Otolithic Membrane: A gelatinous membrane overlying the acoustic maculae of SACCULE AND UTRICLE. It contains minute crystalline particles (otoliths) of CALCIUM CARBONATE and protein on its outer surface. In response to head movement, the otoliths shift causing distortion of the vestibular hair cells which transduce nerve signals to the BRAIN for interpretation of equilibrium.Membranes: Thin layers of tissue which cover parts of the body, separate adjacent cavities, or connect adjacent structures.Membrane Lipids: Lipids, predominantly phospholipids, cholesterol and small amounts of glycolipids found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. These lipids may be arranged in bilayers in the membranes with integral proteins between the layers and peripheral proteins attached to the outside. Membrane lipids are required for active transport, several enzymatic activities and membrane formation.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Intracellular Membranes: Thin structures that encapsulate subcellular structures or ORGANELLES in EUKARYOTIC CELLS. They include a variety of membranes associated with the CELL NUCLEUS; the MITOCHONDRIA; the GOLGI APPARATUS; the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM; LYSOSOMES; PLASTIDS; and VACUOLES.Membrane Potentials: The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).Membranes, Artificial: Artificially produced membranes, such as semipermeable membranes used in artificial kidney dialysis (RENAL DIALYSIS), monomolecular and bimolecular membranes used as models to simulate biological CELL MEMBRANES. These membranes are also used in the process of GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION.Erythrocyte Membrane: The semi-permeable outer structure of a red blood cell. It is known as a red cell 'ghost' after HEMOLYSIS.Membrane Fluidity: The motion of phospholipid molecules within the lipid bilayer, dependent on the classes of phospholipids present, their fatty acid composition and degree of unsaturation of the acyl chains, the cholesterol concentration, and temperature.Cell Membrane Permeability: A quality of cell membranes which permits the passage of solvents and solutes into and out of cells.Basement Membrane: A darkly stained mat-like EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX (ECM) that separates cell layers, such as EPITHELIUM from ENDOTHELIUM or a layer of CONNECTIVE TISSUE. The ECM layer that supports an overlying EPITHELIUM or ENDOTHELIUM is called basal lamina. Basement membrane (BM) can be formed by the fusion of either two adjacent basal laminae or a basal lamina with an adjacent reticular lamina of connective tissue. BM, composed mainly of TYPE IV COLLAGEN; glycoprotein LAMININ; and PROTEOGLYCAN, provides barriers as well as channels between interacting cell layers.Membrane Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of molecules across a biological membrane. Included in this broad category are proteins involved in active transport (BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT, ACTIVE), facilitated transport and ION CHANNELS.Membrane Glycoproteins: Glycoproteins found on the membrane or surface of cells.Lipid Bilayers: Layers of lipid molecules which are two molecules thick. Bilayer systems are frequently studied as models of biological membranes.Mitochondrial Membranes: The two lipoprotein layers in the MITOCHONDRION. The outer membrane encloses the entire mitochondrion and contains channels with TRANSPORT PROTEINS to move molecules and ions in and out of the organelle. The inner membrane folds into cristae and contains many ENZYMES important to cell METABOLISM and energy production (MITOCHONDRIAL ATP SYNTHASE).Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Protein Transport: The process of moving proteins from one cellular compartment (including extracellular) to another by various sorting and transport mechanisms such as gated transport, protein translocation, and vesicular transport.Synaptic Membranes: Cell membranes associated with synapses. Both presynaptic and postsynaptic membranes are included along with their integral or tightly associated specializations for the release or reception of transmitters.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Liposomes: Artificial, single or multilaminar vesicles (made from lecithins or other lipids) that are used for the delivery of a variety of biological molecules or molecular complexes to cells, for example, drug delivery and gene transfer. They are also used to study membranes and membrane proteins.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Cell Fractionation: Techniques to partition various components of the cell into SUBCELLULAR FRACTIONS.