Excision of the whole (total gastrectomy) or part (subtotal gastrectomy, partial gastrectomy, gastric resection) of the stomach. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.
Sequelae of gastrectomy from the second week after operation on. Include recurrent or anastomotic ulcer, postprandial syndromes (DUMPING SYNDROME and late postprandial hypoglycemia), disordered bowel action, and nutritional deficiencies.
A Y-shaped surgical anastomosis of any part of the digestive system which includes the small intestine as the eventual drainage site.
A variety of surgical reconstructive procedures devised to restore gastrointestinal continuity, The two major classes of reconstruction are the Billroth I (gastroduodenostomy) and Billroth II (gastrojejunostomy) procedures.
That portion of the stomach remaining after gastric surgery, usually gastrectomy or gastroenterostomy for cancer of the stomach or peptic ulcer. It is a common site of cancer referred to as stump cancer or carcinoma of the gastric stump.
Surgical formation of an external opening (stoma) into the esophagus.
A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.
Surgical formation of an opening into the DUODENUM.
Surgical excision of one or more lymph nodes. Its most common use is in cancer surgery. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p966)
An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.
Gastrointestinal symptoms resulting from an absent or nonfunctioning pylorus.
The condition of weighing two, three, or more times the ideal weight, so called because it is associated with many serious and life-threatening disorders. In the BODY MASS INDEX, morbid obesity is defined as having a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2.
Pathological processes involving the STOMACH.
Surgical formation of an opening through the ABDOMINAL WALL into the JEJUNUM, usually for enteral hyperalimentation.
A thin lining of closed cavities of the body, consisting of a single layer of squamous epithelial cells (MESOTHELIUM) resting on a thin layer of CONNECTIVE TISSUE, and covered with secreted clear fluid from blood and lymph vessels. Major serous membranes in the body include PERICARDIUM; PERITONEUM; and PLEURA.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
The middle portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between DUODENUM and ILEUM. It represents about 2/5 of the remaining portion of the small intestine below duodenum.
The interruption or removal of any part of the vagus (10th cranial) nerve. Vagotomy may be performed for research or for therapeutic purposes.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the stomach.
Ulceration of the GASTRIC MUCOSA due to contact with GASTRIC JUICE. It is often associated with HELICOBACTER PYLORI infection or consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).
Surgical procedures aimed at affecting metabolism and producing major WEIGHT REDUCTION in patients with MORBID OBESITY.
A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.
The region of the STOMACH at the junction with the DUODENUM. It is marked by the thickening of circular muscle layers forming the pyloric sphincter to control the opening and closure of the lumen.
Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.
The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Surgical procedure in which the STOMACH is transected high on the body. The resulting small proximal gastric pouch is joined to any parts of the SMALL INTESTINE by an end-to-side SURGICAL ANASTOMOSIS, depending on the amounts of intestinal surface being bypasses. This procedure is used frequently in the treatment of MORBID OBESITY by limiting the size of functional STOMACH, food intake, and food absorption.
The shortest and widest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE adjacent to the PYLORUS of the STOMACH. It is named for having the length equal to about the width of 12 fingers.
A syndrome that is characterized by the triad of severe PEPTIC ULCER, hypersecretion of GASTRIC ACID, and GASTRIN-producing tumors of the PANCREAS or other tissue (GASTRINOMA). This syndrome may be sporadic or be associated with MULTIPLE ENDOCRINE NEOPLASIA TYPE 1.
Surgical procedures involving the STOMACH and sometimes the lower ESOPHAGUS to correct anatomical defects, or to treat MORBID OBESITY by reducing the size of the stomach. There are several subtypes of bariatric gastroplasty, such as vertical banded gastroplasty, silicone ring vertical gastroplasty, and horizontal banded gastroplasty.
Bilateral dissection of the abdominal branches of the vagus nerve. It is used frequently in the surgical management of duodenal and gastric ulcers, as well as in physiologic studies of gastrointestinal secretion and motility.
Breakdown of the connection and subsequent leakage of effluent (fluids, secretions, air) from a SURGICAL ANASTOMOSIS of the digestive, respiratory, genitourinary, and cardiovascular systems. Most common leakages are from the breakdown of suture lines in gastrointestinal or bowel anastomosis.
Retrograde flow of duodenal contents (BILE ACIDS; PANCREATIC JUICE) into the STOMACH.
Ulcer that occurs in the regions of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT which come into contact with GASTRIC JUICE containing PEPSIN and GASTRIC ACID. It occurs when there are defects in the MUCOSA barrier. The common forms of peptic ulcers are associated with HELICOBACTER PYLORI and the consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).
The black, tarry, foul-smelling FECES that contain degraded blood.
A poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in which the nucleus is pressed to one side by a cytoplasmic droplet of mucus. It usually arises in the gastrointestinal system.
A PEPTIC ULCER located in the DUODENUM.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.
Nonexpendable apparatus used during surgical procedures. They are differentiated from SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, usually hand-held and used in the immediate operative field.
Decrease in existing BODY WEIGHT.
Pathological development in the JEJUNUM region of the SMALL INTESTINE.
Lining of the STOMACH, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. The surface cells produce MUCUS that protects the stomach from attack by digestive acid and enzymes. When the epithelium invaginates into the LAMINA PROPRIA at various region of the stomach (CARDIA; GASTRIC FUNDUS; and PYLORUS), different tubular gastric glands are formed. These glands consist of cells that secrete mucus, enzymes, HYDROCHLORIC ACID, or hormones.
Endoscopes for examining the interior of the duodenum.
Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system.
A technique of closing incisions and wounds, or of joining and connecting tissues, in which staples are used as sutures.
The evacuation of food from the stomach into the duodenum.
Stable cobalt atoms that have the same atomic number as the element cobalt, but differ in atomic weight. Co-59 is a stable cobalt isotope.
Surgical procedure involving either partial or entire removal of the spleen.
The geographic designation for states bordering on or located in the Pacific Ocean. The states so designated are Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington. (U.S. Geologic Survey telephone communication)
Persons who have a history of physical or psychological dependence on ETHANOL.
Organs or parts of organs surgically formed from nearby tissue to function as substitutes for diseased or surgically removed tissue.
Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.
Fastening devices composed of steel-tantalum alloys used to close operative wounds, especially of the skin, which minimizes infection by not introducing a foreign body that would connect external and internal regions of the body. (From Segen, Current Med Talk, 1995)
The region between the sharp indentation at the lower third of the STOMACH (incisura angularis) and the junction of the PYLORUS with the DUODENUM. Pyloric antral glands contain mucus-secreting cells and gastrin-secreting endocrine cells (G CELLS).

Management and outcome of patients undergoing surgery after acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Steering Group for the National Audit of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage. (1/1177)

Most patients with acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage are managed conservatively or with endoscopic intervention but some ultimately require surgery to arrest the haemorrhage. We have conducted a population-based multicentre prospective observational study of management and outcomes. This paper concerns the subgroup of 307 patients who had an operation because of continued or recurrent haemorrhage or high risk of further bleeding. The principal diagnostic group was those with peptic ulcer. Of 2071 patients with peptic ulcer presenting with acute haemorrhage, 251 (12%) had an operative intervention with a mortality of 24%. In the non-operative group mortality was 10%. The operative intervention rate increased with risk score, ranging from 0% in the lowest risk categories to 38% in the highest. Much of the discrepancy between operative and non-operative mortality was explainable by case mix; however, for high-risk cases mortality was significantly higher in the operated group. In 78% of patients who underwent an operation for bleeding peptic ulcer there had been no previous attempt at endoscopic haemostasis. For patients admitted to surgical units, the operative intervention rate was about four times higher than for those admitted under medical teams. In patients with acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage operative intervention is infrequent and largely confined to the highest-risk patients. The continuing high mortality in surgically treated patients is therefore to be expected. The reasons for the low use of endoscopic treatment before surgery are not revealed by this study, but wider use of such treatments might further reduce the operative intervention rate. Physicians and surgeons have not yet reached consensus on who needs surgery and when.  (+info)

Extended lymph-node dissection for gastric cancer. (2/1177)

BACKGROUND: Curative resection is the treatment of choice for gastric cancer, but it is unclear whether this operation should include an extended (D2) lymph-node dissection, as recommended by the Japanese medical community, or a limited (D1) dissection. We conducted a randomized trial in 80 Dutch hospitals in which we compared D1 with D2 lymph-node dissection for gastric cancer in terms of morbidity, postoperative mortality, long-term survival, and cumulative risk of relapse after surgery. METHODS: Between August 1989 and July 1993, a total of 996 patients entered the study. Of these patients, 711 (380 in the D1 group and 331 in the D2 group) underwent the randomly assigned treatment with curative intent, and 285 received palliative treatment. The procedures for quality control included instruction and supervision in the operating room and monitoring of the pathological results. RESULTS: Patients in the D2 group had a significantly higher rate of complications than did those in the D1 group (43 percent vs. 25 percent, P<0.001), more postoperative deaths (10 percent vs. 4 percent, P= 0.004), and longer hospital stays (median, 16 vs. 14 days; P<0.001). Five-year survival rates were similar in the two groups: 45 percent for the D1 group and 47 percent for the D2 group (95 percent confidence interval for the difference, -9.6 percent to +5.6 percent). The patients who had R0 resections (i.e., who had no microscopical evidence of remaining disease), excluding those who died postoperatively, had cumulative risks of relapse at five years of 43 percent with D1 dissection and 37 percent with D2 dissection (95 percent confidence interval for the difference, -2.4 percent to +14.4 percent). CONCLUSIONS: Our results in Dutch patients do not support the routine use of D2 lymph-node dissection in patients with gastric cancer.  (+info)

Number and anatomical extent of lymph node metastases in gastric cancer: analysis using intra-lymph node injection of activated carbon particles (CH40). (3/1177)

BACKGROUND: The long-term survival of 200 patients with gastric cancer who underwent radical gastrectomy was analyzed with respect to the number and anatomical extent of lymph node metastasis. All of the patients received intra-lymph node injection of fine activated carbon particle solution (CH40) during surgery. METHODS: The average number of resected lymph nodes increased in line with the anatomical level of lymph node dissection; 32.5 per patient in D1, 42.3 in D2, 3 and 66.3 in D4. The percentage of blackened lymph nodes without metastasis (42.4%) was slightly higher than that of lymph nodes containing metastasis (37.2%), but the difference was not statistically significant. Of the 200 patients, 61 (30.5%) had microscopic evidence of metastatic lymph node involvement. Twenty-two patients had between one and three metastatic lymph nodes, 19 had between four and nine and 20 patients had more than nine. The 5-year survival rate was 93.1% in patients without lymph node metastasis, 71.9% in patients with 1-8 metastatic nodes, 36.1% in patients with 4-9 nodes and 19.2% in patients with > 9 nodes. RESULTS: The 5-year survival rate according to the anatomical extent of metastatic lymph nodes was 93.1% in n0, 63.1% in n1, 37.9% in n2, 27.8% in n3 and 0% in n4. The number of metastatic lymph nodes and also their anatomical extent were identified as independent prognostic factors for survival by multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: The number and anatomical extent of metastatic lymph nodes have similar impacts on prognosis in gastric cancer.  (+info)

Clinical symptoms, hormone profiles, treatment, and prognosis in patients with gastric carcinoids. (4/1177)

BACKGROUND: Type 1 gastric carcinoids are associated with hypergastrinaemia and chronic atrophic gastritis, type 2 occur in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 combined with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, and type 3 lack any relation to hypergastrinaemia. Type 1 tumours are usually benign whereas type 3 are highly malignant. AIMS: To identify possible tumour markers in patients with gastric carcinoids. PATIENTS/METHOD: Nine patients with type 1, one with type 2, and five with type 3 were evaluated with regard to symptoms, hormone profile, and prognosis. RESULTS: Plasma chromogranin A was increased in all patients but was higher (p < 0.01) in those with type 3 than those with type 1 carcinoids. All patients with type 3 carcinoids died from metastatic disease, but none of the type 1 patients died as a result of their tumours. One type 1 patient with a solitary liver metastasis received interferon alpha and octreotide treatment. Nine months later, the metastasis was no longer detectable. She is still alive eight years after diagnosis, without recurrent disease. This represents the only reported case of foregut carcinoid with an unresectable liver metastasis that seems to be have been cured by biotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma chromogranin A appears to be a valuable tumour marker for all types of gastric carcinoid. Combination therapy with interferon alpha and octreotide may be beneficial in patients with metastasising type 1 gastric carcinoids.  (+info)

Total gastrectomy with simultaneous pancreaticosplenectomy or splenectomy in patients with advanced gastric carcinoma. (5/1177)

A splenectomy or distal pancreaticosplenectomy is often performed simultaneously with total gastrectomy in the treatment of gastric carcinoma to facilitate dissection of the lymph nodes around the splenic artery and splenic hilus. However, the negative impact of splenectomy and pancreaticosplenectomy has also been reported. A retrospective analysis was performed to evaluate the outcomes of distal pancreaticosplenectomy and total gastrectomy, splenectomy and total gastrectomy, and gastrectomy alone in the patients with advanced gastric carcinoma without distant metastasis. Prognostic factors were examined. No significant differences existed in 5-year survival in the patients who underwent gastrectomy with splenectomy, gastrectomy with distal pancreaticosplenectomy, or gastrectomy alone. Neither splenectomy, nor distal pancreaticosplenectomy were prognostic factors. However, distal pancreaticosplenectomy was an independent predictor of pancreatic fistula. In conclusion, the addition of distal pancreaticosplenectomy or splenectomy to total gastrectomy for gastric cancer increases the risk of severe complications, but does not improve survival.  (+info)

