Gastrointestinal Diseases: Diseases in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Gastroenterology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of the physiology and diseases of the digestive system and related structures (esophagus, liver, gallbladder, and pancreas).Enterocolitis, Necrotizing: ENTEROCOLITIS with extensive ulceration (ULCER) and NECROSIS. It is observed primarily in LOW BIRTH WEIGHT INFANT.Gastrointestinal Tract: Generally refers to the digestive structures stretching from the MOUTH to ANUS, but does not include the accessory glandular organs (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Clostridium perfringens: The most common etiologic agent of GAS GANGRENE. It is differentiable into several distinct types based on the distribution of twelve different toxins.Dyspepsia: Impaired digestion, especially after eating.Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A disorder with chronic or recurrent colonic symptoms without a clearcut etiology. This condition is characterized by chronic or recurrent ABDOMINAL PAIN, bloating, MUCUS in FECES, and an erratic disturbance of DEFECATION.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Probiotics: Live microbial DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS which beneficially affect the host animal by improving its intestinal microbial balance. Antibiotics and other related compounds are not included in this definition. In humans, lactobacilli are commonly used as probiotics, either as single species or in mixed culture with other bacteria. Other genera that have been used are bifidobacteria and streptococci. (J. Nutr. 1995;125:1401-12)San MarinoHelicobacter Infections: Infections with organisms of the genus HELICOBACTER, particularly, in humans, HELICOBACTER PYLORI. The clinical manifestations are focused in the stomach, usually the gastric mucosa and antrum, and the upper duodenum. This infection plays a major role in the pathogenesis of type B gastritis and peptic ulcer disease.Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.Peptic Ulcer: Ulcer that occurs in the regions of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT which come into contact with GASTRIC JUICE containing PEPSIN and GASTRIC ACID. It occurs when there are defects in the MUCOSA barrier. The common forms of peptic ulcers are associated with HELICOBACTER PYLORI and the consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).Enterocolitis: Inflammation of the MUCOSA of both the SMALL INTESTINE and the LARGE INTESTINE. Etiology includes ISCHEMIA, infections, allergic, and immune responses.Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Chronic, non-specific inflammation of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT. Etiology may be genetic or environmental. This term includes CROHN DISEASE and ULCERATIVE COLITIS.Enteritis: Inflammation of any segment of the SMALL INTESTINE.Helicobacter pylori: A spiral bacterium active as a human gastric pathogen. It is a gram-negative, urease-positive, curved or slightly spiral organism initially isolated in 1982 from patients with lesions of gastritis or peptic ulcers in Western Australia. Helicobacter pylori was originally classified in the genus CAMPYLOBACTER, but RNA sequencing, cellular fatty acid profiles, growth patterns, and other taxonomic characteristics indicate that the micro-organism should be included in the genus HELICOBACTER. It has been officially transferred to Helicobacter gen. nov. (see Int J Syst Bacteriol 1989 Oct;39(4):297-405).Crohn Disease: A chronic transmural inflammation that may involve any part of the DIGESTIVE TRACT from MOUTH to ANUS, mostly found in the ILEUM, the CECUM, and the COLON. In Crohn disease, the inflammation, extending through the intestinal wall from the MUCOSA to the serosa, is characteristically asymmetric and segmental. Epithelioid GRANULOMAS may be seen in some patients.Colonic Diseases, Functional: Chronic or recurrent colonic disorders without an identifiable structural or biochemical explanation. The widely recognized IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME falls into this category.Gastroenteritis: INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.Gastrointestinal Agents: Drugs used for their effects on the gastrointestinal system, as to control gastric acidity, regulate gastrointestinal motility and water flow, and improve digestion.Calculi: An abnormal concretion occurring mostly in the urinary and biliary tracts, usually composed of mineral salts. Also called stones.Intestinal Diseases: Pathological processes in any segment of the INTESTINE from DUODENUM to RECTUM.Gastritis: Inflammation of the GASTRIC MUCOSA, a lesion observed in a number of unrelated disorders.Celiac Disease: A malabsorption syndrome that is precipitated by the ingestion of foods containing GLUTEN, such as wheat, rye, and barley. It is characterized by INFLAMMATION of the SMALL INTESTINE, loss of MICROVILLI structure, failed INTESTINAL ABSORPTION, and MALNUTRITION.Clostridium Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus CLOSTRIDIUM.Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency: A malabsorption condition resulting from greater than 10% reduction in the secretion of pancreatic digestive enzymes (LIPASE; PROTEASES; and AMYLASE) by the EXOCRINE PANCREAS into the DUODENUM. This condition is often associated with CYSTIC FIBROSIS and with chronic PANCREATITIS.Stomach Diseases: Pathological processes involving the STOMACH.Intestinal Mucosa: Lining of the INTESTINES, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. In the SMALL INTESTINE, the mucosa is characterized by a series of folds and abundance of absorptive cells (ENTEROCYTES) with MICROVILLI.Intubation, Gastrointestinal: The insertion of a tube into the stomach, intestines, or other portion of the gastrointestinal tract to allow for the passage of food products, etc.Gastrointestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, from the MOUTH to the ANAL CANAL.Foodborne Diseases: Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.Duodenal Ulcer: A PEPTIC ULCER located in the DUODENUM.Duodenal Diseases: Pathological conditions in the DUODENUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).Colitis, Ulcerative: Inflammation of the COLON that is predominantly confined to the MUCOSA. Its major symptoms include DIARRHEA, rectal BLEEDING, the passage of MUCUS, and ABDOMINAL PAIN.Intestines: The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.Stomach Ulcer: Ulceration of the GASTRIC MUCOSA due to contact with GASTRIC JUICE. It is often associated with HELICOBACTER PYLORI infection or consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).Pancreatic Diseases: Pathological processes of the PANCREAS.Gastrointestinal Motility: The motor activity of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Gastric Mucosa: Lining of the STOMACH, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. The surface cells produce MUCUS that protects the stomach from attack by digestive acid and enzymes. When the epithelium invaginates into the LAMINA PROPRIA at various region of the stomach (CARDIA; GASTRIC FUNDUS; and PYLORUS), different tubular gastric glands are formed. These glands consist of cells that secrete mucus, enzymes, HYDROCHLORIC ACID, or hormones.Campylobacter jejuni: A species of bacteria that resemble small tightly coiled spirals. Its organisms are known to cause abortion in sheep and fever and enteritis in man and may be associated with enteric diseases of calves, lambs, and other animals.Gastric Juice: The liquid secretion of the stomach mucosa consisting of hydrochloric acid (GASTRIC ACID); PEPSINOGENS; INTRINSIC FACTOR; GASTRIN; MUCUS; and the bicarbonate ion (BICARBONATES). (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p651)Digestive System: A group of organs stretching from the MOUTH to the ANUS, serving to breakdown foods, assimilate nutrients, and eliminate waste. In humans, the digestive system includes the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT and the accessory glands (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Enterotoxins: Substances that are toxic to the intestinal tract causing vomiting, diarrhea, etc.; most common enterotoxins are produced by bacteria.Clostridium difficile: A common inhabitant of the colon flora in human infants and sometimes in adults. It produces a toxin that causes pseudomembranous enterocolitis (ENTEROCOLITIS, PSEUDOMEMBRANOUS) in patients receiving antibiotic therapy.Giardiasis: An infection of the SMALL INTESTINE caused by the flagellated protozoan GIARDIA LAMBLIA. It is spread via contaminated food and water and by direct person-to-person contact.Eosinophilia: Abnormal increase of EOSINOPHILS in the blood, tissues or organs.Gastroesophageal Reflux: Retrograde flow of gastric juice (GASTRIC ACID) and/or duodenal contents (BILE ACIDS; PANCREATIC JUICE) into the distal ESOPHAGUS, commonly due to incompetence of the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER.Campylobacter Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus CAMPYLOBACTER.Stomach Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.Stomach: An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Duodenum: The shortest and widest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE adjacent to the PYLORUS of the STOMACH. It is named for having the length equal to about the width of 12 fingers.Liver Diseases: Pathological processes of the LIVER.Jejunum: The middle portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between DUODENUM and ILEUM. It represents about 2/5 of the remaining portion of the small intestine below duodenum.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Bacterial Toxins: Toxic substances formed in or elaborated by bacteria; they are usually proteins with high molecular weight and antigenicity; some are used as antibiotics and some to skin test for the presence of or susceptibility to certain diseases.Colon: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the RECTUM. It includes the ASCENDING COLON; the TRANSVERSE COLON; the DESCENDING COLON; and the SIGMOID COLON.Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Cytomegalovirus Infections: Infection with CYTOMEGALOVIRUS, characterized by enlarged cells bearing intranuclear inclusions. Infection may be in almost any organ, but the salivary glands are the most common site in children, as are the lungs in adults.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Virulence Factors: Those components of an organism that determine its capacity to cause disease but are not required for its viability per se. Two classes have been characterized: TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL and surface adhesion molecules that effect the ability of the microorganism to invade and colonize a host. (From Davis et al., Microbiology, 4th ed. p486)Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Intestine, Small: The portion of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT between the PYLORUS of the STOMACH and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE. It is divisible into three portions: the DUODENUM, the JEJUNUM, and the ILEUM.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Antigens, Bacterial: Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Intestinal Absorption: Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.

