Retrograde flow of gastric juice (GASTRIC ACID) and/or duodenal contents (BILE ACIDS; PANCREATIC JUICE) into the distal ESOPHAGUS, commonly due to incompetence of the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER.
Analysis of the HYDROGEN ION CONCENTRATION in the lumen of the ESOPHAGUS. It is used to record the pattern, frequency, and duration of GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.
Mobilization of the lower end of the esophagus and plication of the fundus of the stomach around it (fundic wrapping) in the treatment of GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX that may be associated with various disorders, such as hiatal hernia. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
The area covering the terminal portion of ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of STOMACH at the cardiac orifice.
INFLAMMATION, acute or chronic, of the ESOPHAGUS caused by BACTERIA, chemicals, or TRAUMA.
Measurement of the pressure or tension of liquids or gases with a manometer.
INFLAMMATION of the ESOPHAGUS that is caused by the reflux of GASTRIC JUICE with contents of the STOMACH and DUODENUM.
Back flow of gastric contents to the LARYNGOPHARYNX where it comes in contact with tissues of the upper aerodigestive tract. Laryngopharyngeal reflux is an extraesophageal manifestation of GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.
Compounds that inhibit H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE. They are used as ANTI-ULCER AGENTS and sometimes in place of HISTAMINE H2 ANTAGONISTS for GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the esophagus.
Substernal pain or burning sensation, usually associated with regurgitation of gastric juice into the esophagus.
STOMACH herniation located at or near the diaphragmatic opening for the ESOPHAGUS, the esophageal hiatus.
A condition with damage to the lining of the lower ESOPHAGUS resulting from chronic acid reflux (ESOPHAGITIS, REFLUX). Through the process of metaplasia, the squamous cells are replaced by a columnar epithelium with cells resembling those of the INTESTINE or the salmon-pink mucosa of the STOMACH. Barrett's columnar epithelium is a marker for severe reflux and precursor to ADENOCARCINOMA of the esophagus.
The physiologic or functional barrier to GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX at the esophagogastric junction. Sphincteric muscles remain tonically contracted during the resting state and form the high-pressure zone separating the lumen of the ESOPHAGUS from that of the STOMACH. (Haubrich et al, Bockus Gastroenterology, 5th ed., pp399, 415)
Retrograde bile flow. Reflux of bile can be from the duodenum to the stomach (DUODENOGASTRIC REFLUX); to the esophagus (GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX); or to the PANCREAS.
Retrograde flow of duodenal contents (BILE ACIDS; PANCREATIC JUICE) into the STOMACH.
Inflammation of the LARYNGEAL MUCOSA, including the VOCAL CORDS. Laryngitis is characterized by irritation, edema, and reduced pliability of the mucosa leading to VOICE DISORDERS such as APHONIA and HOARSENESS.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the digestive tract.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.
Disorders affecting the motor function of the UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; the ESOPHAGUS body, or a combination of these parts. The failure of the sphincters to maintain a tonic pressure may result in gastric reflux of food and acid into the esophagus (GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX). Other disorders include hypermotility (spastic disorders) and markedly increased amplitude in contraction (nutcracker esophagus).
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H2 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine. Their clinically most important action is the inhibition of acid secretion in the treatment of gastrointestinal ulcers. Smooth muscle may also be affected. Some drugs in this class have strong effects in the central nervous system, but these actions are not well understood.
Tumors or cancer of the ESOPHAGUS.
Substances that counteract or neutralize acidity of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
Retrograde flow of urine from the URINARY BLADDER into the URETER. This is often due to incompetence of the vesicoureteral valve leading to ascending bacterial infection into the KIDNEY.
Gastric analysis for determination of free acid or total acid.
Difficulty in SWALLOWING which may result from neuromuscular disorder or mechanical obstruction. Dysphagia is classified into two distinct types: oropharyngeal dysphagia due to malfunction of the PHARYNX and UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; and esophageal dysphagia due to malfunction of the ESOPHAGUS.
Chronic ESOPHAGITIS characterized by esophageal mucosal EOSINOPHILIA. It is diagnosed when an increase in EOSINOPHILS are present over the entire esophagus. The reflux symptoms fail to respond to PROTON PUMP INHIBITORS treatment, unlike in GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE. The symptoms are associated with IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to food or inhalant allergens.
A 4-methoxy-3,5-dimethylpyridyl, 5-methoxybenzimidazole derivative of timoprazole that is used in the therapy of STOMACH ULCERS and ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME. The drug inhibits an H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE which is found in GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS.
Progressive loss of the hard substance of a tooth by chemical processes that do not involve bacterial action. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p296)
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the stomach.
A type of lung inflammation resulting from the aspiration of food, liquid, or gastric contents into the upper RESPIRATORY TRACT.
The superior portion of the body of the stomach above the level of the cardiac notch.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Compounds that contain benzimidazole joined to a 2-methylpyridine via a sulfoxide linkage. Several of the compounds in this class are ANTI-ULCER AGENTS that act by inhibiting the POTASSIUM HYDROGEN ATPASE found in the PROTON PUMP of GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS.
A movement, caused by sequential muscle contraction, that pushes the contents of the intestines or other tubular organs in one direction.
Various agents with different action mechanisms used to treat or ameliorate PEPTIC ULCER or irritation of the gastrointestinal tract. This has included ANTIBIOTICS to treat HELICOBACTER INFECTIONS; HISTAMINE H2 ANTAGONISTS to reduce GASTRIC ACID secretion; and ANTACIDS for symptomatic relief.
A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.
An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.
A sudden, audible expulsion of air from the lungs through a partially closed glottis, preceded by inhalation. It is a protective response that serves to clear the trachea, bronchi, and/or lungs of irritants and secretions, or to prevent aspiration of foreign materials into the lungs.
A stricture of the ESOPHAGUS. Most are acquired but can be congenital.
A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used for the diagnosis of diseases in many tissues, particularly in the gastrointestinal system, liver, and spleen.
The S-isomer of omeprazole.
Pathological processes in the ESOPHAGUS.
That part of the STOMACH close to the opening from ESOPHAGUS into the stomach (cardiac orifice), the ESOPHAGOGASTRIC JUNCTION. The cardia is so named because of its closeness to the HEART. Cardia is characterized by the lack of acid-forming cells (GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS).
Pathological processes of the ear, the nose, and the throat, also known as the ENT diseases.
Hydrochloric acid present in GASTRIC JUICE.
The evacuation of food from the stomach into the duodenum.
Pathological processes involving any part of the LARYNX which coordinates many functions such as voice production, breathing, swallowing, and coughing.
Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.
A motility disorder of the ESOPHAGUS in which the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER (near the CARDIA) fails to relax resulting in functional obstruction of the esophagus, and DYSPHAGIA. Achalasia is characterized by a grossly contorted and dilated esophagus (megaesophagus).
A 2,2,2-trifluoroethoxypyridyl derivative of timoprazole that is used in the therapy of STOMACH ULCERS and ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME. The drug inhibits H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE which is found in GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS. Lansoprazole is a racemic mixture of (R)- and (S)-isomers.
A dopamine D2 antagonist that is used as an antiemetic.
A substituted benzamide used for its prokinetic properties. It is used in the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease, functional dyspepsia, and other disorders associated with impaired gastrointestinal motility. (Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed)
A 4-(3-methoxypropoxy)-3-methylpyridinyl derivative of timoprazole that is used in the therapy of STOMACH ULCERS and ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME. The drug inhibits H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE which is found in GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS.
The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.
The structure at the pharyngoesophageal junction consisting chiefly of the CRICOPHARYNGEUS MUSCLE. It normally occludes the lumen of the ESOPHAGUS, except during SWALLOWING.
Inhaling liquid or solids, such as stomach contents, into the RESPIRATORY TRACT. When this causes severe lung damage, it is called ASPIRATION PNEUMONIA.
A specific blocker of dopamine receptors. It speeds gastrointestinal peristalsis, causes prolactin release, and is used as antiemetic and tool in the study of dopaminergic mechanisms.
A hydrated form of silicon dioxide. It is commonly used in the manufacture of TOOTHPASTES and as a stationary phase for CHROMATOGRAPHY.
A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of the physiology and diseases of the digestive system and related structures (esophagus, liver, gallbladder, and pancreas).
Drugs used for their effects on the gastrointestinal system, as to control gastric acidity, regulate gastrointestinal motility and water flow, and improve digestion.
A compound used as an x-ray contrast medium that occurs in nature as the mineral barite. It is also used in various manufacturing applications and mixed into heavy concrete to serve as a radiation shield.
A condition in which there is a change of one adult cell type to another similar adult cell type.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.
A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Spasmodic swallowing of air.
The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.
A strong corrosive acid that is commonly used as a laboratory reagent. It is formed by dissolving hydrogen chloride in water. GASTRIC ACID is the hydrochloric acid component of GASTRIC JUICE.
An unnaturally deep or rough quality of voice.
The insertion of a tube into the stomach, intestines, or other portion of the gastrointestinal tract to allow for the passage of food products, etc.
A non-imidazole blocker of those histamine receptors that mediate gastric secretion (H2 receptors). It is used to treat gastrointestinal ulcers.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
The act of dilating.
Nutritional support given via the alimentary canal or any route connected to the gastrointestinal system (i.e., the enteral route). This includes oral feeding, sip feeding, and tube feeding using nasogastric, gastrostomy, and jejunostomy tubes.
Impaired digestion, especially after eating.
Infections with organisms of the genus HELICOBACTER, particularly, in humans, HELICOBACTER PYLORI. The clinical manifestations are focused in the stomach, usually the gastric mucosa and antrum, and the upper duodenum. This infection plays a major role in the pathogenesis of type B gastritis and peptic ulcer disease.
Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.
Surgical procedures involving the STOMACH and sometimes the lower ESOPHAGUS to correct anatomical defects, or to treat MORBID OBESITY by reducing the size of the stomach. There are several subtypes of bariatric gastroplasty, such as vertical banded gastroplasty, silicone ring vertical gastroplasty, and horizontal banded gastroplasty.
Diseases in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
The resistance to the flow of either alternating or direct electrical current.
Abnormal passage between the ESOPHAGUS and the TRACHEA, acquired or congenital, often associated with ESOPHAGEAL ATRESIA.
Creation of an artificial external opening into the stomach for nutritional support or gastrointestinal compression.
Abnormal or excessive excitability with easily triggered anger, annoyance, or impatience.
Recording changes in electrical impedance between electrodes placed on opposite sides of a part of the body, as a measure of volume changes in the path of the current. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A transient absence of spontaneous respiration.
Integral membrane proteins that transport protons across a membrane. This transport can be linked to the hydrolysis of ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE. What is referred to as proton pump inhibitors frequently is about POTASSIUM HYDROGEN ATPASE.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Congenital abnormality characterized by the lack of full development of the ESOPHAGUS that commonly occurs with TRACHEOESOPHAGEAL FISTULA. Symptoms include excessive SALIVATION; GAGGING; CYANOSIS; and DYSPNEA.
A plastic operation on the esophagus. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the larynx performed with a specially designed endoscope.
A spiral bacterium active as a human gastric pathogen. It is a gram-negative, urease-positive, curved or slightly spiral organism initially isolated in 1982 from patients with lesions of gastritis or peptic ulcers in Western Australia. Helicobacter pylori was originally classified in the genus CAMPYLOBACTER, but RNA sequencing, cellular fatty acid profiles, growth patterns, and other taxonomic characteristics indicate that the micro-organism should be included in the genus HELICOBACTER. It has been officially transferred to Helicobacter gen. nov. (see Int J Syst Bacteriol 1989 Oct;39(4):297-405).
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
The ejection of gas or air through the mouth from the stomach.
An EPITHELIUM with MUCUS-secreting cells, such as GOBLET CELLS. It forms the lining of many body cavities, such as the DIGESTIVE TRACT, the RESPIRATORY TRACT, and the reproductive tract. Mucosa, rich in blood and lymph vessels, comprises an inner epithelium, a middle layer (lamina propria) of loose CONNECTIVE TISSUE, and an outer layer (muscularis mucosae) of SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS that separates the mucosa from submucosa.
The forcible expulsion of the contents of the STOMACH through the MOUTH.
The liquid secretion of the stomach mucosa consisting of hydrochloric acid (GASTRIC ACID); PEPSINOGENS; INTRINSIC FACTOR; GASTRIN; MUCUS; and the bicarbonate ion (BICARBONATES). (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p651)
The region of the STOMACH at the junction with the DUODENUM. It is marked by the thickening of circular muscle layers forming the pyloric sphincter to control the opening and closure of the lumen.
Inflammation of the BRONCHIOLES leading to an obstructive lung disease. Bronchioles are characterized by fibrous granulation tissue with bronchial exudates in the lumens. Clinical features include a nonproductive cough and DYSPNEA.
A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
A condition of substandard growth or diminished capacity to maintain normal function.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Pressure, burning, or numbness in the chest.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
The act of taking solids and liquids into the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT through the mouth and throat.
Impaired venous blood flow or venous return (venous stasis), usually caused by inadequate venous valves. Venous insufficiency often occurs in the legs, and is associated with EDEMA and sometimes with VENOUS STASIS ULCERS at the ankle.
Excision of part (partial) or all (total) of the esophagus. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.
The motor activity of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
A competitive histamine H2-receptor antagonist. Its main pharmacodynamic effect is the inhibition of gastric secretion.
Organic compounds that have the general formula R-SO-R. They are obtained by oxidation of mercaptans (analogous to the ketones). (From Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 4th ed)
Pathological processes that affect voice production, usually involving VOCAL CORDS and the LARYNGEAL MUCOSA. Voice disorders can be caused by organic (anatomical), or functional (emotional or psychological) factors leading to DYSPHONIA; APHONIA; and defects in VOICE QUALITY, loudness, and pitch.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases or dysfunction of the digestive system or its organs or demonstration of their physiological processes.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.
A tubular organ of VOICE production. It is located in the anterior neck, superior to the TRACHEA and inferior to the tongue and HYOID BONE.
Dilated blood vessels in the ESOPHAGUS or GASTRIC FUNDUS that shunt blood from the portal circulation (PORTAL SYSTEM) to the systemic venous circulation. Often they are observed in individuals with portal hypertension (HYPERTENSION, PORTAL).
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Inflammation of the GASTRIC MUCOSA, a lesion observed in a number of unrelated disorders.
The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.
Inflammation of the middle ear with a clear pale yellow-colored transudate.
Saccular protrusion beyond the wall of the ESOPHAGUS.
A Y-shaped surgical anastomosis of any part of the digestive system which includes the small intestine as the eventual drainage site.
Diseases of the respiratory system in general or unspecified or for a specific respiratory disease not available.
Ulcer that occurs in the regions of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT which come into contact with GASTRIC JUICE containing PEPSIN and GASTRIC ACID. It occurs when there are defects in the MUCOSA barrier. The common forms of peptic ulcers are associated with HELICOBACTER PYLORI and the consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).
Non-invasive, endoscopic imaging by use of VIDEO CAPSULE ENDOSCOPES to perform examination of the gastrointestinal tract, especially the small bowel.
A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Protrusion of abdominal structures into the THORAX as a result of congenital or traumatic defects in the respiratory DIAPHRAGM.
The condition of weighing two, three, or more times the ideal weight, so called because it is associated with many serious and life-threatening disorders. In the BODY MASS INDEX, morbid obesity is defined as having a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2.
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
Pathological processes that tend eventually to become malignant. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
A vasodilator that is administered by inhalation. It is also used recreationally due to its supposed ability to induce euphoria and act as an aphrodisiac.
Imaging techniques that use illumination created with several optical interference filters by which the frequency ranges are spectrally narrowed and light scatter is greatly reduced. Thus the reflected photons reconstituting the images are from distinct depths (the surface and deeper layers) of the object being imaged.
Use of nursing bottles for feeding. Applies to humans and animals.
A clinical syndrome with intermittent abdominal pain characterized by sudden onset and cessation that is commonly seen in infants. It is usually associated with obstruction of the INTESTINES; of the CYSTIC DUCT; or of the URINARY TRACT.
Persistent abnormal dilatation of the bronchi.
Liquid formulations for the nutrition of infants that can substitute for BREAST MILK.
Lining of the STOMACH, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. The surface cells produce MUCUS that protects the stomach from attack by digestive acid and enzymes. When the epithelium invaginates into the LAMINA PROPRIA at various region of the stomach (CARDIA; GASTRIC FUNDUS; and PYLORUS), different tubular gastric glands are formed. These glands consist of cells that secrete mucus, enzymes, HYDROCHLORIC ACID, or hormones.
Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).
Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.
A common interstitial lung disease of unknown etiology, usually occurring between 50-70 years of age. Clinically, it is characterized by an insidious onset of breathlessness with exertion and a nonproductive cough, leading to progressive DYSPNEA. Pathological features show scant interstitial inflammation, patchy collagen fibrosis, prominent fibroblast proliferation foci, and microscopic honeycomb change.
A PEPTIC ULCER located in the DUODENUM.
A disorder with chronic or recurrent colonic symptoms without a clearcut etiology. This condition is characterized by chronic or recurrent ABDOMINAL PAIN, bloating, MUCUS in FECES, and an erratic disturbance of DEFECATION.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.

Symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: double blind controlled study of intermittent treatment with omeprazole or ranitidine. The European Study Group. (1/2087)

OBJECTIVE: To assess intermittent treatment over 12 months in patients with symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. DESIGN: Randomised, multicentre, double blind, controlled study. Patients with heartburn and normal endoscopy results or mild erosive changes received omeprazole 10 mg or 20 mg daily or ranitidine 150 mg twice daily for 2 weeks. Patients remaining symptomatic had omeprazole 10 mg or ranitidine dose doubled for another 2 weeks while omeprazole 20 mg was continued for 2 weeks. Patients who were symptomatic or mildly symptomatic were followed up for 12 months. Recurrences of moderate or severe heartburn during follow up were treated with the dose which was successful for initial symptom control. SETTING: Hospitals and primary care practices between 1994 and 1996. SUBJECTS: 677 patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Total time off active treatment, time to failure of intermittent treatment, and outcomes ranked from best to worst. RESULTS: 704 patients were randomised, 677 were eligible for analyses; 318 reached the end of the study with intermittent treatment without recourse to maintenance antisecretory drugs. The median number of days off active treatment during follow up was 142 for the entire study (281 for the 526 patients who reached a treatment related end point). Thus, about half the patients did not require treatment for at least 6 months, and this was similar in all three treatment groups. According to outcome, 378 (72%) patients were in the best outcome ranks (no relapse or one (or more) relapse but in remission until 12 months); 630 (93%) had three or fewer relapses in the intermittent treatment phase. Omeprazole 20 mg provided faster relief of heartburn. The results were similar in patients with erosive and non-erosive disease. CONCLUSIONS: Intermittent treatment is effective in managing symptoms of heartburn in half of patients with uncomplicated gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. It is simple and applicable in general practice, where most patients are seen.  (+info)

The effect of hiatus hernia on gastro-oesophageal junction pressure. (2/2087)

BACKGROUND: Hiatus hernia and lower oesophageal sphincter hypotension are often viewed as opposing hypotheses for gastro-oesophageal junction incompetence. AIMS: To examine the interaction between hiatus hernia and lower oesophageal sphincter hypotension. METHODS: In seven normal subjects and seven patients with hiatus hernia, the squamocolumnar junction and intragastric margin of the gastro-oesophageal junction were marked with endoscopically placed clips. Axial and radial characteristics of the gastro-oesophageal junction high pressure zone were mapped relative to the hiatus and clips during concurrent fluoroscopy and manometry. Responses to inspiration and abdominal compression were also analysed. RESULTS: In normal individuals the squamocolumnar junction was 0.5 cm below the hiatus and the gastro-oesophageal junction high pressure zone extended 1.1 cm distal to that. In those with hiatus hernia, the gastro-oesophageal junction high pressure zone had two discrete segments, one proximal to the squamocolumnar junction and one distal, attributable to the extrinsic compression within the hiatal canal. Inspiration and abdominal compression mainly augmented the distal one. Simulation of hernia reduction by algebraically summing the proximal segment pressures with the hiatal canal pressures restored normal maximal pressure, radial asymmetry, and dynamic responses of the gastro-oesophageal junction. CONCLUSIONS: Hiatus hernia reduces lower oesophageal sphincter pressure and alters its dynamic responsiveness by spatially separating pressure components derived from the intrinsic lower oesophageal sphincter and the extrinsic compression of the oesophagus within the hiatal canal.  (+info)

Improvement in quality of life measures after laparoscopic antireflux surgery. (3/2087)

OBJECTIVE: To determine if patients with gastroesophageal reflux "well controlled medically" had a different quality of life from those with residual symptoms receiving aggressive medical therapy, and to determine whether laparoscopic antireflux surgery significantly altered quality of life in patients with gastroesophageal reflux. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Clinical determinants of outcome may not adequately reflect the full impact of therapy. The medical outcomes study short form (SF-36) is a well-validated questionnaire that assays eight specific health concepts in three general fields. It may provide a more sensitive tool for judging the success of antireflux therapy. METHODS: A total of 345 patients undergoing laparoscopic antireflux surgery completed at least one questionnaire during the study period. Preoperative questionnaires were completed by 290 patients, 223 completed a questionnaire 6 weeks after surgery, and 50 completed the same questionnaire 1 year after surgery. A subgroup of 70 patients was divided before surgery into two groups on the basis of their response to standard medical therapy. RESULTS: Preoperative scores were extremely low. All eight SF-36 health categories improved significantly 6 weeks and 1 year after surgery. In the 70-patient subgroup, 53 patients (76%) underwent laparoscopic antireflux surgery because of symptoms refractory to medical therapy and 17 patients (24%) reported that their symptoms were well controlled but elected to have surgery because they wished to be medication-free. The preoperative quality of life scores of these two patient groups were equivalent in all but one category. Postoperative scores were significantly improved in all categories and indistinguishable between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic antireflux surgery is an effective therapy for patients with gastroesophageal reflux and may be more effective than medical therapy at improving quality of life.  (+info)

Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux as a risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma. (4/2087)

BACKGROUND: The causes of adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and gastric cardia are poorly understood. We conducted an epidemiologic investigation of the possible association between gastroesophageal reflux and these tumors. METHODS: We performed a nationwide, population-based, case-control study in Sweden. Case ascertainment was rapid, and all cases were classified uniformly. Information on the subjects' history of gastroesophageal reflux was collected in personal interviews. The odds ratios were calculated by logistic regression, with multivariate adjustment for potentially confounding variables. RESULTS: Of the patients interviewed, the 189 with esophageal adenocarcinoma and the 262 with adenocarcinoma of the cardia constituted 85 percent of the 529 patients in Sweden who were eligible for the study during the period from 1995 through 1997. For comparison, we interviewed 820 control subjects from the general population and 167 patients with esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma. Among persons with recurrent symptoms of reflux, as compared with persons without such symptoms, the odds ratios were 7.7 (95 percent confidence interval, 5.3 to 11.4) for esophageal adenocarcinoma and 2.0 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.4 to 2.9) for adenocarcinoma of the cardia. The more frequent, more severe, and longer-lasting the symptoms of reflux, the greater the risk. Among persons with long-standing and severe symptoms of reflux, the odds ratios were 43.5 (95 percent confidence interval, 18.3 to 103.5) for esophageal adenocarcinoma and 4.4 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.7 to 11.0) for adenocarcinoma of the cardia. The risk of esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma was not associated with reflux (odds ratio, 1.1; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.7 to 1.9). CONCLUSIONS: There is a strong and probably causal relation between gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal adenocarcinoma. The relation between reflux and adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia is relatively weak.  (+info)

Gastroesophageal reflux disease: diagnosis and management. (5/2087)

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic, relapsing condition with associated morbidity and an adverse impact on quality of life. The disease is common, with an estimated lifetime prevalence of 25 to 35 percent in the U.S. population. GERD can usually be diagnosed based on the clinical presentation alone. In some patients, however, the diagnosis may require endoscopy and, rarely, ambulatory pH monitoring. Management includes lifestyle modifications and pharmacologic therapy; refractory disease requires surgery. The therapeutic goals are to control symptoms, heal esophagitis and maintain remission so that morbidity is decreased and quality of life is improved.  (+info)

Pseudo-steroid resistant asthma. (6/2087)

BACKGROUND: Steroid resistant asthma (SRA) represents a small subgroup of those patients who have asthma and who are difficult to manage. Two patients with apparent SRA are described, and 12 additional cases who were admitted to the same hospital are reviewed. METHODS: The subjects were selected from a tertiary hospital setting by review of all asthma patients admitted over a two year period. Subjects were defined as those who failed to respond to high doses of bronchodilators and oral glucocorticosteroids, as judged by subjective assessment, audible wheeze on examination, and serial peak flow measurements. RESULTS: In 11 of the 14 patients identified there was little to substantiate the diagnosis of severe or steroid resistant asthma apart from symptoms and upper respiratory wheeze. Useful tests to differentiate this group of patients from those with severe asthma appear to be: the inability to perform reproducible forced expiratory manoeuvres, normal airway resistance, and a concentration of histamine causing a 20% fall in the forced expiratory volume (FEV1) being within the range for normal subjects (PC20). Of the 14 subjects, four were health care staff and two reported childhood sexual abuse. CONCLUSION: Such patients are important to identify as they require supportive treatment which should not consist of high doses of glucocorticosteroids and beta2 adrenergic agonists. Diagnoses other than asthma, such as gastro-oesophageal reflux, hyperventilation, vocal cord dysfunction and sleep apnoea, should be sought as these may be a cause of glucocorticosteroid treatment failure and pseudo-SRA, and may respond to alternative treatment.  (+info)

Review article: Helicobacter pylori and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease-clinical implications and management. (7/2087)

A significant proportion of patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have Helicobacter pylori infection, but it is unclear whether or not H. pylori should be treated in this clinical setting. The aim of this review was to critically assess the relationship between H. pylori and GERD and its potential implications for the management of GERD. Data for this review were gathered from the following sources up to April 1998-the biomedical database MEDLINE, a detailed review of medical journals, and a review of abstracts submitted to relevant international meetings. On average, 40% of GERD patients carry H. pylori infection, with a reported infection prevalence ranging from 16% to 88%. To date, there has been no reported controlled trial of effective H. pylori therapy in GERD. GERD has been reported to develop de novo following the cure of H. pylori in peptic ulcer disease. In the presence of H. pylori, proton pump inhibitor therapy appears to accelerate the development of atrophic corpus gastritis, a potentially precancerous condition. Conversely, proton pump inhibitor therapy seems to become less effective after cure of H. pylori. The mechanisms underlying these important contrasting phenomena are poorly understood. The relationship between H. pylori and GERD is complex, and it is difficult to give definitive guidelines on the management of H. pylori infection in GERD. Controlled trials of H. pylori therapy in GERD are urgently needed, as well as further long-term data on both the natural history of gastric histopathological changes in the H. pylori-positive GERD patient treated with proton pump inhibitors, and the impact of H. pylori status on the clinical efficacy of antisecretory therapy. Pending these data, it is perhaps advisable to advocate cure of H. pylori in young patients with proton pump inhibitor-dependent GERD who, in the absence of anti-reflux surgery, are faced with the likelihood of long-term medical therapy.  (+info)

A manometric assessment of oesophagogastrostomy. (8/2087)

Intraluminal pressures were recorded in 14 patients who had undergone oesophagogastrectomy. Seven of these had a mid-thoracic and seven a high cervical oesophagogastrostomy. The incidence of postoperative reflux complications in each group was noted. No pressure gradient across the anastomosis was detected in any patient but the upper oesophageal sphincter was shown to be retained as a functioning unit in all cases. It is considered that the thoracic anastomosis provides no demonstrable barrier to reflux. In addition, a high cervical oesophagogastrostomy does not adversely affect the upper oesophageal sphincter. The wider application of this latter procedure may be associated with a decreased incidence of postoperative reflux complications.  (+info)