Comparison of the effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane on arterial oxygenation during one lung ventilation. (6/1177)

We have compared the effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane on arterial oxygenation, heart rate and mean arterial pressure during one lung anaesthesia in a prospective, crossover study. We studied 28 patients undergoing oesophagogastrectomy, allocated alternatively to one of two groups. Patients in group I/S (n = 14) received 1 MAC (1.1%) of isoflurane in oxygen from induction until the end of 30 min of open chest one lung ventilation (OLV) in the lateral position. This was followed by 1 MAC (2.1%) of sevoflurane in oxygen for the next 30 min of OLV. Patients in group S/I (n = 14) received the two anaesthetic agents in the reverse order. We found no significant difference in arterial oxygenation, heart rate or mean arterial pressure between the two potent inhalation agents. In the subgroup of patients with pulmonary artery catheters (n = 12), we found a significant increase (P < 0.05) in derived shunt during sevoflurane anaesthesia. There was no significant difference in mixed venous saturation and cardiac output. We conclude that during one lung ventilation, the choice between sevoflurane and isoflurane did not significantly influence arterial oxygenation.  (+info)

Delay of gastric emptying by duodenal intubation: sensitive measurement of gastric emptying by the paracetamol absorption test. (7/1177)

AIMS: To examine the influence of duodenal intubation on gastric emptying measured by the paracetamol absorption test using a new algorithm developed to estimate emptying parameters, and to determine the sensitivity of this test. METHODS: A caloric liquid meal with paracetamol as marker of emptying was administered orally to eight healthy volunteers during phase I and phase II of the migrating motor complex (MMC) and without intubation on 3 separate days, and to 10 patients with partial gastrectomy. RESULTS: Healthy subjects: With duodenal tube, time until 25% of the meal had emptied (t25%) was 24+/-7 (phase I, P<0.02) and 21+/-6 min (phase II, P<0.02) compared with 14+/-4 min for meal intake without intubation. Time until 50% of the meal had emptied (t50%) was 45+/-8 (phase I, P<0.001) and 35+/-8 min (phase II, P<0.02) compared with 26+/-9 min for meal intake without intubation. Intraduodenal instillation of 10-20 mL of the liquid meal was reliably detected. PATIENTS: In 9 out of 10 patients with partial gastrectomy t25% was below the lower limit of the range for healthy controls, and t25% detected accelerated emptying with a higher degree of sensitivity than the commonly applied pharmacokinetic parameters Cmax and Tmax. CONCLUSIONS: A duodenal tube delays gastric emptying of a caloric liquid meal. The paracetamol absorption test emerges as a sensitive method suitable for detecting both delayed and accelerated gastric emptying of caloric liquid meals.  (+info)

Urinary gonadotropin peptide as acute phase reactant: transient elevation after operation for digestive diseases. (8/1177)

OBJECTIVE: In order to characterize urinary gonadotropin peptide (UGP) as an acute phase reactant, we focused on the UGP levels after surgical operation. DESIGN: Fifty cases of gastrointestinal cancer, 4 cases of cancers of other organs and 13 cases of benign digestive diseases were enrolled into this study. METHODS: UGP levels were measured using an enzyme immunoassay before and after surgery. RESULTS: Fifty-four (80.6%) of the 67 cases studied showed transient elevations of UGP. Both urinary interleukin (IL)-6 and LH levels were also increased transiently in 49 cases (73.1%). All of these three factors were increased in 38 cases (56.7%), and in 32 (84.2%) of these 38 cases, the order of peak appearance was as follows: IL-6, LH, and UGP. The UGP levels in the group of total gastrectomy were significantly higher than those in the group of partial gastrectomy. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that UGP shows a transient peak after surgery, correlating with levels of cytokines such as IL-6. UGP may be an acute phase reactant, and its levels are correlated with the grade of surgical stress.  (+info)

A Gastrectomy is a surgical procedure involving the removal of all or part of the stomach. This procedure can be total (complete resection of the stomach), partial (removal of a portion of the stomach), or sleeve (removal of a portion of the stomach to create a narrow sleeve-shaped pouch).

Gastrectomies are typically performed to treat conditions such as gastric cancer, benign tumors, severe peptic ulcers, and in some cases, for weight loss in individuals with morbid obesity. The type of gastrectomy performed depends on the patient's medical condition and the extent of the disease.

Following a gastrectomy, patients may require adjustments to their diet and lifestyle, as well as potential supplementation of vitamins and minerals that would normally be absorbed in the stomach. In some cases, further reconstructive surgery might be necessary to reestablish gastrointestinal continuity.

Stomach neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the stomach that can be benign or malignant. They include a wide range of conditions such as:

1. Gastric adenomas: These are benign tumors that develop from glandular cells in the stomach lining.
2. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs): These are rare tumors that can be found in the stomach and other parts of the digestive tract. They originate from the stem cells in the wall of the digestive tract.
3. Leiomyomas: These are benign tumors that develop from smooth muscle cells in the stomach wall.
4. Lipomas: These are benign tumors that develop from fat cells in the stomach wall.
5. Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs): These are tumors that develop from the neuroendocrine cells in the stomach lining. They can be benign or malignant.
6. Gastric carcinomas: These are malignant tumors that develop from the glandular cells in the stomach lining. They are the most common type of stomach neoplasm and include adenocarcinomas, signet ring cell carcinomas, and others.
7. Lymphomas: These are malignant tumors that develop from the immune cells in the stomach wall.

Stomach neoplasms can cause various symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, weight loss, and difficulty swallowing. The diagnosis of stomach neoplasms usually involves a combination of imaging tests, endoscopy, and biopsy. Treatment options depend on the type and stage of the neoplasm and may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or targeted therapy.

Postgastrectomy syndromes refer to a group of clinical manifestations that can occur as complications or sequelae following a gastrectomy, which is the surgical removal of all or part of the stomach. These syndromes are relatively common and can have a significant impact on the patient's quality of life.

There are several types of postgastrectomy syndromes, including:

1. Dumping syndrome: This occurs when the remaining portion of the stomach is unable to adequately regulate the passage of food into the small intestine, leading to symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, dizziness, and sweating.
2. Gastroparesis: This is a condition where the stomach is unable to empty properly due to decreased motility, leading to symptoms such as bloating, nausea, vomiting, and early satiety.
3. Nutritional deficiencies: Following gastrectomy, there can be malabsorption of certain nutrients, including vitamin B12, iron, calcium, and folate, leading to anemia, osteoporosis, and other health problems.
4. Afferent loop syndrome: This is a rare complication that occurs when the afferent loop, which carries digestive enzymes from the pancreas and bile from the liver to the small intestine, becomes obstructed or narrowed, leading to symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and jaundice.
5. Alkaline reflux gastritis: This occurs when the alkaline contents of the small intestine reflux into the remnant stomach, causing inflammation and ulceration.
6. Bile reflux: This is a condition where bile from the small intestine flows back into the stomach, leading to symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and heartburn.

Treatment of postgastrectomy syndromes depends on the specific type and severity of the syndrome, and may include dietary modifications, medication, or surgical intervention.

Roux-en-Y anastomosis is a type of surgical connection between two parts of the gastrointestinal tract, typically performed during gastric bypass surgery for weight loss. In this procedure, a small pouch is created from the upper stomach, and the remaining portion of the stomach is bypassed. The Roux limb, a segment of the small intestine, is then connected to both the pouch and the bypassed stomach, creating two separate channels for food and digestive juices to mix. This surgical technique helps to reduce the amount of food that can be consumed and absorbed, leading to weight loss.

Gastroenterostomy is a surgical procedure that creates an anastomosis (a connection or junction) between the stomach and the small intestine, usually between the stomach's lesser curvature and the jejunum (the second part of the small intestine). This procedure is often performed to bypass a diseased or obstructed portion of the gastrointestinal tract, such as in the case of gastric ulcers, tumors, or other conditions that prevent normal digestion and absorption.

There are different types of gastroenterostomy procedures, including:
1. Billroth I (or "gastroduodenostomy"): The stomach is connected directly to the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine).
2. Billroth II (or "gastrojejunostomy"): The stomach is connected to the jejunum, bypassing the duodenum.
3. Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy: A more complex procedure in which a portion of the jejunum is separated and reconnected further down the small intestine, creating a Y-shaped configuration. This type of gastroenterostomy is often used in bariatric surgery for weight loss.

The choice of gastroenterostomy technique depends on the specific medical condition being treated and the patient's overall health status.

The "gastric stump" refers to the remaining portion of the stomach that is left behind following a surgical procedure called gastrectomy. In a gastrectomy, a part or the entire stomach is removed, and the remaining parts are reconnected. The gastric stump is the end that is connected to the small intestine, where the food residue from the stomach enters the intestinal tract. This term is often used in the context of patients who have undergone surgeries for conditions such as stomach cancer or peptic ulcers.

An esophagostomy is a surgical opening created between the esophagus and the skin of the neck or chest. It is typically performed as an emergency procedure in cases where there is an obstruction or injury to the esophagus that cannot be managed through less invasive means. The esophagostomy provides a temporary or permanent access point for feeding, medication administration, or decompression of the esophagus.

The procedure involves creating an incision in the neck or chest and exposing the esophagus. A small opening is then made in the esophageal wall, and a tube is inserted through the opening and brought out through the skin. The tube may be secured in place with sutures or staples, and a dressing is applied to protect the site from infection.

After surgery, patients with an esophagostomy will require close monitoring and care to ensure proper healing and prevent complications such as infection, bleeding, or leakage of digestive fluids. The tube may be removed once the underlying condition has been treated and the esophagus has healed.

Laparoscopy is a surgical procedure that involves the insertion of a laparoscope, which is a thin tube with a light and camera attached to it, through small incisions in the abdomen. This allows the surgeon to view the internal organs without making large incisions. It's commonly used to diagnose and treat various conditions such as endometriosis, ovarian cysts, infertility, and appendicitis. The advantages of laparoscopy over traditional open surgery include smaller incisions, less pain, shorter hospital stays, and quicker recovery times.

Duodenostomy is a surgical procedure that creates an opening (stoma) into the duodenum, which is the first part of the small intestine. This procedure is typically performed to divert the flow of digestive secretions and contents away from a diseased or obstructed area of the gastrointestinal tract.

A duodenostomy may be created as a temporary measure to allow a portion of the intestine to heal or as a permanent solution for conditions such as chronic inflammatory bowel disease, cancer, or congenital abnormalities. The stoma can be located on the abdominal wall, allowing for the external drainage of digestive secretions and contents into a collection bag.

It is important to note that the specific medical definition and indications for duodenostomy may vary based on individual clinical context and patient needs. Therefore, it is always best to consult with a healthcare professional or medical expert for accurate information.

Lymph node excision is a surgical procedure in which one or more lymph nodes are removed from the body for the purpose of examination. This procedure is often conducted to help diagnose or stage various types of cancer, as malignant cells may spread to the lymphatic system and eventually accumulate within nearby lymph nodes.

During a lymph node excision, an incision is made in the skin overlying the affected lymph node(s). The surgeon carefully dissects the tissue surrounding the lymph node(s) to isolate them from adjacent structures before removing them. In some cases, a sentinel lymph node biopsy may be performed instead, where only the sentinel lymph node (the first lymph node to which cancer cells are likely to spread) is removed and examined.

The excised lymph nodes are then sent to a laboratory for histopathological examination, which involves staining and microscopic evaluation of the tissue to determine whether it contains any malignant cells. The results of this examination can help guide further treatment decisions and provide valuable prognostic information.

In anatomical terms, the stomach is a muscular, J-shaped organ located in the upper left portion of the abdomen. It is part of the gastrointestinal tract and plays a crucial role in digestion. The stomach's primary functions include storing food, mixing it with digestive enzymes and hydrochloric acid to break down proteins, and slowly emptying the partially digested food into the small intestine for further absorption of nutrients.

The stomach is divided into several regions, including the cardia (the area nearest the esophagus), the fundus (the upper portion on the left side), the body (the main central part), and the pylorus (the narrowed region leading to the small intestine). The inner lining of the stomach, called the mucosa, is protected by a layer of mucus that prevents the digestive juices from damaging the stomach tissue itself.

In medical contexts, various conditions can affect the stomach, such as gastritis (inflammation of the stomach lining), peptic ulcers (sores in the stomach or duodenum), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and stomach cancer. Symptoms related to the stomach may include abdominal pain, bloating, nausea, vomiting, heartburn, and difficulty swallowing.

Dumping syndrome, also known as rapid gastric emptying, is a condition that typically occurs in people who have had surgery to remove all or part of their stomach (gastrectomy) or have had a procedure called a gastrojejunostomy. These surgeries can lead to the stomach's contents entering the small intestine too quickly, causing symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramping, diarrhea, dizziness, and sweating.