Dose-loading with hydroxychloroquine improves the rate of response in early, active rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized, double-blind six-week trial with eighteen-week extension. (1/2511)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the usefulness of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) dose-loading to increase the percentage of responders or rate of response in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Two hundred twelve patients with early RA (mean duration 1.5 years) were enrolled in a 24-week trial. Patients were stabilized with 1,000 mg naproxen/day and then began a 6-week, double-blind trial comparing treatment with HCQ at 400 mg/day (n = 71), 800 mg/day (n = 71), and 1,200 mg/day (n = 66), followed by 18 weeks of open-label HCQ treatment at 400 mg/day. RESULTS: All patients had mild, active disease at the time of initiation of HCQ treatment (31-43% rheumatoid factor positive; no previous disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs; mean swollen joint count 8.6-10.4). Based on the Paulus criteria, response during the 6-week double-blind portion of the study was 47.97%, 57.7%, and 63.6% in the 400 mg/day, 800 mg/day, and 1,200 mg/day groups, respectively (P = 0.052). Discontinuations for adverse events were dose related (3 in the 400 mg/day group, 5 in the 800 mg/day group, 6 in the 1,200 mg/day group). Most involved the gastrointestinal (GI) system, with the background naproxen treatment possibly contributing. Ocular abnormalities occurred in 17 of 212 patients (8%) but were not dose related. CONCLUSION: Dose-loading with HCQ increased the degree of response at 6 weeks in this group of patients with early, predominantly seronegative RA. Adverse GI events were dose related, while adverse ocular events were not.  (+info)