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Extraembryonic Membranes: The thin layers of tissue that surround the developing embryo. There are four extra-embryonic membranes commonly found in VERTEBRATES, such as REPTILES; BIRDS; and MAMMALS. They are the YOLK SAC, the ALLANTOIS, the AMNION, and the CHORION. These membranes provide protection and means to transport nutrients and wastes.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Detergents: Purifying or cleansing agents, usually salts of long-chain aliphatic bases or acids, that exert cleansing (oil-dissolving) and antimicrobial effects through a surface action that depends on possessing both hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Endoplasmic Reticulum: A system of cisternae in the CYTOPLASM of many cells. In places the endoplasmic reticulum is continuous with the plasma membrane (CELL MEMBRANE) or outer membrane of the nuclear envelope. If the outer surfaces of the endoplasmic reticulum membranes are coated with ribosomes, the endoplasmic reticulum is said to be rough-surfaced (ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM, ROUGH); otherwise it is said to be smooth-surfaced (ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM, SMOOTH). (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Phosphatidylcholines: Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to a choline moiety. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid and choline and 2 moles of fatty acids.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Golgi Apparatus: A stack of flattened vesicles that functions in posttranslational processing and sorting of proteins, receiving them from the rough ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM and directing them to secretory vesicles, LYSOSOMES, or the CELL MEMBRANE. The movement of proteins takes place by transfer vesicles that bud off from the rough endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi apparatus and fuse with the Golgi, lysosomes or cell membrane. (From Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.Dictionaries, MedicalDictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Dura Mater: The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.Dictionaries, ChemicalCentral Nervous System Vascular Malformations: Congenital, inherited, or acquired abnormalities involving ARTERIES; VEINS; or venous sinuses in the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and MENINGES.Semicircular Canals: Three long canals (anterior, posterior, and lateral) of the bony labyrinth. They are set at right angles to each other and are situated posterosuperior to the vestibule of the bony labyrinth (VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH). The semicircular canals have five openings into the vestibule with one shared by the anterior and the posterior canals. Within the canals are the SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS.Saccule and Utricle: Two membranous sacs within the vestibular labyrinth of the INNER EAR. The saccule communicates with COCHLEAR DUCT through the ductus reuniens, and communicates with utricle through the utriculosaccular duct from which the ENDOLYMPHATIC DUCT arises. The utricle and saccule have sensory areas (acoustic maculae) which are innervated by the VESTIBULAR NERVE.Cochlea: The part of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) that is concerned with hearing. It forms the anterior part of the labyrinth, as a snail-like structure that is situated almost horizontally anterior to the VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH.Ear, Inner: The essential part of the hearing organ consists of two labyrinthine compartments: the bony labyrinthine and the membranous labyrinth. The bony labyrinth is a complex of three interconnecting cavities or spaces (COCHLEA; VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH; and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS) in the TEMPORAL BONE. Within the bony labyrinth lies the membranous labyrinth which is a complex of sacs and tubules (COCHLEAR DUCT; SACCULE AND UTRICLE; and SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS) forming a continuous space enclosed by EPITHELIUM and connective tissue. These spaces are filled with LABYRINTHINE FLUIDS of various compositions.Vestibule, Labyrinth: An oval, bony chamber of the inner ear, part of the bony labyrinth. It is continuous with bony COCHLEA anteriorly, and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS posteriorly. The vestibule contains two communicating sacs (utricle and saccule) of the balancing apparatus. The oval window on its lateral wall is occupied by the base of the STAPES of the MIDDLE EAR.Hair Cells, Vestibular: Sensory cells in the acoustic maculae with their apical STEREOCILIA embedded in a gelatinous OTOLITHIC MEMBRANE. These hair cells are stimulated by the movement of otolithic membrane, and impulses are transmitted