There are two types of dumping syndrome: early and late. Early dumping syndrome occurs within 30 minutes after eating, while late dumping syndrome occurs 1-3 hours after eating. Symptoms of early dumping syndrome may include nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramping, diarrhea, bloating, dizziness, and fatigue. Late dumping syndrome symptoms may include hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), which can cause sweating, weakness, confusion, and rapid heartbeat.

Treatment for dumping syndrome typically involves dietary modifications, such as eating smaller, more frequent meals that are low in simple sugars, and avoiding fluids during meals. In some cases, medication may be prescribed to help slow down gastric emptying or manage symptoms. If these treatments are not effective, surgery may be necessary to correct the problem.

Morbid obesity is a severe form of obesity, defined by a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or higher or a BMI of 35 or higher in the presence of at least one serious obesity-related health condition, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or sleep apnea. It is called "morbid" because it significantly increases the risk of various life-threatening health problems and reduces life expectancy.

Morbid obesity is typically associated with significant excess body weight, often characterized by a large amount of abdominal fat, that can strain the body's organs and lead to serious medical complications, such as:

* Type 2 diabetes
* High blood pressure (hypertension)
* Heart disease
* Stroke
* Sleep apnea and other respiratory problems
* Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)
* Osteoarthritis
* Certain types of cancer, such as breast, colon, and endometrial cancer

Morbid obesity can also have significant negative impacts on a person's quality of life, including mobility issues, difficulty with daily activities, and increased risk of mental health problems, such as depression and anxiety. Treatment for morbid obesity typically involves a combination of lifestyle changes, medication, and in some cases, surgery.

Stomach diseases refer to a range of conditions that affect the stomach, a muscular sac located in the upper part of the abdomen and is responsible for storing and digesting food. These diseases can cause various symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, heartburn, indigestion, loss of appetite, and bloating. Some common stomach diseases include:

1. Gastritis: Inflammation of the stomach lining that can cause pain, irritation, and ulcers.
2. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): A condition where stomach acid flows back into the esophagus, causing heartburn and damage to the esophageal lining.
3. Peptic ulcers: Open sores that develop on the lining of the stomach or duodenum, often caused by bacterial infections or long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
4. Stomach cancer: Abnormal growth of cancerous cells in the stomach, which can spread to other parts of the body if left untreated.
5. Gastroparesis: A condition where the stomach muscles are weakened or paralyzed, leading to difficulty digesting food and emptying the stomach.
6. Functional dyspepsia: A chronic disorder characterized by symptoms such as pain, bloating, and fullness in the upper abdomen, without any identifiable cause.
7. Eosinophilic esophagitis: A condition where eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, accumulate in the esophagus, causing inflammation and difficulty swallowing.
8. Stomal stenosis: Narrowing of the opening between the stomach and small intestine, often caused by scar tissue or surgical complications.
9. Hiatal hernia: A condition where a portion of the stomach protrudes through the diaphragm into the chest cavity, causing symptoms such as heartburn and difficulty swallowing.

These are just a few examples of stomach diseases, and there are many other conditions that can affect the stomach. Proper diagnosis and treatment are essential for managing these conditions and preventing complications.

A jejunostomy is a surgical procedure where an opening (stoma) is created in the lower part of the small intestine, called the jejunum. This stoma allows for the passage of nutrients and digestive enzymes from the small intestine into a tube or external pouch, bypassing the mouth, esophagus, stomach, and upper small intestine (duodenum).

Jejunostomy is typically performed to provide enteral nutrition support in patients who are unable to consume food or liquids by mouth due to various medical conditions such as dysphagia, gastroparesis, bowel obstruction, or after certain surgical procedures. The jejunostomy tube can be used for short-term or long-term nutritional support, depending on the patient's needs and underlying medical condition.

A serous membrane is a type of thin, smooth tissue that lines the inside of body cavities and surrounds certain organs. It consists of two layers: an outer parietal layer that lines the cavity wall, and an inner visceral layer that covers the organ. Between these two layers is a small amount of fluid called serous fluid, which reduces friction and allows for easy movement of the organs within the body cavity.

Serous membranes are found in several areas of the body, including the pleural cavity (around the lungs), the pericardial cavity (around the heart), and the peritoneal cavity (around the abdominal organs). They play an important role in protecting these organs and allowing them to move smoothly within their respective cavities.

Postoperative complications refer to any unfavorable condition or event that occurs during the recovery period after a surgical procedure. These complications can vary in severity and may include, but are not limited to:

1. Infection: This can occur at the site of the incision or inside the body, such as pneumonia or urinary tract infection.
2. Bleeding: Excessive bleeding (hemorrhage) can lead to a drop in blood pressure and may require further surgical intervention.
3. Blood clots: These can form in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis) and can potentially travel to the lungs (pulmonary embolism).
4. Wound dehiscence: This is when the surgical wound opens up, which can lead to infection and further complications.
5. Pulmonary issues: These include atelectasis (collapsed lung), pneumonia, or respiratory failure.
6. Cardiovascular problems: These include abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), heart attack, or stroke.
7. Renal failure: This can occur due to various reasons such as dehydration, blood loss, or the use of certain medications.
8. Pain management issues: Inadequate pain control can lead to increased stress, anxiety, and decreased mobility.
9. Nausea and vomiting: These can be caused by anesthesia, opioid pain medication, or other factors.
10. Delirium: This is a state of confusion and disorientation that can occur in the elderly or those with certain medical conditions.

Prompt identification and management of these complications are crucial to ensure the best possible outcome for the patient.

The jejunum is the middle section of the small intestine, located between the duodenum and the ileum. It is responsible for the majority of nutrient absorption that occurs in the small intestine, particularly carbohydrates, proteins, and some fats. The jejunum is characterized by its smooth muscle structure, which allows it to contract and mix food with digestive enzymes and absorb nutrients through its extensive network of finger-like projections called villi.

The jejunum is also lined with microvilli, which further increase the surface area available for absorption. Additionally, the jejunum contains numerous lymphatic vessels called lacteals, which help to absorb fats and fat-soluble vitamins into the bloodstream. Overall, the jejunum plays a critical role in the digestion and absorption of nutrients from food.

A vagotomy is a surgical procedure that involves cutting or blocking the vagus nerve, which is a parasympathetic nerve that runs from the brainstem to the abdomen and helps regulate many bodily functions such as heart rate, gastrointestinal motility, and digestion. In particular, vagotomy is often performed as a treatment for peptic ulcers, as it can help reduce gastric acid secretion.

There are several types of vagotomy procedures, including:

1. Truncal vagotomy: This involves cutting the main trunks of the vagus nerve as they enter the abdomen. It is a more extensive procedure that reduces gastric acid secretion significantly but can also lead to side effects such as delayed gastric emptying and diarrhea.
2. Selective vagotomy: This involves cutting only the branches of the vagus nerve that supply the stomach, leaving the rest of the nerve intact. It is a less extensive procedure that reduces gastric acid secretion while minimizing side effects.
3. Highly selective vagotomy (HSV): Also known as parietal cell vagotomy, this involves cutting only the branches of the vagus nerve that supply the acid-secreting cells in the stomach. It is a highly targeted procedure that reduces gastric acid secretion while minimizing side effects such as delayed gastric emptying and diarrhea.

Vagotomy is typically performed using laparoscopic or open surgical techniques, depending on the patient's individual needs and the surgeon's preference. While vagotomy can be effective in treating peptic ulcers, it is not commonly performed today due to the development of less invasive treatments such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) that reduce gastric acid secretion without surgery.

Gastroscopy is a medical procedure that involves the insertion of a gastroscope, which is a thin, flexible tube with a camera and light on the end, through the mouth and into the digestive tract. The gastroscope allows the doctor to visually examine the lining of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum (the first part of the small intestine) for any abnormalities such as inflammation, ulcers, or tumors.

The procedure is usually performed under sedation to minimize discomfort, and it typically takes only a few minutes to complete. Gastroscopy can help diagnose various conditions, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastritis, stomach ulcers, and Barrett's esophagus. It can also be used to take tissue samples for biopsy or to treat certain conditions, such as bleeding or the removal of polyps.

A stomach ulcer, also known as a gastric ulcer, is a sore that forms in the lining of the stomach. It's caused by a breakdown in the mucous layer that protects the stomach from digestive juices, allowing acid to come into contact with the stomach lining and cause an ulcer. The most common causes are bacterial infection (usually by Helicobacter pylori) and long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Stomach ulcers may cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, heartburn, and nausea. If left untreated, they can lead to more serious complications like internal bleeding, perforation, or obstruction.

Bariatric surgery is a branch of medicine that involves the surgical alteration of the stomach, intestines, or both to induce weight loss in individuals with severe obesity. The primary goal of bariatric surgery is to reduce the size of the stomach, leading to decreased food intake and absorption, which ultimately results in significant weight loss.

There are several types of bariatric surgeries, including:

1. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB): This procedure involves creating a small pouch at the top of the stomach and connecting it directly to the middle portion of the small intestine, bypassing the rest of the stomach and the upper part of the small intestine.
2. Sleeve gastrectomy: In this procedure, a large portion of the stomach is removed, leaving behind a narrow sleeve-shaped pouch that restricts food intake.
3. Adjustable gastric banding (AGB): This surgery involves placing an adjustable band around the upper part of the stomach to create a small pouch and limit food intake.
4. Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD/DS): This is a more complex procedure that involves both restricting the size of the stomach and rerouting the small intestine to reduce nutrient absorption.

Bariatric surgery can lead to significant weight loss, improvement in obesity-related health conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, sleep apnea, and reduced risk of mortality. However, it is not without risks and complications, including infection, bleeding, nutrient deficiencies, and dumping syndrome. Therefore, careful consideration and evaluation by a multidisciplinary team are necessary before undergoing bariatric surgery.

Adenocarcinoma is a type of cancer that arises from glandular epithelial cells. These cells line the inside of many internal organs, including the breasts, prostate, colon, and lungs. Adenocarcinomas can occur in any of these organs, as well as in other locations where glands are present.

The term "adenocarcinoma" is used to describe a cancer that has features of glandular tissue, such as mucus-secreting cells or cells that produce hormones. These cancers often form glandular structures within the tumor mass and may produce mucus or other substances.

Adenocarcinomas are typically slow-growing and tend to spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body through the lymphatic system or bloodstream. They can be treated with surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or a combination of these treatments. The prognosis for adenocarcinoma depends on several factors, including the location and stage of the cancer, as well as the patient's overall health and age.

The pylorus is the lower, narrow part of the stomach that connects to the first part of the small intestine (duodenum). It consists of the pyloric canal, which is a short muscular tube, and the pyloric sphincter, a circular muscle that controls the passage of food from the stomach into the duodenum. The pylorus regulates the entry of chyme (partially digested food) into the small intestine by adjusting the size and frequency of the muscular contractions that push the chyme through the pyloric sphincter. This process helps in further digestion and absorption of nutrients in the small intestine.

Surgical anastomosis is a medical procedure that involves the connection of two tubular structures, such as blood vessels or intestines, to create a continuous passage. This technique is commonly used in various types of surgeries, including vascular, gastrointestinal, and orthopedic procedures.

During a surgical anastomosis, the ends of the two tubular structures are carefully prepared by removing any damaged or diseased tissue. The ends are then aligned and joined together using sutures, staples, or other devices. The connection must be secure and leak-free to ensure proper function and healing.

The success of a surgical anastomosis depends on several factors, including the patient's overall health, the location and condition of the structures being joined, and the skill and experience of the surgeon. Complications such as infection, bleeding, or leakage can occur, which may require additional medical intervention or surgery.

Proper postoperative care is also essential to ensure the success of a surgical anastomosis. This may include monitoring for signs of complications, administering medications to prevent infection and promote healing, and providing adequate nutrition and hydration.

The esophagus is the muscular tube that connects the throat (pharynx) to the stomach. It is located in the midline of the neck and chest, passing through the diaphragm to enter the abdomen and join the stomach. The main function of the esophagus is to transport food and liquids from the mouth to the stomach for digestion.

The esophagus has a few distinct parts: the upper esophageal sphincter (a ring of muscle that separates the esophagus from the throat), the middle esophagus, and the lower esophageal sphincter (another ring of muscle that separates the esophagus from the stomach). The lower esophageal sphincter relaxes to allow food and liquids to enter the stomach and then contracts to prevent stomach contents from flowing back into the esophagus.

The walls of the esophagus are made up of several layers, including mucosa (a moist tissue that lines the inside of the tube), submucosa (a layer of connective tissue), muscle (both voluntary and involuntary types), and adventitia (an outer layer of connective tissue).

Common conditions affecting the esophagus include gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), Barrett's esophagus, esophageal cancer, esophageal strictures, and eosinophilic esophagitis.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Gastric bypass is a surgical procedure that involves creating a small pouch in the stomach and rerouting the small intestine to connect to this pouch, thereby bypassing the majority of the stomach and the first part of the small intestine (duodenum). This procedure is typically performed as a treatment for morbid obesity and related health conditions such as type 2 diabetes, sleep apnea, and high blood pressure.

The smaller stomach pouch restricts food intake, while the rerouting of the small intestine reduces the amount of calories and nutrients that are absorbed, leading to weight loss. Gastric bypass can also result in hormonal changes that help regulate appetite and metabolism, further contributing to weight loss and improved health outcomes.

