Snails: Marine, freshwater, or terrestrial mollusks of the class Gastropoda. Most have an enclosing spiral shell, and several genera harbor parasites pathogenic to man.Gastropoda: A class in the phylum MOLLUSCA comprised of SNAILS and slugs. The former have coiled external shells and the latter usually lack shells.Helix (Snails): A genus of chiefly Eurasian and African land snails including the principal edible snails as well as several pests of cultivated plants.Mollusca: A phylum of the kingdom Metazoa. Mollusca have soft, unsegmented bodies with an anterior head, a dorsal visceral mass, and a ventral foot. Most are encased in a protective calcareous shell. It includes the classes GASTROPODA; BIVALVIA; CEPHALOPODA; Aplacophora; Scaphopoda; Polyplacophora; and Monoplacophora.Lymnaea: A genus of dextrally coiled freshwater snails that includes some species of importance as intermediate hosts of parasitic flukes.Conus Snail: A genus of cone-shaped marine snails in the family Conidae, class GASTROPODA. It comprises more than 600 species, many containing unique venoms (CONUS VENOMS) with which they immobilize their prey.Animal Shells: The hard rigid covering of animals including MOLLUSCS; TURTLES; INSECTS; and crustaceans.Biomphalaria: A genus of planorbid freshwater snails, species of which are intermediate hosts of Schistosoma mansoni.Pacific OceanSeed Dispersal: The various physical methods which include wind, insects, animals, tension, and water, by which a plant scatters its seeds away from the parent plant.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Mollusk Venoms: Venoms from mollusks, including CONUS and OCTOPUS species. The venoms contain proteins, enzymes, choline derivatives, slow-reacting substances, and several characterized polypeptide toxins that affect the nervous system. Mollusk venoms include cephalotoxin, venerupin, maculotoxin, surugatoxin, conotoxins, and murexine.Epsilonproteobacteria: A group of proteobacteria consisting of chemoorganotrophs usually associated with the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM of humans and animals.Protein Structure, Secondary: The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.Hydrothermal Vents: Hot springs on the ocean floor. They are commonly found near volcanically active places such as mid-oceanic ridges.Bays: An area of water mostly surrounded by land, usually smaller than a gulf, and affording access to the sea.Animal Structures: Organs and other anatomical structures of non-human vertebrate and invertebrate animals.Indian Ocean: A body of water covering approximately one-fifth of the total ocean area of the earth, extending amidst Africa in the west, Australia in the east, Asia in the north, and Antarctica in the south. Including the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf, it constitutes the third largest ocean after the ATLANTIC OCEAN and the PACIFIC OCEAN. (New Encyclopaedia Britannica Micropaedia, 15th ed, 1990, p289)Anomura: An infraorder of CRUSTACEA, in the order DECAPODA comprising the hermit crabs and characterized by a small fifth pair of legs.Introduced Species: Non-native organisms brought into a region, habitat, or ECOSYSTEM by human activity.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Freshwater Biology: The study of life and ECOLOGIC SYSTEMS in bodies of FRESHWATER.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Disease Vectors: Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Trialkyltin Compounds: Organometallic compounds which contain tin and three alkyl groups.Reproductive Physiological Phenomena: Physiological processes, factors, properties and characteristics pertaining to REPRODUCTION.Coprophagia: Eating of excrement by animal species.Lakes: Inland bodies of still or slowly moving FRESH WATER or salt water, larger than a pond, and supplied by RIVERS and streams.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Oceanography: The science that deals with the ocean and its phenomena. (Webster, 3d ed)FMRFamide: A molluscan neuroactive peptide which induces a fast excitatory depolarizing response due to direct activation of amiloride-sensitive SODIUM CHANNELS. (From Nature 1995; 378(6558): 730-3)Ganglia, Invertebrate: Clusters of neuronal cell bodies in invertebrates. Invertebrate ganglia may also contain neuronal processes and non-neuronal supporting cells. Many invertebrate ganglia are favorable subjects for research because they have small numbers of functional neuronal types which can be identified from one animal to another.Octopodiformes: A superorder in the class CEPHALOPODA, consisting of the orders Octopoda (octopus) with over 200 species and Vampyromorpha with a single species. The latter is a phylogenetic relic but holds the key to the origins of Octopoda.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Molluscacides: Agents destructive to snails and other mollusks.Fresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.Predatory Behavior: Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.Conotoxins: Peptide neurotoxins from the marine fish-hunting snails of the genus CONUS. They contain 13 to 29 amino acids which are strongly basic and are highly cross-linked by disulfide bonds. There are three types of conotoxins, omega-, alpha-, and mu-. OMEGA-CONOTOXINS inhibit voltage-activated entry of calcium into the presynaptic membrane and therefore the release of ACETYLCHOLINE. Alpha-conotoxins inhibit the postsynaptic acetylcholine receptor. Mu-conotoxins prevent the generation of muscle action potentials. (From Concise Encyclopedia Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 3rd ed)Bahamas: A chain of islands, cays, and reefs in the West Indies, lying southeast of Florida and north of Cuba. It is an independent state, called also the Commonwealth of the Bahamas or the Bahama Islands. The name likely represents the local name Guanahani, itself of uncertain origin. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p106 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p45)HemocyaninLarva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Metamorphosis, Biological: Profound physical changes during maturation of living organisms from the immature forms to the adult forms, such as from TADPOLES to frogs; caterpillars to BUTTERFLIES.