INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.
A species of CORONAVIRUS causing a fatal disease to pigs under 3 weeks old.
A condition of chronic gastroenteritis in adult pigs and fatal gastroenteritis in piglets caused by a CORONAVIRUS.
Virus diseases caused by CALICIVIRIDAE. They include HEPATITIS E; VESICULAR EXANTHEMA OF SWINE; acute respiratory infections in felines, rabbit hemorrhagic disease, and some cases of gastroenteritis in humans.
A genus in the family CALICIVIRIDAE, associated with epidemic GASTROENTERITIS in humans. The type species, NORWALK VIRUS, contains multiple strains.
Infection with any of the rotaviruses. Specific infections include human infantile diarrhea, neonatal calf diarrhea, and epidemic diarrhea of infant mice.
A genus of REOVIRIDAE, causing acute gastroenteritis in BIRDS and MAMMALS, including humans. Transmission is horizontal and by environmental contamination. Seven species (Rotaviruses A thru G) are recognized.
The type species in the genus NOROVIRUS, first isolated in 1968 from the stools of school children in Norwalk, Ohio, who were suffering from GASTROENTERITIS. The virions are non-enveloped spherical particles containing a single protein. Multiple strains are named after the places where outbreaks have occurred.
Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
A genus of the family CALICIVIRIDAE associated with worldwide sporadic outbreaks of GASTROENTERITIS in humans. The first recorded outbreak was in human infants in Sapporo, Japan in 1977. The genus is comprised of a single species, Sapporo virus, containing multiple strains.
Spherical RNA viruses, in the order NIDOVIRALES, infecting a wide range of animals including humans. Transmission is by fecal-oral and respiratory routes. Mechanical transmission is also common. There are two genera: CORONAVIRUS and TOROVIRUS.
A genus of small, circular RNA viruses in the family ASTROVIRIDAE. They cause GASTROENTERITIS and are found in the stools of several vertebrates including humans. Transmission is by the fecal-oral route and there are at least eight human serotypes. The type species is Human astrovirus.
Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with ROTAVIRUS.
Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.
Infections with ASTROVIRUS, causing gastroenteritis in human infants, calves, lambs, and piglets.
A family of RNA viruses infecting a broad range of animals. Most individual species are restricted to their natural hosts. They possess a characteristic six-pointed starlike shape whose surfaces have cup-shaped (chalice) indentions. Transmission is by contaminated food, water, fomites, and occasionally aerosolization of secretions. Genera include LAGOVIRUS; NORWALK-LIKE VIRUSES; SAPPORO-LIKE VIRUSES; and VESIVIRUS.
An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.
DIARRHEA occurring in infants from newborn to 24-months old.
Viruses whose taxonomic relationships have not been established.
Infections with bacteria of the genus CAMPYLOBACTER.
A family of marine mollusks in the class BIVALVIA, commonly known as oysters. They have a rough irregular shell closed by a single adductor muscle.
The condition that results from excessive loss of water from a living organism.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
A species of bacteria found in the marine environment, sea foods, and the feces of patients with acute enteritis.
Infections with bacteria of the genus VIBRIO.
Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Infections with bacteria of the genus SALMONELLA.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.
A general term for diseases produced by viruses.
Respiratory and conjunctival infections caused by 33 identified serotypes of human adenoviruses.
Aquatic invertebrates belonging to the phylum MOLLUSCA or the subphylum CRUSTACEA, and used as food.
A species of bacteria that resemble small tightly coiled spirals. Its organisms are known to cause abortion in sheep and fever and enteritis in man and may be associated with enteric diseases of calves, lambs, and other animals.
Therapy whose basic objective is to restore the volume and composition of the body fluids to normal with respect to WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE. Fluids may be administered intravenously, orally, by intermittent gavage, or by HYPODERMOCLYSIS.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
Abnormal increase of EOSINOPHILS in the blood, tissues or organs.
A genus of bacteria found in the reproductive organs, intestinal tract, and oral cavity of animals and man. Some species are pathogenic.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Poisoning caused by ingestion of food harboring species of SALMONELLA. Conditions of raising, shipping, slaughtering, and marketing of domestic animals contribute to the spread of this bacterium in the food supply.
Virus diseases caused by the ADENOVIRIDAE.
The forcible expulsion of the contents of the STOMACH through the MOUTH.
A genus in the family PICORNAVIRIDAE whose type species Aichi virus, causes gastroenteritis in humans.
Means or process of supplying water (as for a community) usually including reservoirs, tunnels, and pipelines and often the watershed from which the water is ultimately drawn. (Webster, 3d ed)
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Fluids restored to the body in order to maintain normal water-electrolyte balance.
Virus diseases caused by the PICORNAVIRIDAE.
A drug combination that contains diphenhydramine and theophylline. It is used for treating VERTIGO, MOTION SICKNESS, and NAUSEA associated with PREGNANCY.
The confinement of a patient in a hospital.
Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.
Proteins that form the CAPSID of VIRUSES.
Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.
Inflammation of any segment of the SMALL INTESTINE.
Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.
A genus of the family CORONAVIRIDAE which causes respiratory or gastrointestinal disease in a variety of vertebrates.
Minute infectious agents whose genomes are composed of DNA or RNA, but not both. They are characterized by a lack of independent metabolism and the inability to replicate outside living host cells.
Substances elaborated by viruses that have antigenic activity.
Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.
Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.
A family of RNA viruses with two genera: MAMASTROVIRUS and AVASTROVIRUS. They cause GASTROENTERITIS in humans and also infect other vertebrates.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.
Live vaccines prepared from microorganisms which have undergone physical adaptation (e.g., by radiation or temperature conditioning) or serial passage in laboratory animal hosts or infected tissue/cell cultures, in order to produce avirulent mutant strains capable of inducing protective immunity.
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that utilizes citrate as a sole carbon source. It is pathogenic for humans, causing enteric fevers, gastroenteritis, and bacteremia. Food poisoning is the most common clinical manifestation. Organisms within this genus are separated on the basis of antigenic characteristics, sugar fermentation patterns, and bacteriophage susceptibility.
DYSENTERY caused by gram-negative rod-shaped enteric bacteria (ENTEROBACTERIACEAE), most often by the genus SHIGELLA. Shigella dysentery, Shigellosis, is classified into subgroups according to syndrome severity and the infectious species. Group A: SHIGELLA DYSENTERIAE (severest); Group B: SHIGELLA FLEXNERI; Group C: SHIGELLA BOYDII; and Group D: SHIGELLA SONNEI (mildest).
Contamination of bodies of water (such as LAKES; RIVERS; SEAS; and GROUNDWATER.)
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
A state in south central Australia. Its capital is Adelaide. It was probably first visited by F. Thyssen in 1627. Later discoveries in 1802 and 1830 opened up the southern part. It became a British province in 1836 with this self-descriptive name and became a state in 1901. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1135)
A genus in the subfamily PARVOVIRINAE comprising three species: Bovine parvovirus, Canine minute virus, and HUMAN BOCAVIRUS.
A genus in the family PICORNAVIRIDAE infecting humans and rodents. The type species is Human parechovirus.
Infections produced by reoviruses, general or unspecified.
Poisoning from toxins present in bivalve mollusks that have been ingested. Four distinct types of shellfish poisoning are recognized based on the toxin involved.
A member of the family PARVOVIRIDAE, subfamily PARVOVIRINAE, originally isolated from human nasopharyngeal aspirates in patients with respiratory disease.
The application of molecular biology to the answering of epidemiological questions. The examination of patterns of changes in DNA to implicate particular carcinogens and the use of molecular markers to predict which individuals are at highest risk for a disease are common examples.
Facilities which provide care for pre-school and school-age children.
A form of intestinal obstruction caused by the PROLAPSE of a part of the intestine into the adjoining intestinal lumen. There are four types: colic, involving segments of the LARGE INTESTINE; enteric, involving only the SMALL INTESTINE; ileocecal, in which the ILEOCECAL VALVE prolapses into the CECUM, drawing the ILEUM along with it; and ileocolic, in which the ileum prolapses through the ileocecal valve into the COLON.
A lactose-fermenting bacterium causing dysentery.
Miscellaneous agents found useful in the symptomatic treatment of diarrhea. They have no effect on the agent(s) that cause diarrhea, but merely alleviate the condition.
Beaches, both natural and man-made, used for bathing and other activities.
A family of gram-negative, parasitic bacteria including several important pathogens of man.
Absorbent pads designed to be worn by infants and very young children.