via the VESTIBULAR NERVE to the BRAIN STEM. Hair cells in the saccule and those in the utricle sense linear acceleration in vertical and horizontal directions, respectively.Vestibulocochlear Nerve: The 8th cranial nerve. The vestibulocochlear nerve has a cochlear part (COCHLEAR NERVE) which is concerned with hearing and a vestibular part (VESTIBULAR NERVE) which mediates the sense of balance and head position. The fibers of the cochlear nerve originate from neurons of the SPIRAL GANGLION and project to the cochlear nuclei (COCHLEAR NUCLEUS). The fibers of the vestibular nerve arise from neurons of Scarpa's ganglion and project to the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI.Embryology: The study of the development of an organism during the embryonic and fetal stages of life.Organ of Corti: The spiral EPITHELIUM containing sensory AUDITORY HAIR CELLS and supporting cells in the cochlea. Organ of Corti, situated on the BASILAR MEMBRANE and overlaid by a gelatinous TECTORIAL MEMBRANE, converts sound-induced mechanical waves to neural impulses to the brain.Spiral Ganglion: The sensory ganglion of the COCHLEAR NERVE. The cells of the spiral ganglion send fibers peripherally to the cochlear hair cells and centrally to the COCHLEAR NUCLEI of the BRAIN STEM.Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases: Pathological processes of the VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE, including the branches of COCHLEAR NERVE and VESTIBULAR NERVE. Common examples are VESTIBULAR NEURITIS, cochlear neuritis, and ACOUSTIC NEUROMA. Clinical signs are varying degree of HEARING LOSS; VERTIGO; and TINNITUS.BooksFissure in Ano: A painful linear ulcer at the margin of the anus. It appears as a crack or slit in the mucous membrane of the anus and is very painful and difficult to heal. (Dorland, 27th ed & Stedman, 25th ed)
The tips of these stereocilia and kinocilium are embedded in a gelatinous otolithic membrane. This membrane is weighted with ... The gelatinous layer and the statoconia together are referred to as the otolithic membrane, where the tips of the stereocilia ... The otolithic membrane adds weight to the tops of the hair cells and increases their inertia. The addition in weight and ... The otolithic membrane of the macula utriculi briefly lags behind the rest of the tissues, bends the stereocilia backward, and ...
A gelatinous cover called the otolithic membrane envelops the tips of the stereocilia and kinocilium. The otolithic membrane is ... In vertical linear acceleration, the weighted otolithic membrane lags behind the stereocilia and kinocilium. This bends the ...
These microscopic structures possess stereocilia and one kinocilium which are located within the gelatinous otolithic membrane ... which includes the basilar membrane, is called the scala tympani. As a result of this increase in length, the basilar membrane ... Hardesty's membrane is the layer of the tectoria closest to the reticular lamina and overlying the outer hair cell region. ... Reissner's membrane is composed of two cell layers and separates the scala media from the scala vestibuli. Huschke's teeth are ...
Supporting cells interdigitate between hair cells and secrete the otolithic membrane, a thick, gelatinous layer of glycoprotein ... are oriented away from the striola The tips of the stereocilia and kinocilium are embedded in a gelatinous otolithic membrane. ... Covering the surface of the otolithic membrane are otoliths, which are crystals of calcium carbonate. For this reason, the ... This membrane is weighted with protein-calcium carbonate granules called otoliths, which add to the weight and inertia of the ...
The gelatinous layer and the statoconia together are referred to as the otolithic membrane, where the tips of the stereocilia ... The bottom layer is made of sensory hair cells which are embedded in bottom of a gelatinous layer. Each hair cell has between ... When the head is tilted such that gravity pulls on the statoconia the gelatinous layer is pulled in the same direction also ... The otoliths are relatively heavy, providing weight to the membrane as well as inertia. This allows for a greater sense of ...
... which is covered by a gelatinous layer and the otolithic membrane on top. Embedded in this membrane are calcium carbonate ...
Overlying the hair cells and their hair bundles is a gelatinous layer and above that layer is the otolithic membrane. The ... doi:10.1016/0378-5955(90)90119-a. Lychakov, D.V. (2004). "Evolution of otolithic membrane. Structure of otolithic membrane in ... Otolithic membranes of utricles in reptiles and amphibians represent thin plates of non-uniform structure, while the otolithic ... One final type of model that researchers have used to understand the otolithic membrane is related to the membrane-hair cell ...