Table of Content. 1. Report Introduction. 2. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) 3. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Current Treatment Patterns. 4. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) - DelveInsights Analytical Perspective. 5. Therapeutic Assessment. 6. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Late Stage Products (Phase-III). 7. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Mid Stage Products (Phase-II). 8. Early Stage Products (Phase-I). 9. Pre-clinical Products and Discovery Stage Products. 10. Inactive Products. 11. Dormant Products. 12. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Discontinued Products. 13. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Product Profiles. 14. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Key Companies. 15. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Key Products. 16. Dormant and Discontinued Products. 17. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Unmet Needs. 18. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Future Perspectives. 19. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Analyst Review 20. ...
Treatment of GERD - gastroesophageal reflux disease - is more than just chronic heartburn. Although heartburn is the most common symptom of this disease, GERD is a condition in which stomach acid or, occasionally, bile flows back (refluxes) into your food pipe (esophagus). The constant backwash or acid reflux can irritate the lining of your esophagus and cause inflammation. Such irritation can lead to complications such as narrowing of the esophagus, ulcers and even a slightly increased risk of esophageal cancer, Most people can manage the discomfort of heartburn with lifestyle modifications and over-the-counter medications. But if you have GERD, these remedies may offer only temporary or partial relief. If you have GERD, you may need newer, more potent medications, possibly even surgery, to reduce symptoms, Gastric Reflux, Gastroesophageal, Acid Reflux, Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms, Cause Of Gastroesophageal Reflux, Diagnosis Of Gastroesophageal Reflux, Gastroesophageal Reflux Definition,
Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in the Greek general population: prevalence and risk factors Nikolaos Spantideas,1 Eirini Drosou,1 Anastasia Bougea,2 Dimitrios Assimakopoulos,3 1Athens Speech Language and Swallowing Institute, Glyfada, Athens, Greece; 2Athens Speech Language and Swallowing Institute, Agios Dimitrios, Athens, Greece; 3Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical School of Ioannina University, University Hospital of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece Background and aims: Population-based data regarding the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Greece are very poor. This study estimated the prevalence of GERD symptoms and their risk factors in the Greek adult population.Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was answered by a randomly selected population of 340 subjects. The question regarding â heartburn, chest pain, indigestion, or stomach acid coming upâ as included in the Reflux Symptom Index was used for prevalence assessment.Results: The monthly prevalence
Gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD), a common disorder. Development of the GerdQ, a tool for the diagnosis and management of gastro-oesophageal.. If the typical symptoms of reflux disease are present, including heartburn and regurgitation, your doctor may begin treatment without performing specific.. Covers main symptom of heartburn, caused by stomach acid and juices flowing from the stomach back into the esophagus. Covers treatment with medicines and.. Sep 17, 2019 · doctors recommend lifestyle and dietary changes for most people needing treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease (gerd). treatment aims at decreasing the amount of reflux.. Typical symptoms are heartburn and acid regurgitation. Extraesophageal symptoms include cough, laryngitis, asthma, or dental erosion. Atypical symptoms include dyspepsia, epigastric pain, nausea, bloating, and belching. Katz PO, Gerson LB, Vela MF. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease.. Heartburn Cancer Symptom ...
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Does High Heart Rate Burn Fat In my last blog I recommend the use of a heart rate monitor when starting an exercise. Why is that important? The body does not burn significant amounts of fat at high intensity. If your goal is to. Antacid Images Download this free picture about Tums Pills Tablets from Pixabays vast library of public domain. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD; or GORD when spelling oesophageal, the BE form) is defined as chronic symptoms or mucosal damage produced by the abnormal reflux of gastric contents into the.. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Obese Patients. - Published by PubMed Study of the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms and the role of each in relation to the GERD Impact Scale, based on.. Could any life form survive in the stomachs sizzling acid? Most thought there was no chance. pylori eradication was suspected as the reason for a rise in gastric esophageal reflux disease (GERD),. Photo by wavebreakmedia (Shutterstock). For example, if your doctor ...
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Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a chronic condition in which stomach acid climbs back up your throat. Heartburn is the primary symptom of this condition. When a person experiences the symptoms of this ailment regularly, only then it can be said that he may be a victim of GERD.. Occasional episodes of this condition are termed gastroesophageal reflux, GER. Therefore, GERD is a long-term condition that causes acid reflux and may also result in tissue damage. In GERD, severe acid reflux is experienced at least once a week.. Symptoms Of GERD The acid reflux that occurs due to GERD may damage the lining of the esophagus. Some symptoms of the disease include heartburn, chest pain, problems in swallowing, respiratory problems, bad breath, and decay. For those who experience GERD at night, they may also have asthma, chronic cough, and sleep disruption as symptoms.. What Is Heartburn? Heartburn is the most common symptom of this acid reflux causing disease. It is a form of indigestion which causes a ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Body positioning and medical therapy for infantile gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. AU - Loots, Clara. AU - Kritas, Stamatiki. AU - van Wijk, Michiel. AU - McCall, Lisa. AU - Peeters, Laura. AU - Lewindon, Peter. AU - Bijlmer, Rob. AU - Haslam, Ross. AU - Tobin, Jacinta. AU - Benninga, Marc. AU - Davidson, Geoffrey. AU - Omari, Taher. PY - 2014/8. Y1 - 2014/8. N2 - OBJECTIVE: Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) reduce acid gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and esophageal acid exposure in infants; however, they do not reduce total GER or symptoms attributed to GER. Reflux is reduced in the left lateral position (LLP). We hypothesize that the effect of LLP in combination with acid suppression is most effective in reducing GER symptoms in infants.METHODS: In this prospective sham-controlled trial, infants (0-6 months) with symptoms suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux disease were studied using 8-hour pH-impedance, cardiorespiratory and video monitoring, direct nurse observation, and a ...
Page topic: The Usefulness of a Structured Questionnaire in the Assessment of Symptomatic Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. Created by: Veronica Schroeder. Language: english.
Recognising nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) as a distinct presentation of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) has been one of the most important developments in the field of GORD. Therapeutic modalities still focus on acid suppression for the management of heartburn, GORD and NERD. However, there is growing recognition that other therapeutic treatments should be considered for NERD.
PubMed journal article: Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux as a risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma. Download Prime PubMed App to iPhone, iPad, or Android
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Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) / Heartburn in Children What is GERD? Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a digestive disorder that is caused by gastric acid flowing from the stomach into the esophagus. Gastroesophageal refers to the stomach and esophagus, and reflux means to flow back or return. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is the return of acidic stomach juices, or food and fluids, back up into the esophagus. GER is very common in infants, though it can occur at any age. It is the most c...
The team then compared the frequency of new, or less than 1 yr duration, and old, defined as 1 year or more duration of symptoms in weight change subgroups.. The association between weight change and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms was analyzed by logistic regression.. The model adjusted for body mass index and other potential confounders.. The researchers found that the prevalence of new and old gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, respectively, was higher in subjects with more than 5kg weight gain.. Subjects with a 5kg weight gain or less showed an adjusted odds ratio of 1.5 for new gastroesophageal reflux symptoms.. The team noted that for old gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, subjects with the 5kg or less weight gain had an adjusted odds ratio of about 1.. Those with a weight gain more than 5 kg showed an adjusted odds ratio of 3 for new gastroesophageal reflux symptoms and of 1.3 for old symptoms.. Dr Reys team comments, Weight gain is associated with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, ...
A.A. KAMALOVA, V.P. BULATOV. Kazan State Medical University, Butlerov St., 49, Kazan, Russian Federation, 420012. Kamalova A.A. - D. Med. Sc., Associate Professor of the Department of Pediatrics, tel. (843) 237-30-37, e-mail: [email protected]Bulatov V.P. - D. Med. Sc., Professor, Head of the Department of Pediatrics, tel. (843) 237-30-37, e-mail: [email protected]. Despite the developed algorithms for diagnosis and treatment of the gastroesophageal reflux disease in children, there is a group of patients prone to severe disease that require individual approach and long-term monitoring because of the risk of subsequent serious complications such as Barretts esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. The article describes the conditions and diseases associated with severe gastroesophageal reflux disease. The approaches to the treatment and its evaluation are presented.. Key words: gastroesophageal reflux disease, children, severe course.. REFERENCES. 1. Privorotskiy V.F., Luppova N.E., Belmer ...
BACKGROUND AND AIM The pathophysiology of non-erosive reflux disease is poorly understood. Triggering of secondary peristalsis is impaired in patients with erosive esophagitis but data in patients with non-erosive reflux disease are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference in esophageal motility between patients with non-erosive reflux disease and healthy subjects. METHODS Twenty patients with non-erosive reflux disease, with reflux symptoms occurring more than twice per week, and 20 healthy subjects of comparable age and sex underwent esophageal manometry. Primary peristalsis was tested with 10 swallows of a 5-mL water bolus. Secondary peristalsis was triggered by esophageal distention using a 20-mL air bolus, which was injected rapidly into the mid-esophagus. After 20 s, each stimulus was followed by a dry swallow to clear any residual air and then each stimulus was repeated five times. RESULTS Basal lower esophageal sphincter pressure, pressure wave amplitude in the upper,
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Global Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Therapeutics Market Report and Forecast to 2021 Global Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Therapeutics Market Report and Forecast to 2021 Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Therapeutics - Market research report and industry analysis - 11146682
Uncertain diagnostic performance has limited clinical adoption of salivary pepsin, a noninvasive diagnostic tool for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This study aimed to assess diagnostic performance of salivary pepsin, and test validity of thresholds in an external cohort of patients with or without GERD. This two-phase prospective study conducted at two centers enrolled adult asymptomatic volunteers, patients with symptoms of GERD undergoing reflux monitoring, and patients with Barretts esophagus (BE). Fasting saliva samples were processed for pepsin concentration using Peptest. Phase 1 compared pepsin concentration between No GERD (volunteers/functional heartburn) and GERD (erosive reflux disease/nonerosive reflux disease (NERD)/BE). Phase 2 tested validity of the diagnostic thresholds identified from Phase 1 among external functional heartburn and NERD cohorts. Of 243 enrolled subjects, 156 met inclusion criteria. Phase 1 (n = 114): Pepsin concentrations were significantly higher in ...
The effect of laparoscopic fundoplication on reflux-related chronic cough is unpredictable, the aim of the study is to investigate the predictive effect of positive reflux-cough correlation on the resolution of reflux-related chronic cough after anti-reflux surgery. A 5 years retrospective review was performed. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the independent predictors on the cure of chronic cough. Seventy-nine patients were included in this study, among which chronic cough was cured in 47 (59.5%) and significantly improved in 10 (12.7%) patients. Present of typical symptoms (odds ratio = 6.435,95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.427-29.032, p = 0.015) and number of Reflux episodes (impedance) ≥73 (odds ratio = 0.306, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.107-0.874, p = 0.027) were significantly associated with the cure of chronic cough. laparoscopic fundoplicaiton is effective for the management of reflux-related chronic cough, particularly with the present of typical symptoms. (Trial
TY - CHAP. T1 - Management of Gastrointestinal Disorders and the Pharmacists Role: Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. T2 - GERD. AU - Nirwan, Jorabar. AU - Yousaf, Maria. AU - Conway, Barbara. AU - Ghori, Muhammad Usman PY - 2019/6/20. Y1 - 2019/6/20. N2 - Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic disorder caused by abnormal reflux of stomach contents into the esophagus. This event occurs primarily because of relaxation of the transient lower esophageal sphincter. Non-pharmacological intervention includes behavioral changes and lifestyle modifications Pharmacological interventions, many of which are available without prescription include administration of antacids, H2-receptor antagonists, proton pump inhibitors and alginate-based raft formulations. If these treatment strategies fail, the patient may undergo surgery (fundoplication). Pharmacists can manage mild and, to some extent, moderate symptoms of GERD either by recommending lifestyle changes to the patient or by recommending ...
Bile reflux and gastric acid reflux are separate conditions. Whether bile is important in GERD is controversial. Bile is often a suspected of contributing to GERD when people respond incompletely or not at all to powerful acid-suppressant medications.. Between 25 percent to 40 percent of Americans of all ages suffer from acid reflux symptoms. An estimated 20 percent of adults experience gastroesophageal reflux disease weekly or daily - commonly called GERD or referred to as heartburn, a more severe case of acid reflux.1. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) / Heartburn. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), commonly known as acid reflux, is a chronic condition classified by frequent occurrences of heartburn.. Bile reflux - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic - Bile reflux and gastric acid reflux are separate conditions. Whether bile is important in GERD is controversial. Bile is often a suspected of contributing to GERD when people respond incompletely or not at all to powerful ...
The Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Disease Impact Scale demonstrated good psychometric properties in newly diagnosed gastro-oesophageal reflux disease patients and those already receiving treatment. This simple communication tool is a useful aid for managing primary care patients with gastro-oesophageal …
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Symptomatic infants displayed three patterns of gastroesophageal reflux after drinking apple juice (20 ml/kg or 300 ml/m2 of body surface area). The type I pattern occurred in patients who had continuous postcibal gastroesophageal reflux, large hiatal hernias and frequently required an antireflux operation. A functional motility disorder suggesting delayed gastric emptying appeared to be important in infants with discontinuous reflux (type II pattern). These infants had frequent gastroesophageal reflux for only 2 3/4 hours postcibally, antral-pylorospasm, increased low esophageal sphincter pressures, and a high incidence of pulmonary symptoms and non-specific watery diarrhea. The mixed (type III) pattern of gastroesophageal reflux occurred in a small number of infants and exhibited features of both type I and II patterns. ...
TRULLENQUE JUAN, R. et al. Surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease: a comparative study between the open and laparoscopic approaches. Rev. esp. enferm. dig. [online]. 2005, vol.97, n.5, pp.328-337. ISSN 1130-0108.. Objective: given the demonstrated effectiveness of medical treatment together with the eminent acceptance of the laparoscopic approach, the indications of surgery in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are currently subject to continuous controversy. To participate in this debate, we have the following work hypothesis: The results of the 360º short and floppy laparoscopic fundoplication are superior to those of open surgery. Clinical design: prospective, clinical, non-randomized study. Patients: our work was developed between November 1991 and December 1998 by means of a prospective, non-randomized clinical rehearsal with two groups of patients: -Group I (n = 75): 360° short and floppy laparoscopic fundoplication in Hospital Dr. Peset, Valencia (Spain). ...
Duodenal Contents Reflux can Induce Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma as Well as Adenocarcinoma. Articles related to gastroesophageal reflux disease are open access to read here.
A study of people who take Allopurinol and have Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, conducted by eHealthMe with data from FDA and social media (http://www.ehealthme.com/ds/allopurinol/gastroesophageal+reflux+disease). The study analyzes who these people are, when they have Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and how. eHealthMe updates the study periodically.. Wiki created 2 years 9 months ago ...
GERD, or gastroesophageal reflux disease, is best managed with a comprehensive treatment plan. At Florida Medical Clinic, our gastroenterologists work one-on-one with each patient to develop an effective treatment plan, usually consisting of lifestyle changes and other self-care options, acid reflux medications, and potentially even surgery to help reduce the pain and discomfort often caused by GERD. Although surgery is not necessary for every patient, those who do require an operation are in steady hands; we are highly experienced in the field of gastrointestinal surgery, performing more than 15,000 GI procedures each year.. When treating a patient with gastroesophageal reflux disease, our gastroenterologists consider a number of individualized factors, such as the specific symptoms the patient is experiencing, when they are most severe, and which triggers tend to make them worse. Using this information, we then create an individualized GERD treatment plan consisting of options such as:. ...
Anti-reflux surgery is a treatment for acid reflux, also known as GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). GERD is a condition in which food or stomach acid comes back up from your stomach into the esophagus. The esophagus is the tube from your mouth to the stomach.. Patient education: Acid reflux (gastroesophageal reflux disease) in adults ( Beyond.. Approved Uses for NEXIUM. NEXIUM is prescribed to treat the symptoms of acid reflux disease, which typically include persistent heartburn on 2 or more days per week, despite treatment and change of diet. For many people, NEXIUM is also prescribed to heal damage to.. If you suffer from heartburn, you know how acid reflux can be no fun, but gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as acid. you dont want to add gas to the list. This post was originally.. It is a very common condition, and it is estimated that the disease affects around 20 percent of the U.S. population. Not only do patients with GERD suffer from a long list of bothersome ...