Detection of campylobacter in gastroenteritis: comparison of direct PCR assay of faecal samples with selective culture. (1/2074)

The prevalence of campylobacter gastroenteritis has been estimated by bacterial isolation using selective culture. However, there is evidence that certain species and strains are not recovered on selective agars. We have therefore compared direct PCR assays of faecal samples with campylobacter culture, and explored the potential of PCR for simultaneous detection and identification to the species level. Two hundred unselected faecal samples from cases of acute gastroenteritis were cultured on modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar and subjected to DNA extraction and PCR assay. Culture on CCDA indicated that 16 of the 200 samples contained 'Campylobacter spp.'. By contrast, PCR assays detected campylobacters in 19 of the 200 samples, including 15 of the culture-positive samples, and further identified them as: C. jejuni (16), C. coli (2) and C. hyointestinalis (1). These results show that PCR offers a different perspective on the incidence and identity of campylobacters in human gastroenteritis.  (+info)

An outbreak of viral gastroenteritis associated with consumption of sandwiches: implications for the control of transmission by food handlers. (2/2074)

Although food handlers are often implicated as the source of infection in outbreaks of food-borne viral gastroenteritis, little is known about the timing of infectivity in relation to illness. We investigated a gastroenteritis outbreak among employees of a manufacturing company and found an association (RR = 14.1, 95% CI = 2.0-97.3) between disease and eating sandwiches prepared by 6 food handlers, 1 of whom reported gastroenteritis which had subsided 4 days earlier. Norwalk-like viruses were detected by electron microscopy or reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in stool specimens from several company employees, the sick food handler whose specimen was obtained 10 days after resolution of illness, and an asymptomatic food handler. All RT-PCR product sequences were identical, suggesting a common source of infection. These data support observations from recent volunteer studies that current recommendations to exclude food handlers from work for 48-72 h after recovery from illness may not always prevent transmission of Norwalk-like viruses because virus can be shed up to 10 days after illness or while exhibiting no symptoms.  (+info)

Helicobacter pylori vacuolating toxin forms anion-selective channels in planar lipid bilayers: possible implications for the mechanism of cellular vacuolation. (3/2074)

The Helicobacter pylori VacA toxin plays a major role in the gastric pathologies associated with this bacterium. When added to cultured cells, VacA induces vacuolation, an effect potentiated by preexposure of the toxin to low pH. Its mechanism of action is unknown. We report here that VacA forms anion-selective, voltage-dependent pores in artificial membranes. Channel formation was greatly potentiated by acidic conditions or by pretreatment of VacA at low pH. No requirement for particular lipid(s) was identified. Selectivity studies showed that anion selectivity was maintained over the pH range 4.8-12, with the following permeability sequence: Cl- approximately HCO3- > pyruvate > gluconate > K+ approximately Li+ approximately Ba2+ > NH4+. Membrane permeabilization was due to the incorporation of channels with a voltage-dependent conductance in the 10-30 pS range (2 M KCl), displaying a voltage-independent high open probability. Deletion of the NH2 terminus domain (p37) or chemical modification of VacA by diethylpyrocarbonate inhibited both channel activity and vacuolation of HeLa cells without affecting toxin internalization by the cells. Collectively, these observations strongly suggest that VacA channel formation is needed to induce cellular vacuolation, possibly by inducing an osmotic imbalance of intracellular acidic compartments.  (+info)

Campylobacter jejuni--an emerging foodborne pathogen. (4/2074)

Campylobacter jejuni is the most commonly reported bacterial cause of foodborne infection in the United States. Adding to the human and economic costs are chronic sequelae associated with C. jejuni infection--Guillian-Barre syndrome and reactive arthritis. In addition, an increasing proportion of human infections caused by C. jejuni are resistant to antimicrobial therapy. Mishandling of raw poultry and consumption of undercooked poultry are the major risk factors for human campylobacteriosis. Efforts to prevent human illness are needed throughout each link in the food chain.  (+info)

