Mobilization of the lower end of the esophagus and plication of the fundus of the stomach around it (fundic wrapping) in the treatment of GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX that may be associated with various disorders, such as hiatal hernia. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Retrograde flow of gastric juice (GASTRIC ACID) and/or duodenal contents (BILE ACIDS; PANCREATIC JUICE) into the distal ESOPHAGUS, commonly due to incompetence of the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER.
STOMACH herniation located at or near the diaphragmatic opening for the ESOPHAGUS, the esophageal hiatus.
A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.
The superior portion of the body of the stomach above the level of the cardiac notch.
A motility disorder of the ESOPHAGUS in which the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER (near the CARDIA) fails to relax resulting in functional obstruction of the esophagus, and DYSPHAGIA. Achalasia is characterized by a grossly contorted and dilated esophagus (megaesophagus).
Measurement of the pressure or tension of liquids or gases with a manometer.
The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
Analysis of the HYDROGEN ION CONCENTRATION in the lumen of the ESOPHAGUS. It is used to record the pattern, frequency, and duration of GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.
INFLAMMATION of the ESOPHAGUS that is caused by the reflux of GASTRIC JUICE with contents of the STOMACH and DUODENUM.
Difficulty in SWALLOWING which may result from neuromuscular disorder or mechanical obstruction. Dysphagia is classified into two distinct types: oropharyngeal dysphagia due to malfunction of the PHARYNX and UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; and esophageal dysphagia due to malfunction of the ESOPHAGUS.
The area covering the terminal portion of ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of STOMACH at the cardiac orifice.
The ejection of gas or air through the mouth from the stomach.
Abnormal distention of the STOMACH due to accumulation of gastric contents that may reach 10 to 15 liters. Gastric dilatation may be the result of GASTRIC OUTLET OBSTRUCTION; ILEUS; GASTROPARESIS; or denervation.
Creation of an artificial external opening into the stomach for nutritional support or gastrointestinal compression.
Gastrointestinal symptoms resulting from an absent or nonfunctioning pylorus.
An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
Presence of milky lymph (CHYLE) in the PERITONEAL CAVITY, with or without infection.
A plastic operation on the esophagus. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Traumatic injuries to the VAGUS NERVE. Because the vagus nerve innervates multiple organs, injuries in the nerve fibers may result in any gastrointestinal organ dysfunction downstream of the injury site.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the esophagus.
Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.
Saccular protrusion beyond the wall of the ESOPHAGUS.
An opening or hole in the ESOPHAGUS that is caused by TRAUMA, injury, or pathological process.
Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.
A stricture of the ESOPHAGUS. Most are acquired but can be congenital.
A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
INFLAMMATION, acute or chronic, of the ESOPHAGUS caused by BACTERIA, chemicals, or TRAUMA.
Back flow of gastric contents to the LARYNGOPHARYNX where it comes in contact with tissues of the upper aerodigestive tract. Laryngopharyngeal reflux is an extraesophageal manifestation of GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.
Bursting of the STOMACH.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Production or presence of gas in the gastrointestinal tract which may be expelled through the anus.
The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the digestive tract.
Pathological processes involving the STOMACH.
Protrusion of abdominal structures into the THORAX as a result of congenital or traumatic defects in the respiratory DIAPHRAGM.
A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.
A congenital or acquired condition in which the SPLEEN is not in its normal anatomical position but moves about in the ABDOMEN. This is due to laxity or absence of suspensory ligaments which normally provide peritoneal attachments to keep the SPLEEN in a fixed position. Clinical symptoms include ABDOMINAL PAIN, splenic torsion and ISCHEMIA.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.
Motion picture study of successive images appearing on a fluoroscopic screen.
Remaining tissue from normal DERMIS tissue after the cells are removed.
Twisting of the STOMACH that may result in gastric ISCHEMIA and GASTRIC OUTLET OBSTRUCTION. It is often associated with DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA.
Devices intended to replace non-functioning organs. They may be temporary or permanent. Since they are intended always to function as the natural organs they are replacing, they should be differentiated from PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS and specific types of prostheses which, though also replacements for body parts, are frequently cosmetic (EYE, ARTIFICIAL) as well as functional (ARTIFICIAL LIMBS).
Abnormal passage communicating with the STOMACH.
The period following a surgical operation.
The pit in the center of the ABDOMINAL WALL marking the point where the UMBILICAL CORD entered in the FETUS.
The act of dilating.
The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.
ENDOSCOPES for examining the abdominal and pelvic organs in the peritoneal cavity.
Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.
A technique of closing incisions and wounds, or of joining and connecting tissues, in which staples are used as sutures.
Substances that counteract or neutralize acidity of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
An unnaturally deep or rough quality of voice.
Substernal pain or burning sensation, usually associated with regurgitation of gastric juice into the esophagus.
A condition with damage to the lining of the lower ESOPHAGUS resulting from chronic acid reflux (ESOPHAGITIS, REFLUX). Through the process of metaplasia, the squamous cells are replaced by a columnar epithelium with cells resembling those of the INTESTINE or the salmon-pink mucosa of the STOMACH. Barrett's columnar epithelium is a marker for severe reflux and precursor to ADENOCARCINOMA of the esophagus.
The evacuation of food from the stomach into the duodenum.
A movement, caused by sequential muscle contraction, that pushes the contents of the intestines or other tubular organs in one direction.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.