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Marine Biology: The study of the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of organisms which inhabit the OCEANS AND SEAS.Zosteraceae: A plant family of the order Najadales, subclass ALISMATIDAE, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). This is a group of perennial aquatic herbs with basal leaves.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Aplysia: An opisthobranch mollusk of the order Anaspidea. It is used frequently in studies of nervous system development because of its large identifiable neurons. Aplysiatoxin and its derivatives are not biosynthesized by Aplysia, but acquired by ingestion of Lyngbya (seaweed) species.Aminoethylphosphonic Acid: An organophosphorus compound isolated from human and animal tissues.Hemolymph: The blood/lymphlike nutrient fluid of some invertebrates.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Invertebrates: Animals that have no spinal column.DNA, Mitochondrial: Double-stranded DNA of MITOCHONDRIA. In eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GENOME is circular and codes for ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and about 10 proteins.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Organotin Compounds: Organic compounds which contain tin in the molecule. Used widely in industry and agriculture.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Hemocytes: Any blood or formed element especially in invertebrates.Cercaria: The free-swimming larval forms of parasites found in an intermediate host.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Nucleic Acid Conformation: The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Vibrio parahaemolyticus: A species of bacteria found in the marine environment, sea foods, and the feces of patients with acute enteritis.Schistosoma mansoni: A species of trematode blood flukes of the family Schistosomatidae. It is common in the Nile delta. The intermediate host is the planorbid snail. This parasite causes schistosomiasis mansoni and intestinal bilharziasis.Spatial Analysis: Techniques which study entities using their topological, geometric, or geographic properties.Trematoda: Class of parasitic flukes consisting of three subclasses, Monogenea, Aspidogastrea, and Digenea. The digenetic trematodes are the only ones found in man. They are endoparasites and require two hosts to complete their life cycle.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Atlantic OceanBinding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Genome, Mitochondrial: The genetic complement of MITOCHONDRIA as represented in their DNA.Schistosomiasis: Infection with flukes (trematodes) of the genus SCHISTOSOMA. Three species produce the most frequent clinical diseases: SCHISTOSOMA HAEMATOBIUM (endemic in Africa and the Middle East), SCHISTOSOMA MANSONI (in Egypt, northern and southern Africa, some West Indies islands, northern 2/3 of South America), and SCHISTOSOMA JAPONICUM (in Japan, China, the Philippines, Celebes, Thailand, Laos). S. mansoni is often seen in Puerto Ricans living in the United States.Cleavage Stage, Ovum: The earliest developmental stage of a fertilized ovum (ZYGOTE) during which there are several mitotic divisions within the ZONA PELLUCIDA. Each cleavage or segmentation yields two BLASTOMERES of about half size of the parent cell. This cleavage stage generally covers the period up to 16-cell MORULA.Gills: Paired respiratory organs of fishes and some amphibians that are analogous to lungs. They are richly supplied with blood vessels by which oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged directly with the environment.Oceans and Seas: A great expanse of continuous bodies of salt water which together cover more than 70 percent of the earth's surface. Seas may be partially or entirely enclosed by land, and are smaller than the five oceans (Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Antarctic).Crustacea: A large subphylum of mostly marine ARTHROPODS containing over 42,000 species. They include familiar arthropods such as lobsters (NEPHROPIDAE), crabs (BRACHYURA), shrimp (PENAEIDAE), and barnacles (THORACICA).Crystallography, X-Ray: The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Body Size: The physical measurements of a body.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Food Chain: The sequence of transfers of matter and energy from organism to organism in the form of FOOD. Food chains intertwine locally into a food web because most organisms consume more than one type of animal or plant. PLANTS, which convert SOLAR ENERGY to food by PHOTOSYNTHESIS, are the primary food source. In a predator chain, a plant-eating animal is eaten by a larger animal. In a parasite chain, a smaller organism consumes part of a larger host and may itself be parasitized by smaller organisms. In a saprophytic chain, microorganisms live on dead organic matter.Estivation: In certain living species, a period of dormancy during the summer months marked by decreased metabolism.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Bivalvia: A class in the phylum MOLLUSCA comprised of mussels; clams; OYSTERS; COCKLES; and SCALLOPS. They are characterized by a bilaterally symmetrical hinged shell and a muscular foot used for burrowing and anchoring.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Cadherins: Calcium-dependent cell adhesion proteins. They are important in the formation of ADHERENS JUNCTIONS between cells. Cadherins are classified by their distinct immunological and tissue specificities, either by letters (E- for epithelial, N- for neural, and P- for placental cadherins) or by numbers (cadherin-12 or N-cadherin 2 for brain-cadherin). Cadherins promote cell adhesion via a homophilic mechanism as in the construction of tissues and of the whole animal body.Digestive System: A group of organs stretching from the MOUTH to the ANUS, serving to breakdown foods, assimilate nutrients, and eliminate waste. In humans, the digestive system includes the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT and the accessory glands (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Embryo, Nonmammalian: The developmental entity of a fertilized egg (ZYGOTE) in animal species other than MAMMALS. For chickens, use CHICK EMBRYO.Schistosoma: A genus of trematode flukes belonging to the family Schistosomatidae. There are over a dozen species. These parasites are found in man and other mammals. Snails are the intermediate hosts.Symbiosis: The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other or a relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other.Electron