There are different types of gastric bypass procedures, including Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic gastric bypass. The choice of procedure depends on various factors such as the patient's overall health, medical history, and personal preferences. Gastric bypass is generally considered a safe and effective treatment for morbid obesity, but like any surgical procedure, it carries risks and requires careful consideration and preparation.

The duodenum is the first part of the small intestine, immediately following the stomach. It is a C-shaped structure that is about 10-12 inches long and is responsible for continuing the digestion process that begins in the stomach. The duodenum receives partially digested food from the stomach through the pyloric valve and mixes it with digestive enzymes and bile produced by the pancreas and liver, respectively. These enzymes help break down proteins, fats, and carbohydrates into smaller molecules, allowing for efficient absorption in the remaining sections of the small intestine.

Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome (ZES) is a rare digestive disorder that is characterized by the development of one or more gastrin-secreting tumors, also known as gastrinomas. These tumors are usually found in the pancreas and duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). Gastrinomas produce excessive amounts of the hormone gastrin, which leads to the overproduction of stomach acid.

The increased stomach acid can cause severe peptic ulcers, often multiple or refractory to treatment, in the duodenum and jejunum (the second part of the small intestine). ZES may also result in diarrhea due to the excess acid irritating the intestines. In some cases, gastrinomas can be malignant and metastasize to other organs such as the liver and lymph nodes.

The diagnosis of Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome typically involves measuring serum gastrin levels and performing a secretin stimulation test. Imaging tests like CT scans, MRI, or endoscopic ultrasounds may be used to locate the tumors. Treatment usually includes medications to reduce stomach acid production (such as proton pump inhibitors) and surgery to remove the gastrinomas when possible.

Gastroplasty is a surgical procedure that involves reducing the size of the stomach to treat morbid obesity. It is also known as vertical banded gastroplasty or stomach stapling. In this procedure, a part of the stomach is permanently stapled vertically to create a small pouch at the top of the stomach. This restricts the amount of food that can be eaten at one time and causes a feeling of fullness with smaller amounts of food.

The goal of gastroplasty is to help patients lose weight by reducing their calorie intake, promoting weight loss, and improving overall health. However, it is important to note that gastroplasty requires significant lifestyle changes, including regular exercise and healthy eating habits, to maintain long-term weight loss success.

As with any surgical procedure, there are risks associated with gastroplasty, such as infection, bleeding, and complications related to anesthesia. It is important for patients to discuss these risks with their healthcare provider before deciding whether or not to undergo the procedure.

A truncal vagotomy is a surgical procedure that involves the selective or complete division of the trunks of the vagus nerves. The vagus nerves are pairs of nerves that originate in the brainstem and extend down to the abdomen, providing parasympathetic nerve supply to various organs. In a truncal vagotomy, the vagus nerves are cut above the level of the diaphragm, which results in denervation of the stomach and parts of the digestive tract.

This procedure is typically performed as a treatment for peptic ulcers, as it reduces acid secretion in the stomach by interrupting the nerve supply that stimulates acid production. However, truncal vagotomy can also have side effects such as altered gastric motility and decreased intestinal secretions, which may lead to symptoms like bloating, diarrhea, or dumping syndrome.

It's important to note that there are different types of vagotomy procedures, including selective vagotomy and highly selective vagotomy, which aim to preserve some of the nerve supply to the stomach and minimize side effects. The choice of procedure depends on various factors, such as the location and severity of the ulcer, patient's overall health, and individual preferences.

An anastomotic leak is a medical condition that occurs after a surgical procedure where two hollow organs or vessels are connected (anastomosed). It refers to the failure of the connection, resulting in a communication between the inside of the connected structures and the outside, which can lead to the escape of fluids, such as digestive contents or blood, into the surrounding tissues.

Anastomotic leaks can occur in various parts of the body where anastomoses are performed, including the gastrointestinal tract, vasculature, and respiratory system. The leakage can cause localized or systemic infection, inflammation, sepsis, organ failure, or even death if not promptly diagnosed and treated.

The risk of anastomotic leaks depends on several factors, such as the patient's overall health, the type and location of the surgery, the quality of the surgical technique, and the presence of any underlying medical conditions that may affect wound healing. Treatment options for anastomotic leaks vary depending on the severity and location of the leak, ranging from conservative management with antibiotics and bowel rest to surgical intervention, such as drainage, revision of the anastomosis, or resection of the affected segment.

Duodenogastric reflux (DGR) is a medical condition in which the contents of the duodenum, the first part of the small intestine, flow backward into the stomach. This occurs when the pyloric sphincter, a muscle that separates the stomach and duodenum, fails to function properly, allowing the reflux of duodenal juice into the stomach.

Duodenogastric refluxate typically contains bile acids, digestive enzymes, and other stomach-irritating substances. Chronic DGR can lead to gastritis (inflammation of the stomach lining), ulcers, and other gastrointestinal complications. Symptoms may include abdominal pain, bloating, nausea, vomiting, heartburn, and indigestion. Treatment usually involves medications that reduce acid production or neutralize stomach acid, as well as lifestyle modifications to minimize reflux triggers.

A peptic ulcer is a sore or erosion in the lining of your stomach and the first part of your small intestine (duodenum). The most common causes of peptic ulcers are bacterial infection and long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen.

The symptoms of a peptic ulcer include abdominal pain, often in the upper middle part of your abdomen, which can be dull, sharp, or burning and may come and go for several days or weeks. Other symptoms can include bloating, burping, heartburn, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, and weight loss. Severe ulcers can cause bleeding in the digestive tract, which can lead to anemia, black stools, or vomit that looks like coffee grounds.

If left untreated, peptic ulcers can result in serious complications such as perforation (a hole through the wall of the stomach or duodenum), obstruction (blockage of the digestive tract), and bleeding. Treatment for peptic ulcers typically involves medications to reduce acid production, neutralize stomach acid, and kill the bacteria causing the infection. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

Melena is a medical term that refers to the passage of black, tarry stools. It's not a specific disease but rather a symptom caused by the presence of digested blood in the gastrointestinal tract. The dark color results from the breakdown of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells, by gut bacteria and stomach acids.

Melena stools are often associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, which can occur due to various reasons such as gastric ulcers, esophageal varices (dilated veins in the esophagus), Mallory-Weiss tears (tears in the lining of the esophagus or stomach), or tumors.

It is essential to differentiate melena from hematochezia, which refers to the passage of bright red blood in the stool, typically indicating lower gastrointestinal bleeding. A healthcare professional should evaluate any concerns related to changes in bowel movements, including the presence of melena or hematochezia.

Carcinoma, signet ring cell is a type of adenocarcinoma, which is a cancer that begins in glandular cells. In signet ring cell carcinoma, the cancer cells have a characteristic appearance when viewed under a microscope. They contain large amounts of mucin, a substance that causes the nucleus of the cell to be pushed to one side, giving the cell a crescent or "signet ring" shape.

Signet ring cell carcinoma can occur in various organs, including the stomach, colon, rectum, and breast. It is often aggressive and has a poor prognosis, as it tends to grow and spread quickly. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, depending on the location and extent of the cancer.

A duodenal ulcer is a type of peptic ulcer that develops in the lining of the first part of the small intestine, called the duodenum. It is characterized by a break in the mucosal layer of the duodinal wall, leading to tissue damage and inflammation. Duodenal ulcers are often caused by an imbalance between digestive acid and mucus production, which can be exacerbated by factors such as bacterial infection (commonly with Helicobacter pylori), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, smoking, and stress. Symptoms may include gnawing or burning abdominal pain, often occurring a few hours after meals or during the night, bloating, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, and weight loss. Complications can be severe, including bleeding, perforation, and obstruction of the duodenum. Diagnosis typically involves endoscopy, and treatment may include antibiotics (if H. pylori infection is present), acid-suppressing medications, lifestyle modifications, and potentially surgery in severe cases.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Reconstructive surgical procedures are a type of surgery aimed at restoring the form and function of body parts that are defective or damaged due to various reasons such as congenital abnormalities, trauma, infection, tumors, or disease. These procedures can involve the transfer of tissue from one part of the body to another, manipulation of bones, muscles, and tendons, or use of prosthetic materials to reconstruct the affected area. The goal is to improve both the physical appearance and functionality of the body part, thereby enhancing the patient's quality of life. Examples include breast reconstruction after mastectomy, cleft lip and palate repair, and treatment of severe burns.

Surgical equipment refers to the specialized tools and instruments used by medical professionals during surgical procedures. These devices are designed to assist in various aspects of surgery, such as cutting, grasping, retraction, clamping, and suturing. Surgical equipment can be categorized into several types based on their function and use:

1. Cutting instruments: These include scalpels, scissors, and surgical blades designed to cut through tissues with precision and minimal trauma.

2. Grasping forceps: Forceps are used to hold, manipulate, or retrieve tissue, organs, or other surgical tools. Examples include Babcock forceps, Kelly forceps, and Allis tissue forceps.

3. Retractors: These devices help to expose deeper structures by holding open body cavities or tissues during surgery. Common retractors include Weitlaner retractors, Army-Navy retractors, and self-retaining retractors like the Bookwalter system.

4. Clamps: Used for occluding blood vessels, controlling bleeding, or approximating tissue edges before suturing. Examples of clamps are hemostats, bulldog clips, and Satinsky clamps.

5. Suction devices: These tools help remove fluids, debris, and smoke from the surgical site, improving visibility for the surgeon. Examples include Yankauer suctions and Frazier tip suctions.

6. Needle holders: Specialized forceps designed to hold suture needles securely during the process of suturing or approximating tissue edges.

7. Surgical staplers: Devices that place linear staple lines in tissues, used for quick and efficient closure of surgical incisions or anastomoses (joining two structures together).

8. Cautery devices: Electrosurgical units that use heat generated by electrical current to cut tissue and coagulate bleeding vessels.

9. Implants and prosthetics: Devices used to replace or reinforce damaged body parts, such as artificial joints, heart valves, or orthopedic implants.

10. Monitoring and navigation equipment: Advanced tools that provide real-time feedback on patient physiology, surgical site anatomy, or instrument positioning during minimally invasive procedures.

These are just a few examples of the diverse range of instruments and devices used in modern surgery. The choice of tools depends on various factors, including the type of procedure, patient characteristics, and surgeon preference.

Weight loss is a reduction in body weight attributed to loss of fluid, fat, muscle, or bone mass. It can be intentional through dieting and exercise or unintentional due to illness or disease. Unintentional weight loss is often a cause for concern and should be evaluated by a healthcare professional to determine the underlying cause and develop an appropriate treatment plan. Rapid or significant weight loss can also have serious health consequences, so it's important to approach any weight loss plan in a healthy and sustainable way.

Jejunal diseases refer to a range of medical conditions that affect the jejunum, which is the middle section of the small intestine. These diseases can cause various symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, bloating, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. Some examples of jejunal diseases include:

1. Jejunal inflammation or infection (jejunitis)
2. Crohn's disease, which can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract including the jejunum
3. Intestinal lymphoma, a type of cancer that can develop in the small intestine
4. Celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder that causes damage to the small intestine when gluten is consumed
5. Intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), which can occur due to various reasons including structural abnormalities or motility disorders of the jejunum
6. Meckel's diverticulum, a congenital condition where a small pouch protrudes from the wall of the intestine, usually located in the ileum but can also affect the jejunum
7. Intestinal strictures or obstructions caused by scarring, adhesions, or tumors
8. Radiation enteritis, damage to the small intestine caused by radiation therapy for cancer treatment.

The diagnosis and management of jejunal diseases depend on the specific condition and its severity. Treatment options may include medications, dietary modifications, surgery, or a combination of these approaches.

Gastric mucosa refers to the innermost lining of the stomach, which is in contact with the gastric lumen. It is a specialized mucous membrane that consists of epithelial cells, lamina propria, and a thin layer of smooth muscle. The surface epithelium is primarily made up of mucus-secreting cells (goblet cells) and parietal cells, which secrete hydrochloric acid and intrinsic factor, and chief cells, which produce pepsinogen.

The gastric mucosa has several important functions, including protection against self-digestion by the stomach's own digestive enzymes and hydrochloric acid. The mucus layer secreted by the epithelial cells forms a physical barrier that prevents the acidic contents of the stomach from damaging the underlying tissues. Additionally, the bicarbonate ions secreted by the surface epithelial cells help neutralize the acidity in the immediate vicinity of the mucosa.

The gastric mucosa is also responsible for the initial digestion of food through the action of hydrochloric acid and pepsin, an enzyme that breaks down proteins into smaller peptides. The intrinsic factor secreted by parietal cells plays a crucial role in the absorption of vitamin B12 in the small intestine.

The gastric mucosa is constantly exposed to potential damage from various factors, including acid, pepsin, and other digestive enzymes, as well as mechanical stress due to muscle contractions during digestion. To maintain its integrity, the gastric mucosa has a remarkable capacity for self-repair and regeneration. However, chronic exposure to noxious stimuli or certain medical conditions can lead to inflammation, erosions, ulcers, or even cancer of the gastric mucosa.

A duodenoscope is a type of endoscope that is used for performing minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the gastrointestinal tract, specifically in the duodenum, which is the first part of the small intestine. The duodenoscope is a flexible tube with a camera and a light at its tip, allowing physicians to visualize the inside of the duodenum and surrounding organs. It also has channels that can deliver therapies or enable the removal of tissue samples for biopsy. Duodenoscopes are commonly used in procedures such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), which involves the examination and treatment of the bile and pancreatic ducts.

