRecent Developments in Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia | SpringerLink

Purpose of review Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Oncology is a relatively new field encompassing research in the unique ... Efficacy and toxicity of a paediatric protocol in teenagers and young adults with Philadelphia chromosome negative acute ... Press Announcements-FDA approval brings first gene therapy to the United States. https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/ ... Treatment of high-risk Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and adults according to ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11899-018-0442-1

Combination therapy shows promise for chronic myeloid leukemia | MD
Anderson Cancer CenterCombination therapy shows promise for chronic myeloid leukemia | MD Anderson Cancer Center

... to form the BCR-ABL fusion gene. The changed chromosome 22 with the fusion gene on it is called the Philadelphia chromosome. ... CML is a cancer of the white blood cells and accounts for 20% of adult leukemia.. The studys researchers combined two drugs ... The gene is a "hybrid" that forms when pieces of chromosomes 9 and 22 break off and trade places. The ABL gene from chromosome ... 9 joins to the BCR gene on chromosome 22, ... that inhibit the BCR-ABL gene, which is found in most patients ...
more infohttps://www.mdanderson.org/publications/cancer-frontline/combination-therapy-shows-promise-for-chronic-myeloid-leukemia.h00-159070290.html

Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL): Diagnosis - AHealthyMe - Blue Cross Blue Shield of MassachusettsAcute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL): Diagnosis - AHealthyMe - Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts

... their leukemia cells have the Philadelphia chromosome. This chromosome contains the abnormal gene BCR-ABL that helps the ... Adult Health Library. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Topic Index ... Finding the gene changes for your ALL cells can help decide your treatment. For example, in about 1 out of 4 people with ALL, ... The chromosomes inside the cells are then stained with special dyes and viewed with a microscope. Major changes in the ...
more infohttp://www.ahealthyme.com/Library/DiseasesConditions/Adult/Liver/34,BALLD1A

Diagnosis And Classification Of Myeloproliferative And... | BartlebyDiagnosis And Classification Of Myeloproliferative And... | Bartleby

... is the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph+), a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22, and the presence ... MPNs have a slow onset and are mainly diagnosed in adults between 45 and 55 years of age. Clinical symptoms include anemia, ... of the BCR/ABL1 fusion gene. Peripheral blood shows leukocytosis (,100×109 WBC/L), a predominance of myelocytes and segmented ... diagnosis and categorization of these syndromes emphasizes a combination of hematologic bone marrow characterization and gene ...
more infohttps://www.bartleby.com/essay/Diagnosis-And-Classification-Of-Myeloproliferative-And-Myelodysplastic-P3Z8YTW3FT8X

Most Popular | Managed Care magazineMost Popular | Managed Care magazine

Bosutinib (Bosulif, Pfizer Inc.) is now FDA-approved to treat adults with newly diagnosed chronic-phase Philadelphia chromosome ... FDA Approves Gene Therapy to Treat Rare Inherited Vision Loss. The FDA has approved the gene therapy Luxturna (voretigene ... Luxturna is the first directly administered gene therapy approved in the U.S. that targets a disease… ... According to a report in the Philadelphia Inquirer, the FDA said the latest studies are consistent… ...
more infohttp://managedcaremag.com/popular/all?page=18&%3Bdestination=popular

Philadelphia Chromosome | Analysis for BCR-ABL Fusion Transcripts in Cleveland, Ohio | University HospitalsPhiladelphia Chromosome | Analysis for BCR-ABL Fusion Transcripts in Cleveland, Ohio | University Hospitals

... gave rise to a fusion BCR-ABL gene. Philadelphia chromosome was found in about 90 to 95 percent of chronic myeloid leukemia ( ... This translocation also has been found in 25 to 30 percent of adult and in 2 to 5 percent of pediatric acute lymphoblastic ... The Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) resulting from the reciprocal translocation of chromosomes 9 and 22 [t(9:22)(q34;q11)] ... Using the ABL gene as an internal control, we calculate the normalized copy number (NCN) of BCR-ABL as well as the log ...
more infohttps://www.uhhospitals.org/services/genetic-services/for-clinicians/laboratory-tests-offered/quantitative-analysis-for-bcr-abl-fusion-transcripts

BCR-ABL1 and CD66c exhibit high concordance in minimal residual disease detection of adult B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia. |...BCR-ABL1 and CD66c exhibit high concordance in minimal residual disease detection of adult B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia. |...