Adenovirus infection after pediatric bone marrow transplantation. (5/2074)

Retrospective analysis of 206 patients undergoing 215 consecutive bone marrow transplants (BMT) at St Jude Children's Research Hospital between November 1990 and December 1994 identified 6% (seven male, six female) with adenovirus infection. The affected patients had a median age of 7.9 years (range 3-24 years) at time of transplantation. Although transplants were performed for hematologic malignancies, solid tumors or nonmalignant conditions, only patients with hematologic malignancies had adenoviral infections. Adenovirus was first detected at a median of 54 days (range -4 to +333) after BMT. Adenovirus developed in eight of 69 (11.6%) patients receiving grafts from matched unrelated or mismatched related donors, in four of 52 (7.7%) receiving grafts from HLA-matched siblings, and in one of 93 (1.1%) receiving autografts. The most common manifestation of adenovirus infection was hemorrhagic cystitis, followed by gastroenteritis, pneumonitis and liver failure. The incidence of adenovirus infection in pediatric BMT patients at our institution is similar to that reported in adult patients. Using univariate analysis, use of total body irradiation and type of bone marrow graft were significant risk factors for adenovirus infection. Only use of total body irradiation remained as a factor on multiple logistic regression analysis.  (+info)

Presence of Campylobacter and Salmonella in sand from bathing beaches. (6/2074)

The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. in sand from non-EEC standard and EEC standard designated beaches in different locations in the UK and to assess if potentially pathogenic strains were present. Campylobacter spp. were detected in 82/182 (45%) of sand samples and Salmonella spp. in 10/182 (6%). Campylobacter spp. were isolated from 46/92 (50%) of samples from non-EEC standard beaches and 36/90 (40%) from EEC standard beaches. The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. was greater in wet sand from both types of beaches but, surprisingly, more than 30% of samples from dry sand also contained these organisms. The major pathogenic species C. jejuni and C. coli were more prevalent in sand from non-EEC standard beaches. In contrast, C. lari and urease positive thermophilic campylobacters, which are associated with seagulls and other migratory birds, were more prevalent in sand from EEC standard beaches. Campylobacter isolates were further characterized by biotyping and serotyping, which confirmed that strains known to be of types associated with human infections were frequently found in sand on bathing beaches.  (+info)

A community outbreak of food-borne small round-structured virus gastroenteritis caused by a contaminated water supply. (7/2074)

In August 1994, 30 of 135 (23%) bakery plant employees and over 100 people from South Wales and Bristol in the United Kingdom, were affected by an outbreak of gastroenteritis. Epidemiological studies of employees and three community clusters found illness in employees to be associated with drinking cold water at the bakery (relative risk 3.3, 95%, CI 1.6-7.0), and in community cases with eating custard slices (relative risk 19.8, 95%, CI 2.9-135.1) from a variety of stores supplied by one particular bakery. Small round-structured viruses (SRSV) were identified in stool specimens from 4 employees and 7 community cases. Analysis of the polymerase and capsid regions of the SRSV genome by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) demonstrated viruses of both genogroups (1 and 2) each with several different nucleotide sequences. The heterogeneity of the viruses identified in the outbreak suggests that dried custard mix may have been inadvertently reconstituted with contaminated water. The incident shows how secondary food contamination can cause wide-scale community gastroenteritis outbreaks, and demonstrates the ability of molecular techniques to support classical epidemiological methods in outbreak investigations.  (+info)

Characterization of intestinal disease associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection and response to antiretroviral therapy. (8/2074)

Combination antiretroviral therapies suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in peripheral blood, but the effect in gastrointestinal mucosa is uncertain. The occurrence of pathogen-negative diarrhea led to speculation that local HIV infection is etiologic. Mucosal cellular reservoirs for HIV were documented by use of several techniques. Correlations were found among gastrointestinal symptoms, histopathologic findings, cytokine expression, lymphoid apoptosis, and HIV RNA and protein expression in rectal mucosa. Disproportionate depletion of mucosal CD4+ lymphocytes also was found. The short-term effects of antiretroviral therapies were examined to test the hypothesis that these changes are directly related to mucosal HIV infection. Therapy was associated with decreased symptoms, with comparable drops in peripheral blood and mucosal HIV RNA contents, and by increases in blood and mucosal CD4+ lymphocyte contents. In addition, the number of apoptotic cells also declined during therapy. These results suggest that HIV plays a direct role in producing intestinal dysfunction.  (+info)