Gastro-oesophageal reflux related cough and its response to laparoscopic fundoplication. (1/248)

BACKGROUND: This study was designed to determine prospectively the rate of cough before and after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication performed for the control of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. METHODS: One hundred and ninety five consecutive patients (76 men) of mean (SD) age 46.9 (14.1) years with proven gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, who were either on long term omeprazole (n = 187) or who had not responded to a trial of omeprazole (n = 8), took part in the study which was carried out in a university teaching hospital that included a regional respiratory referral centre. Patients underwent oesophageal manometry, 24 hour oesophageal pH testing, and symptom score evaluation by an independent observer before and six months after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. RESULTS: One hundred and thirty three patients presented with reflux symptoms and 62 with respiratory symptoms; 68% of patients complained of cough before surgery (86% with respiratory symptoms, 60% with gastrointestinal symptoms). The percentage reflux time in 24 hours fell significantly (p < 0.0001) from a mean (SD) of 9.38 (10.99)% to 1.22 (2.92)%, lower oesophageal sphincter tone rose significantly (p < 0.0001) from a mean (SD) of 7.71 (5.90) mm Hg to 21.74 (10.84) mm Hg, and the cough score fell from a median value of 8.0 (IQR 12.0) to 0 (IQR 3) following surgery. Of the patients with cough, 51% were cough free after surgery and 31% improved. The patients with respiratory symptoms had a higher cough score before (median 12.0 (IQR 5.5) versus 4.0 (IQR 8.75), p < 0.0001) and after surgery (median 1 (7.5) versus 0.0 (IQR 1.0), p = 0.0045) than those with gastrointestinal symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Patients who present to gastroenterologists with severe reflux commonly complain of cough. Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is effective in the control of cough in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, with or without primary respiratory disease.  (+info)

Anatomic fundoplication failure after laparoscopic antireflux surgery. (2/248)

OBJECTIVE: Anatomic fundoplication failure occurs after antireflux surgery and may be more common in the learning curve of laparoscopic antireflux surgery (LARS). The authors' aims were to assess the incidence, presentation, precipitating factors, and management of anatomic fundoplication failures after LARS. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The advent of LARS has increased the frequency with which antireflux surgery is performed for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Postoperative symptoms frequently occur and may result from physiologic abnormalities or anatomic failure of the fundoplication (e.g., displacement or disruption). Few data exist on the potential causes or best treatment of anatomic fundoplication failures. METHOD: LARS was performed in 290 patients by one of the authors over a 6-year period. In the first 53 patients (group 1), the short gastric vessels were divided on a selective basis and the diaphragmatic crura were closed only when large hiatal hernias were present. In the subsequent 237 patients (group 2), the crura were always approximated posterior to the short gastric vessels and full fundic mobilization was performed. Clinical postoperative evaluation was performed on a regular basis, with detailed tests of anatomy and physiology when untoward symptoms developed. Postoperative foregut symptoms were reported by 26% of the patients, of whom 73% were found to have an intact fundoplication. In 7% of the entire group, anatomic failure of the fundoplication was demonstrated, with the majority exhibiting intrathoracic migration of the wrap with or without disruption of the fundoplication. New-onset postoperative epigastric or substernal chest pain frequently heralded fundoplication failure. Factors correlated with the development of anatomic fundoplication failure included presence in group 1, early postoperative vomiting, other diaphragm "stressors," and large hiatal hernias. Repeat operation has been performed in 8 of the 20 patients (40%), with 5 patients successfully treated using laparoscopic techniques. CONCLUSIONS: Anatomic fundoplication failure occurred in 7% of patients undergoing LARS, with the majority occurring in patients who underwent surgery during the learning curve. Anatomic failure is associated with technical shortcomings, large hiatal hernias, and early postoperative vomiting. Full esophageal mobilization and meticulous closure of the diaphragmatic crura posterior to the esophagus should minimize anatomic functional failure after LARS.  (+info)

Evolution of the modified Rossetti fundoplication in children: surgical technique and results. (3/248)

OBJECTIVE: To compare the modified Rossetti fundoplication with the classic Nissen. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The traditional surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux in children has been the classic Nissen fundoplication, defined by liver mobilization, crural repair, takedown of short gastric vessels, and floppy wrap. The authors have progressed in our technique of fundoplication and now perform a modified Rossetti fundoplication, defined by liver retraction without mobilization, no crural repair, short gastric vessels left intact, and 2-cm floppy wrap. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed on 407 pediatric patients who had open fundoplications (Jan. 13, 1993, to Feb. 25, 1998). Two groups were analyzed: the Nissen group (171 patients) and the Rossetti group (236 patients). Groups were compared for incidence of recurrent reflux, dysphagia, hiatal hernia, need for esophageal dilation, revision of fundoplication, time to discharge, and operative time. RESULTS: Incidence of dysphagia (3.7% vs. 3.3%), postoperative hiatal hernia (1.9% vs. 1.4%), need for esophageal dilation (1.2% vs. 0.5%), and need for fundoplication revision (2.5% vs. 2.3%) were similar between the groups. The mean operative time was significantly decreased in the Rossetti group (65 +/- 25 minutes) versus the Nissen group (73 +/- 33 minutes). Recurrent reflux occurred significantly more often in the Nissen group (11.2%) than in the Rossetti group (5.1 %). CONCLUSION: The modified Rossetti fundoplication has a low complication rate and is the authors' preferred method for the surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux in children.  (+info)

Early laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for recurrent reflux esophagitis: a cost-effective alternative to omeprazole. (4/248)