BARRETTS ESOPHAGUS, GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE AND ADENOCARCINOMA OF THE ESOPHAGUS Release Date: September 17, 2001 RFA: RFA-DK-02-015 National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (http://www.niddk.nih.gov) National Cancer Institute (http://www.nci.nih.gov/) Letter of Intent Receipt Date: February 20, 2002 Application Receipt Date: March 20, 2002 THIS RFA USES MODULAR GRANT AND JUST-IN-TIME CONCEPTS. MODULAR INSTRUCTIONS MUST BE USED FOR RESEARCH GRANT APPLICATIONS REQUESTING LESS THAN $250,000 PER YEAR IN ALL YEARS. MODULAR BUDGET INSTRUCTIONS ARE PROVIDED IN SECTION C OF THE PHS 398 (REVISION 5/2001) AVAILABLE AT https://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/phs398/phs398.html. PURPOSE This initiative is designed to stimulate and solicit studies to broadly address the problem of Barretts esophagus and its etiology and relationship to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and its link to the rising incidence of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. The specific areas of ...
Meanwhile, typically the effects can go the other way too - which means that asthma can aggravate acid reflux disorder, thanks to pressure adjustments that occur inside typically the chest and abdomen throughout an asthma attack. And in a study inside a February 2017 issue from the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, researchers examined possible factors that cause frequent asthma flares and found that will higher body mass index, gastroesophageal reflux, and long-term sinusitis were each linked with frequent exacerbations associated with asthma.. Both children were treated with anti-reflux methods and both became sign free. Anti-reflux process of difficult-to-treat asthmatic children, case statement and literature review Physique 8: Effect of antireflux surgery on asthma symptoms in adults: 14 research. Figure 4: Prevalence associated with GERD in adult asthmatics: GERD defined as typically the presence of esophageal mucosal disease. Littner MR, Leung FW, Ballard EDII, ...
Gastroesophageal reflux, regurgitation of gastric contents into the esophagus, and gastroesophageal reflux disease, displaying symptoms and complications from regurgitation, are both very common in infants. Daily reflux is present in up to 50% of infants younger than 3 months and in more than 66% at 4 months of age. GERD is primarily attributed to lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Between 5-9% of infants less than one year of age have GERD and require acid suppression. Complications associated with GERD include failure to thrive, apnea, wheezing, recurrent aspiration, poor feeding, refusal to feed, irritability, and in more severe cases, acute life-threatening events.. Pantoprazole is a proton pump inhibitor that suppresses the final step in gastric acid production through binding to the H+-K+-ATPase enzyme system at the surface of parietal cells in gastric epithelium. This causes a reduction in acid production regardless of the stimulus presented. Pantoprazole is used as therapy in GERD, ...
ASGE Standards of Practice Committee, Muthusamy VR, Lightdale JR, et al. The role of endoscopy in the management of GERD. Gastrointest Endosc. 2015;81(6):1305-1310. PMID: 25863867 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25863867.. Falk GW, Katzka DA. Diseases of the esophagus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 138.. Katz PO, Gerson LB, Vela MF. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Am J Gastroenterol. 2013;108(3):308-328. PMID: 23419381 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23419381.. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases website. Acid reflux (GER & GERD) in adults. www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/acid-reflux-ger-gerd-adults/all-content. Updated November 2015. Accessed December 6, 2017.. Richter JE, Friedenberg FK. Gastroesophageal reflux disease. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtrans Gastrointestinal and Liver ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and its risk factors in rural area. AU - Hapsari, Florentina Caroline Puspita. AU - Putri, Leonita Ariesti. AU - Rahardja, Cindy. AU - Utari, Amanda Pitarini. AU - Syam, Ari Fahrial. PY - 2017/4/1. Y1 - 2017/4/1. N2 - Background: Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is escalating in Asia. The present study aimed toinvestigate the prevalence of GERD symptoms as well as potential risk factors associated with GERD in residents in a rural area in Jakarta. Method: The study population consisted of subjects who aged 20 years or more and lived in rural area Kebon Bawang-Tanjung Priok, Jakarta. A self-administered questionnaire based on earlier validated questionnaire (GERDQ) was given. The questionnaire consisted of demographic characteristic, self and environment sanitary, social and past illness history, and the symptoms score for GERD. Total score for GERDs symptoms score was 18, with a score of at least 8 was considered ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Management of symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. T2 - Does endoscopy influence medical management?. AU - Ellis, Kenneth K.. AU - Oehlke, Megan. AU - Helfand, Mark. AU - Lieberman, David. PY - 1997/10/9. Y1 - 1997/10/9. N2 - Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the theories that underlie the clinical decision to perform endoscopy in patients with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Physicians reported that they use endoscopic findings to modify medical treatment of GERD. This study was undertaken to test this hypothesis in clinical practice. Methods: A consortium of community specialists in gastrointestinal disease was formed. Physicians completed a database on patients undergoing elective endoscopy for symptoms of GERD, which includes symptom severity, endoscopic findings, and medical treatment before and after endoscopy. An increase in medical treatment was defined as an increase in acid suppression therapy, and/or the addition of a ...
Gastroesophageal Reflux Condition, typically called GERD, can be a really excruciating and also discomforting condition. An private with acid reflux locates that he or she has a burning sensation in he breast under the breastplate that goes up right into the throat. There are a variety of points that can prompt these signs. They could be connected to an diet plan that is not appropriate for your digestive system, stress and anxiety can obtain you all worked up as well as feeling it or some type of unhealthy lifestyle can trigger significant issues not just in your tummy but various other locations as well.. There are a ton of drugs developed for the relief of the symptoms however a lot of them feature telltale side effects that are practically as undesirable as the trouble. As is generally the situation the even more all-natural therapies for Gastroesophageal Reflux Illness are are better and they have a tendency to work without all the negative effects and actually aid in other locations of our ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Endoscopic Full-Thickness Plication for the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. T2 - A Randomized, Sham-Controlled Trial. AU - Rothstein, Richard. AU - Filipi, Charles. AU - Caca, Karel. AU - Pruitt, Ronald. AU - Mergener, Klaus. AU - Torquati, Alfonso. AU - Haber, Gregory. AU - Chen, Yang. AU - Chang, Kenneth. AU - Wong, David. AU - Deviere, Jacques. AU - Pleskow, Douglas. AU - Lightdale, Charles. AU - Ades, Alain. AU - Kozarek, Richard. AU - Richards, William. AU - Lembo, Anthony. PY - 2006/9. Y1 - 2006/9. N2 - Background & Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of endoscopic full-thickness plication for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in comparison with a sham procedure. Methods: Patients with symptomatic GERD requiring maintenance proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy were entered into a randomized, single-blind, prospective, multicenter trial. Seventy-eight patients were randomly assigned to undergo endoscopic ...
Asthma and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. People with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) often suffer recurrent chest distress and commonly experience asthma symptoms.. This fact sheet provides useful information about the relationship between asthma and GERD. We hope that this material helps you better understand the nature of asthma symptoms, especially as they may relate to GERD. Please keep in mind that this information is not meant to take the place of medical advice from your physician.. After 51-year-old Percy feasted on his wifes Thanksgiving. dinner, he popped a couple of antacid tablets to ward off the usual heartburn. But the feeling that he couldnt quite catch his breath just wouldnt go away. Throughout the holiday season, the frequent parties and irregular eating schedule only seemed to make his heartburn feel worse than ever before plus he developed a wheezing cough that plagued him late at night. When he visited his internist in January, the physician told him he probably ...
Learn and reinforce your understanding of Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) through video. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic condition of mucosal damage caused by stomach acid coming up from the stomach into the esophagus
Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) - Frank W. Shagets, Jr, M.D., PC located in JOPLIN,MO, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) - Frank W. Shagets, Jr, M.D., PC located in JOPLIN,MO specializing in Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery, Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Best Treatments for Gastroesophageal reflux disease gerd in Ahmedabad : Find Best Doctors, Book Appointment, Call Now, Get Address & numbers of Best Treatments for Gastroesophageal reflux disease gerd in Ahmedabad
Commonly referred to as Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or gastric reflux disease, acid reflux is basically a chronic symptom of increased level of stomach acid. Other condition related to acid reflux is laryngopharyngeal reflux, which does not however cause heartburn as acid reflux causes. Although it is adults who normally complain of acid reflux or heart burn, children too suffer from the same. It can however be difficult to detect. Read More... ...
Abdul-Hussein M, Castell DO. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In: Kellerman RD, Rakel DP, eds. Conns Current Therapy 2019. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019;208-211. Falk GW, Katzka DA. Diseases of the esophagus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 138. Katz PO, Gerson LB, Vela MF. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Am J Gastroenterol. 2013;108(3):308-328. PMID: 23419381 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23419381. Richter JE, Friedenberg FK. Gastroesophageal reflux disease. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtrans Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 44. BACK TO TOP Review Date: 10/31/2018 Reviewed By: Michael M. Phillips, MD, Clinical Professor of Medicine, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda ...
Learn about Gastroesophageal reflux disease, find a doctor, complications, outcomes, recovery and follow-up care for Gastroesophageal reflux disease.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Randomized controlled trial. T2 - Roxatidine vs omeprazole for non-erosive reflux disease. AU - Nakamura, Kazuhiko. AU - Akiho, Hirotada. AU - Ochiai, Toshiaki. AU - Motomura, Yasuaki. AU - Higuchi, Naomi. AU - Okamoto, Risa. AU - Matsui, Noriaki. AU - Yasuda, Daisuke. AU - Akahoshi, Kazuya. AU - Kabemura, Teppei. AU - Ihara, Eikichi. AU - Harada, Naohiko. AU - Ito, Tetsuhide. AU - Takayanagi, Ryoichi. PY - 2010/5/1. Y1 - 2010/5/1. N2 - Background/Aims: Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy is considered as the first choice for treatment of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). However, NERD is less sensitive to PPIs than erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and the differences between PPIs and H2 receptor antagonists are less evident in NERD than in erosive GERD. Since gastric acid secretion is lower in the Japanese population than in Western populations, we aimed to investigate whether PPI therapy is really necessary for NERD patients in Japan. Methodology: Thirty-three ...
Acid reflux or GERD: Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease is the western medical terminology for symptoms that may include stomach pain, hyperacidity, heart burns, etc.. Common temporary treatments are the use of antacid drugs, which in the first place is WRONG and if used for the long term, harmful.. The Cause of Acid Reflux. Acid reflux is caused by a backed up, constipated colon. It is that simple.. The Cure for Acid Reflux. Target the cause and you will be cured. Since the cause is a backed up, constipated colon, all you need to do is get the most powerful, most thorough colon cleansers and you will poop your problems away.. Just because you poop once a day does not mean you are not constipated. Otherwise you wouldnt be suffering from acid reflux.. Colon cleansers I know that will work:. Dr. Tams Miracle Tea - Buy 1 liter bottle, take 1/2 cup every evening for 10 days.. Barefoot Herbalist MH LBB - Buy the whole bottle, take 6 to 8 capsules a day, 1 capsule per hour. Find your activation dose. ...
In the gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), stomach acid or food from the stomach goes back into the esophagus (reflux). This is very common in infants because the muscles above the stomach is not yet well developed. This is a normal Developmental phenomenon transient.. The GTC is the most common cause of vomiting in our baby ilikia.Oloi episodes have recourse from time to time. But GERD problem is common and causes pain and vomiting.. What are the symptoms of GERD disease?. The most common is pain by stomach acid. The baby may be restless and crying on or after food. Baby worse back and relieved when held upright. Often beset by intense vomiting or regurgitation. Other symptoms may be cough, nasal congestion. noisy breathing and in severe cases poor growth.. ...
Find doctors who specialize in gastroesophageal reflux disesase treatment. All your queries about gastroesophageal reflux symptoms answered here. Ask query, book appointments for gastroesophageal reflux treatment.
British: Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD);[1] gastric reflux disease, acid reflux disease, reflux, gastroesophageal ... Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as acid reflux, is a long-term condition in which stomach contents rise up ... "Testing for refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease" (PDF). Retrieved 20 August 2018.. *^ a b c d e Using the Proton Pump ... December 2019). "Gastroesophageal reflux in laryngopharyngeal reflux patients: Clinical features and therapeutic response". ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease[edit]. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the indirect result of many factors and some ... or narrowing of the esophagus near the junction with the stomach due to chronic gastroesophageal reflux. This is the most ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease[edit]. A 2011 review said melatonin is effective in relieving epigastric pain and heartburn.[ ... "The potential therapeutic effect of melatonin in Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease". BMC Gastroenterology. 10: 7. doi:10.1186/ ...
gastroesophageal reflux. *allergies. *sinus problems. *a family history of sleep apnea. *deviated septum[19] ...
"Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease". A.D.A.M Medical Encyclopedia. PubMed Health. Archived from the original on 4 January 2014. ... Swallowing air excessively Gastroesophageal reflux Hiatal hernia Rapid eating Carbonated beverages, alcohol, dry breads, and ... Hiccups that are secondary to some other cause, like gastroesophageal reflux disease or esophageal webs, are dealt with by ...
Dysfunction of the gastroesophageal sphincter causes gastroesophageal reflux, which causes heartburn and if it happens often ... ISBN 978-0-7216-0240-0. Kahrilas PJ (2008). "Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease". The New England Journal of Medicine. 359 (16): ... can lead to gastroesophageal reflux disease, with damage of the esophageal mucosa. The esophagus is innervated by the vagus ... such as managing reflux or treating infection. Prolonged esophagitis, particularly from gastric reflux, is one factor thought ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD or GORD) including symptomatic endoscopy-negative reflux disease[9] and ... gastroesophageal reflux disease, or inflammation of the esophagus if these last two were not severe.[20] Stopping is not ... "American Gastroenterological Association Medical Position Statement on the Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease". ... associated laryngopharyngeal reflux causing laryngitis[10] and chronic cough[11]. *Barrett's esophagus[12] ...
Gastro-esophageal reflux Cervix Glandular epithelium Squamous epithelium Low pH of vagina ... Micrograph of a gastro-esophageal junction with pancreatic acinar metaplasia. The esophageal mucosa (stratified squamous ...
"Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)". Cedars-Sinai. Archived from the original on January 14, 2009. Retrieved 2009-08-03. ... and gastroesophageal reflux disease. There are four caffeine-induced psychiatric disorders recognized by the Diagnostic and ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). *Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). *Esophageal stricture. *Megaesophagus. *Esophageal ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). *Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). *Esophageal stricture. *Megaesophagus. Stomach. * ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). *Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). *Esophageal stricture. *Megaesophagus. *Esophageal ... The gastroesophageal junction between the esophagus and the stomach is controlled by the lower esophageal sphincter, which ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). *Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). *Esophageal stricture. *Megaesophagus. Stomach. * ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). *Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). *Esophageal stricture. *Megaesophagus. *Esophageal ...
GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). *Peptic ulcer disease. *Accumulation of fluid in the peritoneal cavity (eg. ascites) ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). *Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). *Esophageal stricture. *Megaesophagus. Stomach. * ...
This may result in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) with symptoms such as a taste of ... "Transoral incisionless fundoplication for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in clinical practice". Surg Endosc. 26 ( ... "Histologic and clinical outcome after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's ... The pain and discomfort that a patient experiences is due to the reflux of gastric acid, air, or bile. While there are several ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). *Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). *Esophageal stricture. *Megaesophagus. *Esophageal ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). *Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). *Esophageal stricture. *Megaesophagus. Stomach. * ...
GERD (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease). *Nutcracker esophagus. *Systemic sclerosis. *Esophageal food bolus obstruction ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). *Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). *Esophageal stricture. *Megaesophagus. *Esophageal ...
... gastroesophageal reflux disease, and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome.[1] There is also tentative evidence of benefit for hives.[3] ... "Gastroesophageal reflux: management guidance for the pediatrician". Pediatrics. 131 (5): e1684-e1695. doi:10.1542/peds.2013- ... "Reflux Remedies: ranitidine". PharmaSight OTC Health. PharmaSight.org. Archived from the original on 21 August 2017. Retrieved ... "Reflux Remedies: ranitidine". PharmaSight OTC Health. PharmaSight.org. Archived from the original on 12 January 2013. Retrieved ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). *Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). *Esophageal stricture. *Megaesophagus. Stomach. * ...
The principal cause of the chronic inflammation is gastroesophageal reflux disease, GERD (UK: GORD). In this disease, acidic ... gastroesophageal reflux disease), although a large subgroup of patients with Barrett's esophagus do not have symptoms.[1] ... The main cause of Barrett's esophagus is thought to be an adaptation to chronic acid exposure from reflux esophagitis[3] The ... Screening endoscopy is recommended among males over the age of 60 who have reflux symptoms that are of long duration and not ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). *Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). *Esophageal stricture. *Megaesophagus. Stomach. * ...
This could include treatment for gastrointestinal reflux disease, allergies, and thyroid problems. Intervention to stop smoking ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). *Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). *Esophageal stricture. *Megaesophagus. Stomach. * ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). *Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). *Esophageal stricture. *Megaesophagus. Stomach. * ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). *Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). *Esophageal stricture. *Megaesophagus. Stomach. * ...
Stomach myoelectrical response of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease receiving omeprazole treatment. Journal of ...
... frequent heartburn or gastroesophageal reflux disease; and heavy night sweats. Whereas the vast majority of patients with ...