Newswise - Implementation of infant rotavirus vaccination in 2006 has substantially reduced the burden of severe gastroenteritis among U.S. children younger than 5 years, write Paul A. Gastanaduy, M.D., M.P.H., of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, and colleagues. Whether indirect protection (due to reduced transmission of rotavirus) extends to adults remains unclear.. As reported in a Research Letter, the authors assessed patterns of gastroenteritis hospitalizations among children 5 years of age or older and among adults before and after implementation of infant rotavirus immunization. Rotavirus-coded and cause-unspecified gastroenteritis discharges from January 2000 through December 2010 were retrieved from a nationally representative database of hospital inpatient stays, the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Estimates were determined of annual and monthly incidence rate ratios (RR) of the postvaccine years (2008, 2009, and 2010) separately and combined vs. the prevaccine ...
Description of disease Bacterial gastroenteritis. Treatment Bacterial gastroenteritis. Symptoms and causes Bacterial gastroenteritis Prophylaxis Bacterial gastroenteritis
Norovirus is a highly contagious virus that can infect anyone. You can get it from an infected person, contaminated food or water, or by touching contaminated surfaces. The virus causes your stomach or intestines or both to get inflamed. This leads you to have stomach pain, nausea, diarrhea and vomiting. These symptoms can be serious for many people, especially the vulnerable, young children and older adults.. HomeCareDirect alongside the NHS Infection Prevention and Control team wish to raise awareness in the prevention and control of Viral Gastroenteritis (Norovirus).. Numerous hospitals, independent living accommodation and care homes across the UK have recently been affected by viral gastroenteritis (Norovirus). Predictions are that it could be one of the worst years for people getting viral gastroenteritis which causes diarrhoea and vomiting, especially over Christmas and the winter months. To access advice to help you in preventing and controlling the spread of viral gastroenteritis, ...
Viral gastroenteritis infection, typically a self-limiting condition of short duration in humans, is extremely common and associated with relatively low deaths. Surveillance of outbreaks of this infection, rather than individual cases, may be more appropriate. In our review of the surveillance for this infection in Europe, we found variations in the organizations conducting surveillance, the surveillance definition of a viral gastroenteritis outbreak, the populations under surveillance, and the completeness of descriptive and analytical epidemiologic and diagnostic information.. Researchers comparing surveillance information at an international level should consider the outputs of surveillance, as well as the influence of methodology and structure of surveillance on these outputs. Surveillance for viral gastroenteritis in Europe is poorly developed; systems vary in their sources of data, definitions, and use of diagnostic techniques. These differences are reflected in the wide range of numbers ...
Chronic gastritis occurs when your stomach lining becomes swollen or. Medications and diet are the most common ways of treating chronic gastritis. And treatment for each type focuses on the cause of the. H2 receptor blockers can be used to treat conditions that cause excess stomach acid.. Home Cure Stomach Acid A worrying new study finds that the most widely sold drugs to treat heartburn and acid reflux may more than. Gastroenteritis In Adults - an easy to understand guide covering causes, diagnosis, symptoms, treatment and prevention plus additional in depth medical information.. Food poisoning and gastroenteritis can cause symptoms of diarrhea and vomiting. Treatment. Gastroenteritis and food poisoning usually resolve themselves without any medical intervention. More common in adults; Less common viral causes are astrovirus,. Also known as the stomach flu, viral gastroenteritis can affect anyone throughout the world. viral gastroenteritis is the leading cause of severe diarrhea in adults and ...
An outbreak at a police training institute in Wong Chuk Hang has been confirmed as acute gastroenteritis, the Department of Healths Center for Health Protection said today.. The center said a total of 17 male and 11 female trainees were affected, aged between 20 to 36. They were said to have developed abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhea since January 5. All of them sought medical attention and none required hospitalization.. All affected persons have been in stable condition.. Officers of the center conducted a site visit and the institute has been put under medical surveillance.. ...
Infectious Gastroenteritis - Diarrhea used for IBS , hyperthyroidism, colon cancer, diarrhea, dysbiosis, inflammatory bowel disease, cancer, fever, hypoallergen
Viral gastroenteritis is an intestinal infection caused by several different viruses. You can get viral gastroenteritis is by eating or drinking contaminated food or water.
To the Editor: Viral gastroenteritis is caused by many pathogens, each with unique characteristics requiring different laboratory test for identification1,2. In our country several groups emphasizes the role of the viral gastroenteritis in children3-4. Similar studies have been done in the european countries5-7, Asia8, America9 and Oceania10. In relation to these contributions and since we are geographically related and have a similar context we could like to point out three aspects: first, to bring forward or 16 years of experience in systematic detection of Rotavirus in children; second, to show our findings in detecting other virus causing gastroenteritis (Adenovirus and Astrovirus) and finally, to mark that both Rotavirus infection and that caused by the aforementioned virus are reported to National Epidemiological Surveillance System. Since 1986 we systematically search for Rotavirus in fecal samples from children under seven years. At that time Rotavirus antigen detection by means of a ...
We estimated for Australia the number of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths due to foodborne gastroenteritis in a typical year, circa 2000. The total amount of infectious gastroenteritis was measured by using a national telephone survey. The foodborne proportion was estimated from Australian data on each of 16 pathogens. To account for uncertainty, we used simulation techniques to calculate 95% credibility intervals (CrI). The estimate of incidence of gastroenteritis in Australia is 17.2 million (95% confidence interval 14.5-19.9 million) cases per year. We estimate that 32% (95% CrI 24%-40%) are foodborne, which equals 0.3 (95% CrI 0.2-0.4) episodes per person, or 5.4 million (95% CrI 4.0-6.9 million) cases annually in Australia. Norovirus, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Campylobacter spp., and Salmonella spp. cause the most illnesses. In addition, foodborne gastroenteritis causes ≈15,000 (95% CrI 11,000-18,000) hospitalizations and 80 (95% CrI 40-120) deaths annually. This study highlights
Given the absence of information in medical literature, we assumed that the clinical and socio-demographic features of TS associated gastroenteritis might not differ by place of residence - urban Dhaka and rural Maltab as well as diarrhea due to other pathogens. However, we observed a number of important differences, which are likely to have public health implications. Among the differences, the prevalence of S. Typhi was higher and that of Paratyphi was lower in Dhaka compared to Matlab.. There are differences between Dhaka and Matlab populations with regards to food, water and hygiene practices. They all have significant associations with gastroenteritis irrespective of age, sex and socio-demographic contexts [17]. Most of the recent studies have described the features of gastroenteritis due to NTS but only a few described urban-rural (Dhaka-Matlab) differentials [7]. The present study might be the novel one to describe geographical heterogeneity of TS gastroenteritis irrespective of their age ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Nitric oxide synthesis in patients with infective gastroenteritis. AU - Forte, P AU - Dykhuizen, R S AU - Milne, Eric. AU - McKenzie, A AU - Smith, C C AU - Benjamin, N PY - 1999/9. Y1 - 1999/9. N2 - Background-There is evidence that endogenous nitrate synthesis is notably increased in patients with infective gastroenteritis.Aims-To determine whether this is due to nitric oxide (NO) production via the L-arginine/NO pathway.Methods-Seven male patients with community acquired bacterial gastroenteritis and 15 healthy male volunteers participated in this study, All patients had stool culture positive infective gastroenteritis. A bolus of 200 mg L-[N-15](2)-arginine was administered intravenously after an overnight fast. Urine was collected for the next 36 hours. Urinary [N-15:N-14]nitrate ratio was assessed by dry combustion in an isotope ratio mass spectrometer.Results-Mean 36 hour total urinary nitrate excretion in the gastroenteritis group was 5157 (577) mu mol compared with 2594 ...