BACKGROUND: Eighty percent of patients treated medically for gastroesophageal reflux disease relapse after treatment. Many of these patients require indefinite treatment with omeprazole to prevent recurrence. Nissen fundoplication has been shown to be effective, safe and cost effective in the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease. We suggest a treatment algorithm, which encourages early surgical intervention in cases of recurrent esophagitis after a previously successful two-month course of omeprazole. METHODS: We have offered laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication since 1993. Patients who received Nissen fundoplication since 1990 were asked to report return to baseline activity, medications, and lifestyle changes. Concurrent chart review of patients treated with omeprazole was conducted to analyze cost. RESULTS: Patients receiving laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication were discharged significantly sooner and spent significantly less time convalescing when compared to those who underwent open Nissen fundoplication. Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication became cost effective at 1.5 to 2 years when compared to omeprazole. CONCLUSION: Based on cost analysis, patient satisfaction, acceptable complication rate, and efficient use of time and resources, we recommend laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication as the appropriate treatment in patients who develop recurrent esophagitis after a two-month treatment with omeprazole.  (+info)

Laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery in the community hospital setting: evaluation of 100 consecutive patients. (5/248)

BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery has been shown to be superior to medical management for treatment of complicated gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This study encompasses 100 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic Nissen-Rossetti or Toupet fundoplications for GERD refractory to medical management. STUDY DESIGN: All 100 patients had failed maximum medical management (behavioral and dietary modifications, antacids, and H2 and acid PUMP blockers). All patients underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy prior to surgery. Ninety-eight patients had esophageal manometry to evaluate the lower esophageal sphincter pressures and determine the amplitude of contractions of the body of the esophagus. Twenty-four hour pH studies were used selectively when the preceding studies were equivocal. RESULTS: All 100 patients' surgeries were accomplished laparoscopically. The mortality rate was zero. The postoperative complication rate was 2%. The average hospital stay was 1.85 days. Follow-up was achieved in 98%. The mean follow-up was 17.6 months. All patients had significant improvement of their symptoms. No patients have long-term dysphagia. CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrates that laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery can be safely and effectively accomplished in the community hospital setting.  (+info)

Laparoscopic fundoplication failures: patterns of failure and response to fundoplication revision. (6/248)

OBJECTIVE: To determine rates and mechanisms of failure in 857 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease or paraesophageal hernia (1991-1998), and compare this population with 100 consecutive patients undergoing fundoplication revision (laparoscopic and open) at the authors' institution during the same period. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Gastroesophageal fundoplication performed through a laparotomy or thoracotomy has a failure rate of 9% to 30% and requires revision in most of the patients who have recurrent or new foregut symptoms. The frequency and patterns of failure of laparoscopic fundoplication have not been well studied. METHODS: All patients undergoing fundoplication revision were included in this study. Symptom severity was scored before and after surgery by patients on a 4-point scale. Evaluation of patients included esophagogastroscopy, barium swallow, esophageal motility, 24-hour ambulatory pH, and gastric emptying studies. Statistical analysis was performed with multiple chi-square analyses, Fisher exact test, and analysis of variance. RESULTS: Laparoscopic fundoplication was performed in 758 patients for gastroesophageal reflux disease and in 99 for paraesophageal hernia. Median follow-up was 2.5 years. Thirty-one patients (3.5%) have undergone revision for fundoplication failure. The mechanism of failure was transdiaphragmatic herniation of the fundoplication in 26 patients (84%). In 40 patients referred from other institutions, after laparoscopic fundoplication, only 10 (25%) had transdiaphragmatic migration (p < 0.01); a slipped or misplaced fundoplication occurred in 13 patients (32%), and a twisted fundoplication in 12 patients (30%). The failure mechanisms of open fundoplication (29 patients) followed patterns previously described. Fundoplication revision procedures were initiated laparoscopically in 65 patients, with six conversions (8%). The morbidity rate was 4% in laparoscopic procedures and 9% in open ones. There was one death, from aspiration and adult respiratory distress syndrome after open fundoplication. A year or more after revision operation, heartburn, chest pain, and dysphagia were rare or absent in 88%, 78%, and 91%, respectively, after laparoscopic revision, and were rare or absent in 91%, 83%, and 70%, respectively, after open revision, but 11 patients ultimately required additional operations for continued or recurrent symptoms, 3 after open revision (17%), and 8 after laparoscopic fundoplication (11%). CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic fundoplication failure is infrequent in experienced hands; the rate may be further reduced by extensive esophageal mobilization, secure diaphragmatic closure, esophageal lengthening (applied selectively), and avoidance of events leading to increased intraabdominal pressure. When revision is required, laparoscopic access may be used successfully by the laparoscopically experienced esophageal surgeon.  (+info)

Esophageal manometry and 24-hour pH monitoring to evaluate laparoscopic Lind fundoplication in gastroesophageal reflux disease. (7/248)

Laparoscopic and thoracoscopic techniques have provided a new dimension in the correction of functional disorders of the esophagus. Therapeutic success, however, depends on the confirmation of esophageal disease as a cause of the symptoms, on understanding the basic cause of dysfunction and on identifying the surgical patient. This study is a retrospective study of patients submitted to surgery using the Lind procedure for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The purpose of this study is to establish the value of the routine use of esophageal manometry and 24-hour pH monitoring in order to select patients and perform pre and postoperative functional evaluation. Forty-one patients (68.3%) had a hypotonic lower esophageal sphincter. The average pressure was 9.2 mm Hg preoperatively and 15.2 mm Hg postoperatively, with an increase of 6.0 mm Hg. This increase was 8.8 mm Hg in hypotonics and 4.3 mm Hg in the normotonics. There was a certain degree of hypomotility of the esophageal body in 14 patients (23.3%) and, of this group, 4 (28.5%) improved postoperatively. Pathological acid reflux was found in 51 cases (85.0%) by pH monitoring. The mean of the preoperative DeMeester score was 31.4, later dropping to 3.2. Esophageal manometry and 24-hour pH monitoring are effective methods for revealing the level of functional modification established by anti-reflux surgery and for helping to objectively perform the selection.  (+info)