In Italy it is used in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease and in Canada, the drug is indicated in upper ... Pediatric reflux[edit]. Domperidone has been found effective in the treatment of pediatric reflux.[32] However some specialists ... who was born at 28 weeks gestation with respiratory complications and had a fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux and ... It is available over-the-counter to treat gastroesophageal reflux and functional dyspepsia in many countries, such as Ireland, ...
"Gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity". Rev Gastroenterol Disord. Vol. 8 no. 4. str. 233-9. PMID 19107097.. ...
Acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease, can greatly exacerbate the mouth-alcohol problem. The stomach is normally ... "Reliability of Breath-Alcohol Analysis in Individuals with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease". Journal of Forensic Sciences. 44 ( ...
... gastroesophageal reflux disease, and aphthous stomatitis. A range of extraintestinal symptoms, which can be the only ...
Sclerotherapy for Vascular Malformations and Gastroesophageal Reflux. The medical facilities at the hospital consist of 5 ... Vesico-Ureteric Reflux, Appendicitis, Intussusception, Anorectal Malformations, Hirschprung's Disease, Hepatobiliary Surgery, ...
... gastroesophageal reflux disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and migraine.[1] History[edit]. The condition is named after the ...
"New insights on gastro-esophageal reflux in cystic fibrosis by longitudinal follow up". Arch. Dis. Child. 66 (11): 1339-45. . ...
... gastroesophageal reflux disease, and heartburn,[22] although none of these supposed effects is confirmed by high-quality ...
While omeprazole is approved only at doses of up to 20 mg for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux,[81] esomeprazole is ... The primary uses are treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease, treatment and maintenance of erosive esophagitis, treatment ...
Baker, ME; Einstein, DM (Mar 2014). "Barium esophagram: does it have a role in gastroesophageal reflux disease?". ... Barium swallow studies are better than endoscopy at demonstrating the anatomic findings in gastroesophageal reflux disease ... They are used to diagnose and monitor esophageal reflux, dysphagia, hiatus hernia, strictures, diverticula, pyloric stenosis, ... after anti-reflux surgery.[23]. *Barium fluoroscopic examinations have some advantages over computed tomography and magnetic ...
... gastroesophageal reflux disease, and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome.[1] There is also tentative evidence of benefit for hives.[3] ... "Gastroesophageal reflux: management guidance for the pediatrician". Pediatrics. 131 (5): e1684-e1695. doi:10.1542/peds.2013- ... "Reflux Remedies: ranitidine". PharmaSight OTC Health. PharmaSight.org. Archived from the original on 21 August 2017. Retrieved ... "Reflux Remedies: ranitidine". PharmaSight OTC Health. PharmaSight.org. Archived from the original on 12 January 2013. Retrieved ...
Gastroesophageal reflux diseaseEdit. A 2011 review said melatonin is effective in relieving epigastric pain and heartburn.[118] ... "The potential therapeutic effect of melatonin in Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease". BMC Gastroenterology. 10: 7. doi:10.1186/ ...
Lying down or reclining after taking the drug and prior to eating breakfast may cause gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal ...
... gastroesophageal reflux ) వ్యాధి మరింత సాధారణంగా ఉంటుంది.[37] దంతాలు[మార్చు]. డౌన్ సిండ్రోమ్ ఉన్న వ్యక్తులు గింగివిటిస్కు ( ...
Dysfunction of the gastroesophageal sphincter causes gastroesophageal reflux, which causes heartburn and if it happens often ... Gastro-esophageal junction[edit]. The gastro-esophageal junction (also known as the esophagogastric junction) is the junction ... "Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease". The New England Journal of Medicine. 359 (16): 1700-7. doi:10.1056/NEJMcp0804684. PMC 3058591 ... can lead to gastroesophageal reflux disease, with damage of the esophageal mucosa.[10] ...
... gastroesophageal reflux (GER), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). GER may also lead to recurrent infections of ...
Katz, PO; Gerson, LB; Vela, MF (2013). "Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease". Am J ... Omeprazole can be used in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic ulcers, erosive esophagitis, ... is a medication used in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease, peptic ulcer disease, and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). *Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). *Esophageal stricture. *Megaesophagus. Stomach. * ...
... in infants secondary to gastroesophageal reflux. Pediatrics. 1977; 60(6). [4] Donoghue AJ, Berg RA, Nadkarni ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease doesnt just affect old people who eat too much while watching TV. Active, healthy teens can ... What Is Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER)?. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER), also called reflux, is when food and acid from the ... What Is Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)?. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is when someone has reflux more than ... While its more common in adults, kids, teens, and even babies can have gastroesophageal (gas-tro-ih-sah-fuh-JEE-ul) reflux. ...
British: Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD);[1] gastric reflux disease, acid reflux disease, reflux, gastroesophageal ... Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as acid reflux, is a long-term condition in which stomach contents rise up ... "Testing for refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease" (PDF). Retrieved 20 August 2018.. *^ a b c d e Using the Proton Pump ... December 2019). "Gastroesophageal reflux in laryngopharyngeal reflux patients: Clinical features and therapeutic response". ...
... it could be gastroesophageal reflux (GER). And it can be a problem for kids - even newborns. ... What Is Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER)?. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER), also called reflux, is when food and acid from the ... How Is Gastroesophageal Reflux Diagnosed?. In older kids, doctors usually diagnose reflux by doing an exam and hearing about ... What Are the Signs & Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux?. Common signs of reflux include:. *heartburn (a burning sensation in ...
from the Czech Republic have evaluated extraesophageal reflux (EER) using reflux area index, number of reflux, and acid ... Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. Gaurav V. Kulkarni,1 Fernando A. M. Herbella,2 and P. Marco Fisichella3 ... In United States, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) affects almost 20% of the population, and its incidence seems to be ... Moreover, in recent years, diagnostic modalities of more complex manifestations of GERD, such as extraesophageal reflux, have ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition in which the stomach contents leak backward from the stomach into the ... This is called reflux or gastroesophageal reflux. Reflux may cause symptoms. Harsh stomach acids can also damage the lining of ... Heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux can be brought on or made worse by pregnancy. Symptoms can also be caused by certain ... Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition in which the stomach contents leak backward from the stomach into the ...
Gastroesophageal Reflux and Esophageal Atresia. In: Vandenplas Y. (eds) Gastroesophageal Reflux in Children. Springer, Cham. * ... Evaluation of gastroesophageal function and mechanisms underlying gastroesophageal reflux in infants and adults born with ... Gastroesophageal reflux and Barretts esophagus in adults born with esophageal atresia. Am J Gastroenterol. 1999;94(10):2825-8. ... Gastroesophageal reflux and related pathology in adults who were born with esophageal atresia: a long-term follow-up study. ...
For a patient who has persistent symptoms despite medical treatment, an anti-reflux operation may be an option. ... food and liquid can move backward into the esophagus and cause heartburn and other symptoms known as gastroesophageal disease ( ... Gastroesophageal reflux disease. URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/imagepages/19609.htm Gastroesophageal reflux disease ...
Reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus leading to localized infection. This relatively common and unpleasant proble ... Reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus leading to localized infection. This relatively common and unpleasant problem is ... Tobacco smoking causes a lowering of tone in the sphincter thus allowing reflux to occur. Alcohol in turn increases the ...
Fasting and postprandial mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Dig Dis Sci. ... Effect of baclofen on esophagogastric motility and gastroesophageal reflux in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease: a ... Vieira M.C. (2017) Gastroesophageal Reflux and Prokinetics. In: Vandenplas Y. (eds) Gastroesophageal Reflux in Children. ... Vandenplas Y, Hassall E. Mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease. J Pediatr Gastroenterol ...
Drugs & Diseases , Gastroenterology , Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Q&A What are strictures in gastroesophageal reflux ... LINX® reflux management system to bridge the "treatment gap" in gastroesophageal reflux disease: a systematic review of 35 ... Gastroesophageal reflux strictures typically occur in the mid-to-distal esophagus and can be visualized on upper GI tract ... Endoscopy in symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease: scoping out whom to target. JAMA Intern Med. 2014 Mar. 174(3):465-6. ...
pyloriin the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) ... Pathophysiology of reflux esophagitis. *Patient education: Acid reflux (gastroesophageal reflux disease) in adults (The Basics) ... Patient education: Acid reflux (gastroesophageal reflux disease) in adults (Beyond the Basics) ... Helicobacter pylori eradication does not exacerbate reflux symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease. Gastroenterology 2001; ...
2. Gastroesophageal Reflux and Antireflux Barriers. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is defined as a normal, physiologic ... W. J. Dodds, J. Dent, and W. J. Hogan, "Mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux in patients with reflux esophagitis," The New ... A. J. Ing, M. C. Ngu, and A. B. X. Breslin, "Obstructive sleep apnea and gastroesophageal reflux," American Journal of Medicine ... B. C.-Y. Wong, W. M. Wong, and R. Smales, "Gastroesophageal reflux disease and tooth erosion," in Tooth Erosion: Prevention and ...
December 2019). "Gastroesophageal reflux in laryngopharyngeal reflux patients: Clinical features and therapeutic response". ... Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), is a chronic condition in which stomach contents rise up into the esophagus, resulting ... Occasional gastroesophageal reflux without troublesome symptoms or complications is even more common. The classic symptoms of ... "Testing for refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease" (PDF). Retrieved 20 August 2018. Using the Proton Pump Inhibitors to ...
Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Q&A What are the differential diagnoses for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease?. Updated: May 23, ... Endoscopy in symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease: scoping out whom to target. JAMA Intern Med. 2014 Mar. 174(3):465-6. ... Medical therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease in 2007. Rev Gastroenterol Disord. 2007 Fall. 7(4):193-203. [Medline]. ... Time trends of gastroesophageal reflux disease: a systematic review. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2007 Jan. 5(1):17-26. [Medline ...
Are you suffering from heartburn? Heartburn can be a symptom of a serious problem called "gastroesophageal reflux disease," ... Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, Health Care, Heartburn, Muscle, Pain, Pasta, Pregnancy, Research, Sleep, Smoking, Smoking ... Persistent symptoms of heartburn and reflux should not be ignored. You should see a doctor if you experience any of the ... Heartburn is caused by the regurgitation or reflux of gastric fluid/contents into the esophagus, the muscular tube that ...
encoded search term (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease) and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease What to Read Next on Medscape. ... Gastroesophageal reflux disease occurs when the amount of gastric juice that refluxes into the esophagus exceeds the normal ... Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs when the amount of gastric juice that refluxes into the esophagus exceeds the ... The only way to determine if abnormal reflux is present and if symptoms are actually caused by gastroesophageal reflux is ...
When these acids travel up into the mouth and then down into the lungs, they can cause gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). ... Heartburn, also known as gastric reflux or indigestion, happens after you eat and food is in your stomach. In the stomach, food ...
Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) is one of the most common digestive disorders. The most frequent symptoms are heart ... Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) is one of the most common digestive disorders. The most frequent symptoms are heart ... Regurgitation of reflux. This leads to reflux of the acid from the stomach into the back of the mouth. This causes a sour or ... Symptoms of Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). News-Medical. https://www.news-medical.net/health/Symptoms-of-Gastro- ...
... some patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) continue to have reflux symptoms or endoscopic evidence of ... gastroesophageal reflux disease) in adults (Beyond the Basics). *Patient education: Acid reflux (gastroesophageal reflux ... Effect of baclofen on esophagogastric motility and gastroesophageal reflux in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease: a ... See Clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of non-acid reflux and Surgical management of gastroesophageal reflux ...
Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Clinical Research Trial Listings in Gastroenterology Otolaryngology (Ear, Nose, Throat) ... Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Clinical Trials. A listing of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) medical research ... Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common condition defined as symptoms or mucosal damage produced by the abnormal ... Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common outpatient diagnosis in gastroenterology and is associated with a ...
Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Clinical Research Trial Listings in Gastroenterology Otolaryngology (Ear, Nose, Throat) ... Methoclopramide for Gastroesophageal Reflux in Premature Infants Justification: Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER) is a condition ... Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Clinical Trials. A listing of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) medical research ... Prucalopride Treatment for Refractory Gastro-esophageal Reflux Disease Up to date there is no placebo-controlled trial to ...
Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. 497 Words , 2 Pages Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Sensitive Gut (Harvard Special Health ... It is commonly referred to as "heartburn" but is more appropriately named acid reflux disease or gastroesophageal reflux ... Gastro Esophageal Reflux Disease. 837 Words , 3 Pages a serious complication of GERD, in which stands for Gastro Esophageal ... Diverticular Disease and Gastro Esophageal Reflux Disease Essay. 1231 Words 5 Pages The human body is a complex system that ...
... to Flourish by 2026 - published on openPR.com ... Gastroesophageal refers to the stomach and esophagus. Reflux means to return or flow back. Gastroesophageal reflux disease or ... Growing Demand in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Therapeutics Market Clinical R … Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Therapeutics ... Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Treatment Devices Market - Latest Devel … Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) ...
Discusses gastroesophageal reflux disease. Covers main symptom of heartburn, caused by stomach acid and juices flowing from the ...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease is felt to be associated with a variety of laryngeal conditions and symptoms of which "reflux ... Gastroesophageal reflux and voice disorders. Am J Med 1997. In: Rubin JS. Moore P. et al. 22. Gastroenterology 1987. 40. Lacayo ... gastroesophageal reflux (GER) with laryngeal disorders. He speculated that the "eructation of gases from the stomach" and ... the larynx and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) diagnosed by acid barium studies. Treatment with antacids, dietary ...
Linked color imaging improves visibility of reflux esophagitis. With more prevalent gastroesophageal reflux disease comes ... Esophageal pH-impedance monitoring of reflux patterns in non-erosive reflux disease, reflux hypersensitivity and functional ... Association between gastroesophageal reflux disease and depression disorder: A protocol for systematic review and meta-analysis ... Protein expression of TRP channels in the esophagus of patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER)-associated cough. We ...
Gastro esophageal reflux - Food or liquid regurgitating from the stomach into the food pipe, is clearly explained in Medindia ... Medical Word - Gastro esophageal reflux. Ans : Food or liquid regurgitating from the stomach into the food pipe. ... Gastro esophageal reflux - Glossary. Written & Compiled by Medindia Content Team. Medically Reviewed by The Medindia Medical ...
Discusses gastroesophageal reflux disease. Covers main symptom of heartburn, caused by stomach acid and juices flowing from the ... see Gastroesophageal Reflux in Babies and Children . For information on reflux while pregnant, see Gastroesophageal Reflux ... Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). Topic Overview. Is this topic for you?. This topic is about gastroesophageal reflux ... What is gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)?. Reflux means that stomach acid and juices flow from the stomach back up into ...
Comparative clinical trial of S-pantoprazole versus racemic pantoprazole in the treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux disease ... The primary treatment goals in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are relief of symptoms, prevention of ... 1. Background Factors of Reflux Esophagitis and Non-Erosive Reflux Disease- A Cross-Sectional Study of 10,837 Subjects in Japan ... 1. Background Factors of Reflux Esophagitis and Non-Erosive Reflux Disease- A Cross-Sectional Study of 10,837 Subjects in Japan ...
... Statistics from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services indicate that about seven ... At some time, almost everyone experiences a gastroesophageal reflux, or a backflow of acid from the stomach into the swallowing ... When the condition becomes this severe, it is called Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). ... Gastro-Reflux. Headaches. Hypothyroidism. Insomnia. Lower Back Pain. Rash. Sinusitis. Upper Respiratory. Urinary Tract ...
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is when someone has reflux more than twice a week. (kidshealth.org)
  • GERD can be a problem if it's not treated because, over time, the reflux of stomach acid damages the tissue lining the esophagus, causing inflammation and pain. (kidshealth.org)
  • Reflux that causes problems like poor growth, vomiting, or damage to the esophagus is called GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease) . (kidshealth.org)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease ( GERD ), also known as acid reflux , is a long-term condition in which stomach contents rise up into the esophagus , resulting in either symptoms or complications. (wikipedia.org)
  • But in people who have GERD, reflux happens more often and causes noticeable discomfort. (kidshealth.org)
  • In United States, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) affects almost 20% of the population, and its incidence seems to be rising in relation to the widespread epidemic of obesity. (hindawi.com)
  • Moreover, in recent years, diagnostic modalities of more complex manifestations of GERD, such as extraesophageal reflux, have been subjected to refinements. (hindawi.com)
  • This paper discusses recent research regarding the changing spectrum of GERD in areas of the European Union and Asia subjected to urbanization in recent times and discusses recent and clinically important developments in the diagnostic modalities of extraesophageal reflux. (hindawi.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition in which the stomach contents leak backward from the stomach into the esophagus (food pipe). (medlineplus.gov)
  • What are strictures in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)? (medscape.com)
  • Presence of a stricture with a history of reflux can also help diagnose GERD. (medscape.com)
  • A possible role for H. pylori in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has also been suggested in a growing number of studies. (uptodate.com)
  • Suspicion of an interaction between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) stems from epidemiologic data showing that as the prevalence of H. pylori decreased in Western societies, the prevalence of GERD and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus increased [ 1 ]. (uptodate.com)