Transport Complex IV: A multisubunit enzyme complex containing CYTOCHROME A GROUP; CYTOCHROME A3; two copper atoms; and 13 different protein subunits. It is the terminal oxidase complex of the RESPIRATORY CHAIN and collects electrons that are transferred from the reduced CYTOCHROME C GROUP and donates them to molecular OXYGEN, which is then reduced to water. The redox reaction is simultaneously coupled to the transport of PROTONS across the inner mitochondrial membrane.Hydrogen Bonding: A low-energy attractive force between hydrogen and another element. It plays a major role in determining the properties of water, proteins, and other compounds.Angiostrongylus cantonensis: A species of parasitic nematodes distributed throughout the Pacific islands that infests the lungs of domestic rats. Human infection, caused by consumption of raw slugs and land snails, results in eosinophilic meningitis.Angiosperms: Members of the group of vascular plants which bear flowers. They are differentiated from GYMNOSPERMS by their production of seeds within a closed chamber (OVARY, PLANT). The Angiosperms division is composed of two classes, the monocotyledons (Liliopsida) and dicotyledons (Magnoliopsida). Angiosperms represent approximately 80% of all known living plants.Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).Twist Transcription Factor: A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that was originally identified in DROSOPHILA as essential for proper gastrulation and MESODERM formation. It plays an important role in EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT and CELL DIFFERENTIATION of MUSCLE CELLS, and is found in a wide variety of organisms.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Protein Folding: Processes involved in the formation of TERTIARY PROTEIN STRUCTURE.Echinostoma: A genus of intestinal flukes of the family Echinostomatidae which consists of many species. They occur in man and other vertebrates. The intermediate hosts are frequently mollusks.Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular: NMR spectroscopy on small- to medium-size biological macromolecules. This is often used for structural investigation of proteins and nucleic acids, and often involves more than one isotope.Swimming: An activity in which the body is propelled through water by specific movement of the arms and/or the legs. Swimming as propulsion through water by the movement of limbs, tail, or fins of animals is often studied as a form of PHYSICAL EXERTION or endurance.Neuropeptides: Peptides released by NEURONS as intercellular messengers. Many neuropeptides are also hormones released by non-neuronal cells.Mutagenesis, Site-Directed: Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Gammaproteobacteria: A group of the proteobacteria comprised of facultatively anaerobic and fermentative gram-negative bacteria.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Thermodynamics: A rigorously mathematical analysis of energy relationships (heat, work, temperature, and equilibrium). It describes systems whose states are determined by thermal parameters, such as temperature, in addition to mechanical and electromagnetic parameters. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed)Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Mesoderm: The middle germ layer of an embryo derived from three paired mesenchymal aggregates along the neural tube.Host-Parasite Interactions: The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions: The thermodynamic interaction between a substance and WATER.Bayes Theorem: A theorem in probability theory named for Thomas Bayes (1702-1761). In epidemiology, it is used to obtain the probability of disease in a group of people with some characteristic on the basis of the overall rate of that disease and of the likelihood of that characteristic in healthy and diseased individuals. The most familiar application is in clinical decision analysis where it is used for estimating the probability of a particular diagnosis given the appearance of some symptoms or test result.Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Trematode Infections: Infections caused by infestation with worms of the class Trematoda.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Serotonin: A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.Dimerization: The process by which two molecules of the same chemical composition form a condensation product or polymer.
Peltanová A., Peltan T., Petrusek A., Juřičková L. & Kment P. (in prep.). "A fast snail's pace: Mediterranean gastropod Helix ... In addition there are at least 11 gastropod species surviving in greenhouses. There are 219 gastropod species (50 freshwater ... Helix aspersa (O. F. Müller, 1774) - Bohemia, non-indigenous since 2008 (hlemýžď balkánský) Helix lucorum Linnaeus, 1758 - non- ... There are also 11 introduced gastropod species (5 freshwater and 7 land species) and 4 bivalve species living in the wild in ...
... a pulmonate gastropod in the family Helicidae, the typical snails. Cantareus is a synonym for the genus Helix. It contains the ... Cantareus is a genus of air-breathing land snails, ... following species: Cantareus apertus - synonym: Helix aperta ...
... is a species of air-breathing land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk in the family ... Reeve L. A. (1852). "Monograph of the genus Helix". pls 63-132, 134-146. In: Reeve L.A. (ed.). Conchologia Iconica. London: L. ...
... is a species of air-breathing land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk in the family ... This species was described under the name Helix plectostoma by William Henry Benson in 1836. It was the first described species ...
Alternate names for Neohelix albolabris are Helix albolabris and Triodopsis albolabris. It is the first land snail to be named ... Neohelix albolabris is a species of air-breathing land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk in the family ... was one of the three most common land snails in New England. He wrote extensively about it in his pioneering work "Land Snails ... N. albolabris is one of the largest native land snails in North America. Its range extends from Maine to Georgia and west to ...
... is a species of air-breathing land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk in the family ... Sphincterochila cariosula cariosula (Michaud, 1833) Sphincterochila cariosula hispanica (Westerlund, 1891) - synonym Helix ...