Gastroesophageal reflux disease in asthma: effects of medical and surgical antireflux therapy on asthma control. (8/248)

OBJECTIVE: To critique the English-language reports describing the effects of medical and surgical antireflux therapy on respiratory symptoms and function in patients with asthma. METHODS: The Medline computerized database (1959-1999) was searched, and all publications relating to both asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease were retrieved. RESULTS: Seven of nine trials of histamine-receptor antagonists showed a treatment-related improvement in asthma symptoms, with half of the patients benefiting. Only one study identified a beneficial effect on objective measures of pulmonary function. Three of six trials of proton pump inhibitors documented improvement in asthma symptoms with treatment; benefit was seen in 25% of patients. Half of the studies reported improvement in pulmonary function, but the effect occurred in fewer than 15% of patients. In the one study that used optimal antisecretory therapy, asthma symptoms were improved in 67% of patients and pulmonary function was improved in 20%. Combined data from 5 pediatric and 14 adult studies of anti-reflux surgery indicated that almost 90% of children and 70% of adults had improvement in respiratory symptoms, with approximately one third experiencing improvements in objective measures of pulmonary function. CONCLUSIONS: Fundoplication has been consistently shown to ameliorate reflux-induced asthma; results are superior to the published results of antisecretory therapy. Optimal medical therapy may offer similar results, but large studies providing support for this assertion are lacking.  (+info)

Fundoplication is a surgical procedure in which the upper part of the stomach (the fundus) is wrapped around the lower esophagus and then stitched into place. This procedure strengthens the lower esophageal sphincter, which helps prevent acid reflux from the stomach into the esophagus. It is commonly used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and paraesophageal hernias.

Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is the retrograde movement of stomach contents into the esophagus, which can cause discomfort and symptoms. It occurs when the lower esophageal sphincter (a ring of muscle between the esophagus and stomach) relaxes inappropriately, allowing the acidic or non-acidic gastric contents to flow back into the esophagus.

Gastroesophageal reflux becomes gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) when it is more severe, persistent, and/or results in complications such as esophagitis, strictures, or Barrett's esophagus. Common symptoms of GERD include heartburn, regurgitation, chest pain, difficulty swallowing, and chronic cough or hoarseness.

A hiatal hernia is a type of hernia that occurs when a part of the stomach protrudes or squeezes through an opening (hiatus) in the diaphragm, the muscular partition between the chest and abdominal cavities. Normally, the esophagus passes through this opening to connect to the stomach, but in a hiatal hernia, a portion of the stomach also moves up into the chest cavity through the hiatus.

There are two main types of hiatal hernias: sliding and paraesophageal. In a sliding hiatal hernia, the junction between the esophagus and stomach (gastroesophageal junction) slides upward into the chest cavity, which is the most common type. Paraesophageal hiatal hernias are less common but can be more severe, as they involve the stomach herniating alongside the esophagus, potentially leading to complications like obstruction or strangulation of the blood supply to the stomach.

Many people with hiatal hernias do not experience symptoms, but some may have heartburn, acid reflux, regurgitation, difficulty swallowing, chest pain, or shortness of breath. Treatment depends on the severity and associated symptoms, ranging from lifestyle modifications and medications to surgical repair in severe cases.

Laparoscopy is a surgical procedure that involves the insertion of a laparoscope, which is a thin tube with a light and camera attached to it, through small incisions in the abdomen. This allows the surgeon to view the internal organs without making large incisions. It's commonly used to diagnose and treat various conditions such as endometriosis, ovarian cysts, infertility, and appendicitis. The advantages of laparoscopy over traditional open surgery include smaller incisions, less pain, shorter hospital stays, and quicker recovery times.

The gastric fundus is the upper, rounded portion of the stomach that lies above the level of the cardiac orifice and extends up to the left dome-shaped part of the diaphragm. It is the part of the stomach where food and liquids are first stored after entering through the esophagus. The gastric fundus contains parietal cells, which secrete hydrochloric acid, and chief cells, which produce pepsinogen, a precursor to the digestive enzyme pepsin. It is also the site where the hormone ghrelin is produced, which stimulates appetite.

Esophageal achalasia is a rare disorder of the esophagus, the tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach. In this condition, the muscles at the lower end of the esophagus fail to relax properly during swallowing, making it difficult for food and liquids to pass into the stomach. This results in symptoms such as difficulty swallowing (dysphagia), regurgitation of food, chest pain, and weight loss. The cause of esophageal achalasia is not fully understood, but it is believed to be related to damage to the nerves that control the muscles of the esophagus. Treatment options include medications to relax the lower esophageal sphincter, botulinum toxin injections, and surgical procedures such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM).

Manometry is a medical test that measures pressure inside various parts of the gastrointestinal tract. It is often used to help diagnose digestive disorders such as achalasia, gastroparesis, and irritable bowel syndrome. During the test, a thin, flexible tube called a manometer is inserted through the mouth or rectum and into the area being tested. The tube is connected to a machine that measures and records pressure readings. These readings can help doctors identify any abnormalities in muscle function or nerve reflexes within the digestive tract.

The esophagus is the muscular tube that connects the throat (pharynx) to the stomach. It is located in the midline of the neck and chest, passing through the diaphragm to enter the abdomen and join the stomach. The main function of the esophagus is to transport food and liquids from the mouth to the stomach for digestion.

The esophagus has a few distinct parts: the upper esophageal sphincter (a ring of muscle that separates the esophagus from the throat), the middle esophagus, and the lower esophageal sphincter (another ring of muscle that separates the esophagus from the stomach). The lower esophageal sphincter relaxes to allow food and liquids to enter the stomach and then contracts to prevent stomach contents from flowing back into the esophagus.

