Gasoline: Volative flammable fuel (liquid hydrocarbons) derived from crude petroleum by processes such as distillation reforming, polymerization, etc.WeldingHydrocarbonsXylenes: A family of isomeric, colorless aromatic hydrocarbon liquids, that contain the general formula C6H4(CH3)2. They are produced by the destructive distillation of coal or by the catalytic reforming of petroleum naphthenic fractions. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Petroleum: Naturally occurring complex liquid hydrocarbons which, after distillation, yield combustible fuels, petrochemicals, and lubricants.Vehicle Emissions: Gases, fumes, vapors, and odors escaping from the cylinders of a gasoline or diesel internal-combustion engine. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Air Pollutants, Occupational: Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.Benzene: Toxic, volatile, flammable liquid hydrocarbon byproduct of coal distillation. It is used as an industrial solvent in paints, varnishes, lacquer thinners, gasoline, etc. Benzene causes central nervous system damage acutely and bone marrow damage chronically and is carcinogenic. It was formerly used as parasiticide.Inhalation Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents by inhaling them.Neurobehavioral Manifestations: Signs and symptoms of higher cortical dysfunction caused by organic conditions. These include certain behavioral alterations and impairments of skills involved in the acquisition, processing, and utilization of knowledge or information.Forensic Pathology: The application of pathology to questions of law.Air Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Volatilization: A phase transition from liquid state to gas state, which is affected by Raoult's law. It can be accomplished by fractional distillation.tert-Butyl AlcoholOccupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Tetraethyl Lead: A highly toxic compound used as a gasoline additive. It causes acute toxic psychosis or chronic poisoning if inhaled or absorbed through the skin.Steel: A tough, malleable, iron-based alloy containing up to, but no more than, two percent carbon and often other metals. It is used in medicine and dentistry in implants and instrumentation.Benzene DerivativesLead: A soft, grayish metal with poisonous salts; atomic number 82, atomic weight 207.19, symbol Pb. (Dorland, 28th)Ventilation: Supplying a building or house, their rooms and corridors, with fresh air. The controlling of the environment thus may be in public or domestic sites and in medical or non-medical locales. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Automobiles: A usually four-wheeled automotive vehicle designed for passenger transportation and commonly propelled by an internal-combustion engine using a volatile fuel. (Webster, 1973)Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic: A major group of unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons containing two or more rings. The vast number of compounds of this important group, derived chiefly from petroleum and coal tar, are rather highly reactive and chemically versatile. The name is due to the strong and not unpleasant odor characteristic of most substances of this nature. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed, p96)Octanes: Eight-carbon saturated hydrocarbon group of the methane series. Include isomers and derivatives.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Ethyl EthersEnvironmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Toluene: A widely used industrial solvent.Gases: The vapor state of matter; nonelastic fluids in which the molecules are in free movement and their mean positions far apart. Gases tend to expand indefinitely, to diffuse and mix readily with other gases, to have definite relations of volume, temperature, and pressure, and to condense or liquefy at low temperatures or under sufficient pressure. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Energy-Generating Resources: Materials or phenomena which can provide energy directly or via conversion.Air Movements: The motion of air currents.Methyl Ethers: A group of compounds that contain the general formula R-OCH3.Fossil Fuels: Any combustible hydrocarbon deposit formed from the remains of prehistoric organisms. Examples are petroleum, coal, and natural gas.Lead PoisoningSmog: A mixture of smoke and fog polluting the atmosphere. (Dorland, 27th ed)Hydrocarbons, Aromatic: Organic compounds containing carbon and hydrogen in the form of an unsaturated, usually hexagonal ring structure. The compounds can be single ring, or double, triple, or multiple fused rings.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.PaintMotor Vehicles: AUTOMOBILES, trucks, buses, or similar engine-driven conveyances. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)PropaneAcid Rain: Acidic water usually pH 2.5 to 4.5, which poisons the ecosystem and adversely affects plants, fishes, and mammals. It is caused by industrial pollutants, mainly sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides, emitted into the atmosphere and returning to earth in the form of acidic rain water.Rain: Water particles that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Environmental Pollution: Contamination of the air, bodies of water, or land with substances that are harmful to human health and the environment.Tetranychidae: Family of spider MITES, in the superfamily Tetranychoidea, suborder Trombidiformes.Wetlands: Environments or habitats at the interface between truly terrestrial ecosystems and truly aquatic systems making them different from each yet highly dependent on both. Adaptations to low soil oxygen characterize many wetland species.Climate Change: Any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). It may result from natural factors such as changes in the sun's intensity, natural processes within the climate system such as changes in ocean circulation, or human activities.Greenhouse Effect: The effect of GLOBAL WARMING and the resulting increase in world temperatures. The predicted health effects of such long-term climatic change include increased incidence of respiratory, water-borne, and vector-borne diseases.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Global Warming: Increase in the temperature of the atmosphere near the Earth's surface and in the troposphere, which can contribute to changes in global climate patterns.WashingtonAtmosphere: The gaseous envelope surrounding a planet or similar body. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)BoliviaEcuadorMoraceae: The mulberry plant family of the order Urticales, subclass Hamamelidae, class Magnoliopsida. They have milky latex and small, petalless male or female flowers.Gastrointestinal Transit: Passage of food (sometimes in the form of a test meal) through the gastrointestinal tract as measured in minutes or hours. The rate of passage through the intestine is an indicator of small bowel function.