... is a species of small air-breathing land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk in the family ... Oxychilidae, the glass snails. This species was described under the name Helix camelina from today's Lebanon by Jules René ... After copulation, snails were observed to lay up to a total of 8 eggs, in groups of 1-4 eggs. The size of the eggs was 1.7 mm. ... These snails can be fed in captivity using cucumber, aquarium fish food, and pork meat. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species ...
... is a species of small air-breathing land snail, a terrestrial gastropod mollusk in the family Charopidae. ... This species was described under the name Helix hookeri by an English conchologist Lovell Augustus Reeve in 1854. The specific ... This snail lives on islands in the sub-Antarctic region. Its shell is unique among land snails in that the organic part of the ... Snails of the OS-ecophenotype are characterised by thinner and larger shell sizes compared to snails of the MS-ecophenotype, ...
... is a genus of air-breathing land snails or semi-slugs, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks in the family ... "On Indian Species of Land-Shells belonging to the Genera Helix, Linn., and Nanina, Gray". Annals and Magazine of Natural ... Wronski T. & Hausdorf B. (2010). "Diversity and body-size patterns of land snails in rain forests in Uganda". Journal of ...
It has been referred to as the "burgundy snail", but should not to be confused with Helix pomatia, which is also known by that ... Attenborougharion rubicundus is a species of air-breathing semi-slug, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod molluscs in the family ... Otley H.M. (1999). Survey report for the burgundy snail (Helicarion rubicundus) on the Forestier and Tasman Peninsulas. Report ... Love, Madelaine (2017-02-07). "Native Tasmanian snail named after Sir David Attenborough". The Australian Museum. Retrieved ...
... is a genus of air-breathing land snails, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks in the family Sagdidae. Species in ... Helix ambigua Hyalosagda simplex - synonym: Helix delaminata Hyalosagda subaquila Hyalosagda turbiniformis Hyalosagda. Discover ...
Gastropod species named after Otto Müller: Helix Aspersa Müller. Pictures of snail and of its anatomy.. ...
... or Spanish snail, is a large, edible species of air-breathing land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk in the ... Synonyms include Helix lactea and Iberus alonensis. This species of snail is native to Europe and parts of North Africa. It has ... This snail creates and uses love darts as part of its courtship behaviour, prior to mating. Taxonomy for Species Otala lactea ... family Helicidae the typical snails. Archaeological recovery at the Ancient Roman site of Volubilis, in Morocco, illustrates ...
... may refer to: Helix aspersa, the garden snail, a pulmonate gastropod species Hogna aspersa, a large wolf spider ...
... although it occasionally feeds on snails too. Mite infection among gastropod populations varies greatly. Dense gastropod ... Deroceras agreste Arianta arbustorum Arion ater Arion hortensis Cornu aspersum Helix pomatia Limax maximus Milax budapestensis ... Infected slugs and snails lay fewer eggs than uninfected individuals. Infected gastropods also show decreased winter survival ... Riccardoella limacum or the white snail mite is a member of the Acari (mite) family which is parasitic primarily on snails. ...
Koene, JM (2006) Tales of two snails: sexual selection and sexual conflict in Lymnaea stagnalis and Helix aspersa Integrative ... Chase, R (2007) Gastropod reproductive behavior Scholarpedia, 2(9):4125. *Chung DJD (1986) Initiation of growth of the first ... Landolfaa, MA; Greena, DM and Chase, R (2001) Dart shooting influences paternal reproductive success in the snail Helix aspersa ... Davison, A; Wade, CM; Mordan, PB and Chiba, S (2005) Sex and darts in slugs and snails (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Stylommatophora) ...
... land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk in the family Helicidae, the true snails or typical snails. Eobania ... Eobania vermiculata also known as Helix vermiculata, common name the "chocolate-band snail" is a species of large, air- ... These snails create and use love darts as part of their mating behavior. Around 70 eggs per snail are laid 20 days later. The ... About 20% of the snails in a population survive to lay eggs in the 3rd year, 5% of the snails lay eggs again in the 4th year. ...
... found as normal anatomical feature in the reproductive system of some gastropods including such species as the land snail Helix ... In invertebrates that are normally hermaphroditic, such as most gastropods (snails and slugs) in the clade Eupulmonata, an ... Chase R, Antkowiak T, Geoffroy E, Weatherill D (2004). "Why the ovotestis of Helix aspersa is innervated". Acta Biol. Hung. 55 ...
It has even been found on a shell of the garden snail Helix aspersa which had been accidentally washed out to sea. The shell ... The larva is for some reason drawn to settle on the inner lip of a gastropod shell. At first the larva develops in the same way ... Please see WoRMS A. palliata normally lives on the shell of a sea snail which is housing a hermit crab. The anemone's base is ... It is usually found growing on a gastropod shell inhabited by the hermit crab, Pagurus prideaux. The anemone often completely ...
Helix aspersa (garden snail) occurs in Canberra and is a common garden pest. Another Helix, Helix aperta is also found in ACT. ... Other terrestrial gastropods are Oxychilus draparnaldi (Draparnald's glass snail), Oxychilus alliarius (garlic glass-snail), ... slippery little pillar snail), Diphyoropa saturni (Sydney copper pinwheel snail), Elsothera funerea (Grim Reaper pinwheel snail ... cellar glass-snail), and Trocholaoma ninguicola. Freshwater snails include Physa acuta found at the Point Hut Crossing, and ...