Consequently, the cupula is not displaced by gravity, unlike the otolithic membranes of the utricle and saccule. As with ... Each ampulla contains an ampulla crest, the crista ampullaris which consists of a thick gelatinous cap called a cupula and many ... These hair cells have many cytoplasmic projections on the apical surface called stereocilia which are embedded in a gelatinous ...
Ossicles Otolithic membrane Otolith microchemical analysis Sahney, Sarda; Wilson, Mark V. H. (2001). "Extrinsic labyrinth ... In addition, in most species the accretion of calcium carbonate and gelatinous matrix alternates on a daily cycle. It is ... When the body changes position or begins a movement the weight of the membrane bends the stereocilia and stimulates the hair ... In mammals, otoliths are small particles, composed of a combination of a gelatinous matrix and calcium carbonate in the viscous ...
Consequently, the cupula is not displaced by gravity, unlike the otolithic membranes of the utricle and saccule. As with ... Each ampulla contains an ampulla crest, the crista ampullaris which consists of a thick gelatinous cap called a cupula and many ... These hair cells have many cytoplasmic projections on the apical surface called stereocilia which are embedded in a gelatinous ...
Otolithic membrane, gelatinous structure overlying the hair cells 15 Fxn of otoconia: ... head trauma, virus, or rise in endolymph volume due to hole in membrane separating endolymph and cochlea fluids OR improper ... 50mV, bc cell is slightly depolarized due to the tugging on membrane that open mechanoreceps allowing K to enter ... it is fluid and not mechanically coupled to the outside structures (i.e. the cupola is coupled to membrane) ...
The tips of these stereocilia and kinocilium are embedded in a gelatinous otolithic membrane. This membrane is weighted with ... The gelatinous layer and the statoconia together are referred to as the otolithic membrane, where the tips of the stereocilia ... The otolithic membrane adds weight to the tops of the hair cells and increases their inertia. The addition in weight and ... The otolithic membrane of the macula utriculi briefly lags behind the rest of the tissues, bends the stereocilia backward, and ...
A gelatinous cover called the otolithic membrane envelops the tips of the stereocilia and kinocilium. The otolithic membrane is ... In vertical linear acceleration, the weighted otolithic membrane lags behind the stereocilia and kinocilium. This bends the ...
... dural membrane explanation free. What is dural membrane? Meaning of dural membrane medical term. What does dural membrane mean? ... Looking for online definition of dural membrane in the Medical Dictionary? ... otolithic membrane. A layer of gelatinous substance containing otoconia or otoliths, found on the surface of maculae in the ... Wachendorf membrane. See: Wachendorf membrane. yolk membrane. Vitelline membrane.. membrane. a thin sheet of tissue.. membrane ...
N-75 Figure 2: Anatomy of otolithic membrane. 2. Function (Figs. 7-45, p. 219; 7-46, p. 220) a. When the head moves and changes ... All cilia project into a gelatinous substance which contains otoliths . The otoliths are crystals of calcium carbonate . Head ... When they move, the gelatinous substance in which they are embedded also moves. This bends the cilia. ... movement causes the otoliths to move due to the force of gravity, which causes the whole gelatinous mass to move, which moves ...
membrane answers are found in the Tabers Medical Dictionary powered by Unbound Medicine. Available for iPhone, iPad, Android, ... otolithic membrane. A gelatinous membrane containing otoconia or otoliths, found on the surface of maculae in the inner ear. ... A membrane of fibrinous exudate on a mucous surface of a membrane, as in croup or diphtheria. SYN: SEE: croupous membrane ... nuclear membrane. The two-layered membrane surrounding the chromosomes of a cell. The membrane has pores and its outer layer is ...
It contains two bulblike sacs, the saccule and utricle, whose membranes are continuous with ... the otolithic membrane. Calcium carbonate crystals called otoliths pervade the otolithic membrane, increasing its density and ... each crista ampullaris contains numerous hair cells whose stereocilia and kinocilium protrude into a gelatinous matrix, the ... Changes in linear motion cause the otolithic membrane to move forward and backward in the utricle or up and down in the saccule ...