Lymphatic metastasis is the spread of cancer cells from a primary tumor to distant lymph nodes through the lymphatic system. It occurs when malignant cells break away from the original tumor, enter the lymphatic vessels, and travel to nearby or remote lymph nodes. Once there, these cancer cells can multiply and form new tumors, leading to further progression of the disease. Lymphatic metastasis is a common way for many types of cancer to spread and can have significant implications for prognosis and treatment strategies.

Surgical stapling is a medical technique that uses specialized staplers to place linear staple lines to close surgical incisions, connect or remove organs and tissues during surgical procedures. Surgical staples are made of titanium or stainless steel and can be absorbable or non-absorbable. They provide secure, fast, and accurate wound closure, reducing the risk of infection and promoting faster healing compared to traditional suturing methods.

The surgical stapler consists of a handle, an anvil, and a cartridge containing multiple staples. The device is loaded with staple cartridges and used to approximate tissue edges before deploying the staples. Once the staples are placed, the stapler is removed, leaving the staple line in place.

Surgical stapling has various applications, including gastrointestinal anastomosis, lung resection, vascular anastomosis, and skin closure. It is widely used in different types of surgeries, such as open, laparoscopic, and robotic-assisted procedures. The use of surgical stapling requires proper training and expertise to ensure optimal patient outcomes.

Gastric emptying is the process by which the stomach empties its contents into the small intestine. In medical terms, it refers to the rate and amount of food that leaves the stomach and enters the duodenum, which is the first part of the small intestine. This process is regulated by several factors, including the volume and composition of the meal, hormonal signals, and neural mechanisms. Abnormalities in gastric emptying can lead to various gastrointestinal symptoms and disorders, such as gastroparesis, where the stomach's ability to empty food is delayed.

Cobalt isotopes are variants of the chemical element Cobalt (Co) that have different numbers of neutrons in their atomic nuclei. This results in the different isotopes having slightly different masses and varying levels of stability.

The most naturally occurring stable cobalt isotope is Co-59, which contains 27 neutrons in its nucleus. However, there are also several radioactive isotopes of cobalt, including Co-60, which is a commonly used medical and industrial radioisotope.

Co-60 has 30 neutrons in its nucleus and undergoes beta decay, emitting gamma rays and becoming Nickel-60. It has a half-life of approximately 5.27 years, making it useful for a variety of applications, including cancer treatment, industrial radiography, and sterilization of medical equipment.

Other radioactive isotopes of cobalt include Co-57, which has a half-life of 271.8 days and is used in medical imaging, and Co-56, which has a half-life of just 77.2 seconds and is used in research.

A splenectomy is a surgical procedure in which the spleen is removed from the body. The spleen is an organ located in the upper left quadrant of the abdomen, near the stomach and behind the ribs. It plays several important roles in the body, including fighting certain types of infections, removing old or damaged red blood cells from the circulation, and storing platelets and white blood cells.

There are several reasons why a splenectomy may be necessary, including:

* Trauma to the spleen that cannot be repaired
* Certain types of cancer, such as Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
* Sickle cell disease, which can cause the spleen to enlarge and become damaged
* A ruptured spleen, which can be life-threatening if not treated promptly
* Certain blood disorders, such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) or hemolytic anemia

A splenectomy is typically performed under general anesthesia and may be done using open surgery or laparoscopically. After the spleen is removed, the incision(s) are closed with sutures or staples. Recovery time varies depending on the individual and the type of surgery performed, but most people are able to return to their normal activities within a few weeks.

It's important to note that following a splenectomy, individuals may be at increased risk for certain types of infections, so it's recommended that they receive vaccinations to help protect against these infections. They should also seek medical attention promptly if they develop fever, chills, or other signs of infection.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but there seems to be a mistake in your question. "Pacific States" is not a recognized medical term or concept. The term "Pacific" usually refers to the Pacific Ocean or regions near it, and "states" typically refers to political divisions like countries or states within a country. If you're referring to a specific medical term that includes these words, could you please provide more context or clarify your question? I'm here to help!

Alcoholism, also known as alcohol use disorder (AUD), is a chronic relapsing brain disorder characterized by an impaired ability to stop or control alcohol consumption despite adverse social, occupational, or health consequences. It is defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) as a problematic pattern of alcohol use leading to clinically significant impairment or distress, as manifested by at least two of the following, occurring within a 12-month period:

1. Alcohol is often taken in larger amounts or over a longer period than was intended.
2. There is a persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control alcohol use.
3. A great deal of time is spent in activities necessary to obtain, use, or recover from the effects of alcohol.
4. Craving, or a strong desire or urge to use alcohol, is present.
5. Recurrent alcohol use results in a failure to fulfill major role obligations at work, school, or home.
6. Alcohol use continues despite having persistent or recurrent social or interpersonal problems caused or exacerbated by the effects of alcohol.
7. Important social, occupational, or recreational activities are given up or reduced because of alcohol use.
8. Recurrent alcohol use is in situations in which it is physically hazardous.
9. Alcohol use is continued despite knowledge of having a persistent or recurrent physical or psychological problem that is likely to have been caused or exacerbated by alcohol.
10. Tolerance, as defined by either of the following:
a) A need for markedly increased amounts of alcohol to achieve intoxication or desired effect.
b) A markedly diminished effect with continued use of the same amount of alcohol.
11. Withdrawal, as manifested by either of the following:
a) The characteristic withdrawal syndrome for alcohol (refer to DSM-5 for further details).
b) Alcohol (or a closely related substance, such as a benzodiazepine) is taken to relieve or avoid withdrawal symptoms.

The severity of alcohol use disorder is classified as mild, moderate, or severe based on the number of criteria met:

* Mild: 2-3 criteria met
* Moderate: 4-5 criteria met
* Severe: 6 or more criteria met

It's important to note that alcohol use disorder is a complex condition with various factors contributing to its development and course. If you or someone you know is struggling with alcohol use, it's crucial to seek professional help from a healthcare provider or a mental health specialist for an accurate assessment and appropriate treatment.

"Surgically-created structures" is not a standard medical term, but I can provide a general explanation of surgical procedures that create or modify anatomical structures.

Surgical procedures may involve creating new structures or modifying existing ones to achieve specific therapeutic goals. These modifications can be temporary or permanent and are often designed to improve organ function, restore physiological processes, or correct congenital abnormalities. Here are some examples of surgically-created structures:

1. Anastomosis: The connection of two hollow organs (e.g., intestines, blood vessels) or the reconnection of severed tubular structures after resection (removal) of damaged or diseased segments. Common types include end-to-end, side-to-side, and end-to-side anastomoses.
2. Stoma: An artificial opening created between a hollow organ (e.g., intestine, bladder) and the body surface to allow for waste elimination or drainage. Examples include colostomy, ileostomy, and urostomy.
3. Fistula: An abnormal connection or passageway between two organs, vessels, or the skin and an organ. Surgical creation of a fistula can be intentional (e.g., to divert intestinal contents in the management of complex wounds) or unintentional (e.g., as a complication).
4. Shunts: Artificial channels created to redirect fluid flow between body compartments, cavities, or vessels. Examples include peritoneal dialysis catheters, ventriculoperitoneal shunts for hydrocephalus management, and portosystemic shunts in the treatment of portal hypertension.
5. Flaps: A surgical technique used to relocate tissue from one part of the body to another while maintaining its blood supply. Flaps can be created using skin, muscle, fascia, or bone and are used for various purposes, such as wound closure, soft tissue reconstruction, or coverage of vital structures.
6. Grafts: Transplantation of tissue from one site to another or from a donor to a recipient. Common types include autografts (from the same individual), allografts (from another individual of the same species), and xenografts (from a different species). Examples include skin grafts, heart valve replacements, and corneal transplants.
7. Implants: Artificial devices or materials placed within the body to replace or augment function, support structures, or deliver medication. Examples include pacemakers, cochlear implants, orthopedic prostheses, and drug-eluting stents.
8. Stomas: Surgically created openings on the body surface that allow for the passage of bodily fluids or waste. Common examples include colostomies, ileostomies, and gastrostomies.

Neoplasm staging is a systematic process used in medicine to describe the extent of spread of a cancer, including the size and location of the original (primary) tumor and whether it has metastasized (spread) to other parts of the body. The most widely accepted system for this purpose is the TNM classification system developed by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC).

In this system, T stands for tumor, and it describes the size and extent of the primary tumor. N stands for nodes, and it indicates whether the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes. M stands for metastasis, and it shows whether the cancer has spread to distant parts of the body.

Each letter is followed by a number that provides more details about the extent of the disease. For example, a T1N0M0 cancer means that the primary tumor is small and has not spread to nearby lymph nodes or distant sites. The higher the numbers, the more advanced the cancer.

Staging helps doctors determine the most appropriate treatment for each patient and estimate the patient's prognosis. It is an essential tool for communication among members of the healthcare team and for comparing outcomes of treatments in clinical trials.

Surgical staplers are medical devices used in various surgical procedures to create secure and precise connections between tissues, vessels, or organs. They function by placing sterile, disposable staple cartridges into the device that contain rows of stainless steel staples. The stapler then applies pressure to deform the staples, forming a B-shaped staple line that holds the tissue together.

These devices are often used in place of traditional suturing methods due to their speed, accuracy, and ability to reduce surgical trauma. They can be employed in various types of surgeries, including gastrointestinal, thoracic, gynecologic, and orthopedic procedures.

Surgical staplers come in different shapes and sizes, with some designed for specific applications such as linear or circular stapling. Linear staplers are used to create straight lines of staples, while circular staplers form a ring-shaped connection, often used in anastomosis procedures (the joining of two hollow organs or vessels).

It is essential to follow proper techniques and indications when using surgical staplers, as improper usage can lead to complications such as bleeding, infection, leakage, or even tissue necrosis.

The pyloric antrum is the distal part of the stomach, which is the last portion that precedes the pylorus and the beginning of the duodenum. It is a thickened, muscular area responsible for grinding and mixing food with gastric juices during digestion. The pyloric antrum also helps regulate the passage of chyme (partially digested food) into the small intestine through the pyloric sphincter, which controls the opening and closing of the pylorus. This region is crucial in the gastrointestinal tract's motor functions and overall digestive process.