In late 2016, an uncommon recombinant NoV genotype called GII.P16-GII.2 caused a sharp increase in outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in different countries of Asia and Europe, including China. However, we did not observe a drastic increase in sporadic norovirus cases in the winter of 2016 in Huzhou. Therefore, we investigate the prevalence and genetic diversity of NoVs in the sporadic acute gastroenteritis (AGE) cases from January 2016 to December 2017 in Huzhou City, Zhejiang, China. From January 2016 to December 2017, a total of 1001 specimens collected from patients with AGE were screened for NoV by real-time RT-PCR. Partial sequences of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and capsid gene of the positive samples were amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced. Genotypes of NoV were confirmed by online NoV typing tool and phylogenetic analysis. Complete VP1 sequences of GII.P16-GII.2 strains detected in this study were further obtained and subjected into sequence analysis. In total, 204 (20.4%) specimens
Intestinal biopsy specimens were obtained from normal volunteers before, during, and after administration of the Norwalk agent of acute infectious nonbacterial gastroenteritis. The small intestine of acutely ill volunteers had an intact mucosa but showed histologic changes that included blunting of villi, shortening of microvilli, dilation of endoplasmic reticulum, and an increase in intracellular multivesiculate bodies. Convalescence biopsy specimens, obtained 2 weeks after illness, showed normal histologic patterns. Specimens obtained from volunteers who remained clinically well did not show histologic changes at any time. At the time of illness, brush-border enzyme activities (alkaline phosphatase, sucrase, and trehalase) were decreased as compared with base-line and convalescent values. Thus definite but reversible pathophysiologic lesions of the small intestine in man were seen during acute gastroenteritis induced by a viral agent. ...
The treatment of gastroenteritis in children focuses on preventing dehydration. A child with minimal or no dehydration should be encouraged to continue his or her usual diet plus drink adequate fluids. Many studies have shown that a childs regular diet reduces the duration of diarrhea. Oral rehydration therapy with a rehydration solution can be used to treat diarrhea in children with mild to moderate dehydration. Ondansetron can decrease vomiting or help avoid the need for intravenous fluid, but it increases episodes of diarrhea. Probiotics can be used to shorten the course of diarrhea. Good handwashing reduces the incidence of acute gastroenteritis, but not rotavirus. The introduction of two rotavirus vaccines in the United States in 2006 significantly reduced the incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis. The oral, live vaccines have strong safety records, despite a minimal incidence of intussusception.
Although often considered a benign disease, acute gastroenteritis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children around the world, accounting for 1.34 million deaths annually in children younger than 5 years, or roughly 15% of all child deaths.
Doctor answers on Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, and More: Dr. Novick on does bacterial or viral gastroenteritis have more severe symptoms: Bacterial enterocolitis usually produces more severe symptoms than viral infection. for topic: Does Bacterial Or Viral Gastroenteritis Have More Severe Symptoms
Learn about viral gastroenteritis, a common contagious form of stomach flu: causes, symptoms, treatment, duration & possible complications, e.g. dehydration. With FAQs on diet, difference between bacterial & viral gastroenteritis, etc.
Doctor answers on Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, and More: Dr. Silverman on causes viral gastroenteritis: It is a viral infection of the GI tract. It can be picked up from contact with surfaces, foods, living things, etc. That are carrying the virus. The best prevention is frequent hand washing and proper food preparation. for topic: Causes Viral Gastroenteritis
Learn more about Viral Gastroenteritis at Portsmouth Regional Hospital DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ...
Learn more about Viral Gastroenteritis at Coliseum Health System DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ...
Gastroenteritis, Read about Gastroenteritis symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and treatment. Also read Gastroenteritis articles about how to live with Gastroenteritis, and more.
Gastroenteritis, Read about Gastroenteritis symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and treatment. Also read Gastroenteritis articles about how to live with Gastroenteritis, and more.
BMC Research Notes http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcresnotes/content (Accessed 9 December 2017) Research note Intention to vaccinate universally against varicella, rotavirus gastroenteritis, meningococcal B disease and seasonal influenza among parents in the Netherlands: an internet survey For the decision-making process regarding introduction of new vaccines into the National Immunisation Programme (NIP), advance insight into the potential acceptance among the…
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This is a severe acute gastroenteritis case most probably attributed to the secondary infection of Rotarix-related virus without underlying diseases. The importance of molecular surveillance of rotavirus infections is discussed. What is Known: • The live-attenuated rotavirus vaccines, Rotarix and Ro …
TY - JOUR. T1 - Comparative evaluation of the new xTAG GPP multiplex assay in the laboratory diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis. Clinical assessment and potential application from a multicentre Italian study. AU - Vocale, C.. AU - Rimoldi, S. G.. AU - Pagani, C.. AU - Grande, R.. AU - Pedna, F.. AU - Arghittu, M.. AU - Lunghi, G.. AU - Maraschini, A.. AU - Gismondo, M. R.. AU - Landini, M. P.. AU - Torresani, E.. AU - Topin, F.. AU - Sambri, V.. PY - 2015/5/1. Y1 - 2015/5/1. N2 - Objective: Gastroenteritis caused by a single pathogen or multiple pathogens remains a major diagnostic challenge for the laboratory. The treatment of diarrhoea is based on microbiological results. Diagnosis is achieved using different laboratory techniques that have variable sensitivity and specificity. xTAG GPP is a new multiplex PCR assay that simultaneously detects 15 different pathogens responsible for diarrhoea. The results of the first multicentre study in Italy to evaluate the potential clinical application of ...
Norovirus is the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in children in the United States, according to a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Education is most important for the prevention and treatment of bacterial gastroenteritis. Proper oral rehydration therapy helps to prevent dehydration and hastens recovery of the intestinal mucosa. D... more
The investigation documented SRSVs in a vehicle epidemiologically linked to a gastroenteritis outbreak. The findings demonstrate the power of molecular detection and identification and underscore the importance of fundamental public health practices such as restaurant inspection, assurance of a safe …
Another name for Gastroenteritis is Gastroenteritis. Home care for gastroenteritis includes: * Drink plenty of fluids. * Oral rehydration therapy for ...