The walls of the esophagus are made up of several layers, including mucosa (a moist tissue that lines the inside of the tube), submucosa (a layer of connective tissue), muscle (both voluntary and involuntary types), and adventitia (an outer layer of connective tissue).

Common conditions affecting the esophagus include gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), Barrett's esophagus, esophageal cancer, esophageal strictures, and eosinophilic esophagitis.

Esophageal pH monitoring is a medical test used to measure the acidity (pH level) inside the esophagus. The test involves inserting a thin, flexible tube through the nose and down into the esophagus. The tube contains a sensor that detects changes in pH levels and transmits this information to a recording device worn by the patient.

The test typically lasts for 24 hours, during which time the patient keeps a diary of their activities and symptoms. This information is used to correlate any symptoms with changes in pH levels. The test can help diagnose gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and assess the effectiveness of treatment.

It's important to note that there are some precautions to be taken before and after the test, such as avoiding certain medications that may affect the pH levels or interfere with the test results. Patients should follow their healthcare provider's instructions carefully to ensure accurate results.

Peptic esophagitis is a medical condition that refers to inflammation and damage of the lining of the esophagus caused by stomach acid backing up into the esophagus. This is also known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The term "peptic" indicates that digestive enzymes or stomach acids are involved in the cause of the condition.

Peptic esophagitis can cause symptoms such as heartburn, chest pain, difficulty swallowing, and painful swallowing. If left untreated, it can lead to complications like strictures, ulcers, and Barrett's esophagus, which is a precancerous condition. Treatment typically involves lifestyle changes, medications to reduce acid production, and sometimes surgery.

Deglutition disorders, also known as swallowing disorders, are conditions that affect the ability to move food or liquids from the mouth to the stomach safely and efficiently. These disorders can occur at any stage of the swallowing process, which includes oral preparation (chewing and manipulating food in the mouth), pharyngeal phase (activating muscles and structures in the throat to move food toward the esophagus), and esophageal phase (relaxing and contracting the esophagus to propel food into the stomach).

Symptoms of deglutition disorders may include coughing or choking during or after eating, difficulty initiating a swallow, food sticking in the throat or chest, regurgitation, unexplained weight loss, and aspiration (inhaling food or liquids into the lungs), which can lead to pneumonia.

Deglutition disorders can be caused by various factors, such as neurological conditions (e.g., stroke, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis), structural abnormalities (e.g., narrowing or blockage of the esophagus), muscle weakness or dysfunction, and cognitive or behavioral issues. Treatment for deglutition disorders may involve dietary modifications, swallowing exercises, medications, or surgical interventions, depending on the underlying cause and severity of the condition.

The esophagogastric junction (EGJ) is the region of the gastrointestinal tract where the esophagus (the tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach) meets the stomach. It serves as a physiological sphincter, which helps control the direction of flow and prevent reflux of gastric contents back into the esophagus. The EGJ is also known as the gastroesophageal junction or cardia.

Eructation is the medical term for belching or burping. It refers to the act of expelling gas from the upper digestive tract (esophagus and stomach) through the mouth. This voluntary or involuntary action helps to relieve symptoms of bloating, discomfort, or pain caused by excessive gas build-up in the stomach. Eructation often occurs after swallowing air while eating or drinking quickly, consuming carbonated beverages, or experiencing anxiety or stress. In some cases, frequent eructations may indicate an underlying digestive disorder such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or gastritis.

Gastric dilatation, also known as stomach dilation or distention, refers to the abnormal enlargement or expansion of the stomach. This condition often occurs when the stomach fills with gas, food, or fluids and is unable to empty properly. Gastric dilatation can be caused by various factors such as overeating, swallowing excessive air, gastroparesis (delayed gastric emptying), intestinal obstruction, or certain medical conditions like hiatal hernia or pregnancy.

In severe cases, gastric dilatation may lead to gastric volvulus, where the stomach twists on itself, cutting off its blood supply and leading to ischemia and necrosis of the stomach tissue. This is a life-threatening condition that requires immediate medical attention. Symptoms of gastric dilatation include abdominal pain, bloating, vomiting, loss of appetite, and difficulty breathing.

Gastrostomy is a surgical procedure that creates an opening through the abdominal wall into the stomach. This opening, called a stoma or gastrostomy tract, allows for the passage of a tube (gastrostomy tube) that can be used to provide enteral nutrition and hydration directly into the stomach when a person is unable to consume food or fluids by mouth due to various medical conditions such as dysphagia, neurological disorders, or head and neck cancers.

Gastrostomy tubes come in different types and sizes, including percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tubes, laparoscopic gastrostomy tubes, and open surgical gastrostomy tubes. The choice of the procedure depends on various factors such as the patient's medical condition, anatomy, and overall health status.

The primary purpose of a gastrostomy is to ensure adequate nutrition and hydration for individuals who have difficulty swallowing or are unable to consume enough food or fluids by mouth to meet their nutritional needs. It can also help prevent complications associated with prolonged fasting, such as malnutrition, dehydration, and weight loss.

Dumping syndrome, also known as rapid gastric emptying, is a condition that typically occurs in people who have had surgery to remove all or part of their stomach (gastrectomy) or have had a procedure called a gastrojejunostomy. These surgeries can lead to the stomach's contents entering the small intestine too quickly, causing symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramping, diarrhea, dizziness, and sweating.

There are two types of dumping syndrome: early and late. Early dumping syndrome occurs within 30 minutes after eating, while late dumping syndrome occurs 1-3 hours after eating. Symptoms of early dumping syndrome may include nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramping, diarrhea, bloating, dizziness, and fatigue. Late dumping syndrome symptoms may include hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), which can cause sweating, weakness, confusion, and rapid heartbeat.