Phase I trial of docetaxel with estramustine in androgen-independent prostate cancer. (2/2511)

PURPOSE: To evaluate the toxicity, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of docetaxel when combined with oral estramustine and dexamethasone in a phase I study in patients with progressive metastatic androgen-independent prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-four men were stratified into minimally pretreated (MPT) and extensively pretreated (EPT) groups. Estramustine 280 mg PO tid was administered 1 hour before or 2 hours after meals on days 1 through 5, with escalated doses of docetaxel from 40 to 80 mg/m2 on day 2. Treatment was repeated every 21 days. RESULTS: Thirty-four patients were assessable for toxicity and 33 for response. In the MPT patients, dose-limiting myelosuppression was reached at 80 mg/m2, with six patients experiencing grade 3/4 granulocytopenia. In EPT patients, escalation above 70 mg/m2 was not attempted. Fourteen MPT (70%) and six EPT (50%) patients had a > or = 50% decline in serum PSA on two consecutive measurements taken at least 2 weeks apart. The overall 50% PSA response rate was 63% (95% confidence interval [CI], 28% to 81%). Of the 18 patients with bidimensionally measurable disease, five (28%; 95% CI, 11% to 54%) achieved a partial response. At the time of entry onto the study, 15 patients required narcotic analgesics for bone pain; after treatment, eight (53%) discontinued their pain medications. The area under the curve for docetaxel increased linearly from 40 to 70 mg/m2. At 80 mg/m2, the measured area under the curve was 8.37 (standard deviation, 0.724), which was significantly higher than the previously reported values. CONCLUSION: The recommended phase II dose of docetaxel combined with estramustine is 70 mg/m2 in MPT patients and 60 mg/m2 in EPT patients. This combination is active in men with androgen-independent prostate cancer.  (+info)

Outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness of unknown etiology associated with eating burritos--United States, October 1997-October 1998. (3/2511)

From October 1997 through October 1998, 16 outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness associated with eating burritos occurred in Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, North Dakota, and Pennsylvania. All but one outbreak occurred in schools, and most of the approximately 1700 persons affected were children. This report summarizes investigations of two of these outbreaks and describes the collaborative efforts of CDC, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to identify the etiologic agent(s); these outbreaks may have been caused by an undetected toxin or a new agent not previously associated with illness.  (+info)

Prescription of acid-suppressing drugs in relation to endoscopic diagnosis: a record-linkage study. (4/2511)

BACKGROUND: Although widely used, few data are available on the appropriateness of prescribing of acid-suppressing drugs (ASDs), despite guidelines on the investigation and treatment of dyspeptic patients. METHODS: We created a database of 62 000 endoscopy examinations and record-linked these to a prescribing database. Endoscopic diagnoses were classified into peptic, nonpeptic and others. The H2-antagonists, omeprazole and misoprostol, were studied. RESULTS: 35 000 patients had one or more endoscopies during 1978-93; two-thirds were over 45 years of age at first endoscopy. A quarter of all patients who had been endoscoped had consistently normal examinations. Peptic oesophageal pathology was the commonest positive finding. A quarter of those prescribed ASDs between 1989 and 1993 had been endoscoped between 1978 and 1993. In those with a peptic diagnosis prescribed any ASD, the pathologies found were: oesophageal (42.9%), duodenal (36.3%) and gastro-pyloric (21.3%). Patients prescribed omeprazole were more likely to have undergone endoscopy than those prescribed other ASDs, and they were also more likely to have peptic oesophageal pathology. Long-term prescribing (>56 days per year) occurred in two-thirds of patients prescribed ASDs and 40% had at least one endoscopy. In those prescribed short-term ASDs, 20% had undergone at least one endoscopy. Peptic and nonpeptic endoscopic pathology was associated with increased ASD prescribing, but a normal endoscopy did not reduce prescribing. CONCLUSION: ASD prescribing appeared to be mainly symptom-driven. Positive endoscopic findings increased the prescribing of ASDs, but normal findings did not reduce it.  (+info)

Childcare needs of female street vendors in Mexico City. (5/2511)

This article reports on strategies developed by female street vendors (vendedoras ambulantes) in Mexico City to ensure the care of their young children in the absence of a specific and operational government policy to fulfil this need. The information concerning child care and health was gathered by a survey of 426 street traders selected by multi-stage random cluster sampling in four of the administrative districts (delegaciones politicas) of Mexico City during 1990. It was found that, as mothers of young children, street vendors most frequently looked after their children personally on the street or left them with other members of the family. Related factors were availability of alternative child care providers in the family, the age of the children and working conditions of the mother. Children who remained on the streets with their mothers suffered more frequently from gastro-intestinal diseases and accidents than the national average. The incidence of acute respiratory diseases, however, was similar in the cases of maternal care in the street and care by family members in another environment. Existing public health measures show a greater concern for the health of food consumers than that of workers in this area. Current public policy seeks to regulate street vending activities and to concentrate traders in ad hoc areas and facilities. Our research results document the need for actions that can contribute to an improvement in the care and health conditions of these young children.  (+info)