... is a species of air-breathing land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk in the family Helicidae, the ... IUCN Red List, Distribution map of Helix nucula. Encyclopedia of Life - Helix nucula AnimalBase :: Helix nucula. ... the species has been confused with Helix figulina, a related species. This land snail mainly inhabits areas near the south and ... Although its range is mostly limited to areas of Turkey and Greece, in the local language of Crete these snails are sometimes ...
... is a species of large air-breathing land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk in the family ... This is the largest species in the genus Helix. This species occurs in the Lesser Caucasus in southwestern Georgia This snail ... A new species of the genus Helix from the Lesser Caucasus (sw Georgia). Journal of Conchology, volume: 39, part 5, page 483, ...
... is a species of large, air-breathing land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk in the family ... Helicidae, the typical snails. This species is endemic to Greece. Triantis, K. & Vardinoyannis, K. (2013). "Helix godetiana". ...
... is a species of large, edible, air-breathing land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk in the family ... Helicidae, which is the typical snail family. This species is endemic to Portugal. Frias-Martin, A. 1996. Helix obruta. 2006 ...
... is a species of air-breathing land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk in the family Helicidae, ... Helix melanostoma occurs in Algeria, Tunisia and South France Draparnaud J. P. R. (1801). Tableau des mollusques terrestres et ... the typical snails. Colour of the shell greyish or almost white. The inner margin of the mouth brown or violet. Size about 38 ...
Land and freshwater gastropods. *Helix pomatia. *Helix aspersa. *Helix aperta. *Cepaea nemoralis ... "A Snail's Odyssey. Retrieved 11 April 2017.. *^ a b c "Giant Pacific Octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini) Care Manual" (PDF). AZA ( ... "A Snail's Odyssey. Retrieved 13 April 2017.. *^ a b Wassilieff, Maggy; O'Shea, Steve (2 March 2009). "Octopus and squid - ... "A Snail's Odyssey. Retrieved 13 April 2017.. *^ Mäthger, L. M.; Bell, G. R.; Kuzirian, A. M.; Allen, J. J.; Hanlon, R. T. (2012 ...
Surprisingly, approximately 37% of the L. stagnalis sequences only have a tBLASTx hit in the EST library of another snail ... The freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis (L. stagnalis) has served as a successful model for studies in the field of Neuroscience ... Similar to other gastropods such as the marine snail Aplysia californica (A. californica) and the terrestrial snail Helix ... The freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata (B. glabrata) belongs to the family Planorbidae of the pulmonate gastropod mollusk. ...
Land snail, any of the approximately 35,000 species of snails (phylum Mollusca) adapted to life away from water. Most species ... Typically, land snails live on or near the ground, feed on ... European land snail (Helix).. Jacques Six. Learn More in these ... Several common land snails (Helix species) of Europe are table delicacies, especially in France. See gastropod. ... Copulation in the hermaphroditic land snail Helix. is preceded by a curious courtship involving a bizarre tactile stimulation. ...
Make research projects and school reports about snail easy with credible articles from our FREE, online encyclopedia and ... snail The small snail eaten in Europe is Helix pomatia; the giant African snail (which weighs several hundred grams) is ... snail Terrestrial, marine or freshwater gastropod mollusc. It has a large fleshy foot, antennae on its head, and a coiled ... Many snails, including all land snails, are hermaphroditic, but the majority of the marine species have separate sexes. A snail ...
1839 Helix lucorum Linnaeus, 1758 Helix pomatia Linnaeus, 1758 - Burgundy Snail, Roman Snail, Edible Snail Helix philibinensis ... Some carnivorous species of snails, such as the decollate snail and the rosy wolf snail, also prey on Helix snails. Such ... or brown garden snail, and Helix pomatia, the Roman snail, Burgundy snail, or edible snail. H. pomatia and some other species ... Levantine field snail Helix buchi Dubois de Montpéreux, 1839 (largest species of the genus Helix, a synonym is Helix ...
The class is made up of the snails, which have a shell... ... gastropod: Any member of more than 65,000 animal species ... The common snail (Helix aspersa).. macrophile/John D.. Gastropods are among the few groups of animals to have become successful ... The class is made up of the snails, which have a shell into which the animal can generally withdraw, and the slugs-snails whose ... Most snails are much smaller; probably 90 percent of all adult snails are less than one inch in maximum dimension. ...
Unfortunately it will also consume harmless local species of land gastropods, and beneficial annelids. Decollate snails are ... A photo of decollates feeding on Helix (ivy). ... The snail eats plant matter as well, but the damage it causes ... The decollate snail, scientific name Rumina decollata, is a medium-sized predatory land snail, a species of terrestrial ... It is found in Great Britain, as a "hothouse alien" The shell of the decollate snail is long and roughly cone-shaped. It grows ...
The Gastropod shell is composed chemically of about 1.5 per cent. of an organic substance (Conchiolin); of about 95-98 per cent ... Shell Of Edible Snail (Helix Pomatia). WHEN the shell has its apex directed upwards, and its aperture downwards and towards the ... There is no operculum in the Pulmonata, the order of Gastropoda to which the Snails and Slugs belong. When the snail hibernates ... not wholly as it is in the Garden Snail, Helix aspersa. The smooth rounded off edge of the peristome shows the animal to have ...