Children can be more prone to bacterial gastroenteritis infections than adults. For example, a 2015 report states that children in the United States under a year old are more likely to get salmonella infections. Most salmonella infections happen when children consume contaminated food or water or come into contact with animals that carry the bacteria. Young children are also more likely to get infections from Clostridium difficile. These bacteria are mostly found in dirt and animal feces.. Children are more likely to develop infections from these types of bacteria. However, like adults, children are susceptible to any bacterial infections. Make sure your child practices good hygiene, washing their hands regularly, and avoiding putting their dirty hands in their mouths or near their eyes. Wash your own hands after changing your childs diaper. Wash and prepare food thoroughly, cooking raw dishes like eggs, vegetables, and meat until theyre well done. Many bacterial infection symptoms in children ...
Diarrhea and vomiting are so commonplace that nonphysicians usually underappreciate the potential mortality and morbidity of bacterial gastroenteritis. In the United States each year, several hundred ... more
Previous studies have described IBS incidence and risk factors among the U.S. military members using the Department of Defense medical encounter databases, confirming other civilian population-based studies identifying gender and antecedent gastrointestinal infection as risk factors, the researchers wrote. However, these previous reports, which relied on existing administrative databases containing medical encounter and demographic data, lacked information on many confounders such as life stressors and health behaviors, which are likely important in understanding risk and underlying causal mechanisms for this condition ...
Health,Two persons died of gastroenteritis and diarrhoea and 55 others were a...The deaths of an eight-year-old boy and aged woman and illness of ...Civil Surgeon S K Bansal said 4-5 teams of doctors have been rushed ...He attributed the outbreak of the diseases to contaminated piped wat...Source:PTI News...,Two,Die,,55,Afflicted,With,Gastroenteritis,And,Diarrhea,,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current medical news,latest medicine news
Gastroenteritis is a gut infection. Read specifically about Gastroenteritis in Adults and Older Children. See Gastroenteritis in Adults and Older Children page
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Find the best gastroenteritis doctors in Delhi NCR. Get guidance from medical experts to select gastroenteritis specialist in Delhi NCR from trusted hospitals - credihealth.com
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TOKYO, May 10- Lactobacillus Beverage Confirmed to Reduce Fever Brought on by Acute Gastroenteritis Caused by Norovirus Infection.
The electronic admission database or any other applicable database of the hospital will be reviewed to identify hospitalized children/children with outpatient visits/emergency room visits, less than five years of age who had been diagnosed with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) or RV GE either by the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD 10) diagnostic code (AA00-AA09 for intestinal infectious diseases and A08.0 for RV specific GE) or by RV positive rapid diagnosis kit results.. Note: The outcomes for the outpatient and emergency room visits will be assessed only in case the data for outpatient and emergency room visits can be obtained from at least one of the study centers. ...
Symptoms of viral gastroenteritis include diarrhea, vomiting and nausea. People often call it stomach flu, but its not influenza.
Introduction Gastroenteritis is a common disorder where the belly and bowel become swollen. It is generally caused by a virus-related or bacteriological infection. The two key symptoms of gastroenteritis are vomiting and diarrhoea, which generally clears up in around a week. What Causes Gastroenteritis? The most common cause of gastroenteritis in kids is a germ called the rotavirus. This virus is transmitted out in […]. ...
Acute gastroenteritis (AG) is the most common gastrointestinal inflammatory condition affecting people in both developed and developing countries (And...
The Centre for Health Protection (CHP) of the Department of Health is today (March 27) investigating an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in a primary school in Tsuen Wan, and...
Pathogenesis. Rotavirus, adenovirus, and caliciviruses invade and destroy mature epithelial cells in the middle and upper villus, causing decreased absorption of sodium and water from the bowel lumen. Diagnosis. Diagnostic tests usually are not performed to identify the causes of viral gastroenteritis. However, a rapid antigen test of stool, either by enzyme immunosorbent assay or the latex agglutination test, can be used to aid in the diagnosis of rotavirus infection.. Therapy and Prevention. Viral gastroenteritis is a self-limiting disease, but it is often necessary to administer fluids and electrolytes to patients to prevent dehydration. Oral rehydration therapy is recommended for preventing and treating early dehydration. Shock, severe dehydration, and decreased consciousness require intravenous therapy. Administering antiemetics and antidiarrheal agents to small children is not recommended.. Natural immunity is usually incomplete, and multiple episodes of viral gastroenteritis can occur in ...
Acute gastroenteritis in children is a major cause of morbidity in the United States. Viral infections, primarily from rotavirus, cause 75 to 90 percent of cases. The remaining infections are largely bacterial, with as many as 10 percent of cases secondary to diarrheagenic Escherichia coli. The history and physical examination of children with gastroenteritis should focus on assessing for the presence and degree of dehydration and determining the underlying etiology. The childs weight during the illness versus posttreatment is often used to evaluate degree of dehydration retrospectively. The three examination signs that best suggest dehydration in children are an abnormal respiratory pattern, abnormal skin turgor, and prolonged capillary refill time, although parental report of the childs history is also helpful in the assessment. In general, measuring serum electrolyte levels usually is unnecessary in children with mild to moderate dehydration. Laboratory tests are recommended only when severe
RESULTS: Total 186 subjects: 95 healthy controls and 91 GA-inhibitor users (47 on ranitidine and 44 on omeprazole). The 2 groups were comparable for age, gender, weight, length, and incidence of acute gastroenteritis and pneumonia in the 4 months before enrollment. Rate of subjects presenting with acute gastroenteritis and community-acquired pneumonia was significantly increased in patients treated with GA inhibitors compared with healthy controls during the 4-month follow-up period. No differences were observed between H2 blocker and PPI users in acute gastroenteritis and pneumonia incidence in the previous 4 months and during the follow-up period. On the contrary, in healthy controls, the incidence of acute gastroenteritis and pneumonia remained stable ...
Via the Centre for Health Protection: CHP appeals for vigilance against acute gastroenteritis. Excerpt: The Centre for Health Protection (CHP) of the Department of Health (DH) today (March 15) drew the attention of the public and management of schools and...
Respiratory Infections. Viruses cause many respiratory infections. Rhinovirus, coronavirus and adenovirus cause the common cold. The influenza, or flu, virus can cause upper respiratory infection and pneumonia. Another respiratory virus, called RSV, causes a respiratory infection called bronchiolitis in infants and toddlers. The symptoms of bronchiolitis include dry cough, rapid breathing and wheezing, a high-pitched noise sick children make when trying to exhale.. Gastrointestinal Infections. Viruses cause viral gastroenteritis, commonly called the stomach flu. This common illness, characterized by diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, is caused by many different viruses, but not the influenza virus. According to a 2012 article in the journal American Family Physician, viruses cause between 75 and 90 percent of acute gastrointestinal disease in children. Rotavirus is the most common viral cause of gastroenteritis among children. Norovirus is the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis outbreaks. ...