The otolithic membrane overlies each macula and is composed of numerous filaments and has a high content of acid ... The stereocilia on the hair cells project into the overlying gelatinous material called the cupula. The organ of Corti (hearing ... Embedded in the otolithic membrane are numerous crystalline bodies, otoliths or otoconia, that are composed of a protein core ... have a bundle of elongated microvilli called stereocilia that project from the apical membrane into an extracellular gelatinous ...
The cilia of the otolithic organs are embedded in a thin gelatinous membrane that also contains very dense calcium carbonate ... The cilia extend into an extracellular fluid-filled space, with their tips embedded in a gelatinous membrane. See Cilia and ... The basilar membrane is suspended on both sides by ligaments or bone. The basilar membrane varies regularly in width, being ... The outer wall of the tympanic cavity turns into a thin, elastic tympanic membrane. The sound waves that reach the membrane are ...
The specific gravity of the otolithic membrane is much higher than that of the endolymph, about 2.71-2.94. ... A bulbous, wedge-shaped, gelatinous mass called the cupula surmounts the crista. Cilia of the sensory cells project into the ... Their nuclei are usually found just above the basement membrane and below the hair cells. Hair cells form tight junctions and ... The ciliary bundles of the sensory cells project into the overlying statoconial membrane, which consists of 3 layers, as ...
The maculaeare covered by an extracellular otolithic membrane in which are embedded a number of microscopic stones composed of ... Stereocilia on the hair cells project into an extracellular gelatinous material called the cupula. Motion of endolymph in ... Disease entities of the middle ear include: tympanic membrane perforation, damage to or loss of one of the middle ear ossicles ...
Stereocilia and kinocilium are embedded in gelatinous OTOLITHIC membrane. Membr. is composed of glycoproteins and crystals ... COCHLEAR duct has 3 walls: a) Lateral wall - is stria vascularis, b) Medial wall - is vestibular (or Reissners) membrane, c) ... Lower wall - is basilar membrane. It is place for location of sensory zone, named organ of CORTI (or organ of HEARING).. ORGAN ...
The tough cupula/otolithic membrane is shifted against the sensory cells through acceleration, deceleration or rotating of the ... They are covered by a gelatinous mass. Inside the semicircular ducts, this mass which contains mucopolysaccharide is called ... It is bordered by the Reissners membrane at the scala vestibuli and by the basilar membrane at the scala tympani as well as by ... this mass contains small calcium carbonate crystals inside the otolith organ and is therefore called otolithic membrane. ...
Their sensory hairs are covered by a gelatinous mass, the otolithic membran On the membranes free surface are found calcified ... The tectorial membrane, fibrous and gelatinous, is derived from the internal portion of the so-called spiral limbus ... The basement membrane acts as a frequency analyzer. It is sensitive to high frequencies toward its base and to low frequencies ... Reissners or vestibular membrane is derived from the dorsal surface of the cochlear duct. It becomes very thin and remains ...
They are enclosed in a gelatinous substance. The gelatinous substance is called the cupule. In Maculae the otolithic membrane ...
... but little is known about the mechanical properties of the gelatinous otolithic membrane and its coupling with hair cells. ... mode of attachment to the otolithic membrane [44], and electrical tuning [45, 46]. Outer hair cell stereocilia length is ... Art JJ, Fettiplace R: Variation of membrane properties in hair cells isolated from the turtle cochlea. J Physiol. 1987, 385: ... Greenwood DD: Critical bandwidth and the frequency coordinates of the basilar membrane. J Acoust Soc Am. 1961, 33: 1344-1356. ...
Otolithic membrane - is?. jellylike mass studded with tiny CaCO3 stones called otoliths. ... hair cells with stereocilia (microvilli) & one cilia (kinocilium)supporting cells that secrete gelatinous layer. ... Otolithic movement in the direction of the kinocilia is?. Depolarizes vestibular nerve fibersIncreases the number of action ... to substances dissolved in fluids of the nasal membranes.. Olfactory receptors convey what?. nerve impulses to olfactory nerves ...