The tips of the eyestalks of three species of strombid gastropods were amputated and the structure of the fully developed eye ... Eakin, R.M., Ferlatte, M.M.: Studies of eye regeneration in a snail, Helix aspersa. J. exp. Zool. 184, 81-96 (1973)Google ... Eakin, R.M., Brandenburger, J.L.: Degeneration in severed optic nerve of a pulmonate snail, Helix aspersa. J. Cell Biol. 47, ... Eakin, R.M., Brandenburger, J.L.: Differentiation in the eye of a pulmonate snail, Helix aspersa. J. Ultrastruct. Res. 18, 391- ...
Snail definition, any mollusk of the class Gastropoda, having a spirally coiled shell and a ventral muscular foot on which it ... any of numerous terrestrial or freshwater gastropod molluscs with a spirally coiled shell, esp any of the family Helicidae, ... such as Helix aspersa (garden snail) 2. any other gastropod with a spirally coiled shell, such as a whelk ... Word Origin and History for snail Expand. n. Old English snægl, from Proto-Germanic *snagila (cf. Old Saxon snegil, Old Norse ...
4 papers: Notes on some undescribed Californian Helices (18 p., 3 pls); New Helicoid snails from the Mohave Desert V. The genus ... Revision of the Snail genus Austropyrgus (Gastropoda: Hydrobiidae). A morphostatic radiation of freshwater Gastropods in ... North American Paleozoic land Snails, With a summary of other Paleozoic nonmarine Snails. 42 p., 6 figs, 10 pls, 4to, wrps; ... Snails. 31 p., 34 text figs, paperbound; ML16608 € 6 Babor, J.F., 1898. Ueber Aspidoporus limax / Ueber die von Dr. Rebel im ...
The oxidative stress in the digestive gland of the land snail Helix aspersa was considered as a bioindicator for atmospheric ... An integrated approach to study the biomarker responses in marine gastropod Nerita chamaeleon environmentally exposed to ... The oxidative stress in the digestive gland of the land snail Helix aspersa was considered as a bioindicator for atmospheric ... Oxidative stress on land snail Helix aspersa as a sentinel organism for ecotoxicological effects of urban pollution with heavy ...
... helix aspersa) is one of the best-known species of snails in the world. As all terrestrial snails is a gastropod mollusk. It is ... The Helix aspersa was originally found in the British islands, western Europe and the Mediterraneo, reaching some regions of ...
The distribution of FMRFamide-like material in the gastropod mollusc, Helix aspersa, was studied by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and ... Localization of FMRFamide-like peptides in the snail Helix aspersa Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a message from ... We conclude that Helix aspersa contains at least two FMRFamide-like peptides, FMRFamide and pQDPFLRFamide. These peptides ...
... is involved in acquisition of food-attraction conditioning in the snail Helix pomatia. Neurosci. Lett. 206, 29-32. ... Huang, S., Kerschbaum, H. H. and Hermann, A. (1998). Nitric-oxide mediated cGMP synthesis in Helix neural ganglia. Brain Res. ... Newcomb, J. M., Goy, M., Turner, B. E. and Watson III, W. H. (2001). Modulation of the swim motor program in the gastropod ... Modulation of swimming in the gastropod Melibe leonina by nitric oxide Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a message from ...
6.2 snails: terrestrial gastropods of the species Helix pomatia Linné, Helix aspersa Muller, Helix lucorum and species of the ... SECTION XII: SNAILS. 1. Snails may only be killed using humane methods in an establishment approved for that purpose. Snails ... 3. Snails must not contain, in their edible parts, contaminants such as heavy metals or organo-halogen substances at such a ... 6. FROGS LEGS AND SNAILS. 6.1 frogs legs: posterior part of the body divided by a transverse cut behind the front limbs, ...
... gastropod Land Snail of Oligocene age. The fossil is set in a light coloured matrix from the Dallet area in Puy-de-Dome, ... Opal-ct (Lussatite) Replacing "Helix Ramondi" Land Snail.. $1,800.00 €1,662 £1,530.00 approx. This specimen is priced in US ... A single beautifully replaced white satiny lustered rare gastropod Land Snail of Oligocene age. The fossil is set in a light ... The Opal-CT replaced gastropod measures to 2cm diameter a fine specimen for the Mineral and Fossil collector. ...
... snails live around five to seven years and Helix (genus) snails live about two to three years. Aquatic Apple Snails live only a ... Gastropods are typically placed into two subclasses: Orthogastropoda ("true snails") and Eogastropoda ("true limpets") (Ponder ... Snails range greatly in size. The largest land snail is the Giant African Snail or Ghana Tiger Snail (Achatina achatina; Family ... consuming several species such as Helix aspersa, Helix punctata, Helix pisana, and Helix alonensis among others. Small to ...
Helix Snails 72 count, Espelette Pepper Powder PDO and more at Gourmet-Food.com ... Helix is a genus of large air-breathing land snails, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod molluscs. This genus is native to Europe ... Helix is the type genus of the family Helicidae.The best-known species include... read more ...
Kaliella is a genus of air-breathing land snails or semi-slugs, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks in the family ... "On Indian Species of Land-Shells belonging to the Genera Helix, Linn., and Nanina, Gray". Annals and Magazine of Natural ... Wronski T. & Hausdorf B. (2010). "Diversity and body-size patterns of land snails in rain forests in Uganda". Journal of ...