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Gastroenteritis is usually caused by viruses.[4] However, bacteria, parasites, and fungus can also cause gastroenteritis.[2][4] ... Gastroenteritis at Curlie (based on DMOZ). *Diarrhoea and Vomiting Caused by Gastroenteritis: Diagnosis, Assessment and ... Gastroenteritis/. diarrhea. DNA virus. Adenovirus Adenovirus infection. RNA virus. Rotavirus. Norovirus. Astrovirus. ... A number of protozoa can cause gastroenteritis.[13] Giardia lamblia is most common, but Entamoeba histolytica, Cryptosporidium ...
Gastroenteritis It is important to establish the cause of gastro, as different types of gastroenteritis respond to different ... Gastroenteritis in children Gastroenteritis or Gastro can be dangerous for very young babies. Gastro is common in young ... Gastroenteritis It is important to establish the cause of gastro, as different types of gastroenteritis respond to different ... Gastroenteritis in children by The Sydney Childrens Hospitals Network * Gastroenteritis in children - from Department of ...
Information about gastroenteritis symptoms and how to prevent the spread of an infection causing diarrhea and vomiting, ... Gastroenteritis Gastroenteritis is an infection in the stomach and intestines that causes diarrhea and sometimes vomiting. It ... How Can I Prevent Gastroenteritis?Show It is not possible to keep a child from being exposed to the germs that cause ... gastroenteritis. Proper hand washing by the whole family is the best way to prevent the spread of disease. ...
Norovirus gastroenteritis.. Glass RI1, Parashar UD, Estes MK.. Author information. 1. Fogarty International Center, National ...
Gastroenteritis. Gastroenteritis, acute infectious syndrome of the stomach lining and the intestine. It is characterized by ... gastroenteritisElectron micrographs of gastroenteritis viruses in humans.. Graham Colm. Numerous viruses, bacteria, and ... Viral gastroenteritis, or viral diarrhea, is perhaps the most common type of diarrhea in the world; rotaviruses, caliciviruses ... Other forms of gastroenteritis include food poisoning, cholera, and travelers diarrhea, which develops within a few days after ...
... and when to contact your doctor if you think you have gastroenteritis. ... Cunhas comments on how cases of gastroenteritis are diagnosed, ... Gastroenteritis is defined as swelling and inflammation of the ... A doctor will use your history and any test results to determine if you have gastroenteritis, and if the cause is viral or ... Many other diseases can cause similar symptoms to gastroenteritis, so your doctor will rule out conditions such as: * ...
... gastroenteritis) is an inflammation of the intestines that causes diarrhea, pain, vomiting or fever. Learn what you can do to ... Have you ever had the "stomach flu?" What you probably had was gastroenteritis - not a type of flu at all. Gastroenteritis is ... Viral gastroenteritis (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish * When you have nausea and vomiting (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in ... ClinicalTrials.gov: Gastroenteritis (National Institutes of Health) * ClinicalTrials.gov: Norovirus (National Institutes of ...
... Diarrhoea is your bodys way of trying to get rid of whatever bacteria or virus is causing this, and the ... It certainly sounds as if you are suffering from a simple case of viral gastroenteritis rather than food poisoning here. ...
NVSN: Selected papers on surveillance for hospitalizations and outpatient visits associated with acute respiratory illness (ARI).
Selected papers on surveillance for hospitalizations and outpatient visits associated with acute gastroenteritis (AGE). ... Decline in gastroenteritis-related triage calls during the rotavirus season following rotavirus vaccine licensureexternal icon ... First reports of human rotavirus G8P[4] gastroenteritis in the United Statesexternal icon. J Clin Microbiol 2012;50:1118-1121. ... Norovirus and medically attended gastroenteritis in U.S. childrenexternal icon. N Engl J Med 2013;368:1121-30. ...
Infantile Gastro-enteritis. Br Med J 1944; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.4369.439 (Published 30 September 1944) Cite ...
Gastroenteritis. Say: gas-tro-en-tuh-ry-tus. Feeling sick to your stomach? It may be gastroenteritis, sometimes called stomach ...
Gastroenteritis (Common Causes)IntroductionDisease History, Characteristics, and TransmissionScope and DistributionTreatment ... and PreventionImpacts and IssuesBIBLIOGRAPHY Source for information on Gastroenteritis (Common Causes): Infectious Diseases: In ... Gastroenteritis (Common Causes) Infectious Diseases: In Context COPYRIGHT 2008 Thomson Gale. Gastroenteritis (Common Causes). ... Bacteria also cause gastroenteritis. Common examples include certain strains of Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Shigella, and ...
This type of gastroenteritis happens more in the cold weather months.. Another form of gastroenteritis is food poisoning. You ... Gastroenteritis is a general term for the stomach virus or stomach flu. It is called this because of its symptoms. This is not ... Doctors can diagnose gastroenteritis by reviewing your symptoms and doing a physical exam. Your doctor may order a stool, or ... Several things can cause gastroenteritis. The main cause is a family of viruses called norovirus. Rotovirus also is a viral ...
What is the epidemiology and impact of gastroenteritis?. Acute gastroenteritis-diarrhoea or vomiting (or both) of more than ... Acute gastroenteritis accounts for millions of deaths each year in young children, mostly in developing communities. In ... Prevention is the key to controlling gastroenteritis, and recently licensed, highly effective rotavirus vaccines will have a ... I searched the Cochrane Library database using the keywords "acute gastroenteritis" (all text), "acute disease", " ...
CMV gastroenteritis/colitis is inflammation of the stomach or intestine due to infection with cytomegalovirus. ... CMV gastroenteritis/colitis is inflammation of the stomach or intestine due to infection with cytomegalovirus. ... Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of CMV gastroenteritis/colitis. ...