Gastrointestinal illness in managed care: healthcare utilization and costs. (6/2511)

Identification of inefficiencies is a first step to improving the quality of gastrointestinal (GI) care at the most reasonable cost. This analysis used administrative data to examine the healthcare utilization and associated costs of the management of GI illnesses in a 2.5 million-member private managed care plan containing many benefit designs. An overall incidence of 10% was found for GI conditions, with a preponderance in adults (patients older than 40 years) and women. The most frequently occurring conditions were abdominal pain, nonulcer peptic diseases, lower GI tract diseases, and other GI tract problems. These conditions, along with gallbladder/biliary tract disease, were also the most costly. Claims submitted for care during GI episodes averaged $17 per member per month. Increasing severity of condition was associated with substantial increases in utilization and costs (except for medication use). For most GI conditions, approximately 40% of charges were for professional services (procedures, tests, and visits) and 40% of charges were for facility admissions. The prescription utilization analysis indicated areas where utilization patterns may not match accepted guidelines, such as the low use of anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy, the possible concomitant use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with upper GI diseases, and the use of narcotics in treating patients with lower GI disease and abdominal pain. Also, there was no clear relationship between medication utilization and disease severity. Thus, this analysis indicated that GI disease is a significant economic burden to managed care, and identified usage patterns that potentially could be modified to improve quality of care.  (+info)

Early detection by ultrasound scan of severe post-chemotherapy gut complications in patients with acute leukemia. (7/2511)

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Acute leukemia patients may develop life-threatening gut complications after intensive chemotherapy. We evaluated the role of abdominal and pelvic ultrasound (US) examination in early detection of these complications. DESIGN AND METHODS: A cohort of twenty adult acute leukemia patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy for remission induction entered the study. All chemotherapy regimens included cytarabine by continuous i.v. infusion for several days. RESULTS: Three patients had severe gut complications: 2 cases of enterocolitis and 1 case of gall bladder overdistension in the absence of calculi. In all cases the abnormality was documented by US examination: US scan showed thickening of the intestinal wall (two cases), and gall bladder overdistension with biliary sludge (one case). Immediate medical care included bowel rest, a broad-spectrum antibiotic, antimycotic treatment, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. All patients recovered from the complication. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: We believe that the favorable outcome obtained in our small series can be attributed to early diagnosis followed by appropriate treatment. Early recognition by US and immediate medical management can lead to complete recovery of severe intestinal complications in patients with acute leukemia undergoing intensive chemotherapy.  (+info)

Detection of cytomegalovirus in upper gastrointestinal biopsies from heart transplant recipients: comparison of light microscopy, immunocytochemistry, in situ hybridisation, and nested PCR. (8/2511)

AIM: To establish the diagnostic value of in situ hybridisation and the nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in detecting clinically relevant cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in upper gastrointestinal biopsies from heart transplant patients. METHODS: Test sensitivity and specificity for detection of CMV early gene RNA by in situ hybridisation and CMV intermediate early gene by PCR were established and then compared with haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and immunocytochemical detection of CMV in order to establish the best pathological diagnostic approach. All investigations were carried out on formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue. RESULTS: Nested PCR had the highest test sensitivity, followed by in situ hybridisation and immunocytochemistry with the same sensitivity; H&E had the lowest. H&E and immunocytochemistry were the most specific but both had a significant false negative rate which was less of a problem with PCR. However, PCR gave no other diagnostic information, and in situ hybridisation was no better than immunocytochemistry. Both in situ hybridisation and PCR were technically complex and more expensive. CONCLUSIONS: H&E and immunocytochemistry represent the best initial screen for CMV and other diseases in upper gastrointestinal biopsies from heart transplant patients. If H&E and immunocytochemistry were negative, nested PCR could significantly increase the diagnostic yield of clinically relevant CMV infection. In situ hybridisation appeared to have no advantages and some drawbacks compared with immunocytochemistry and PCR.  (+info)