... both typeI and type II hair cells.The hair cell processes are embedded in the gelatinous polysaccharide otolithic membrane. ... which in turn diffuses from the presynapticknob via the synaptic cleft and postsynaptic membrane tothe adjacent cell. (1993) ...
caused by otoconia detaching from otolithic membrane of utricle and getting stuck in a semicircular canal ... ampullary crest is covered by cupula (gelatinous mass) *cupulas have mass → inertia gives it some lag which ensure that hair ... principal pathway by which otolithic organs can regulate the bodys extensor organs ...
... increase the density of the gelatinous material (otolithic membrane). ... A hair cell that responds best to low frequency sounds will be located at the base end of the basilar membrane. ... Hair cells that respond best to low frequency sounds are located at the apical (helicotrema) end of the basilar membrane. ... opens mechanically gated ion channels in the hair cells increasing the potassium current and hence changing the membrane ...
both otolithic membranes to contribute to the sensations that are derived from that ... What we find is that this gelatinous membrane with the weight of it being ... So, this would be our resting posture with the gelatinous membrane and the ... that tilt and then maintain it, gravity has now pulled that otolithic membrane ...
both otolithic membranes to contribute to the sensations that are derived from that ... What we find is that this gelatinous membrane with the weight of it being ... So, this would be our resting posture with the gelatinous membrane and the ... that tilt and then maintain it, gravity has now pulled that otolithic membrane ...
... bone thinking that it would help loosen otolithic debris adherent to the membrane of the semicircular canal. In 1995, a study ... 2). The ampulla contains the "cupula," a gelatinous mass with the same density as endolymph, which in turn is attached to ... probably displaced from the otolithic membrane in the utricle. They typically settle in the dependent posterior canal and ... Epley postulated that the procedure enabled the otolithic debris to move under the influence of gravity from the posterior ...
Consequently, the cupula is not displaced by gravity, unlike the otolithic membranes of the utricle and saccule. As with ... Each ampulla contains an ampulla crest, the crista ampullaris which consists of a thick gelatinous cap called a cupula and many ... These hair cells have many cytoplasmic projections on the apical surface called stereocilia which are embedded in a gelatinous ...
They are filled with endolymph and contain sensory hair cells called macula The hairs are embedded in the otolithic membrane. ... which contains fine sensory hair cells called crista The crista are embedded in a dome-shaped gelatinous capsule called the ... Why the membrane labelled F is much larger than membrane C (2) 1.4 A dog has lost part A in an accident. Part A is replaced ... We become conscious of sound when the vibrations reach our ear-drums (tympanic membrane). The ear-drum vibrates according to ...
  • it includes the skin-covered flap of cartilage known as the auricle, or pinna, and the opening (auditory canal) leading to the eardrum (tympanic membrane). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Disease entities of the middle ear include: tympanic membrane perforation, damage to or loss of one of the middle ear ossicles, otosclerosis, fluid or infection in the middle ear space, or malfunction of the Eustachian tube. (cdc.gov)
  • At the end of the EAM is the Tympanic Membrane which is the structure separating the outer and middle ear. (slideplayer.com)
  • 16 Tympanic Membrane Umbo- most distal point of attachment of the inner TM to the malleus bone in middle ear The handle/manubrium attaches to the TM along its length, terminating with the lateral process. (slideplayer.com)
  • Hearing occurs as sound enters the outer ear canal and causes vibration of the tympanic membrane (eardrum) and subsequently the movement of the middle ear bones. (wessonhearing.com)
  • impaired oral mucous membrane a nursing diagnosis approved by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as disruptions of the lips and soft tissue of the oral cavity. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Changes in the integrity and health of the oral mucous membrane can occur as a characteristic of such medical disorders as periodontal disease, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, oral cancer, and infection with herpes. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A membrane of fibrinous exudate on a mucous surface of a membrane, as in croup or diphtheria. (tabers.com)
  • The membrane through which gases must pass as they diffuse from air to blood (oxygen) or blood to air (carbon dioxide), including the alveolar fluid and surfactant, cell of the alveolar wall, interstitial space (tissue fluid), and cell of the capillary wall. (tabers.com)