  • The increasing prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children and adults, and of "silent refluxers" in particular, increases the responsibility of dentists to be alert to this potentially severe condition when observing unexplained instances of tooth erosion. (hindawi.com)
  • A recent systematic review found a median prevalence of 24% for tooth erosion in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and a median prevalence of 32.5% for GERD in adult patients who had tooth erosion [ 7 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • GER does not produce gastric symptoms or mucosal damage, but can progress into a clinical disorder termed gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), usually characterized by symptoms of heartburn and acid regurgitation [ 16 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • When these symptoms happen often or aren't tied to certain ingredients, they might be due to gastroesophageal reflux (GER) - also called gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (rchsd.org)
  • How can cigarette smoking affect gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)? (webmd.com)
  • Stopping smoking is important to ease gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms. (webmd.com)
  • National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Heartburn, Gastroesophageal Reflux, and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). (webmd.com)
  • How much should you eat if you have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)? (webmd.com)
  • Heartburn can be a symptom of a serious problem called "gastroesophageal reflux disease," also known as GERD. (news-medical.net)
  • When these acids travel up into the mouth and then down into the lungs, they can cause gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (breastcancer.org)
  • Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) is one of the most common digestive disorders. (news-medical.net)
  • Retrieved on December 04, 2020 from https://www.news-medical.net/health/Symptoms-of-Gastro-Esophageal-Reflux-Disease-(GERD).aspx. (news-medical.net)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), is a chronic condition in which stomach contents rise up into the esophagus, resulting in either symptoms or complications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Learn about gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and acid reflux, including reflux-friendly recipes, tips for dining out, treatments, and more. (healthcentral.com)
  • INTRODUCTION - Despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), some patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) continue to have reflux symptoms or endoscopic evidence of esophagitis. (uptodate.com)
  • Most patients with GERD who do not respond to a PPI have either nonerosive reflux (NERD) or functional heartburn. (uptodate.com)
  • A listing of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) medical research trials actively recruiting patient volunteers. (centerwatch.com)
  • Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common condition defined as symptoms or mucosal damage produced by the abnormal reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus. (centerwatch.com)
  • Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common outpatient diagnosis in gastroenterology and is associated with a significant burden on the healthcare system. (centerwatch.com)
  • Severe Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) leading to a chronic aggression of esophagus mucosa, called Barrett's esophagus is a main complication of Sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity. (centerwatch.com)
  • MediGus, Ltd. Israel) in patients with esophageal or extra-esophageal gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-related symptoms. (centerwatch.com)
  • It is commonly referred to as "heartburn" but is more appropriately named acid reflux disease or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (bartleby.com)
  • The reflux causes irritation to the lining of the esophagus which leads to Gastroesophageal reflux diseases (GERD). (openpr.com)
  • Some of the common symptoms involved in GERD are heart burn, acid reflux etc. (openpr.com)
  • This is an innovative procedure that treats GERD by indirectly reconstructing the anti-reflux valve. (openpr.com)
  • North America seized major share in the global market of gastroesophageal reflux disease devices market due to increase in aging population and awareness of drug therapies followed by Western and Eastern Europe, Asia Pacific may have a negative impact on GERD in their daily lives due to which the acceptance rate of therapy is low and the prevalence in Asia pacific is low as well. (openpr.com)
  • Years later, in 1968, Cherry and Margulies (1) reported three patients with contact ulcers of the larynx and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) diagnosed by acid barium studies. (scribd.com)
  • Authors: Vandenplas Y, Levy E, Simon M Abstract INTRODUCTION: Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) in infants is worldwide diagnosed with increasing frequency, resulting in an increasing number of infants exposed to treatment. (medworm.com)
  • Authors: Lee JM, Yoo IK, Kim E, Hong SP, Cho JY Abstract Background/Aims: : Increased esophagogastric junction (EGJ) relaxation is the most important mechanism involved in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (medworm.com)
  • This topic is about gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in adults. (cigna.com)
  • When you have heartburn that bothers you often, it is called gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD. (cigna.com)
  • With GERD, the reflux and heartburn last longer and come more often. (cigna.com)
  • AIM: To compare the efficacy and tolerability of S-pantoprazole (20 mg once a day) versus racemic Pantoprazole (40 mg once a day) in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (scribd.com)
  • The primary treatment goals in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are relief of symptoms, prevention of symptom relapse, healing of erosive esophagitis, and prevention of complications of esophagitis[1]. (scribd.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, occurs when the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) does not close properly and stomach contents leak back, or reflux, into the esophagus . (medicinenet.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is reflux that occurs more than twice a week for a few weeks. (drugs.com)
  • When the condition becomes this severe, it is called Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). (health-alliance.com)
  • Nearly all epidemiologic studies have found an association between increasing body mass index (BMI) and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (nih.gov)
  • Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has been consistently associated with improvement in the symptoms and findings of GERD. (nih.gov)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) refers to the pathological symptoms and complications that result from reflux. (sages.org)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) affects many infants and children in the United States. (sages.org)
  • The treatment of pathological GERD typically starts with dietary modifications, postural changes, and potentially the addition of pharmacologic agents, particularly anti-reflux medications. (sages.org)
  • Heartburn that occurs more than 2 times a week for several weeks may be gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (denverhealth.org)
  • Most pregnant women have symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), especially heartburn , at some point. (rexhealth.com)
  • But if it becomes a long-term problem, it is called gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (rochester.edu)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) affects 20-30% of the population in Western countries, and is one of the most common clinical problems in daily practice. (nih.gov)
  • Currently patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a disorder of the esophagus that causes frequent symptoms of heartburn . (adventisthealthcare.com)
  • 2 , 3 , 4 A study of infants with GERD found that exposure to cigarette smoke in the environment is associated with reflux, leading the authors conclude that secondhand smoke contributes directly to GERD in infants. (adventisthealthcare.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a complex, chronic, and relapsing condition that carries a risk of morbidity and the potential for resultant complications. (aafp.org)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a less common, more serious pathologic process that usually warrants medical management and diagnostic evaluation. (aafp.org)
  • Gravitational and positional factors may exacerbate GER and increase the risk of GERD by allowing reflux to occur in a supine position. (aafp.org)
  • To treat GERD - a condition in which a patient's gastroesophageal junction does not close completely and acid or bile from the stomach enters and can damage the esophagus - the device is inserted through the mouth and esophagus until it reaches the esophageal junction, the opening at the bottom of the esophagus that connects the esophagus to the stomach. (medgadget.com)
  • Recent comprehensive guidelines developed by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition define the common entities of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) as the physiologic passage of gastric contents into the esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) as reflux associated with troublesome symptoms or complications. (aappublications.org)
  • The ability to distinguish between GER and GERD is increasingly important to implement best practices in the management of acid reflux in patients across all pediatric age groups, as children with GERD may benefit from further evaluation and treatment, whereas conservative recommendations are the only indicated therapy in those with uncomplicated physiologic reflux. (aappublications.org)
  • GER, defined as the passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, is distinguished from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which includes troublesome symptoms or complications associated with GER. (aappublications.org)
  • 5 Therefore, it is important that all practitioners who treat children with reflux-related disorders are able to identify and distinguish those children with GERD, who may benefit from further evaluation and treatment, from those with simple GER, in whom conservative recommendations are more appropriate. (aappublications.org)
  • This is a study of Barrett's Esophagus (BE) and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • GERD or gastroesophageal reflux disease or acid reflux disease is a condition that is caused by the acids in the stomach rising into the esophagus. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Hence, this form of acid reflux is also called silent gerd. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is defined as the rise of gastric or gastro-duodenal content above gastroesophageal junction which can cause bothersome symptoms and/ or structural damage, which can impact quality of life and wellbeing of patients suffering from it. (medigraphic.com)
  • however these findings do not have diagnostic certainty in some patients, which is why it has been proposed that GERD diagnoses be made with both the combination of symptoms, objective endoscopy testing, ambulatory reflux monitoring and response to anti-secretory treatment. (medigraphic.com)
  • A significant percentage of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) will not respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. (dovepress.com)
  • The causes of PPI-refractory GERD are numerous and diverse, and include adherence, persistent acid, functional disorders, nonacid reflux, and PPI bioavailability. (dovepress.com)
  • Available at: https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/gastrointestinal-disorders/esophageal-and-swallowing-disorders/gastroesophageal-reflux-disease-gerd. (epnet.com)
  • Available at: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/acid-reflux-ger-gerd-adults/symptoms-causes. (epnet.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is pathologic reflux associated with poor weight gain, irritability, dysphagia and often requires evaluation and treatment. (healio.com)
  • Unlike physiologic reflux, pathologic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is associated with a subset of symptoms and/or complications that denote a pathologic process. (healio.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic condition when the symptoms of GER become troubling enough for a patient to seek out either prescription and/or over-the-counter (OTC) medication help, or if esophageal or extra-esophageal complications known to be related to GER are noted on any investigation. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLSERs) (55%-65%) and swallow induced lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations (10%) account for most reflux episodes in GERD. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Non-erosive Reflux Disease (NERD) is the most common presentation of GERD. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also called acid reflux, is a common digestive disorder in which stomach contents regurgitate (reflux) into the esophagus. (columbiasurgery.org)
  • For those patients in whom a medical regimen has not been successful, anti-reflux surgery can offer gratifying, durable results with relief of GERD. (columbiasurgery.org)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), or just acid reflux, is when stomach acid frequently flows back into the esophagus. (gastro.org)
  • Each person may not feel gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the same way. (gastro.org)
  • If a person has a hiatal hernia , which can cause gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms, it will also be repaired during this surgery. (healthwise.net)
  • About 25 million American adults suffer daily from (esophageal reflux, sometimes referred to as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or heartburn). (gicare.com)
  • GERD is caused by acid, normally found in the stomach, refluxing or splashing up into the esophagus - the muscular tube that connects the throat to the stomach. (gicare.com)
  • The relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and laryngeal cancer has not been fully elucidated. (nih.gov)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic digestive disorder that affects a growing number of people in the world and is one of the most common gastric complaints that prompts an individual to consult a doctor. (scirp.org)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic disease usually caused by the reflux of acidic gastric and duodenal contents into the distal esophagus. (scirp.org)
  • The aim of this study was to examine the impact of LSG on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (sages.org)
  • Presence of GERD was defined by symptoms, therapy with an anti-reflux medication, or a documented diagnosis of GERD. (sages.org)
  • Following LSG, gastroesophageal reflux improved in the nearly half of patients who had preoperative GERD. (sages.org)
  • The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the United States has been estimated at 18.6 million diagnosed cases, based on 1998 research. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • GERD is a complex disease process characterized by a disruption in the body's mechanisms to protect the esophagus from reflux of acid and other gastric contents. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a syndrome of inappropriate backflow of gastric acid into the esophagus, which can result in inflammation and erosion of the esophageal mucosa. (nutritionmd.org)
  • If the sphincter does not close properly, food and liquid can move backward into the esophagus and cause heartburn and other symptoms known as gastroesophageal disease (GERD). (mountsinai.org)
  • If so, you may have Gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD. (mountsinai.org)
  • To determine if you have GERD, your doctor may request an upper endoscopy exam to look into your esophagus and stomach to diagnose reflux. (mountsinai.org)
  • Do you suffer from gastroesophageal reflux disease (gerd)? (articlesphere.com)
  • Acid reflux remedies come in naturopathic, GERD a natural treatment, and pharmaceutical forms. (articlesphere.com)
  • The long term effects of the drugs you see advertised for gerd and gastric acid reflux have not been realized. (articlesphere.com)
  • This has led to a new problem: gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) after sleeve. (sages.org)
  • In 50 healthy volunteers and 29 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), we evaluated the ingestion dynamics of 100 mL of acidic sour liquid (concentrated lemon juice, pH: 3.0) and 100 mL of water (pH: 6.8). (scielo.br)
  • The association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), the most common gastroesophageal disorder, and AF remains undetermined. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Diagnosis of GERD is by history, esophageal pH monitoring, radiologic study showing reflux of swallowed barium, and endoscopy to identify ulceration or stricture and permit biopsy to rule out malignancy. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Surgical procedures to inhibit reflux mechanically, particularly Nissen fundoplication, can improve symptoms in severe disease but have not been shown to prevent carcinoma in patients with GERD and Barrett esophagus. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a form of persistent gastroesophageal reflux (GER) that occurs more than twice a week and can eventually lead to more serious health problems. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • The gastroesophogeal reflux repair or "wrap" surgery corrects Gastroesophogeal Reflux Disease (GERD). (chp.edu)
  • If yes, then you might be suffering from GERD (Gastro Esophageal Reflux Disease). (iloveindia.com)
  • A chronic burning sensation in your chest and a sour taste in the mouth could be an indication that you have Gastro Esophageal Reflux Disease or GERD. (iloveindia.com)
  • Although there are several causes which lead to acid reflux disease, the functioning of a valve known as lower esophageal sphincter or LES, located at the junction of the esophagus and stomach, is what GERD actually depends on. (iloveindia.com)
  • Thus, excessive intake of caffeine containing beverages can lead to acid reflux and consequently GERD. (iloveindia.com)
  • Treatment for gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (medicalcityhospital.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder affecting approximately more than 10% of the population. (novapublishers.com)
  • This disorder is called gastroesophageal reflux disease (abbreviated GERD) when the esophagus is primarily affected. (evms.edu)
  • GERD stands for gastroesophageal reflux disease, which is the backflow of stomach contents (including stomach acid) upward into the esophagus (the swallowing tube that extends from the mouth to the stomach and sits behind the breast bone). (medbroadcast.com)
  • GER that progresses to esophageal injury and other symptoms is called gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (swedishhospital.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition in which contents of the stomach or small intestine repeatedly move back up into the esophagus (the tube connecting the throat to the stomach). (limamemorial.org)
  • Most people have heartburn at some point in their lives, persistent reflux and severe heartburn may be a sign of GERD. (limamemorial.org)
  • Population-based data regarding the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Greece are very poor. (dovepress.com)
  • Very low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants struggle with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and beyond discharge. (nursingcenter.com)
  • The purpose of this article was to provide an overview of GER/GERD and share an evidence-based GER algorithm for consistent assessment and care of VLBW infants postdischarge to 12 months corrected age presenting with reflux-like symptoms. (nursingcenter.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux and GERD have been well investigated in healthy term infants and children. (nursingcenter.com)
  • GERD, or gastroesophageal reflux disease, is a long-term (chronic) digestive disorder. (ahealthyme.com)
  • GERD is a more serious and long-lasting form of gastroesophageal reflux (GER). (ahealthyme.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) expert witnesses will have strong medical experience, as GERD refers to a digestive disorder in which stomach acid flows back up into the esophagus, which can cause problems with acid reflux and indigestion. (forensisgroup.com)
  • Gastroesophageal expert consulting can provide valuable information for cases involving such areas as pediatric surgery, gastroenterology , oncology, pediatric gastroenterology, and numerous other related medical disciplines, each of which might become highly relevant in the event of litigation concerning GERD. (forensisgroup.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic condition in which contents of the stomach flow back (reflux) into the esophagus potentially causing symptoms (e.g., heartburn) and injury to esophageal tissue. (lifeextension.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition in which stomach contents are refluxed back into the esophagus. (lifeextension.com)