Snail definition, any mollusk of the class Gastropoda, having a spirally coiled shell and a ventral muscular foot on which it ... any of numerous terrestrial or freshwater gastropod molluscs with a spirally coiled shell, esp any of the family Helicidae, ... such as Helix aspersa (garden snail). any other gastropod with a spirally coiled shell, such as a whelk ... snail. Contemporary Examples. of snail. *. The Daily Pic: James Nares slows Manhattans rat race to a snails pace. ...
Noun 1. Helix pomatia - one of the chief edible snails edible snail snail - freshwater or marine or terrestrial gastropod ... Helix pomatia synonyms, Helix pomatia pronunciation, Helix pomatia translation, English dictionary definition of Helix pomatia ... Helix pomatia - one of the chief edible snails edible snail. snail - freshwater or marine or terrestrial gastropod mollusk ... genus Helix, Helix - type genus of the family Helicidae. escargot, snail - edible terrestrial snail usually served in the shell ...
Helix aspersa (garden snail) occurs in Canberra and is a common garden pest. Another Helix, Helix aperta is also found in ACT. ... Other terrestrial gastropods are Oxychilus draparnaldi (Draparnalds glass snail), Oxychilus alliarius (garlic glass-snail), ... slippery little pillar snail), Diphyoropa saturni (Sydney copper pinwheel snail), Elsothera funerea (Grim Reaper pinwheel snail ... cellar glass-snail), and Trocholaoma ninguicola. Freshwater snails include Physa acuta found at the Point Hut Crossing, and ...
Koene, JM (2006) Tales of two snails: sexual selection and sexual conflict in Lymnaea stagnalis and Helix aspersa Integrative ... Chase, R (2007) Gastropod reproductive behavior Scholarpedia, 2(9):4125. *Chung DJD (1986) Initiation of growth of the first ... Landolfaa, MA; Greena, DM and Chase, R (2001) Dart shooting influences paternal reproductive success in the snail Helix aspersa ... Davison, A; Wade, CM; Mordan, PB and Chiba, S (2005) Sex and darts in slugs and snails (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Stylommatophora) ...
... edible snail or escargot, is a species of large, edible, air-breathing land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk in ... Stock video footage Helix pomatia also Roman snail, Burgundy snail, ... Description: Helix pomatia also Roman snail, Burgundy snail, edible snail or escargot, is a species of large, edible, air- ... breathing land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk in the family Helicidae. ...
The author gives a rich summary of the results of a formal proving of Helix tosta including the major themes. Submitted by the ... Helix pomatia is a large (the largest snail in Europe), edible, air breathing, land snail (terrestrial, pulmonate, gastropod, ... Helix tosta refers to toasted snail. The species that is eaten is Helix pomatia. It is most commonly known as the Roman Snail, ... The snail prefers a chalky substrate in warm low lying country. Snails need damp, not wet, environments. Although snails need ...
  • The number of snail sections positive for A. abstrusus was higher than those for T. brevior.Results of this study indicate that A. abstrusus and T. brevior infective L3 are shed in the mucus of H. aspersa or in water where infected gastropods had died submerged.Considering that snails may act as intermediate hosts for other metastrongyloid species, the environmental contamination by mucus-released larvae is discussed in a broader context. (nih.gov)
  • However, the ingestion of fresh vegetables contaminated by snail mucus and/or water has also been proposed as a source of the infection for some zoonotic metastrongyloids (e.g. (nih.gov)
  • The aim of this study was to assess the potential of alternative transmission pathways for A. abstrusus and T. brevior L3 via the mucus of infected Helix aspersa snails and the water where gastropods died. (nih.gov)
  • Snails were subjected to different mechanical and chemical stimuli throughout 20 days in order to elicit the production of mucus. (nih.gov)
  • L3 were detected in the snail mucus (i.e., 37 A. abstrusus and 19 T. brevior) and in the sediment of submerged specimens (172 A. abstrusus and 39 T. brevior). (nih.gov)
  • Results of this study indicate that A. abstrusus and T. brevior infective L3 are shed in the mucus of H. aspersa or in water where infected gastropods had died submerged. (nih.gov)
  • Considering that snails may act as intermediate hosts for other metastrongyloid species, the environmental contamination by mucus-released larvae is discussed in a broader context. (nih.gov)
  • A) and A. abstrusus (B) detected in the mucus of H. aspersa snails at 25 days post-infection (scale bar = 50μm). (nih.gov)
  • This mucus is the reason why snails leave a wet trail of slime when they move around. (dudleyzoo.org.uk)
  • Denny MW (1980) The role of gastropod pedal mucus in locomotion. (springer.com)
  • Snail mucus, scientifically named Helix Aspersa Müller Glycoconjugates, is the gooey excretion from glands on the mollusk's body. (punicamakeup.com)
  • Over several-year waiting on the wings, snail mucus is eventually caught on to the global cosmetic market. (punicamakeup.com)
  • There are two types of Snail mucus. (punicamakeup.com)
  • This has more than merely aesthetic consequences for the individual snails - because snail anatomy is asymmetrical, these differences in orientation are also reflected in the position of the genital openings. (fieldofscience.com)
  • The anatomy , behavior, feeding, and reproductive adaptations of gastropods vary significantly from one clade or group to another. (wikiplanet.click)
  • The farm sells the majority of the snails live - before the inevitable deadly toss into boiling water - but also offers canned meat, pearly white snail's egg caviar and, not for the faint-hearted, slime facial cream. (taipeitimes.com)