A gastrectomy is a partial or total surgical removal of the stomach. Gastrectomies are performed to treat stomach cancer and ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Gastrectomy. Sample meal plan for total gastrectomy (Articles with short description, ... total gastrectomy vs partial gastrectomy) and the pre-operative BMI. Maximum weight loss occurs by 12 months and many patients ... Historically, gastrectomies were used to treat peptic ulcers. These are now usually treated with antibiotics, as it was ...
... is the most commonly performed bariatric surgery worldwide. In many cases, sleeve gastrectomy is as ... Sleeve gastrectomy or vertical sleeve gastrectomy, is a surgical weight-loss procedure, typically performed laparoscopically, ... Sleeve gastrectomy may cause complications; some of them are listed below: Sleeve leaking (occurs 1 in 200 patients) Blood ... Sleeve gastrectomy was originally performed as a modification to another bariatric procedure, the duodenal switch, and then ...
"Gastrectomy". BioPortfolio Limited. Archived from the original on May 8, 2008. Retrieved May 30, 2008. "Surgical Clinics of ... Most of this time was spent working in Vienna with Theodor Billroth, who introduced gastrectomy techniques that are still in ...
Gastrectomy "Small bowel resection". MedlinePlus: U.S. National Library of Medicine. Retrieved 1 June 2013. "Large bowel ...
Billroth first tested gastrectomy surgery on animals in an experiment known as 'Billroth I gastrectomy', which resulted in the ... Antrectomy, also called distal gastrectomy, is a type of gastric resection surgery that involves the removal of the stomach ... In some cases, antrectomy can be used alongside laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy to facilitate weight loss. Yet, the clinical ... Mayir, Burhan (June 2022). "Starting Antrectomy in Less than 2 cm from Pylorus at Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy". Journal of ...
Subtotal gastrectomy is performed by some; it may be associated with higher morbidity and mortality secondary to the difficulty ... In adults, there is no FDA approved treatment other than gastrectomy and a high-protein diet. Cetuximab is approved for ...
These include the first: clinical functional end-to-end anastomosis; clinical gastrectomy using a stapling instrument; clinical ... Rectal Anastomosis Alternate Techniques of Gastroesophageal Reconstruction Stapling in Remedial Operations Total Gastrectomy ...
At the time he weighed almost 200 kilograms (440 lb). He decided to have sleeve gastrectomy. Bonci, Gabriele (2013). Pizza : ...
... but elision happens in gastrectomy (not *gastroectomy). The Greek word τέρας (τέρατο-) = "monster" is usually used to mean " ...
Greater weight loss than sleeve gastrectomy (SG). Greater weight loss than Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB).[citation needed] ...
Samuel B, Atiemo K, Cohen P, Czerniach D, Kelly J, Perugini R (2016). "The Effect of Sleeve Gastrectomy on Gastroparesis: A ... This can be done laparoscopically or endoscopically (called G-POEM). Vertical sleeve gastrectomy, a procedure in which a part ... Bagloo M, Besseler M, Ude A (April 2010). Sleeve gastrectomy for the treatment of diabetic gastroparesis. Proceedings 12th ...
Hunting underwent a successful total gastrectomy on July 12, less than five months after starting the treatment process. He ... "Exodus drummer Tom Hunting to undergo full gastrectomy for cancer treatment". NME. Retrieved July 5, 2021. "EXODUS Drummer TOM ... HUNTING Undergoes Successful Total Gastrectomy". Blabbermouth.net. July 12, 2021. Retrieved July 12, 2021. "EXODUS Drummer TOM ...
"Incidental gastric accessory spleen during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy". Int J Surg Case Rep. 36: 119-121. doi:10.1016/j. ...
Her weight loss prompted speculation of gastrectomy surgery.[citation needed] Netizens criticized her for "glamming up" in the ...
Saber AA, Elgamal MH, Itawi EA, Rao AJ (2008). "Single incision laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SILS): a novel technique". ... sleeve gastrectomy, nephrectomy, and sacrocolpopexy. SPL has been employed by surgeons at Cleveland Clinic for clinical trials ...
Dixon, J. A.; Morgan, K. A.; Adams, D. B. (2009). "Management of common bile duct injury during partial gastrectomy". The ...
"Youngest Patient Undergoes Gastrectomy Surgery by Dr. Muffazal Lakdawala". Archived from the original on 25 April 2012.{{cite ... Till date he has performed the largest number of single incision sleeve gastrectomy surgeries in the world. He is the first ... Lakdawala has performed sleeve gastrectomy surgery on Jayesh Malukani, one of the youngest Indian patient who is a 17-year-old ...
The SPL technique has been used to perform many types of surgery, including adjustable gastric banding and sleeve gastrectomy. ... Saber AA, Elgamal MH, Itawi EA, Rao AJ (2008). "Single incision laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SILS): a novel technique". ... or sleeve gastrectomy (SG) bariatric procedures. One commonly reported occurrence for banded patients is regurgitation of non- ...
First appeared in 1980, biliopancreatic diversion involves two parts: gastrectomy and intestinal bypass. Firstly, gastrectomy ...
A splenectomy or partial gastrectomy may also be required. A cystotomy is a surgical opening of the urinary bladder. It is ...
Sablinski, T; Tilney N L (Jun 1991). "Ludwik Rydygier and the first gastrectomy for peptic ulcer". Surgery, Gynecology & ...
The SILS technique has also been used in weight-loss surgery for both sleeve gastrectomy and - more recently - for laparoscopic ... Saber AA, Elgamal MH, Itawi EA, Rao AJ (October 2008). "Single incision laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SILS): a novel ...
... is prophylactic total gastrectomy indicated?". Cancer. 92 (1): 181-187. doi:10.1002/1097-0142(20010701)92:1. 3.0.CO;2-J. PMID ...
Judin S. Partial gastrectomy in acute perforated peptic ulcer. Surg Gynec Obstet 1937;64:63-8. Vladimir Alexi-Meskishvili and ...
Gastrectomy is the partial or full removal of the stomach. Gingivectomy is the removal of gums. Glossectomy is the removal of ...
Therefore, it must be ensured that patients who have undergone gastrectomy have a proper education on dietary habits, and ... and gastrectomy. Several cases have been documented where Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome has been seen on a large scale. In 1947, ... "Development of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome after long intervals following gastrectomy". Archives of Neurology. 55 (9): 1242-5. ... to the development of WKS was demonstrated in a study that was completed on three patients who recently undergone a gastrectomy ...
"Myelo-optico-neuropathy in copper deficiency occurring after partial gastrectomy. Do small bowel bacterial overgrowth syndrome ...
Sleeve gastrectomy procedure is standard for both of the versions.[citation needed] In addition to sleeve gastrectomy procedure ... Duodenal diverted sleeve gastrectomy with ileal interposition does not cause biliary salt malabsorption. SOARD 2015; 11: 372- ... 1) Celik A, Asci M, Celik BO, Ugale S. The impact of laparoscopic diverted sleeve gastrectomy with ileal transposition (DSIT) ... Ileal Interposition with diverted sleeve gastrectomy for treatment of Type 2 diabetes. Indian J Endocrinol Metab. 2012; 16(2): ...
... is prophylactic total gastrectomy indicated?". Cancer. 92 (1): 181-7. doi:10.1002/1097-0142(20010701)92:1. 3.0.CO;2-J. PMID ...
In 2008, Ji introduced a "modularized" version of D2 gastrectomy. In his own words, the modularized gastrectomy "dissembles the ... During his term (2017-2019), Ji advocated for his modularized gastrectomy on a global level and shared his experiences with ... Effect of Laparoscopic vs Open Distal Gastrectomy on 3-Year Disease-Free Survival in Patients With Locally Advanced Gastric ... Adjuvant capecitabine and oxaliplatin for gastric cancer after D2 gastrectomy (CLASSIC): a phase 3 open-label, randomized ...
A gastrectomy is a partial or total surgical removal of the stomach. Gastrectomies are performed to treat stomach cancer and ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Gastrectomy. Sample meal plan for total gastrectomy (Articles with short description, ... total gastrectomy vs partial gastrectomy) and the pre-operative BMI. Maximum weight loss occurs by 12 months and many patients ... Historically, gastrectomies were used to treat peptic ulcers. These are now usually treated with antibiotics, as it was ...
Gastrectomy is surgery to remove part or all of the stomach. ... partial gastrectomy) or to the esophagus (total gastrectomy). ... Gastrectomy is surgery to remove part or all of the stomach.. *If only part of the stomach is removed, it is called partial ... Gastrectomy. In: Delaney CP, ed. Netters Surgical Anatomy and Approaches. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2021:chap 8. ...
gastrectomy Clinical Research Trial Listings on CenterWatch ...
They identified 1073 patients who had a BMI , 35 kg/m2 at the time of sleeve gastrectomy. On average, their BMI was 33.7 kg/m2 ... Cite this: Sleeve Gastrectomy Beneficial at Lower BMI; Call to Lower Threshold - Medscape - Nov 19, 2019. ... This latest study was designed to answer the question: Did patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy below the 35 kg/m2 cutoff ... LAS VEGAS - In a state-wide registry study of patients who had sleeve gastrectomy, less obese individuals - those with an ...
Video Category: Sleeve Gastrectomy Session. SS09 - Sleeve Gastrectomy: S042 LAPAROSCOPIC SLEEVE GASTRECTOMY FOR OBESITY. ... SAGES 2011 Meeting, Sleeve Gastrectomy Session, Stomach. Learning Themes. Bariatrics. Sources. 2011 Annual Meeting. ... gastrectomy, gastric emptying, GBP, GERD, HH, LES, LSG, morbid obesity, restrictive procedures, super obese ...
Several small incisions will be made in your abdomen. Gas will be pumped in to inflate your abdomen and make it easier to view the stomach. A thin, lighted tool with a tiny camera will be inserted through an incision. A monitor will be used to view the images. Other tools will be inserted into other incisions. Staples will be used to divide the stomach vertically. The new stomach will be the shape of a slim banana. It can only hold 10% of what a normal adult stomach can hold. The rest of the stomach will be removed. Staples or stitches will be used to close the incisions. A bandage will be placed over the area. In some people, the doctor may need to switch to open surgery.. ...
Excision of the whole (total gastrectomy) or part (subtotal gastrectomy, partial gastrectomy, gastric resection) of the stomach ... "Gastrectomy" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject ... Bone changes post-sleeve gastrectomy in relation to body mass and hormonal changes. Eur J Endocrinol. 2023 Sep 01; 189(3):346- ... Below are MeSH descriptors whose meaning is more general than "Gastrectomy".. *Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic ...
Keyword(s): anatomy based sleeve gastrectomy, antrum, buttress, disposable, emerging technology, endoscopic stapling devices, ... FDA, Food & Drug Administration, full length sleeve gastrectomy stapler, fundus, gastric clamp, gastric stapling device, ...
There are brain changes that occur with the Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy. Find out about the VSG and changes in the brain to ... Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy & Changes in the Brain. The Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy (VSG) (also known as the Laparoscopic ... How the Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy Works and Benefits. The "hunger" hormone ghrelin regulates food intake and preference for ... Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy VSG and Changes in the Brain July 21, 2021 ...
Keywords: Enhanced recovery after surgery, Laparoscopic, Gastrectomy, Gastric cancer Core tip: This randomized controlled trial ... Abdikarim I, Cao XY, Li SZ, Zhao YQ, Taupyk Y, Wang Q. Enhanced recovery after surgery with laparoscopic radical gastrectomy ... AIM: To study the efficacy of the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program in laparoscopic radical gastrectomy for ... Enhanced recovery after surgery with laparoscopic radical gastrectomy for stomach carcinomas Ikram Abdikarim, Xue-Yuan Cao, ...
Figure 1 Liver traction. A: Liver traction by a fine line; B: Abdominal incision in the totally laparoscopic gastrectomy group ... Influence of liver function after laparoscopy-assisted vs totally laparoscopic gastrectomy. World J Gastrointest Surg 2023; 15( ... Influence of liver function after laparoscopy-assisted vs totally laparoscopic gastrectomy. World J Gastrointest Surg 2023; 15( ...
Laparoscopic-assisted distal gastrectomy versus open distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer. Surg Endosc. 2009;23:1252- ... Comparative study of laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy and open distal gastrectomy. J Am Coll Surg. 2006;202:874-880. [ ... Jiang L, Yang KH, Guan QL, Cao N, Chen Y, Zhao P, Chen YL, Yao L. Laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy versus open gastrectomy for ... Robot-assisted total gastrectomy is comparable with laparoscopically assisted total gastrectomy for early gastric cancer. Surg ...
All-Inclusive Sleeve Gastrectomy Packages Abroad. Compare Sleeve Gastrectomy Package Prices in the World. ... Sleeve Gastrectomy Related Packages. Gastric Sleeve Package in Cancun, Mexico by Metabolic Health. Get a Gastric Sleeve Package ... Sleeve Gastrectomy Related Experiences. Gastric Sleeve Surgery in Turkey 2023. Discover the transformational treatment of ... The gastric sleeve surgery (or gastrectomy) package at the LaCLINIQUE Hospital in Switzerland. The price starts at $30,000. ...
Few people can argue that losing weight is difficult, and keeping the weight off is even harder. For those folks suffering from "diabesity" - both type 2 diabetes and obesity - maintaining a "healthy" weight seems like a never-ending battle. So why is it so easy to gain weight, yet so difficult to lose it? If you have type 2 and are struggling with your weight, these new medications and surgical options might be right for you. read more → ...
Sleeve gastrectomy (gastric sleeve surgery or VSG surgery) is a minimally invasive weight loss surgery that involves removing a ... How is Sleeve Gastrectomy Surgery Performed?. Sleeve gastrectomy is done laparoscopically, which means it is associated with ... What is VSG Surgery (Sleeve Gastrectomy)?. Sleeve gastrectomy is a minimally invasive weight loss surgery that involves ... What Happens After Sleeve Gastrectomy Surgery?. Sleeve gastrectomy is a lifelong commitment that requires nutritional and ...
Gastrectomy for ulcers Gastrectomy is also occasionally used in the treatment of severe peptic ulcer disease or its ... This gastrectomy was my second procedure for gastric cancer. I had a partial gastrectomy in 2007 for gastric cancer. At that ... To remove a portion of the stomach in a gastrectomy, the surgeon gains access to the stomach via an incision in the abdomen. ... After gastrectomy surgery, patients are taken to the recovery unit and vital signs are closely monitored by ...
What is a distal gastrectomy?. A distal gastrectomy or antrectomy removes part of the stomach and stitches the remainder with ... Distal gastrectomy is a type of partial gastrectomy that involves the surgical removal of only a portion of the stomach. ... A partial gastrectomy surgery is followed by a surgery to create a connection (anastomosis) of the remaining portion of the ... Antrectomy (distal gastrectomy) is a procedure that involves surgical removal of the lower 30% of the stomach (antrum). ...