  • Research and Markets has announced the addition of the 'Global Gastro Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Drug and Devices Market - Analysis and Forecast 2017-2023 (Focus on Device Type, Drug Type, Market Share Analysis, Patent Landscape and Country Analysis)' report to their offering. (prnewswire.co.uk)
  • Currently available devices are MUSE, LINX reflux device, Stretta & GERD-X among others. (prnewswire.co.uk)
  • Invasive procedures include LINX management system & MUSE while the non-invasive include EsophyX, Endostim, Stretta, Durasphere, GERD-X. The diagnostic devices include Bravo reflux management system & Digitrapper. (prnewswire.co.uk)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common disorders in medical practice. (scielo.br)
  • given the demonstrated effectiveness of medical treatment together with the eminent acceptance of the laparoscopic approach, the indications of surgery in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are currently subject to continuous controversy. (isciii.es)
  • Lack of distal esophageal contractions is a key determinant of gastroesophageal reflux disease after repair of esophageal atresia. (springer.com)
  • The first step in managing esophageal reflux disease involves medical treatment. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Armstrong D. The clinical usefulness of prokinetic agents in gastrooesophageal reflux disease. (springer.com)
  • Guidelines for the management of symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. (springer.com)
  • Metoclopramide for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in infants: a systematic review. (springer.com)
  • Giannini EG, Zentilin P, Dulbecco P, Vigneri S, Scarlata P, Savarino V. Management strategy for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease: a comparison between empirical treatment with esomeprazole and endoscopy-oriented treatment. (medscape.com)
  • Medical therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease in 2007. (medscape.com)
  • Updated guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. (medscape.com)
  • Surgery for reflux disease: reflections of a gastroenterologist. (medscape.com)
  • Meta-analysis: obesity and the risk for gastroesophageal reflux disease and its complications. (medscape.com)
  • Do I have gastroesophageal reflux disease? (drugs.com)
  • What are the differential diagnoses for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease? (medscape.com)
  • Gastroesophageal Reflux and the Lung provides a comprehensive review of current knowledge concerning normal deglutition and foregut digestive processes and examines how abnormalities of swallowing or excessive/abnormal GER can lead to respiratory tract dysfunction and lung disease. (springer.com)
  • Upper gastrointestinal contrast-enhanced studies are the initial radiologic procedure of choice in the workup gastroesophageal reflux disease. (medscape.com)
  • Currently, no role exists for computed tomography scanning, magnetic resonance imaging, or ultrasonography in the routine evaluation of patients with reflux disease. (medscape.com)
  • Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease involves a stepwise approach. (medscape.com)
  • Transthoracic and transabdominal fundoplications are performed for gastroesophageal reflux disease, including partial (anterior or posterior) and circumferential wraps. (medscape.com)
  • See 'Medical management of gastroesophageal reflux disease in adults' . (uptodate.com)
  • Diverticular Disease and Gastro Esophageal Reflux Disease. (bartleby.com)
  • There are a small amount of diseases that can be not only prevented, but also corrected by eating the proper nutrition or maintaining a healthy lifestyle such as Diverticular Disease and Gastro esophageal Reflux Disease. (bartleby.com)
  • Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Sensitive Gut (Harvard Special Health Reports) In consultation with Lawrence S. Friedman, M.D. Stanford, CT In this article, you are informed about a disease that is occurring more often in our society. (bartleby.com)
  • A chronic digestive disease that occurs when gastric juices or the stomach content flow back to the esophagus is known as Gastroesophageal reflux disease. (openpr.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease devices market is predicted to increase during the forecast period due to the extensive research and regulations in the field of Gastroesophageal reflux Disease Market. (openpr.com)
  • Hence Innovations in terms of treatment modalities and commercialization of cost effective devices are expected to boost gastroesophageal reflux disease devices market during the forecast period. (openpr.com)
  • Based on geographic regions, gastroesophageal reflux disease devices market is segmented into seven key regions: North America, Latin America, Europe, APAC and Middle East & Africa. (openpr.com)
  • Safety considerations when managing gastro-esophageal reflux disease in infants. (medworm.com)
  • The Usefulness of the Measurement of Esophagogastric Junction Distensibility by EndoFLIP in the Diagnosis of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. (medworm.com)
  • Methods: We analyzed EndoFLIP® data from 204 patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD), 310 patients with nonerosive reflux disease (NERD). (medworm.com)
  • Esophageal pH-impedance monitoring of reflux patterns in non-erosive reflux disease, reflux hypersensitivity and functional heartburn]. (medworm.com)
  • Abstract OBJECTIVE: To analyze the differences in reflux patterns in 24-hour esophageal pH-impedance monitoring in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), reflux hypersensitivity (RH) and functional heartburn (FH) and explore the possible mechanism of symptoms in patients with heartburn and negative endoscopic findings. (medworm.com)
  • For information on reflux while pregnant, see Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease During Pregnancy . (cigna.com)
  • Current evidence suggests that laparoscopic adjusted gastric banding should be avoided in these patients as the impact on gastroesophageal reflux disease appears unfavorable. (nih.gov)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease--from reflux episodes to mucosal inflammation. (nih.gov)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease typically manifests as heartburn and regurgitation, but it may also present with atypical or extraesophageal symptoms, including asthma, chronic cough, laryngitis, hoarseness, chronic sore throat, dental erosions, and noncardiac chest pain. (aafp.org)
  • Diagnosing atypical manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease is often a challenge because heartburn and regurgitation may be absent, making it difficult to prove a cause-and-effect relationship. (aafp.org)
  • In patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease who have atypical or extraesophageal symptoms, aggressive acid suppression using proton pump inhibitors twice daily before meals for three to four months is the standard treatment, although some studies have failed to show a significant benefit in symptomatic improvement. (aafp.org)
  • Bringing the remaining areas together for healing and scarring increases the strength of the stomach-pouch wall so it will last longer, distinguishing this procedure from other noninvasive methods that have been attempted for obesity and reflux disease. (medgadget.com)
  • 1.Vakil N, Zanten S, Kahrilas P, Dent J, Jones R. The Montreal Definition and Classification of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Global Evidence-Based Consensus. (medigraphic.com)
  • Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. (medigraphic.com)
  • 4.Gerson LB, Kahrilas PJ , Fass R . Insights into gastroesophageal reflux disease associated dyspeptic symptoms. (medigraphic.com)
  • 5.Corley DA, Kubo A. Body mass index and gastroesophageal refl ux disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis. (medigraphic.com)
  • Metaanalysis: obesity and the risk for gastroesophageal reflux disease and its complications. (medigraphic.com)
  • Diagnosis and management of non-erosive reflux disease The Vevey NERD Consensus Group. (medigraphic.com)
  • Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) acid reflux and symptom patterns. (medigraphic.com)
  • Upper Endoscopy for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Best Practice Advice from the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians. (medigraphic.com)
  • Shimamoto T, Yamamichi N. No association of coffee consumption with gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, reflux esophagitis, and non-erosive reflux disease: A cross-sectional study of 8,013 healthy subjects in Japan. (epnet.com)
  • Diagnostic Confirmation: Are you sure your patient has gastroesophageal reflux disease? (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • It is also indicated for complications of reflux disease such as an esophageal stricture (narrowing) and the development of pre-cancerous changes in the esophagus. (columbiasurgery.org)
  • How severe the disease becomes depends on how weakened the LES is, and the amount and duration of acid refluxed into the esophagus. (gicare.com)
  • Some patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease also experience erosive esophagitis from acid-related mucosal injury, which will require careful treatment. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Many of them are familiar because of their use in treating reflux or peptic ulcer disease in adults. (drgreene.com)
  • Such disorders, which include scleroderma and Parkinson's disease, can impair esophageal clearance of refluxed gastric acid. (nutritionmd.org)
  • Mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux in premature infants with chronic lung disease. (springer.com)
  • Temperature-controlled radiofrequency energy delivery for gastroesophageal reflux disease: the Stretta procedure. (springer.com)
  • I suffered from gastroesophageal reflux disease for a long time. (articlesphere.com)
  • If you have ever suffered from this debilitating disease, you know the pain of waking in the middle of the night with acid reflux. (articlesphere.com)
  • Some of the pills prescribed for acid reflux disease cost as much as $100 per bottle. (articlesphere.com)
  • There is hope and there is a safe easy way to cure gastroesophageal reflux disease. (articlesphere.com)
  • There is a holistic way to overcome acid reflux disease. (articlesphere.com)
  • They can give temporary relief, but they do not get rid of acid reflux disease. (articlesphere.com)
  • Acid reflux disease treatment is different for many individuals. (articlesphere.com)
  • Excellent outcomes can be achieved when procedures are chosen based on patient physiology and a thorough evaluation of the patient's reflux disease. (sages.org)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease and atrial fibrillation: a nationwide population-based study. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Only when the frequency of acid reflux is greater than normal or complications occur as a result of it, the condition is known as gastro esophageal reflux disease. (iloveindia.com)
  • Understanding heartburn and reflux disease. (medicalcityhospital.com)
  • When it involves the larynx and pharynx, we call in laryngopharyngeal reflux disease (LPRD). (evms.edu)
  • Trullenque Juan R, Torres Sánchez T, Martí Martínez E, Martínez Abad M, Trullenque Peris R, Delgado Gomis F. Surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease: a comparative study between the open and laparoscopic approaches. (isciii.es)
  • Group I: 75 patients subjected to LS by a 3-surgeon team specially devoted to gastroesophageal disease in Hospital Dr. Peset, Valencia. (isciii.es)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux (GER), also called reflux , is when food and acid from the stomach go back up into the esophagus. (kidshealth.org)
  • In babies with GER, breast milk or formula regularly refluxes into the esophagus, and sometimes out of the mouth. (kidshealth.org)
  • This is a special X-ray that can show the refluxing of liquid into the esophagus, any irritation in the esophagus, and abnormalities in the upper digestive tract. (kidshealth.org)
  • The tip rests just above the esophageal sphincter to monitor the acid levels in the esophagus and to detect any reflux. (kidshealth.org)
  • [5] Acid reflux is due to poor closure of the lower esophageal sphincter , which is at the junction between the stomach and the esophagus. (wikipedia.org)
  • These patients are at major risk of presenting gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and its complications, as anastomotic strictures, esophagitis, failure to thrive, and Barrett's esophagus. (springer.com)
  • Anti-acid medications can neutralize acid that refluxes into the esophagus and prevent damage to the esophagus. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus leading to localized infection. (healthy.net)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux strictures typically occur in the mid-to-distal esophagus and can be visualized on upper GI tract studies and endoscopy. (medscape.com)
  • Pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux and Barrett esophagus. (medscape.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) occurs when stomach contents reflux or go up into the esophagus (the tube that connects the mouth to the stomach), during or after a meal. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • Reflux can occur when the LES opens, allowing stomach contents and acid to come back up into the esophagus. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • When refluxed material rapidly returns to the stomach, it causes no damage to the esophagus. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • In some children, reflux occurs very frequently or does not clear from the esophagus, causing damage to the lining of the esophagus. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • Not only may the tooth erosion from endogenous acid be more severe than that from exogenous acids but also gastric reflux, regurgitation, and microaspiration may have significant adverse effects on the mucosa of the esophagus, oropharynx, and respiratory system [ 2 - 6 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is defined as a normal, physiologic retrograde flow of gastric contents into the esophagus that occurs mostly postprandial (after meals) for around one hour per day [ 10 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • The burping, heartburn, and spitting up associated with GER are the result of acidic stomach contents moving backward into the esophagus (this is called reflux). (rchsd.org)
  • Heartburn is caused by the regurgitation or reflux of gastric fluid/contents into the esophagus, the muscular tube that connects the mouth and the stomach. (news-medical.net)
  • Smoking and the use of alcoholic beverages reduce the pressure on the lower esophageal sphincter (muscle between the esophagus and the stomach) permitting reflux to occur. (news-medical.net)
  • After the food and liquid is passed through the esophagus and entered in to the stomach the attractive forces of the magnet closes the Linx system which prevents the reflux. (openpr.com)
  • This prevent the reflux of the stomach fluids in esophagus. (openpr.com)
  • Test results can often be normal when reflux is present, but an endoscopy may detect inflammation of the esophagus (esophagitis) or other complications. (mayoclinic.org)
  • The LINX device is an expandable ring of metal beads that keeps stomach acid from refluxing into the esophagus, but allows food to pass into the stomach. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Reflux means that stomach acid and juices flow from the stomach back up into the tube that leads from the throat to the stomach ( esophagus ). (cigna.com)
  • Stomach acid and juices from the stomach flow back up (reflux) into the esophagus. (cigna.com)
  • When refluxed stomach acid touches the lining of the esophagus, it causes a burning sensation in the chest or throat called heartburn . (medicinenet.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux occurs when acid and food in the stomach back up into the esophagus. (drugs.com)
  • At some time, almost everyone experiences a gastroesophageal reflux, or a backflow of acid from the stomach into the swallowing tube or esophagus. (health-alliance.com)
  • In some individuals, this reflux occurs so frequently or severely that it can impact the patient's life and/or damage the esophagus. (health-alliance.com)
  • Central adiposity may be the most important risk for the development of reflux and related complications such as Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. (nih.gov)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux is defined as the passage of gastric contents into the esophagus. (sages.org)
  • There are a number of physiologic barriers that exist to prevent reflux from the stomach to the lower esophagus, such as the lower esophageal sphincter, the angle of HIS, and the length of the intra-abdominal esophagus. (sages.org)
  • In addition, mechanisms are present to both minimize the amount of reflux in the esophagus and to limit esophageal injury. (sages.org)
  • The right crus should be dissected so that the gastroesophageal junction can be clearly identified and an adequate length of intra-abdominal esophagus is confirmed. (sages.org)
  • Gastroesophageal refers to the stomach and esophagus. (rochester.edu)
  • A chronic condition in which the lower esophageal sphincter allows gastric acids to reflux into the esophagus, causing heartburn, acid indigestion, and possible injury to the esophageal lining. (yourdictionary.com)
  • BE represents a change in the lining (mucosa) of the esophagus which is known to be produced as a result of chronic gastroesophageal reflux. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The refluxed acidic liquid usually reaches the base of the esophagus, thus affecting the nerves in that area, making the region sore. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux is the involuntary retrograde passage of gastric contents into the esophagus with or without regurgitation and is considered a normal physiologic process, occurring daily in greater than one-third of all infants. (healio.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a physiologic event associated with the reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Impaired salivary neutralization of refluxed acid in the esophagus and an impaired mucosal barrier are also contributory. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Abnormality or weakness in the LES (lower esophageal sphincter - a muscle at the junction of the esophagus and stomach), usually associated with hiatal hernia, contributes to the failure of the body's natural anti-reflux mechanism. (columbiasurgery.org)
  • Biopsies (small tissue samples) can also be obtained from an endoscopy to confirm the diagnosis of esophageal inflammation and to exclude Barrett's esophagus, the transformation of esophageal cells into stomach lining cells after years of reflux. (columbiasurgery.org)
  • Other tests include an upper GI series or a barium swallow x-ray, which can show the acid reflux and inflammation of the esophagus as well as the presence of hiatal hernia, which occurs when the upper part of the stomach moves up into the chest through a small opening in the diaphragm, often causing LES dysfunction. (columbiasurgery.org)
  • As the stomach becomes distended during a meal, the wrap compresses the lower esophagus, preventing reflux, thus imitating the action of a valve. (columbiasurgery.org)
  • Instruments and a small camera are inserted through the mouth and advanced to the junction between the esophagus and the stomach, where the stomach is tacked alongside the esophagus in order to create a more effective barrier to reflux. (columbiasurgery.org)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux, or just reflux , happens when what is inside your stomach - stomach acid, food or other contents - backs up out of the stomach into the esophagus (the tube that links your mouth and stomach) and possibly all the way into your throat and mouth. (gastro.org)
  • Esophageal reflux occurs when the LES is not functioning properly allowing stomach acid to flow freely up into the esophagus. (gicare.com)
  • Treatment is aimed at reducing reflux and damage to the lining of the esophagus. (gicare.com)
  • Some patients have acid-related damage (erosions), such as mucosal breaks or lesions, to the lining of the esophagus known as EE, relating to the abnormal reflux of gastric content. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Because of the angle of the connection between the esophagus and the stomach, both the upright and "tummy time" positions use the force of gravity to minimize the chances of food and acid refluxing up the esophagus. (drgreene.com)
  • Further, a possible complication of chronic reflux is the development of Barrett's esophagus, in which metaplasia of the lower esophageal mucosa results in replacement of the squamous epithelium with columnar epithelium. (nutritionmd.org)
  • The anti-reflux barrier can be surgically refashioned by elongation of the intra-abdominal esophagus and accentuation of the angle of His (gastropexy) accompanied by creation of a half-valve (Thal and Boix-Ochoa operations) or incomplete (Toupet operation) or complete wraparound using the fundus (Nissen operation). (springer.com)
  • A sphincter at the junction of the esophagus and the stomach prevents reflux of food and acid from the stomach into the esophagus. (mountsinai.org)
  • Fortunately, there's a band of muscle between the stomach and the esophagus - called the Lower Esophageal Sphincter or L-E-S, that clamps down to prevent the stomach contents from moving or refluxing upward and burning the lining of the esophagus. (mountsinai.org)