  • I have a 2007 Suzuki Grand Vitara and lately it has smelled like gasoline inside the vehicle after it has been parked for awhile and the odor also permeates throughout the garage. (fixya.com)
  • It is a colorless gas with a mild gasoline-like odor. (cdc.gov)
  • The state Air Resources Board has detected faulty vapor recovery systems manufactured by the Wayne Division of Dresser Industries Inc., known as Dresser Wayne, and installed at many gasoline stations. (latimes.com)
  • Vapor control systems have been required in California gasoline stations since the 1970s and are considered one of the most cost-effective anti-smog technologies in history. (latimes.com)
  • A vapor recovery line is supposed to pull fumes back into the dispenser. (latimes.com)
  • Gasoline can also enter the environment uncombusted, both as liquid and as vapor, from leakage and handling during production, transport and delivery (e.g., from storage tanks, from spills, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • The "volatile" in VOC, means that they convert to a vapor at room temperature and atmospheric pressure - in other words, we can smell them because their fumes diffuse into the air. (cooperator.com)
  • The umbilical cord blood of these 10 children, collected by Red Cross after the cord was cut, harbored pesticides, consumer product ingredients, and wastes from burning coal, gasoline, and garbage. (ewg.org)
  • She also advises them to avoid gasoline fumes, pesticides, certain types of fish, and some household cleaners and cosmetics. (sfgate.com)
  • About 2,000 gasoline dispensers at California service stations are gradually being repaired after a discovery that they have been leaking large volumes of smog-causing fumes into the air, probably for several years. (latimes.com)
  • When working properly, anti-smog nozzles and hoses are supposed to be highly effective, eliminating 95% of the fumes that seep into the air while motorists fill their tanks. (latimes.com)
  • In addition to forming smog, gasoline fumes contain cancer-causing compounds, so motorists face an unexpected health risk as they fill their tanks with the company's nozzles. (latimes.com)
  • Amal Kinawy of Cairo University found that rats exposed to gasoline fumes were more aggressive than those breathing clean air and more likely to show signs of anxiety. (wired.com)
  • Kinawy subjected 15 rats to leaded gasoline - which is still available in Egypt - and 15 to unleaded fuel. (wired.com)
  • She found the rats that had breathed gas fumes were more likely to exhibit aggressive behavior such as chattering their teeth, arching their backs and biting. (wired.com)
  • Rats exposed to unleaded gasoline showed indications of increased damage caused by free radicals and altered levels of neurotransmitters in the brain cortex region, in comparison with the control or leaded-gasoline groups,' she said. (wired.com)
  • Gasoline fumes and aggressive rats. (islandpress.org)
  • Kidney effects of inhaled unleaded gasoline--comprehensive and critical summary of observations in rats and mice. (cdc.gov)
  • Methyl tert -butyl ether (MTBE) is a flammable liquid which is used as an additive in unleaded gasoline. (cdc.gov)
  • Some people exposed to MTBE while pumping gasoline, driving their cars, or working in gas stations have reported having headaches, nausea, dizziness, and mental confusion. (cdc.gov)
  • In previous work, Hilpert and colleagues documented the release of gasoline as fuel is stored and transferred between tanker trucks, storage tanks, and vehicle tanks, and how these spills can contaminate the surrounding environment. (greencarcongress.com)
  • Once the engine has been fueled, wipe up gasoline spills. (phoenix.gov)
  • If the scientists were to apply their findings from the LA study to the rest of the world, a decrease in the emission of organic species from gasoline engines may significantly reduce SOA concentrations on a global scale as well. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Napalm, invented by Fieser in 1942, is an incendiary substance made by the simple procedure of adding a 'gelling' powder, composed of naphthalene and palmitate (hence 'napalm'), to gasoline in varying concentrations to form a sticky, combustible substance. (liveleak.com)