Apollo Hospitals offer Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) in India in which approximately 2/3rd of the left side of the ... Sleeve Gastrectomy surgery will be recommended as weight loss surgery:. *If your BMI is more than 60, sleeve gastrectomy is ... What is Sleeve Gastrectomy?. Sleeve Gastrectomy is an irreversible weight loss surgery performed laparoscopically, hence it is ... If you are older or have any risk factors for surgery like cardiac, lung, or liver problems, sleeve gastrectomy will be a ...
i,Conclusion.,/i, Malnutrition is relatively common in elderly patients undergoing gastrectomy. Advanced age, duration of ... who underwent gastrectomy at Zhongshan Hospital from January 2018 to May 2020 was conducted. Clinical data, including ... and the risk factors associated with delayed discharge of geriatric patients undergoing gastrectomy. ,i,Methods.,/i, A ... J. Y. Yang, H. J. Lee, T. H. Kim et al., "Short- and long-term outcomes after gastrectomy in elderly gastric cancer patients," ...
Figure 1 Response of study subjects with narrowing of the gastric sleeve after vertical sleeve gastrectomy. This figure shows ... Dysphagia after vertical sleeve gastrectomy: Evaluation of risk factors and assessment of endoscopic intervention. World J ... Dysphagia after vertical sleeve gastrectomy: Evaluation of risk factors and assessment of endoscopic intervention. World J ...
Sleeve Gastrectomy Surgery in India. Sleeve gastrectomy has become one of the most popular weight-loss surgeries in India and ... Sleeve Gastrectomy Surgery Cost In India In India, Gastric sleeve surgery cost starts from USD 5,500. This may vary depending ... Top Destinations for Sleeve Gastrectomy in India Mumbai, New Delhi, Bangalore, Chennai are some of the top most destinations ... Hospitals For Sleeve Gastrectomy in India. *Choose from 48 clinics and hospitals ...
2, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents with obesity undergoing sleeve gastrectomy (SG) have a decrease in lumbar volumetric ... "Adolescents who underwent sleeve gastrectomy had bone loss and an increase in bone marrow fat, despite marked loss of body fat ... RSNA: Sleeve Gastrectomy in Teens May Harm Bone Health. Dec 3, 2020 ... 2, 2020 (HealthDay News) - Adolescents with obesity undergoing sleeve gastrectomy (SG) have a decrease in lumbar volumetric ...
Benefits of sleeve gastrectomy surgery. June 30, 2018. July 25, 2018. Aira ... The surgery named gastric sleeve abroad is popular today and it is also termed traditionally as Sleeve gastrectomy but ... extra fat levels in the stomach area which is approximately 75 to 80 percent in the form of laparoscopic and gastrectomy ...
This randomized Phase II trial will compare the efficacy and safety of laparoscopy-assisted D2 distal gastrectomy and open ... distal D2 gastrectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for patients with macroscopically resectable serosa-positive gastric ... The sample size to test the hypothesis of the non-inferiority of laparoscopy-assisted D2 distal gastrectomy to open distal D2 ... This trial will be able to appraise the use of the laparoscopic approach as a curative D2 distal gastrectomy after neoadjuvant ...
Unfortunately it'll be a full gastrectomy, but the good news is I'll get to live which is definitely NOT overated [ ... Gastrectomy complete, heavily sedated but all cancer and mesothelioma nodules removed. He's a warrior. ... Hunting indicated that four more treatments will follow in the wake of the gastrectomy recovery period. Then I can resume my ... Update (07/13/21): Tom Hunting has undergone successful gastrectomy surgery. Everything went according to plan, Gary Holt ...
One hundred and twenty-eight gastric cancer patients scheduled to undergo radical gastrectomy under general anesthesia were ... We selected patients undergoing open radical gastrectomy, which is a surgical procedure that causes considerable post-operative ... Patients undergoing radical gastrectomy are particularly prone to post-operative nausea and vomiting due to the site of surgery ... aged 20-75 years and undergoing radical gastrectomy were recruited into this study. Liver and renal functions of all patients ...
Our mission at Central Valley Bariatrics is to keep our patients informed through every step of their healthcare in order to provide the best likelihood of long-term success. Dr. Ara Keshishian and his team provide patients with open communication, sincere compassion, and advanced surgical skill ...
How to Eat a Vegetarian Diet After Sleeve Gastrectomy. admin June 19, 2021 2 min read ... Maintaining a vegetarian diet after sleeve gastrectomy requires extra mindfulness when it comes to sources of protein. ...
HCA UK provides sleeve gastrectomy to reduce the volume of food you can eat. ... Sleeve gastrectomy. Weight loss surgery Removing part of the Stomach. HCA UK provides sleeve gastrectomy surgery for weight ... What is a sleeve gastrectomy?. Sleeve gastrectomy is a weight loss surgery that involves removing up to 80% of the stomach and ... After sleeve gastrectomy, the areas will be closed with stitches or staples.. Your consultant will let you know in advance how ...
... Weight loss surgeries, also known as bariatric surgeries, are very common among patients who suffer from ... and sleeve gastrectomy is one of the popular methods among these surgeries. During sleeve gastrectomy, the surgeon removes a ... Sleeve gastrectomy significantly reduces the size of the stomach and limits the amount of food that can be consumed. It does ... Sleeve gastrectomy is a relatively safe procedure. But there are some risks and complications that can occur after any major ...
  • All patients lose weight after gastrectomy, although the extent of weight loss is dependent on the extent of surgery (total gastrectomy vs partial gastrectomy) and the pre-operative BMI. (wikipedia.org)
  • Depending on what part of the stomach was removed, the intestine may need to be reconnected to the remaining stomach (partial gastrectomy) or to the esophagus (total gastrectomy). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Excision of the whole (total gastrectomy) or part (subtotal gastrectomy, partial gastrectomy, gastric resection) of the stomach. (harvard.edu)
  • While the vast majority of peptic ulcers (gastric ulcers in the stomach or duodenal ulcers in the duodenum) are managed with medication, partial gastrectomy is sometimes required for peptic ulcer patients who have complications. (surgeryencyclopedia.com)
  • Distal gastrectomy is a type of partial gastrectomy that involves the surgical removal of only a portion of the stomach. (hdkino.org)
  • A partial gastrectomy surgery is followed by a surgery to create a connection (anastomosis) of the remaining portion of the stomach to the duodenum (gastroduodenostomy) or the jejunum (gastrojejunostomy) of the small intestine. (hdkino.org)
  • A partial gastrectomy is the removal of only part of the stomach. (ucsf.edu)
  • Sleeve gastrectomy is quick and easy to perform by experienced bariatric surgeons, and it is now the most commonly performed bariatric procedure in the U.S. (bannerhealth.com)
  • The surgical procedure for severe ulcer disease is also called an antrectomy , a limited form of gastrectomy in which the antrum, a portion of the stomach, is removed. (surgeryencyclopedia.com)
  • Antrectomy (distal gastrectomy) is a procedure that involves surgical removal of the lower 30% of the stomach (antrum). (hdkino.org)
  • Often in high risk patients, sleeve gastrectomy is performed as a staging procedure prior to a gastric bypass or duodenal switch. (apollohospitals.com)
  • The surgeon who does the surgery to his patient, he has to key concentrate on removing extra fat levels in the stomach area which is approximately 75 to 80 percent in the form of laparoscopic and gastrectomy procedure. (skincancer-infoguide.com)
  • Exodus drummer Tom Hunting revealed he was diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma, a cancer of the stomach, earlier this year and now, in a new update, he has informed fans the next step in his battle involves a full gastrectomy procedure. (katsfm.com)
  • In The Vertical Gastrectomy Procedure, the outer two thirds of the stomach is removed creataing a long narrow stomach. (seriousweightloss.net)
  • Results of this surgery are similar to the Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass, but without the malabsorption risk that procedure can carry. (seriousweightloss.net)
  • What is Sleeve Gastrectomy Procedure? (sutured.com)
  • A sleeve gastrectomy procedure is performed with the purpose of limiting your stomach size and help you lose a significant amount of weight, over a short period of time. (sutured.com)
  • A sleeve gastrectomy is also known as vertical sleeve gastrectomy is most commonly performed laparoscopically, meaning that it is a minimally invasive surgical procedure. (sutured.com)
  • Who can have a Sleeve Gastrectomy Procedure? (sutured.com)
  • Sleeve gastrectomy procedure is a complex surgical procedure, and there are special criteria that you need to meet before you are able to undergo this procedure. (sutured.com)
  • Benefits of Sleeve Gastrectomy Procedure? (sutured.com)
  • Sleeve gastrectomy procedure is one of the most common weight loss procedures with patients losing about 60 percent to 70 percent of the excess weight. (sutured.com)
  • Sleeve gastrectomy is a minimally invasive procedure that only takes approximately one hour, making it one of the fastest options amongst weight loss procedures. (sutured.com)
  • Moreover, the sleeve gastrectomy procedure helps you lose weight safely and quickly, hence, reducing your chances of developing potentially fatal medical conditions. (sutured.com)
  • For the purpose of the sleeve gastrectomy procedure, your surgeon will place small incisions in your abdomen through which a laparoscopic probe will be inserted into your abdominal cavity. (sutured.com)
  • A sleeve gastrectomy procedure is a surgical procedure and just like any other surgical procedure, it has certain risks and complications associated with it. (sutured.com)
  • The gastric sleeve procedure, also called a sleeve gastrectomy , is the more invasive weight loss procedures. (mexicosleevegastrectomy.com)
  • Banded sleeve gastrectomy is a surgical procedure designed to help individuals struggling with obesity achieve significant weight loss. (gastricsleevelife.com)
  • In this article, we will discuss the concept of banded sleeve gastrectomy, its benefits, the surgical procedure involved, and the potential risks and complications. (gastricsleevelife.com)
  • Banded sleeve gastrectomy is a surgical procedure that is commonly used as a treatment for obesity. (gastricsleevelife.com)
  • The Surgical Technique of Banded Sleeve Gastrectomy is a complex procedure that requires a step-by-step approach for success. (gastricsleevelife.com)
  • By following this detailed guide, surgeons can effectively perform the banded sleeve gastrectomy procedure. (gastricsleevelife.com)
  • 1 procedure: gastrectomy and cholecystectomy (n = 1), sleeve gastrectomy and bowel resection (1), sleeve gastrectomy and lap band removal (1), and sleeve gastrectomy, breast augmentation, and abdominoplasty (1). (cdc.gov)
  • Gastrectomy is surgery to remove part or all of the stomach. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Abdikarim I, Cao XY, Li SZ, Zhao YQ, Taupyk Y, Wang Q. Enhanced recovery after surgery with laparoscopic radical gastrectomy for stomach carcinomas. (wjgnet.com)
  • To study the efficacy of the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program in laparoscopic radical gastrectomy for stomach carcinomas. (wjgnet.com)
  • What is VSG Surgery (Sleeve Gastrectomy)? (bannerhealth.com)
  • Sleeve gastrectomy is a minimally invasive weight loss surgery that involves removing a part of the stomach to reduce its size. (bannerhealth.com)
  • It is also known as laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) or gastric sleeve surgery. (bannerhealth.com)
  • How is Sleeve Gastrectomy Surgery Performed? (bannerhealth.com)
  • Vitamin deficiency can occur with Roux-en-Y (gastric bypass) surgery. (bannerhealth.com)
  • Sleeve gastrectomy is a safe weight loss surgery, but complications can still occur during and after surgery. (bannerhealth.com)
  • What Happens After Sleeve Gastrectomy Surgery? (bannerhealth.com)
  • Gastrectomy for gastric cancer is almost always done using the traditional open surgery technique, which requires a wide incision to open the abdomen. (surgeryencyclopedia.com)
  • What Is Distal Gastrectomy Surgery? (hdkino.org)
  • Sleeve Gastrectomy is an irreversible weight loss surgery performed laparoscopically, hence it is also known as Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG). (apollohospitals.com)
  • If your BMI is more than 60, sleeve gastrectomy is performed as an initial surgery to help you lose enough weight so that you can undergo more extensive type of bariatric surgery like a gastric bypass or duodenal switch with biliopancreatic diversion. (apollohospitals.com)
  • If your BMI is about 40 to 50, you will be recommended for a sleeve gastrectomy as the primary weight-loss surgery. (apollohospitals.com)
  • If you are older or have any risk factors for surgery like cardiac, lung, or liver problems, sleeve gastrectomy will be a better choice for you. (apollohospitals.com)
  • The surgery named gastric sleeve abroad is popular today and it is also termed traditionally as Sleeve gastrectomy but popularly gastric sleeve surgery too. (skincancer-infoguide.com)
  • Update (07/13/21): Tom Hunting has undergone successful gastrectomy surgery. (katsfm.com)
  • After sleeve gastrectomy surgery, you will not be able to eat as much as you did before the operation. (hairclinic.com)
  • HCA UK provides sleeve gastrectomy surgery for weight loss. (hcahealthcare.co.uk)
  • Sleeve gastrectomy is a weight loss surgery that involves removing up to 80% of the stomach and leaving behind a thin tube (or sleeve) that can only hold 50-100ML of fluid. (hcahealthcare.co.uk)
  • I thought that this might help others who are anxious about surgery or have just had a gastrectomy. (gastrectomyconnections.com)
  • However, patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy for this purpose were found to have lost much more weight than expected and most importantly sufficient weight, as a result, this technique was introduced into the medical literature as a bariatric surgery that can be performed alone. (obesitybodrum.com)
  • Roux-en-Y gastric by-pass (RNYGP) is currently the most common type of bariatric surgery performed in the world, especially in the USA. (obesitybodrum.com)
  • In the last year, the rate of sleeve gastrectomy surgery has increased and has been started to be performed almost evenly with RNYGP. (obesitybodrum.com)
  • How Old Should The Patient Be To Have Sleeve Gastrectomy Surgery? (obesitybodrum.com)
  • The gastric sleeve surgery, also known as the vertical sleeve gastrectomy, is a weight loss surgery that removes a large portion of your stomach. (weightzen.com)
  • Sleeve gastrectomy is considered to be more effective than other weight-loss surgeries, especially gastric band surgery in helping people lose weight. (sutured.com)
  • The answer to all your questions about Gastric Sleeve Surgery, also known as Sleeve Gastrectomy, is in our content! (healthenjoytr.com)
  • Sleeve Gastrectomy, also known as sleeve gastrectomy surgery, is the surgery to turn the stomach into a tube. (healthenjoytr.com)