  • Courtship begins with the snails touching heads and posterior antennae for tens of seconds, then withdrawing and circling to find each other again, often consuming each other's slime trails, or alternatively breaking courtship. (blogspot.com)
  • Whether you come to surprise or not, snail slime has been hitting the U.S. cosmetic industry as a potent, innovative component since 2011. (punicamakeup.com)
  • Decades ago, ancestors prescribed snail slime for medical conditions in Ancient Greece. (punicamakeup.com)
  • It seems that people have been aware of the benefits of snail slime for centuries. (punicamakeup.com)
  • By chance, he observed that the radiation aroused the snails to secrete goo, which is different from their usual slime for moving. (punicamakeup.com)
  • The South Korean beauty industry has historically been innovative, so they adopted snail slime as an important component in many of their beauty products - including the ones they brought to the United States. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The benefits of snail slime may have been common knowledge in ancient times, but its rediscovery dates back to the 1980s. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Snail slime and oil pulling-are they really effective? (thefreedictionary.com)
  • invertebrate notes snail, octopus. (prv.pl)
  • The cat lungworm has an indirect life-cycle that requires invertebrate gastropods as an intermediate host within which the first-stage larvae (L1s) mature to the infective third-stage larvae (L3s) [ 12 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • H. aspersa snails stab a calcite spine, known as a "love dart", at their partner. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following the artificial digestion of H. aspersa snails, a mean number of 127.8 A. abstrusus and 60.3 T. brevior larvae were recovered. (nih.gov)
  • Following the artificial digestion, all H. aspersa snails scored positive for metastrongyloid larvae. (nih.gov)
  • Knowledge of monoaminergic distribution in this snail´s foot is important for understanding the pharmacological control of reflexive responses and locomotive behavior. (scielo.br)
  • Though you can eat snails from your yard, be aware that even though you may not use snail/slug bait, poison laid out by your neighbor may infect seemingly healthy snails in your yard - ingesting poisoned snails can kill you! (localwiki.org)
  • A good snail and slug management program relies on a combination of methods: eliminating shelters, creating unfavorable conditions, destroying existing colonies. (localwiki.org)
  • Other gastropods that like being in gardens and under pots are two common slugs: the Common Slug, Bugħarwien tal-Bjar (Limacus flavus), and the Black Wedged Slug, Bugħarwien Iswed (Milax nigricans). (fortpestcontrol.com)
  • Like other gastropods, their body plan involves a torsion or twisting during larval development whereby the visceral mass twists 180 degrees in relation to the head, bringing the mantle cavity to the anterior of the animal. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Gastropods have a fossil record that extends back over 500 million years. (britannica.com)
  • The Opal-CT replaced gastropod measures to 2cm diameter a fine specimen for the Mineral and Fossil collector. (crystalclassics.co.uk)
  • As of 2017, there are 721 families of gastropods known, of which 245 are extinct and appear only in the fossil record and 476 occur in the Recent with or without a fossil record. (wikiplanet.click)
  • Annelida] Giant snail fossil created by a capitellid? (bio.net)
  • Proceedings of the Geologists Association 122(3): 492-500 When first described in 1922, Dinocochlea ingens, an Early Cretaceous (Valanginian) fossil from the Wadhurst Clay Formation (Wealden) of Hastings in Sussex, England, was regarded as the steinkern of a huge gastropod over 2 m in length and claimed to be the largest gastropod ever to have lived. (bio.net)
  • Having each coil lying outside the other was a great disadvantage as it was not very compact nor was it easy to carry around as the diameter could become very great (some fossil gastropods have been found with shells measuring 8 feet (2.5m! (manandmollusc.net)
  • Most snails have spiral shells on their backs into which they can pull back for protection. (prv.pl)
  • Effects of Dietary Pb and Cd and Their Combination on Glutathion-S-Transferase and Catalase Enzyme Activities in Digestive Gland and Foot of the Green Garden Snail, Cantareus apertus (Born, 1778). (semanticscholar.org)
  • Other smaller but common species are the Red-banded Snail, Għakrux Mara (Eobiana vermiculata), the Goat Snail, Mogħża (Helix apertus) and the endemic Maltese Marmorana, Bebbuxu tal-Bejt (Marmorana melitensis). (fortpestcontrol.com)
  • Thus, the locomotor apparatus is fundamentally the same in both snails and the difference between crawling reflects an adaptation to a habitat. (springer.com)
  • For comparison, modern snail samples were collected in known environmental conditions to model snail habitat preferences in the general locations of the archaeological sites. (ufl.edu)
  • Based on the results of the modern snail collections and observed habitat tendencies, the snails identified from the samples at Stallings Island, Ed Marshall, and Mims Point were utilized to infer past habitats and environmental impacts. (ufl.edu)
  • The results indicated the site was mainly wooded until a disturbance event occurred, which caused a shift in the snail taxa to being dominated by more snails in the taxa with open habitat tendencies. (ufl.edu)
  • Feline aelurostrongylosis, caused by the metastrongyloid nematode Aelurostrongylus abstrusus , is an important gastropod-borne parasitic lung disease in cats. (biomedcentral.com)