  • There's no equivilent fuel substitute for gasoline cars since they can't run more than 10% ethanol without being specifically tuned to run higher concentrations. (hybridcars.com)
  • Researchers had already established that SOAs could be formed from gases released by gasoline engines, diesel engines, and natural sources-biogenic agents from plants and trees-but they had not determined which of these sources were the most important, she said. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Paying through the nose to fill up the car is enough to send anyone into a rage, but it might be the fumes you're inhaling while pumping gas that make you angry. (wired.com)
  • My nose, my mouth is bleeding from the fumes. (nytimes.com)
  • Crude oil and wholesale gasoline prices are rising in response to positive US employment numbers and OPEC's agreement to extend crude production cuts," said AAA spokesperson Mark Jenkins. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • The nozzles are more difficult to insert into gasoline tanks, and fitting the 700 or so service stations scattered throughout Broward with the new nozzles could cost as much as $10 million. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • Underground tanks are outfitted with devices that allow fumes to be recovered. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • TALLAHASSEE - An attempt to solve Florida's problem of leaking gasoline storage tanks bogged down Wednesday in the Senate Natural Resources Committee, infuriating Chairman George Stuart Jr. who wanted to pass the bill and send it to another committee. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • For decades, the excise tax on gasoline and diesel fuel has been the main source of funds for building and maintaining the nation's roadways. (mi-ita.com)
  • The first thing to do if a person breathes an excessive amount of gasoline fumes is to get that person into fresh air as quickly as possible. (reference.com)
  • Ensure that gasoline-powered pressure washers or other fuel-powered tools are not used in enclosed or partially enclosed areas where CO can build up. (cdc.gov)
  • Use gasoline-oil mixture as fuel. (nasdonline.org)
  • When a fuel tank is not sealed, fumes escape 24-7, even when the car is parked. (hotrod.com)
  • Gasoline" is a North American word that refers to fuel for automobiles . (wikipedia.org)
  • British refiners originally used "motor spirit" as a generic name for the automotive fuel and "aviation spirit" for aviation gasoline . (wikipedia.org)
  • Shortening gasoline to gas , which happens often, causes confusion with various forms of gaseous products also used as automotive fuel (for example, compressed natural gas (CNG) , liquefied natural gas (LNG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) ). (wikipedia.org)
  • Gasoline Hybrid is the best stepping stone to the next fuel source. (hybridcars.com)
  • More broadly stated, I resent a manufacturer installing a fuel tank the bleeds fumes and then shrugs and tells you to suck it up. (cruisersforum.com)
  • And second, improved fuel economy and the rise of hybrid and electric vehicles means that more driving won't be matched by higher gasoline sales, and that how much people pay for the roads won't necessarily reflect how much they use them. (mi-ita.com)
  • Many gas stations across the country do not have fuel vapour return lines and smell strongly of gasoline. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Yet the headaches that Dubon suffered - until he joined a landscaping company that used electric machines - provide only a whiff of the possible hazards from gasoline-fired lawn and garden equipment. (fairwarning.org)
  • Avoid mowing your lawn or using other gasoline-powered gardening equipment until the late evening or until the air quality improves. (kidshealth.org)
  • Increasing environmental concerns over the past two decades have resulted in regulatory action in North America, Europe and elsewhere with successively tighter emission standards for both diesel and gasoline engines. (autoblog.com)
  • 3. Ensure that personal CO detectors equipped with audible alarms are used by employees when working with small gasoline-powered engines in locations where CO may build up. (cdc.gov)