  • Acid reflux can cause peptic esophagitis, ulcer formation, esophageal stricture, or metaplastic change in esophageal squamous epithelium, called Barrett esophagus, which can progress to carcinoma. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Esophagitis from refluxed stomach acid can damage the lining of the esophagus and cause bleeding or ulcers. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • The term "gastro esophageal reflux" is the movement of the stomach contents back into the esophagus. (iloveindia.com)
  • Reflux occurs when the sphincters do not function well and therefore allow the strong contents to travel back up the esophagus. (evms.edu)
  • Because the esophagus lacks a similar protective lining, stomach acid that flows backward (refluxes) into it causes heartburn (also called dyspepsia ). (medbroadcast.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is the back up of acid or food from the stomach to the esophagus. (swedishhospital.com)
  • A tube with a tiny camera is inserted down your throat into the esophagus to look for signs of reflux, inflammation, ulcers, or other changes in the esophagus. (limamemorial.org)
  • Treatment is intended to reduce the reflux, stop the harmful effect by reducing stomach acid, improve the way food gets through to the stomach, and protect the walls of the esophagus. (limamemorial.org)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux is defined as the passage of gastric contents into the esophagus with or without regurgitation and vomiting. (nursingcenter.com)
  • It happens when stomach contents flow back up (reflux) into the food pipe (esophagus) and cause symptoms or problems. (ahealthyme.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is when gastric contents passively pass from the stomach, up through the lower esophageal sphincter and into the esophagus. (mspca.org)
  • Heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux can be brought on or made worse by pregnancy. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Persistent symptoms of heartburn and reflux should not be ignored. (news-medical.net)
  • Heartburn, also known as gastric reflux or indigestion, happens after you eat and food is in your stomach. (breastcancer.org)
  • Wiley) Individuals who are obese often experience heartburn and other symptoms of acid reflux. (medworm.com)
  • This will ease the heartburn caused by reflux. (rochester.edu)
  • Heartburn is the most common symptom of gastro-esophageal reflux. (articlesphere.com)
  • No, there can frequently be reflux in the absence of heartburn. (evms.edu)
  • Other individuals may simply not experience heartburn even though reflux is present. (evms.edu)
  • Reflux causes heartburn. (limamemorial.org)
  • The question regarding "heartburn, chest pain, indigestion, or stomach acid coming up" as included in the Reflux Symptom Index was used for prevalence assessment. (dovepress.com)
  • Comparative effects of metoclopramide and bethanechol on lower esophageal sphincter pressure in reflux patients. (springer.com)
  • The actual mechanism is that reflux arises in order to maintain balance between the Lower esophageal sphincter pressure and the intra gastric pressure. (openpr.com)
  • Conversely, some patients have irregular pattern of sphincter relaxing and normal Lower esophageal sphincter pressures, resulting into gastric reflux. (openpr.com)
  • Reflux happens because the lower esophageal sphincter in babies opens easily. (rochester.edu)
  • Reflux is often caused by problems with the lower esophageal sphincter. (rochester.edu)
  • A decreased basal tone of the lower esophageal sphincter is a less common cause and can cause severe reflux especially when intra-abdominal pressure increases or when lying supine. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • In each case, the increased gastric pressure exerts abnormally high pressure on the lower esophageal sphincter and predisposes the individual to reflux. (nutritionmd.org)
  • O'Connor KW, Lehman GA. Endoscopic placement of collagen at the lower esophageal sphincter to inhibit gastroesophageal reflux: a pilot study of 10 medically intractable patients. (springer.com)
  • See 'Pathophysiology of reflux esophagitis' and 'Treatment regimens for Helicobacter pylori' . (uptodate.com)
  • It is also known as esophagitis reflux. (openpr.com)
  • These changes are similar to esophageal biopsies of reflux esophagitis patients. (scribd.com)
  • Reflux esophagitis, sliding hiatal hernia, and the anatomy of repair. (springer.com)
  • When there is damage to the esophageal epithelium, it is known as reflux esophagitis . (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The importance of pH reflux monitoring test for the management of low-grade esophagitis in Chinese patients. (annals.org)
  • 3 , 13-15 Reflux esophagitis causes painful feeding experience and, in response, infants will modify their feeding behavior to avoid pain. (nursingcenter.com)
  • [8] Occasional gastroesophageal reflux without troublesome symptoms or complications is even more common. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anti-reflux surgery may be an option for people whose symptoms do not go away with lifestyle changes and medicines. (medlineplus.gov)
  • H. Inoue (inventor of the anti-reflux mucosectomy 20 years ago) and his team postulated that the reflux symptoms would be reduced by creating a relative restriction of gastric cardia. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This observation suggested that ARMS could represent an effective anti-reflux procedure with the advantage that no prostheses would be left in situ. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • While not all hiatal hernias cause reflux, the associated anatomical displacement of the LES causes impairment of the anti-reflux barrier at the gastroesophageal (GE) junction and larger hiatal hernias contribute to more severe reflux and chronicity of reflux. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a complex phenomenon involving always a failure of the anti-reflux barrier and often other components like dysmotility, alkaline refluxate, or delayed gastric emptying. (springer.com)
  • Sometimes, the anti-reflux procedure is accompanied by a gastrostomy for nutritional purposes, and very rarely, a gastric outlet procedure is necessary for facilitating gastric emptying. (springer.com)
  • When GER cannot be controlled by anti-reflux surgery, esophagogastric dissociation or feeding jejunostomy with gastrostomy may help. (springer.com)
  • For a patient who has persistent symptoms despite medical treatment, an anti-reflux operation may be an option. (mountsinai.org)
  • Although gastroesophageal reflux is a normal physiologic occurrence, excessive gastric and duodenal regurgitation combined with a decrease in normal protective mechanisms, including an adequate production of saliva, may result in many esophageal and extraesophageal adverse conditions. (hindawi.com)
  • Although symptoms of the condition are varied they may be characterized by three cardinal features - heart burn, acid reflux or regurgitation in the mouth and difficulty swallowing. (news-medical.net)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux, with passive regurgitation of feedings, occurs in about 50% of healthy infants but seldom persists beyond 1 year of age. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • It also is a necessary precursor to regurgitation which is the outward manifestation of extreme reflux - that which reaches the oropharynx. (mspca.org)
  • In a paper that looked at the incidence of regurgitation (not gastroesophageal reflux) in a larger population of anesthetized dogs (4,271 cases) they identified a 25 fold greater incidence of regurgitation in dogs that were having orthopedic procedures performed. (mspca.org)
  • Reglan (metoclopramide) is a commonly used medication to reduce the risk of reflux, regurgitation, and vomiting in the anesthetic period. (mspca.org)
  • This test can find a hiatal hernia, blockage and other problems that might mimic reflux. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • In this way, a hiatal hernia can cause reflux. (medicinenet.com)
  • Upper gastrointestinal radiography (UGI) may identify reflux or a hiatal hernia but also can be used to rule out other anatomic abnormalities of the upper gastrointestinal tract such as malrotation. (sages.org)
  • This makes it possible to see the reflux and a hiatal hernia on the x-ray. (gicare.com)
  • Angelchik JP, Cohen R. A new surgical procedure for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux and hiatal hernia. (springer.com)
  • When a hiatal hernia is present, acid reflux can occur more easily. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Davis MV (1969) Evolving concepts regarding hiatal hernia and gastroenterological reflux. (springer.com)
  • Swallowing air excessively Gastroesophageal reflux Hiatal hernia Rapid eating Carbonated beverages, alcohol, dry breads, and some spicy foods Opiate drug use Laughing vigorously or for a long time Hiccups may be triggered by a number of common human conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The primary surgical treatment of esophageal reflux is called esophageal fundoplication. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Gastro-esophageal reflux and esophageal motility disorders in morbidly obese patients before and after bariatric surgery. (medscape.com)
  • PPI therapy reduces symptoms of noncardiac chest pain and may be useful as a diagnostic test in identifying abnormal esophageal reflux. (aafp.org)
  • Occasional esophageal reflux is usually nothing to be concerned about. (gicare.com)
  • However, anyone who has esophageal reflux on a regular basis should consult a physician. (gicare.com)
  • Thus, gastro esophageal reflux is also known as acid reflux. (iloveindia.com)
  • Chapter two studies the clinical practices for extra-esophageal reflux and explores the outcomes. (novapublishers.com)
  • Overholt RH, Ashraf MM (1966) Esophageal reflux as a trigger in asthma. (springer.com)
  • Danus O, Cesar C, Larrain A, Pope II CE (1976) Esophageal reflux: an unrecognised cause of recurrent obstructive bronchitis in children. (springer.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) occurs in more than two-thirds of otherwise healthy infants and is the topic of discussion with pediatricians at one-quarter of all routine 6-month infant visits. (aappublications.org)
  • Acid reflux often occurs, then, at night after a late night snack or a night on the town. (articlesphere.com)
  • In many cases the reflux occurs at nighttime when we lie down. (evms.edu)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux occurs during running in healthy volunteers. (annals.org)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux occurs without any obvious outward signs and can happen in the awake, asleep or anesthetized patient. (mspca.org)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux in infants and children. (medicinenet.com)
  • A more recent article on gastroesophageal reflux in infants and children is available. (aafp.org)
  • Darling DB, McCauley RGK, Leonidas JC, Schwartz AM (1978) Gastroesophageal reflux in infants and children: correlation of radiological severity and pulmonary pathology. (springer.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux is a normal physiologic phenomenon experienced intermittently by most people, particularly after a meal. (medscape.com)
  • It is generally considered a normal physiologic process, with physiologic reflux events occurring around 70 times per day in many neonates. (healio.com)
  • Infants with physiologic GER are commonly referred to as "happy spitters" and continue to grow and develop appropriately despite their reflux. (healio.com)
  • While it's more common in adults, kids, teens, and even babies can have gastroesophageal (gas-tro-ih-sah-fuh-JEE-ul) reflux. (kidshealth.org)
  • van Wijk M, Knüppe F, Omari T, de Jong J, Benninga M. Evaluation of gastroesophageal function and mechanisms underlying gastroesophageal reflux in infants and adults born with esophageal atresia. (springer.com)
  • Almost all children and adults have a bit of reflux, without being aware of it. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • Both adults and infants who inhale the reflux acid may experience coughing, hoarseness, or wheezing. (medbroadcast.com)
  • Mays EE (1976) Intrinsic asthma in adults: association with gastroesophageal reflux. (springer.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux is a normal physiological process occurring several times per day in healthy infants, children, and adults. (nursingcenter.com)
  • Upper endoscopy (pronounced: en-DAS-ko-pee). (kidshealth.org)
  • 1. To demonstrate reflux through the study of changes unveiled by complementary explorations (radiological study, upper digestive endoscopy, 24-hour pHmetry, and manometry), and to structure two homogeneous groups of patients. (isciii.es)
  • What Are the Signs & Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux? (kidshealth.org)
  • Tenatoprazole and the salts thereof can be used in the production of a medicament for the treatment of atypical and esophageal symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux, gastrorrhagia and dyspepsia. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • 1. A medicament useful in the treatment of atypical and oesophageal symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux, digestive bleeding and dyspepsia, comprised of tenatoprazole. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • 12. A method for the treatment of atypical and oesophageal symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux, digestive bleeding and dyspepsia, which comprises administering a medicament comprising tenatoprazole. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Postmenopausal hormone use and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. (epnet.com)
  • It treats the root cause responsible for Gastroesophageal reflux diseases without any surgery. (openpr.com)
  • Kawahara H, Dent J, Davidson G. Mechanisms responsible for gastroesophageal reflux in children. (springer.com)
  • Pantoprazole is a drug that can help treat conditions such as acid reflux and peptic ulcers. (medworm.com)
  • An antireflux barrier at the gastroesophageal junction is formed by normal anatomical features, including the oblique course of the gastroesophageal junction and diaphragmatic curve. (hindawi.com)
  • However, the impact of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) on gastroesophageal reflux remains undetermined with conflicting results in published data. (sages.org)
  • Use of bethanechol for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux. (springer.com)
  • The treatment of reflux depends upon the child's symptoms and age. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • Whereas very few clinical success of the medical device for the treatment along with considerable side effects is restraining the growth of Gastroesophageal Reflux Diseases Devices Market. (openpr.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux medications in the treatment of apnea in premature infants. (nih.gov)
  • Stratification for documented reflux (by radiographic contrast or by pH probe analysis), concomitant use of methylxanthines or ranitidine, developmental age, feeding volume, and respiratory support did not identify a subgroup of patients whose apnea improved with antireflux treatment. (nih.gov)
  • As long as these children grow well and don't have other issues caused by reflux, they don't need treatment. (rochester.edu)
  • 18. The method of claim 12, wherein the medicament is administered for the treatment of nocturnal reflux. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • The present invention concerns the treatment of diseases related to gastroesophageal reflux, digestive bleeding and dyspepsia, and more particularly the use of tenatoprazole in the manufacture of a medicament intended for the treatment of diseases related to gastroesophageal reflux, digestive bleeding and dyspepsia. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Treatment with medicines does not completely relieve your symptoms, and the remaining symptoms are proved to be caused by reflux of stomach juices. (healthwise.net)
  • Because reflux is usually a mechanical problem, and because babies can't adjust their position as well as you and I can, positioning is an important part of reflux treatment. (drgreene.com)
  • The first line of treatment for reflux is prevention. (evms.edu)
  • Resection of the Gastroesophageal Junction and Roux-en-Y Reconstruction as a New Alternative for the Treatment of Recurrent Achalasia: Outcomes in a Short Series of Patients. (annals.org)
  • More than 90% of patients who undergo fundoplication have no reflux after surgery. (columbiasurgery.org)
  • When the refluxed material passes into the back of the mouth or enters the airways, the child may become hoarse, have a raspy voice or a chronic cough. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • Examples of these symptoms are asthma, hoarseness, or cough along with reflux. (healthwise.net)
  • I have over 30 years experience in Otolaryngology with expertise in voice disorders, professional and singing voice care, dysphagia and associated swallowing disorders, airway surgery and reconstruction, spasmodic dysphonia, extra esophageal and gastroesophageal reflux, and chronic cough. (forensisgroup.com)
  • Acid and non-acid reflux in patients with persistent symptoms despite acid suppressive therapy: a multicenter study using combined ambulatory impedance-pH monitoring. (medigraphic.com)
  • Does weight loss surgery help relieve acid reflux? (medworm.com)
  • Additionally, orthopedic patients were often repositioned multiple times under anesthesia prior to surgery and this manipulation may have triggered reflux events. (mspca.org)
  • from the Czech Republic have evaluated extraesophageal reflux (EER) using reflux area index, number of reflux, and acid exposure times to assess for response to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). (hindawi.com)
  • As a result, when acidic stomach contents are refluxed they cause the larynx to become irritated and inflamed. (evms.edu)
  • This article reviews the literature concerning the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of patients with reflux laryngitis. (scribd.com)
  • WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 -- Reflux symptoms return in about half of patients who undergo gastric bypass, according to a study published online June 4 in Alimentary Pharmacology& Therapeutics. (medworm.com)
  • Conversely, almost half of patients without preoperative gastroesophageal reflux developed it postoperatively. (sages.org)
  • Hughes DM, Spier S, Rivlin J, Levison H (1983) Gastroesophageal reflux during sleep in asthmatic patients. (springer.com)
  • Our gastrointestinal specialists were among the first to perform endoscopic suturing for gastroesophageal reflux and continue to evaluate its efficacy. (columbiasurgery.org)
  • Therefore, to evaluate the efficacy of prucalopride on the improvement in symptom severity and reflux parameters, we will conduct a randomized, parallel, placebo-controlled, single-blind study. (centerwatch.com)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) represents a well-established digestive disorder which was identified by gastroenterologists long ago. (springer.com)
  • This is considered the most accurate way to detect reflux and the number of reflux episodes. (kidshealth.org)
  • They found a direct positive correlation between the response and higher incidence of the reflux parameters, which was more pronounced when acid exposure times or reflux area indices were used for diagnosing EER rather than the number of reflux episodes. (hindawi.com)
  • the degree to which their symptoms correlate with actual episodes of gastroesophageal acid reflux varies. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Reflux episodes were usually associated with belching. (annals.org)
  • Reflux episodes commonly occur with crying, defecating, coughing, and after meals when there is increased abdominal pressure. (nursingcenter.com)
  • Justification: Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER) is a condition that affects the majority of premature infants that are followed at the Kangaroo Mother Care Program. (centerwatch.com)
  • To determine whether medications commonly used in the management of gastroesophageal reflux reduce the frequency of apnea in premature infants. (nih.gov)
  • The left lobe of the liver is retracted superiorly to expose the gastroesophageal junction. (sages.org)
  • In addition, it is important for the wrap to be above the gastroesophageal junction. (sages.org)
  • Usually two stitches are necessary on one side of the gastroesophageal junction. (medgadget.com)
  • Pellegrini CA, DeMeester TR, Johnson LF, et al (1979) Gastroesophageal reflux and pulmonary aspiration: incidence, functional abnormality, and results of surgical therapy. (springer.com)
  • Evidence of gastroesophageal reflux on preoperative barium swallow did not predict postoperative reflux. (sages.org)
  • Neither weight loss outcomes nor evidence of gastroesophageal reflux on preoperative barium swallow were predictive of postoperative gastroesophageal reflux. (sages.org)
  • The classic symptoms of reflux are those described above: hoarseness, throat pain, frequent throat clearing, a lump or tickle sensation in the throat, and frequent coughing. (evms.edu)
  • But, in healthy individuals, the acidic reflux is cleared by esophageal peristalsis and saliva within 1-2 minutes [ 12 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • A large number of disorders can occur when the highly acidic contents of the stomach are refluxed back up into the throat. (evms.edu)