Treatment for dumping syndrome typically involves dietary modifications, such as eating smaller, more frequent meals that are low in simple sugars, and avoiding fluids during meals. In some cases, medication may be prescribed to help slow down gastric emptying or manage symptoms. If these treatments are not effective, surgery may be necessary to correct the problem.

In anatomical terms, the stomach is a muscular, J-shaped organ located in the upper left portion of the abdomen. It is part of the gastrointestinal tract and plays a crucial role in digestion. The stomach's primary functions include storing food, mixing it with digestive enzymes and hydrochloric acid to break down proteins, and slowly emptying the partially digested food into the small intestine for further absorption of nutrients.

The stomach is divided into several regions, including the cardia (the area nearest the esophagus), the fundus (the upper portion on the left side), the body (the main central part), and the pylorus (the narrowed region leading to the small intestine). The inner lining of the stomach, called the mucosa, is protected by a layer of mucus that prevents the digestive juices from damaging the stomach tissue itself.

In medical contexts, various conditions can affect the stomach, such as gastritis (inflammation of the stomach lining), peptic ulcers (sores in the stomach or duodenum), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and stomach cancer. Symptoms related to the stomach may include abdominal pain, bloating, nausea, vomiting, heartburn, and difficulty swallowing.

Postoperative complications refer to any unfavorable condition or event that occurs during the recovery period after a surgical procedure. These complications can vary in severity and may include, but are not limited to:

1. Infection: This can occur at the site of the incision or inside the body, such as pneumonia or urinary tract infection.
2. Bleeding: Excessive bleeding (hemorrhage) can lead to a drop in blood pressure and may require further surgical intervention.
3. Blood clots: These can form in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis) and can potentially travel to the lungs (pulmonary embolism).
4. Wound dehiscence: This is when the surgical wound opens up, which can lead to infection and further complications.
5. Pulmonary issues: These include atelectasis (collapsed lung), pneumonia, or respiratory failure.
6. Cardiovascular problems: These include abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), heart attack, or stroke.
7. Renal failure: This can occur due to various reasons such as dehydration, blood loss, or the use of certain medications.
8. Pain management issues: Inadequate pain control can lead to increased stress, anxiety, and decreased mobility.
9. Nausea and vomiting: These can be caused by anesthesia, opioid pain medication, or other factors.
10. Delirium: This is a state of confusion and disorientation that can occur in the elderly or those with certain medical conditions.

Prompt identification and management of these complications are crucial to ensure the best possible outcome for the patient.

Chylous ascites is a medical condition characterized by the accumulation of milky, fat-containing fluid in the peritoneal cavity, which is the space within the abdomen that contains the intestines, liver, and other organs. The fluid, called chyle, is normally found in the lymphatic system and is formed when dietary fats are absorbed from the small intestine.

Chylous ascites can occur as a result of damage to the lymphatic vessels that transport chyle from the intestines to the bloodstream. This damage can be caused by various conditions, such as trauma, surgery, tumors, inflammation, or congenital abnormalities. When the lymphatic vessels are damaged, chyle leaks into the peritoneal cavity and accumulates there, leading to ascites.

Symptoms of chylous ascites may include abdominal distension, pain, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. The condition can be diagnosed through various tests, such as imaging studies or analysis of the fluid in the peritoneal cavity. Treatment typically involves addressing the underlying cause of the condition, as well as managing symptoms and preventing complications. This may include dietary modifications, medications to reduce lymphatic flow, or surgical interventions to repair damaged lymphatic vessels.

Esophagoplasty is a surgical procedure that involves reconstructing or reshaping the esophagus, which is the muscular tube that connects the throat to the stomach. This procedure may be performed to treat various conditions such as esophageal atresia (a birth defect in which the esophagus does not develop properly), esophageal stricture (narrowing of the esophagus), or esophageal cancer.

During an esophagoplasty, a surgeon may use tissue from another part of the body, such as the stomach or colon, to reconstruct the esophagus. The specific technique used will depend on the individual patient's needs and the nature of their condition.

It is important to note that esophagoplasty is a complex surgical procedure that carries risks such as bleeding, infection, and complications related to anesthesia. Patients who undergo this procedure may require extensive postoperative care and rehabilitation to recover fully.

Vagus nerve injuries refer to damages or traumas affecting the vagus nerve, which is the tenth cranial nerve (CN X) in the human body. This nerve plays a crucial role in the autonomic nervous system, regulating essential functions such as heart rate, respiratory rate, and digestion.

Vagus nerve injuries can occur due to various reasons, including trauma during surgical procedures, neck or head injuries, inflammation, compression, or tumors affecting the nerve. Symptoms of vagus nerve injuries may include:

1. Hoarseness or voice changes
2. Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia)
3. Pain in the throat or ear
4. Changes in heart rate and blood pressure
5. Nausea, vomiting, or abdominal pain
6. Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

The severity and nature of symptoms can vary depending on the location and extent of the injury to the vagus nerve. Treatment for vagus nerve injuries typically involves addressing the underlying cause, such as surgical intervention, physical therapy, or medication to manage pain and inflammation. In some cases, recovery may be incomplete, leading to long-term complications or disabilities.

Esophagoscopy is a medical procedure that involves the visual examination of the esophagus, which is the tube that connects the throat to the stomach. This procedure is typically carried out using an esophagogastroduodenoscope (EGD), a flexible tube with a camera and light on the end.

During the procedure, the EGD is inserted through the mouth and down the throat into the esophagus, allowing the medical professional to examine its lining for any abnormalities such as inflammation, ulcers, or tumors. The procedure may also involve taking tissue samples (biopsies) for further examination and testing.