Karyotyping was used to detect Philadelphia chromosome (Ph), and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and reverse ... Overall, 26/43 (60.5%) B-ALL patients were positive for BCR-ABL1 fusion gene expression, and all Ph positive cases (17/43; 39.5 ... BCR-ABL1 and CD66c exhibit high concordance in minimal residual disease detection of adult B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia.. [Gu ... fusion gene in B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) at primary diagnosis, and their concordance during minimal residual ...
more infohttps://www.sigmaaldrich.com/catalog/papers/26045902

IMPAKT 2013 Press Release: Study reveals magnitude of variation in gene expression measurements within breast cancers |  ESMOIMPAKT 2013 Press Release: Study reveals magnitude of variation in gene expression measurements within breast cancers | ESMO

Philadelphia chromosome-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms • Myelodysplastic syndromes • Hodgkins lymphoma • ... Primary cutaneous lymphoma • Acute myeloblastic leukaemia in adult patients • Waldenstroms macroglobulinaemia • Gastric ... "Some genes, such as ESR1 and HER2, are very consistently expressed across the tissue, thus gene expression measurements display ... Over recent years, scientists have identified many genes, and groups of genes, that can provide crucial information about how ...
more infohttp://www.esmo.org/Topics/Breast-cancer/Study-reveals-magnitude-of-variation-in-gene-expression-measurements-within-breast-cancers

Leukemia | CDCLeukemia | CDC

Most people with chronic myelogenous leukemia have a gene mutation (change) called the Philadelphia chromosome.external icon It ... Acute lymphocytic leukemia is more common among children and teens than among adults. However, because other types of leukemia ... The Philadelphia chromosome is not passed from parent to child.. *White people are more likely than black people to develop ... Adult leukemia survival trends in the United States by subtypeexternal icon ...
more infohttps://www.cdc.gov/cancer/leukemia/index.htm

Ponatinib for Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (TA451) | MIMS onlinePonatinib for Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (TA451) | MIMS online

... as an option for treating Philadelphia-chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in adults when:. *the disease is ... the T315I gene mutation is present.. 1.3 Ponatinib is recommended only if the company provides the drug with the discount ... the T315I gene mutation is present.. 1.2 Ponatinib is recommended, within its marketing authorisation, ...
more infohttps://www.mims.co.uk/ponatinib-treating-chronic-myeloid-leukaemia-acute-lymphoblastic-leukaemia-ta451/cancer/article/1437999
  • Usually multiple oncogenes, along with mutated apoptotic or tumor suppressor genes will all act in concert to cause cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dasatinib, an oral BCR-ABL inhibitor, is currently approved by the European Commission for the treatment of adults for all phases of CML (chronic, accelerated, or myeloid or lymphoid blast phase) with resistance or intolerance to prior therapy including imatinib. (presseportal.de)
  • 1 , 2 Ph-like ALL is driven by alterations in cytokine receptor signaling pathway genes that induce oncogenic kinase signaling, suggesting therapeutic potential for kinase inhibitors. (haematologica.org)
  • 9 In adults with the disease, it is generally thought that the only curative option is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), even if this opinion is only based on small retrospective studies. (bloodjournal.org)
  • 5 6 In adults as well as in children with ALL, Ph + and/or BCR-ABL + ALL is the subgroup associated with the worst prognosis. (bloodjournal.org)
  • Knowing whether a person has the BCR-ABL gene helps the doctor predict a patient's prognosis and recommend treatment. (cancer.net)
  • 1 , 2 The Ph-like ALL subtype comprises 15-25% of B-ALL in older children and adolescents/young adults (AYAs) and 20-40% of cases in older adults. (haematologica.org)
  • The bcr-abl gene is constitutively active (meaning it does not require activation by other proteins), and sends signals to activate proteins and enzymes which speed up cellular division and can lead to the formation of abnormal white blood cells that proliferate to the point that they interfere with normal blood cell production, leading to leukemia. (oncolink.org)
  • Provided are compositions and methods for identifying agents that can modulate expression of the human survivin gene. (roswellpark.org)
  • The BCR-ABL gene causes specific types of white blood cells called B lymphoblasts to grow out of control. (cancer.net)
  • The FDA has approved the gene therapy Luxturna (voretigene neparvovec-rzyl, Spark Therapeutics, Inc.) to treat children and adults with an inherited form of vision loss that may result in blindness. (managedcaremag.com)
  • MPNs have a slow onset and are mainly diagnosed in adults between 45 and 55 years of age. (bartleby.com)