Bacterial gastroenteritis has many causes, can range from mild to severe, and typically manifests with symptoms of vomiting, ... Bacterial Gastroenteritis Differential Diagnoses. Updated: Jul 17, 2018 * Author: Jennifer Lynn Bonheur, MD; Chief Editor: BS ... encoded search term (Bacterial%20Gastroenteritis) and Bacterial Gastroenteritis What to Read Next on Medscape. Related ... Conditions to consider in the differential diagnosis of bacterial gastroenteritis include the following:. * Colovesical fistula ...
Gastroenteritis Deaths, Foodborne Outbreaks Increase (ICEID 3). Several related pieces of news today from the International ... Gastroenteritis deaths on the rise in the United States: The emerging roles of Clostridium difficile and norovirus. 8th ... Over those 8 years, all gastroenteritis deaths doubled both in raw numbers and as a rate, rising from 7,000 to 17,000 deaths ... C. diff deaths, which Hall said represent 71 percent of all gastroenteritis deaths, increased five times over: from 2,700 to ...
Dehydration is the most common complication from gastroenteritis in the United States. Continuing fluid losses without ... Drugs & Diseases , Gastroenterology , Bacterial Gastroenteritis Q&A How does dehydration occur in bacterial gastroenteritis?. ... Safety and efficacy of an attenuated vaccine against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis. N Engl J Med. 2006 Jan 5. 354(1):11-22. ... Garcia Rodriguez LA, Ruigomez A, Panes J. Use of acid-suppressing drugs and the risk of bacterial gastroenteritis. Clin ...
Gastroenteritis is an infection that causes vomiting and diarrhea. ... Gastroenteritis is an infection that causes vomiting and diarrhea.. More to Know. Gastroenteritis can be due to an infection ... Gastroenteritis usually is not serious and generally lasts a few days. The greatest risk from gastroenteritis is dehydration, ...
Gastroenteritis is an infection that causes nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and belly cramps. Its often called the stomach flu, ... What Is Gastroenteritis?. Gastroenteritis, often called the stomach flu, is a common illness that causes nausea, vomiting, ... How Is Gastroenteritis Treated?. There is no specific treatment for gastroenteritis, and most kids can be treated at home. Keep ... Can Gastroenteritis Be Prevented?. Germs that cause gastroenteritis are contagious. That best way to avoid the illness is to ...
Outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis increase risk of severe illness or death for frail elderly people living in residential care ... "Viral gastroenteritis outbreaks dangerous to the elderly." Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 5 Apr. 2014. Web.. 17 Nov. ... Outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis increase risk of severe illness or death for frail elderly people living in residential care ... 2014, April 5). "Viral gastroenteritis outbreaks dangerous to the elderly." Medical News Today. Retrieved from. https://www. ...
... acute gastroenteritis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children around the world, accounting for 1.34 ... encoded search term (Pediatric Gastroenteritis) and Pediatric Gastroenteritis What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions ... Oral ondansetron for gastroenteritis in a pediatric emergency department. N Engl J Med. 2006 Apr 20. 354(16):1698-705. [Medline ... The study also added that protection against acute gastroenteritis infection persists at least up to age 6 years. [4] ...
It is possible that you have a viral gastroenteritis picked up from unwashed fruit, salad or vegetables during the preparation ... Do I have viral gastroenteritis?. It is possible that you have a viral gastroenteritis picked up from unwashed fruit, salad or ... It is possible that you have a viral gastroenteritis picked up from unwashed fruit, salad or vegetables during the preparation ...
Gastroenteritis: First aid. By Mayo Clinic Staff. Gastroenteritis is an inflammation of your stomach and intestines. Common ... If you suspect gastroenteritis in yourself:. *Stop eating for a few hours to let your stomach settle. ... Viral gastroenteritis. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ ... Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-gastroenteritis/basics/art-20056595 ...
... viral infections and parasites are the most common causes of gastroenteritis, also known as the stomach flu, according to Merck ... A: Stomach viruses, also known as viral gastroenteritis or stomach flu, can be caused by a variety of viruses, most commonly ... Gastroenteritis is inflammation of the stomach and intestines that leads to vomiting, stomach pain, diarrhea, fever and nausea ... Parasitic gastroenteritis is frequently linked to poor water sources, explains Merck Manuals. Parasites attach to the lining of ...
Foodborne viral gastroenteritis: challenges and opportunities.. Bresee JS1, Widdowson MA, Monroe SS, Glass RI. ... NLVs may also account for ,10% of sporadic cases of gastroenteritis in children and adults. Future research will focus on the ... Viral Gastroenteritis Section, Respiratory and Enteric Viruses Branch, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for ...
Bacterial gastroenteritis in children. Children can be more prone to bacterial gastroenteritis infections than adults. For ... What is bacterial gastroenteritis?. Bacterial gastroenteritis happens when bacteria causes an infection in your gut. This ... Preventing bacterial gastroenteritis. If you already have gastroenteritis, take safety precautions to avoid spreading the ... Symptoms of bacterial gastroenteritis. Bacterial gastroenteritis symptoms vary depending on the bacteria causing your infection ...
A child with eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) has high levels of a certain white blood cell in the GI tract and bloodstream. ... What is Pediatric Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis (EGE)?. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) is a very rare disorder that involves ... Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) is a type of eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorder that is closely related to eosinophilic ... What are the causes of Pediatric Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis (EGE)?. It is suspected that food most often triggers EGE ...

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