Esophagoscopy is commonly used to diagnose and monitor conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), Barrett's esophagus, esophageal cancer, and other disorders affecting the esophagus. It may also be used to treat certain conditions, such as removing polyps or foreign objects from the esophagus.

A laparotomy is a surgical procedure that involves making an incision in the abdominal wall to gain access to the abdominal cavity. This procedure is typically performed to diagnose and treat various conditions such as abdominal trauma, tumors, infections, or inflammatory diseases. The size of the incision can vary depending on the reason for the surgery and the extent of the condition being treated. Once the procedure is complete, the incision is closed with sutures or staples.

The term "laparotomy" comes from the Greek words "lapara," which means "flank" or "side," and "tome," which means "to cut." Together, they describe the surgical procedure that involves cutting into the abdomen to examine its contents.

An esophageal diverticulum is a small pouch or sac that forms as a result of a protrusion or herniation of the inner lining (mucosa) of the esophagus through the outer layer of muscle in the wall of the esophagus. Esophageal diverticula can occur in any part of the esophagus, but they are most commonly found in the lower third of the esophagus, near the junction with the stomach.

Esophageal diverticula may be congenital (present at birth) or acquired (develop later in life). Acquired esophageal diverticula are often associated with underlying conditions such as esophageal motility disorders, strictures, or tumors that increase the pressure inside the esophagus and cause the mucosa to bulge out through weakened areas of the esophageal wall.

Symptoms of esophageal diverticula may include difficulty swallowing (dysphagia), regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, heartburn, and recurrent respiratory infections due to aspiration of food or saliva into the lungs. Treatment options for esophageal diverticula depend on the size and location of the diverticulum, as well as the presence of any underlying conditions. Small asymptomatic diverticula may not require treatment, while larger symptomatic diverticula may be treated with surgical removal or endoscopic repair.

Esophageal perforation is a medical condition that refers to a hole or tear in the esophagus, which is the muscular tube that connects the throat to the stomach. This condition can occur as a result of various factors such as trauma, forceful vomiting (Boerhaave's syndrome), swallowing sharp objects, or complications from medical procedures like endoscopy.

Esophageal perforation is a serious medical emergency that requires immediate attention and treatment. If left untreated, it can lead to severe complications such as mediastinitis (inflammation of the tissue surrounding the heart), sepsis, and even death. Treatment typically involves surgical repair of the perforation, antibiotics to prevent infection, and supportive care to manage any associated symptoms or complications.

I believe there might be a bit of confusion in your question. A "history" in medical terms usually refers to the detailed account of a patient's symptoms, illnesses, and treatments received, which is used by healthcare professionals to understand their health status and provide appropriate care. It is not typically associated with a specific century like the 18th century.

If you are asking for information about the medical practices or significant developments in the field of medicine during the 18th century, I would be happy to provide some insight into that! The 18th century was a time of great advancement and change in the medical field, with many notable discoveries and innovations. Some examples include:

* The development of smallpox vaccination by Edward Jenner in 1796
* The discovery of oxygen by Joseph Priestley in 1774
* The invention of the thermometer by Gabriel Fahrenheit in 1714
* The publication of "An Inquiry into the Causes and Effects of the Variolae Vaccinae" by Edward Jenner in 1798, which helped to establish the concept of vaccination
* The founding of the Royal Society of Medicine in London in 1773
* The development of new surgical techniques and instruments, such as the use of tourniquets and catgut sutures.

Esophageal stenosis is a medical condition characterized by the narrowing or constriction of the esophagus, which is the muscular tube that connects the throat to the stomach. This narrowing can make it difficult to swallow food and liquids, leading to symptoms such as dysphagia (difficulty swallowing), pain or discomfort while swallowing, regurgitation, and weight loss.

Esophageal stenosis can be caused by a variety of factors, including:

1. Scarring or fibrosis due to prolonged acid reflux or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
2. Radiation therapy for cancer treatment
3. Ingestion of corrosive substances
4. Eosinophilic esophagitis, an allergic condition that affects the esophagus
5. Esophageal tumors or cancers
6. Surgical complications

Depending on the underlying cause and severity of the stenosis, treatment options may include medications to manage symptoms, dilation procedures to widen the narrowed area, or surgery to remove the affected portion of the esophagus. It is important to seek medical attention if you experience any difficulty swallowing or other symptoms related to esophageal stenosis.

A reoperation is a surgical procedure that is performed again on a patient who has already undergone a previous operation for the same or related condition. Reoperations may be required due to various reasons, such as inadequate initial treatment, disease recurrence, infection, or complications from the first surgery. The nature and complexity of a reoperation can vary widely depending on the specific circumstances, but it often carries higher risks and potential complications compared to the original operation.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Esophagitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation and irritation of the esophageal lining, which is the muscular tube that connects the throat to the stomach. This inflammation can cause symptoms such as difficulty swallowing, chest pain, heartburn, and acid reflux.

Esophagitis can be caused by various factors, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), infection, allergies, medications, and chronic vomiting. Prolonged exposure to stomach acid can also cause esophagitis, leading to a condition called reflux esophagitis.

If left untreated, esophagitis can lead to complications such as strictures, ulcers, and Barrett's esophagus, which is a precancerous condition that increases the risk of developing esophageal cancer. Treatment for esophagitis typically involves addressing the underlying cause, managing symptoms, and protecting the esophageal lining to promote healing.

Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is a condition in which the stomach contents, particularly acid, flow backward from the stomach into the larynx (voice box) and pharynx (throat). This is also known as extraesophageal reflux disease (EERD) or supraesophageal reflux disease (SERD). Unlike gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), where acid reflux causes symptoms such as heartburn and regurgitation, LPR may not cause classic reflux symptoms, but rather symptoms related to the upper aerodigestive tract. These can include hoarseness, throat clearing, cough, difficulty swallowing, and a sensation of a lump in the throat.