  • Turner and colleagues note that targeting MLCK1 to prevent barrier loss and restore function could also be useful in other diseases where the epithelial barrier is compromised, including celiac disease, atopic dermatitis, pulmonary infection and acute respiratory distress syndrome, multiple sclerosis, and graft versus host disease (GVHD). (healthcanal.com)
  • This therapeutic approach may help break the cycle of inflammation that drives so many chronic diseases. (healthcanal.com)
  • 1 Dysfunction in this system can wreak havoc throughout the body, and has been linked to allergies, 2 arthritis, 3 autoimmune disease, 4 chronic fatigue, 5 and more. (ifm.org)
  • 7 How can practitioners incorporate new research on barrier integrity, digestion, absorption, gut flora, and nutritional insufficiencies into the diagnosis and management of patients with digestive dysfunction and chronic diseases? (ifm.org)
  • 10 Targeted nutrition that considers individual genetic make-up, epigenetics, and microbiota composition may represent a platform for successful prevention and disease control. (ifm.org)
  • Antioxidants like vitamin C or polyphenols (e.g., curcumin, quercetin, green tea polyphenols) may have beneficial effects to improve non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). (ifm.org)
  • In this regard it is noted that, at the present time, there is an ever greater prevalence of diseases of those organs and systems that perform barrier functions and participate in the preservation of the cleanliness of the organism's internal environment - organs of the respiratory, digestive, excretory, lymphatic, and immune systems, as well as the liver and skin. (ringingcedarsofrussia.org)
  • This microscope image provided by the Van Andel Research Institute in October 2018 shows an abnormal protein that is a hallmark of Parkinson's disease clumped inside the appendix. (nationalpost.com)
  • Objective: One common feature among all these diseases is the dysentery and alteration of gut microbiota composition (gut dysbiosis). (eurekaselect.com)
  • Apart from conventional therapies such as antibiotics and ORS supplementation, gut microbiota modulation with probiotic supplementation has emerged as a successful and healthy alternative in mitigating GI diseases. (eurekaselect.com)
  • Conclusion: Several reports and clinical trials point out to the beneficial effects of probiotics in modulating the gut microbiota and improving the side effects of gastrointestinal diseases. (eurekaselect.com)
  • The book focuses on specific gastrointestinal diseases, critical illness, diabetes, and obesity and includes an extensive section on enteral and parenteral nutrition support. (annals.org)
  • Chagas was the only researcher so far to completely describe a new infectious disease: its pathogen, vector (Triatominae), host, clinical manifestations, and epidemiology. (springer.com)
  • A discussion of the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of other CMV-related diseases in HIV-infected patients is found elsewhere. (uptodate.com)
  • From targeted assays for C. difficile to broad disease state panels covering community-acquired and persistent diarrhea pathogens, clinical labs need flexibility and scalability in their GI assays to deliver optimal results to physicians for patient care, antimicrobial stewardship, and infection control. (luminexcorp.com)
  • Live biotherapeutics and FMT's could be suitable and successful alternatives to conventional therapies in mitigating the gastrointestinal pathogens. (eurekaselect.com)
  • Among lower gastrointestinal diseases, obesity is consistently related to an elevated risk of colon cancer [ 11 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • reported a weak correlation between elevated body mass index (BMI) and symptomatic diverticular disease of colon [ 13 ], whereas other authors found this correlation to be absent [ 14 - 16 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Dietary Interventions in Gastrointestinal Diseases: Foods, Nutrients and Dietary Supplements provides valuable insights into the agents that affect metabolism and other health-related conditions in the gastrointestinal system. (elsevier.com)
  • Information is presented on a variety of foods, including herbs, fruits, soy and olive oil, thus showing that changes in intake can change antioxidant and disease preventing non-nutrients and affect gastrointestinal health and/or disease promotion. (elsevier.com)
  • Guidelines for the prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections in HIV-infected adults and adolescents: Recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, and the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America http://aidsinfo.nih.gov/contentfiles/lvguidelines/adult_oi.pdf (Accessed on November 18, 2013). (uptodate.com)
  • The prognosis for gastrointestinal disorders depends on initial response to medication and the presence of underlying health concerns. (vetinfo.com)
  • This epidemiologic shift varies greatly by region, but in Europe, chronic conditions account for 86% of all deaths, 77% of the disease burden, and up to 80% of health care. (ebscohost.com)
  • Now, a study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System has linked long-term use of such drugs - called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) - to fatal cases of cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease and upper gastrointestinal cancer. (news-medical.net)
  • Other researchers independently have linked PPIs to adverse health problems such as dementia, bone fractures, heart disease and pneumonia, among others. (news-medical.net)
  • Understanding the underlying epidemiology of disease and how it interacts with a community's socioeconomic and medical resources or medical supply characteristics will be necessary to meet the community's health needs and to ensure the financial viability of providers. (rti.org)
  • This experience helped me to realise that doing research was what really interested me and I also became aware of how important the role of a scientist is in helping to understand the cellular and molecular basis for human health and how can we use this knowledge to prevent and treat diseases. (humaneresearch.org.uk)
  • Because coeliac disease has emerged as a public health problem, its prevention is of great importance. (ebscohost.com)
  • Two studies have shown that roughly 75 to 80 percent of individuals with the disease reported experiencing diarrhea. (eatright.org)
  • Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders represent some of the most frequent complaints during pregnancy, possibly due in part to elevated levels of progesterone (eg, nausea/vomiting, gastroesophagel reflux disease [GERD]) and/or prostaglandins (diarrhea). (medscape.com)
  • Dr. Carroll .investigates the mechanisms by which gut bacteria influence gastrointestinal physiology, behavior, and weight regulation. (unc.edu)
  • While many of the molecular mechanisms that trigger gastrointestinal diseases remain a mystery, previous research has found that one enzyme, known as myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), plays a critical role. (healthcanal.com)
  • however, the relative efficacy of probiotic use for treatment and prevention across different gastrointestinal diseases, with differing etiology and mechanisms of action, has not been addressed. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • The field of metabolomics has sought to identify these aberrant metabolites as disease biomarkers, clues to understanding disease mechanisms, or even as therapeutic agents. (chemie.de)
  • However we are now entering an exciting era, as many new 5HT modulating drugs are becoming available for treating functional gastrointestinal (GI) disease. (wiley.com)
  • 5-8 In addition, acute life threatening stress episodes in adult life (rape, post-traumatic stress syndrome) are an important risk factor in the development of functional gastrointestinal disorders. (bmj.com)
  • The impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy on the incidence of CMV disease in AIDS patients (abstract #I-31). (uptodate.com)
  • Abstract: Background: Despite a reduction in the global burden of malaria, the disease remains responsible for 214 million cases and 438,000 deaths annually with 88% of the mortality occurring in sub-Saharan Africa. (chemie.de)
  • Researchers conducting a nationwide study in Denmark found that rosacea may be associated with increased risk of certain gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, but whether there is a cause-and-effect relationship is unknown. (rosacea.org)
  • Changes in the gut flora have emerged as a leading mechanism for the increased prevalence of certain gastrointestinal diseases - . (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Although our general understanding of food hypersensitivity has improved in recent years, gastrointestinal food protein-induced diseases still pose diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • A1 - Heine,Ralf G, PY - 2004/5/6/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/5/6/entrez SP - 221 EP - 9 JF - Current opinion in allergy and clinical immunology JO - Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol VL - 4 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Although our general understanding of food hypersensitivity has improved in recent years, gastrointestinal food protein-induced diseases still pose diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Chronic diseases might include congenital diseases such as Zenker's diverticulum and esophageal webbing, and oesophageal motility disorders including the nutcracker oesophagus, achalasia, diffuse oesophageal spasm, and oesophageal stricture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disadvantages of MR imaging in evaluating acute gastrointestinal conditions include its high cost, limited availability, longer examination times compared to US and CT, and its incompatibility with equipment used for intensive care and patient monitoring. (appliedradiology.com)