  • Since the stomach was turned into a tube (pipe) with this surgery, the name of the operation remained as sleeve gastrectomy surgery. (healthenjoytr.com)
  • In Which Diseases Is Gastric Sleeve Surgery (Sleeve Gastrectomy) Used? (healthenjoytr.com)
  • In cases where the priority is not obesity but type 2 diabetes, bypass group surgeries are more successful than sleeve gastrectomy surgery. (healthenjoytr.com)
  • Who Is Gastric Sleeve Surgery (Sleeve Gastrectomy) Suitable For? (healthenjoytr.com)
  • While it can be scary looking at the potential risks and complications after sleeve gastrectomy surgery , there are ways you can reduce your risks. (mexicosleevegastrectomy.com)
  • Two randomized clinical trials in severely obese patients report that sleeve gastrectomy - an increasingly popular type of bariatric surgery - results in similar weight loss to traditional Roux-en-Y gastric bypass out to 5 years. (medscape.com)
  • However, new or worsening gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was more common with sleeve gastrectomy, as was repeat surgery because of GERD, whereas reoperation after gastric bypass was most often for small bowel obstruction . (medscape.com)
  • Sleeve gastrectomy is technically easier, faster, and potentially safer than Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for weight loss in severely obese patients, Ralph Peterli, MD, Department of Surgery, St Claraspital, Basel, Switzerland and colleagues report. (medscape.com)
  • Banded sleeve gastrectomy, a weight loss surgery, has several advantages. (gastricsleevelife.com)
  • Banded Sleeve Gastrectomy is a popular weight loss surgery that involves removing a portion of the stomach and placing an adjustable band around the remaining part. (gastricsleevelife.com)
  • Risks and Benefits of Roux-en-Y, Sleeve Gastrectomy, and Lap Band Procedures Weight Loss Surgery such as Sleeve Gastrectomy, has been shown to be the most effective and long lasting treatment for morbid obesity. (drshillingford.com)
  • Quality of life of patents undergoing bariatric surgery by laparoscopic technique sleeve gastrectomy. (bvsalud.org)
  • Post-operatively, up to 70% of patients undergoing total gastrectomy develop complications such as dumping syndrome and reflux esophagitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gastrectomy is also occasionally used in the treatment of severe peptic ulcer disease or its complications. (surgeryencyclopedia.com)
  • What are the complications of distal gastrectomy? (hdkino.org)
  • It is considered to be equally efficient as a gastric bypass, however, gastric bypass has long-term complications and sleeve gastrectomy does not make it a better option overall. (sutured.com)
  • What is a distal gastrectomy? (hdkino.org)
  • A distal gastrectomy or antrectomy removes part of the stomach and stitches the remainder with an opening into the small intestine. (hdkino.org)
  • Why is antrectomy (distal gastrectomy) performed? (hdkino.org)
  • This randomized Phase II trial will compare the efficacy and safety of laparoscopy-assisted D2 distal gastrectomy and open distal D2 gastrectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for patients with macroscopically resectable serosa-positive gastric cancer. (nih.gov)
  • The sample size to test the hypothesis of the non-inferiority of laparoscopy-assisted D2 distal gastrectomy to open distal D2 gastrectomy is 80. (nih.gov)
  • This trial will be able to appraise the use of the laparoscopic approach as a curative D2 distal gastrectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer. (nih.gov)
  • This latest study was designed to answer the question: Did patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy below the 35 kg/m 2 cutoff have similar benefits as patients above the cutoff? (medscape.com)
  • Adolescents who underwent sleeve gastrectomy had bone loss and an increase in bone marrow fat, despite marked loss of body fat," Bredella said in a statement. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Changes in Branched-Chain Amino Acids One Year after Sleeve Gastrectomy in Youth with Obesity and Their Association with Changes in Insulin Resistance. (harvard.edu)
  • The Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy (VSG) (also known as the Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) has gained popularity as a result of its safety and low complication rate, making it particularly suitable for people with severe obesity and comorbidities. (obesityhelp.com)
  • WEDNESDAY, Dec. 2, 2020 (HealthDay News) - Adolescents with obesity undergoing sleeve gastrectomy (SG) have a decrease in lumbar volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), which is associated with increased lumbar marrow adipose tissue (MAT), according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, held virtually from Nov. 29 to Dec. 5. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Sleeve Gastrectomy Weight loss surgeries, also known as bariatric surgeries, are very common among patients who suffer from obesity, and sleeve gastrectomy is one of the popular methods among these surgeries. (hairclinic.com)
  • This study describes outcomes of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) in patients with both severe obesity and CAWH. (psu.edu)
  • Additionally, banded sleeve gastrectomy helps in reducing the risk of obesity-related health conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, and sleep apnea. (gastricsleevelife.com)
  • Figure 1 Response of study subjects with narrowing of the gastric sleeve after vertical sleeve gastrectomy. (wjgnet.com)
  • In a vertical sleeve gastrectomy, the surgeon creates a small, tube-shaped stomach by removing the greater portion of the stomach through keyhole incisions. (ucihealth.org)
  • The first successful gastrectomy was performed by Theodor Billroth in 1881 for cancer of the stomach. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sleeve gastrectomy is done laparoscopically, which means it is associated with shorter hospital stays, smaller scars, less pain and a quicker recovery at home. (bannerhealth.com)
  • Your health care provider may recommend sleeve gastrectomy if you are severely obese with a body mass index (BMI) over 40. (bannerhealth.com)
  • To investigate this, they conducted the Swiss Multicenter Bypass or Sleeve Study (SM-BOSS), in which they randomized 217 severely obese adults (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 40 or ≥ 35 kg/m 2 with one comorbidity) to laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (107 patients) or laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (110 patients) at one of four bariatric centers in Switzerland during 2007 to 2011. (medscape.com)
  • Paulina Salminen, MD, PhD, University of Turku, Finland, and colleagues randomized 240 severely obese patients to receive laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (119 patients) or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (121 patients) at three hospitals in three cities. (medscape.com)
  • Obese patients who have laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy keep the weight off in the long run, researchers found. (drshillingford.com)
  • From June 2010 to December 2012, 61 gastric cancer patients who underwent laparoscopic-assisted radical gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy at First Hospital of Jilin University were enrolled in this randomized controlled trial. (wjgnet.com)
  • albums and is featured on the yet-to-be-released Persona Non Grata , will undergo a full gastrectomy. (katsfm.com)
  • One hundred and twenty-eight gastric cancer patients scheduled to undergo radical gastrectomy under general anesthesia were enrolled in the study. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • When it comes to weight loss surgeries, there are several options available, but two of the most common procedures are the banded sleeve gastrectomy and the traditional sleeve gastrectomy. (gastricsleevelife.com)
  • Effect of Four Main Gastrectomy Procedures for Proximal Gastric Cancer on Patient Quality of Life: A Nationwide Multi-Institutional Study. (bvsalud.org)
  • The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the µ-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) A118G polymorphism on the requirement for post-operative fentanyl analgesia in patients undergoing radical gastrectomy. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • The OPRM1 A118G polymorphism does not play a significant role in post-operative fentanyl analgesic dose or post-operative nausea, vomiting and dizziness in patients undergoing radical gastrectomy. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Hence, in the present study, we selected Chinese Han patients undergoing radical gastrectomy to evaluate whether the genetic polymorphisms of OPRM1 affect post-operative fentanyl requirements for analgesia. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • This operation is more radical in relation to Sleeve gastrectomy and is mainly used as the primary choice for patients who have severe diabetes. (atlasklinika.com)
  • Radical gastrectomy was performed in 94 cases. (cdc.gov)
  • After gastrectomy, the surgeon may reconstruct the altered portions of the digestive tract so that it may continue to function. (surgeryencyclopedia.com)
  • During sleeve gastrectomy , the surgeon removes a part of the stomach and joins the remaining part together, creating a banana-sized stomach. (hairclinic.com)
  • During sleeve gastrectomy, your surgeon will make several cuts in your abdomen and use surgical instruments to remove part of your stomach. (hcahealthcare.co.uk)
  • Although bariatric surgeries have been practiced since 1990s, the sleeve gastrectomy technique currently carried out was last reported by Gagner, MD, an American surgeon, in 2001. (obesitybodrum.com)
  • Finsterer-Hofmeister operation List of surgeries by type Roux-en-Y Sleeve gastrectomy Lahey Clinic (1941). (wikipedia.org)
  • Sleeve gastrectomy has become one of the most popular weight-loss surgeries in India and across the world. (tourmyindia.com)
  • Every year, thousands of patients increase their quality of life by losing weight in a healthy way with sleeve gastrectomy surgeries in Turkey. (healthenjoytr.com)
  • We perform Sleeve gastrectomy where the stomach is narrowed to a diameter of about 2 cm, which means almost equal to the width of the esophagus. (atlasklinika.com)
  • The banded sleeve gastrectomy involves placing an adjustable band around the stomach, which can be tightened or loosened as needed. (gastricsleevelife.com)
  • On the other hand, the traditional sleeve gastrectomy involves removing a large portion of the stomach, leaving behind a smaller sleeve-shaped stomach. (gastricsleevelife.com)
  • Gastrectomy, either total or subtotal (also called partial), is the treatment of choice for gastric adenocarcinomas, primary gastric lymphomas (originating in the stomach), and the rare leiomyosarcomas (also called gastric sarcomas). (surgeryencyclopedia.com)
  • Historically, gastrectomies were used to treat peptic ulcers. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the past a gastrectomy for peptic ulcer disease was often accompanied by a vagotomy, to reduce acid production. (wikipedia.org)
  • In sleeve gastrectomy, most of the stomach is removed and the remaining stomach walls are joined together with surgical staples. (obesitybodrum.com)
  • Weight Loss After Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy in Children and Adolescents. (harvard.edu)
  • This study "highlights that there are weight-independent effects of these [sleeve gastrectomy] operations that improve blood sugar, control your blood pressure, cholesterol, and things like that," he reiterated to Medscape Medical News . (medscape.com)
  • The average person loses between 20% to 25% of total body weight over the course of two years after a sleeve gastrectomy. (bannerhealth.com)
  • Sleeve gastrectomy is a lifelong commitment that requires nutritional and lifestyle changes to help sustain weight loss. (bannerhealth.com)
  • Typically sleeve gastrectomy gives an average of 60-80% of excess body weight loss, at the end of one year. (obesity-khalas.com)
  • And Edward H Livingston, MD, from the University of Texas Southwestern School of Medicine, Dallas, and JAMA Deputy Editor for Clinical Content, observed in an editorial that the three studies "demonstrate that outcomes for gastric sleeve resection - including survival, excess BMI, or weight loss, and improvement of comorbidities - are nearly as good as they are for Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and. (medscape.com)
  • However, in a post-hoc analysis, patients in the gastric bypass group had lost slightly more of their initial weight at 5 years than in the sleeve gastrectomy group (29% vs 25%, P = .02). (medscape.com)
  • Patients in the sleeve gastrectomy group were most likely to have reoperations because of GERD followed by insufficient weight loss, whereas patients in the gastric bypass group were more likely to have reoperations for internal hernia. (medscape.com)
  • After RYGB (particularly) or sleeve gastrectomy, levels of gastrointestinal hormones, such as glucagon -like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY), are increased, possibly contributing to satiety, weight loss, and remission of diabetes. (msdmanuals.com)
  • It is not performed for patients with chronic intestinal disorders, because it will be an intervention also intended for small intestines, unlike sleeve gastrectomy. (obesitybodrum.com)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Gastrectomy" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, and whether "Gastrectomy" was a major or minor topic of these publication. (harvard.edu)
  • Barriers and facilitators to CDH1 carriers contemplating or undergoing prophylactic total gastrectomy. (cdc.gov)
  • Adverse perinatal outcomes after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass vs. Sleeve Gastrectomy: a systematic review. (harvard.edu)
  • The resulting pouch, about the shape and size of a banana, is larger than the pouch created during Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. (ucihealth.org)
  • That is, on average at 5 years, patients in the sleeve gastrectomy group had lost 61% of excess BMI, whereas patients in the gastric bypass group had lost 68% of excess BMI ( P = .22). (medscape.com)
  • Sleeve gastrectomy is effective at helping patients with diabetes, high BMI and high blood pressure to manage their conditions. (hcahealthcare.co.uk)
  • Importantly, the studies showed that many patients experience durable diabetes remission after sleeve gastrectomy, Drs Arterburn and Gupta stress. (medscape.com)
  • Bone changes post-sleeve gastrectomy in relation to body mass and hormonal changes. (harvard.edu)
  • In the sleeve gastrectomy, the storage and hormonal part of the stomach is 'stapled-cut' and removed. (obesity-khalas.com)
  • Gastrectomies are performed to treat stomach cancer and perforations of the stomach wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adenocarcinomas are by far the most common form of stomach cancer and are less curable than the relatively uncommon lymphomas, for which gastrectomy offers good chances of survival. (surgeryencyclopedia.com)
  • Gastrectomy complete, heavily sedated but all cancer and mesothelioma nodules removed. (katsfm.com)
  • This study aimed to examine the effects of 4 main types of gastrectomy for proximal gastric cancer on postoperative symptoms, living status, and quality of life (QOL) using the Postgastrectomy Syndrome Assessment Scale-45 (PGSAS-45). (bvsalud.org)