A stomach rupture, also known as gastrointestinal perforation, is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition that occurs when there is a hole or tear in the lining of the stomach. This can allow the contents of the stomach to leak into the abdominal cavity, causing inflammation and infection (peritonitis).

Stomach rupture can be caused by several factors, including trauma, severe gastritis or ulcers, tumors, or certain medical procedures. Symptoms may include sudden and severe abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, and decreased bowel sounds. If left untreated, stomach rupture can lead to sepsis, organ failure, and even death. Treatment typically involves surgery to repair the perforation and antibiotics to treat any resulting infection.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

Flatulence is the medical term for the release of intestinal gas from the rectum, commonly known as passing gas or farting. It is a normal bodily function that occurs when the body digests food in the stomach and intestines.

During digestion, the body breaks down food into nutrients that can be absorbed into the bloodstream. However, not all food particles can be fully broken down, and some of them reach the large intestine, where they are fermented by bacteria. This fermentation process produces gases such as nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and methane.

The buildup of these gases in the digestive tract can cause discomfort, bloating, and the urge to pass gas. The average person passes gas about 10-20 times a day, although this can vary widely from person to person.

While flatulence is a normal bodily function, excessive or frequent passing of gas can be a sign of an underlying digestive issue such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), lactose intolerance, or gastrointestinal infections. If you are experiencing persistent or severe symptoms, it is recommended to consult with a healthcare professional for further evaluation and treatment.

Postoperative care refers to the comprehensive medical treatment and nursing attention provided to a patient following a surgical procedure. The goal of postoperative care is to facilitate the patient's recovery, prevent complications, manage pain, ensure proper healing of the incision site, and maintain overall health and well-being until the patient can resume their normal activities.

This type of care includes monitoring vital signs, managing pain through medication or other techniques, ensuring adequate hydration and nutrition, helping the patient with breathing exercises to prevent lung complications, encouraging mobility to prevent blood clots, monitoring for signs of infection or other complications, administering prescribed medications, providing wound care, and educating the patient about postoperative care instructions.

The duration of postoperative care can vary depending on the type and complexity of the surgical procedure, as well as the individual patient's needs and overall health status. It may be provided in a hospital setting, an outpatient surgery center, or in the patient's home, depending on the level of care required.

Endoscopy of the digestive system, also known as gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, is a medical procedure that allows healthcare professionals to visually examine the inside lining of the digestive tract using a flexible tube with a light and camera attached to it, called an endoscope. This procedure can help diagnose and treat various conditions affecting the digestive system, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), ulcers, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and cancer.

There are several types of endoscopy procedures that focus on different parts of the digestive tract:

1. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD): This procedure examines the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). It is often used to investigate symptoms such as difficulty swallowing, abdominal pain, or bleeding in the upper GI tract.
2. Colonoscopy: This procedure explores the large intestine (colon) and rectum. It is commonly performed to screen for colon cancer, as well as to diagnose and treat conditions like inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulosis, or polyps.
3. Sigmoidoscopy: Similar to a colonoscopy, this procedure examines the lower part of the colon (sigmoid colon) and rectum. It is often used as a screening tool for colon cancer and to investigate symptoms like rectal bleeding or changes in bowel habits.
4. Upper GI endoscopy: This procedure focuses on the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum, using a thin, flexible tube with a light and camera attached to it. It is used to diagnose and treat conditions such as GERD, ulcers, and difficulty swallowing.
5. Capsule endoscopy: This procedure involves swallowing a small capsule containing a camera that captures images of the digestive tract as it passes through. It can help diagnose conditions in the small intestine that may be difficult to reach with traditional endoscopes.

Endoscopy is typically performed under sedation or anesthesia to ensure patient comfort during the procedure. The images captured by the endoscope are displayed on a monitor, allowing the healthcare provider to assess the condition of the digestive tract and make informed treatment decisions.

Stomach diseases refer to a range of conditions that affect the stomach, a muscular sac located in the upper part of the abdomen and is responsible for storing and digesting food. These diseases can cause various symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, heartburn, indigestion, loss of appetite, and bloating. Some common stomach diseases include:

1. Gastritis: Inflammation of the stomach lining that can cause pain, irritation, and ulcers.
2. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): A condition where stomach acid flows back into the esophagus, causing heartburn and damage to the esophageal lining.
3. Peptic ulcers: Open sores that develop on the lining of the stomach or duodenum, often caused by bacterial infections or long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
4. Stomach cancer: Abnormal growth of cancerous cells in the stomach, which can spread to other parts of the body if left untreated.
5. Gastroparesis: A condition where the stomach muscles are weakened or paralyzed, leading to difficulty digesting food and emptying the stomach.
6. Functional dyspepsia: A chronic disorder characterized by symptoms such as pain, bloating, and fullness in the upper abdomen, without any identifiable cause.
7. Eosinophilic esophagitis: A condition where eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, accumulate in the esophagus, causing inflammation and difficulty swallowing.
8. Stomal stenosis: Narrowing of the opening between the stomach and small intestine, often caused by scar tissue or surgical complications.
9. Hiatal hernia: A condition where a portion of the stomach protrudes through the diaphragm into the chest cavity, causing symptoms such as heartburn and difficulty swallowing.

These are just a few examples of stomach diseases, and there are many other conditions that can affect the stomach. Proper diagnosis and treatment are essential for managing these conditions and preventing complications.

A diaphragmatic hernia is a type of hernia that occurs when the abdominal organs (such as the stomach, intestines, or liver) protrude through an opening in the diaphragm, the thin muscle that separates the chest and abdominal cavities. This condition can be present at birth (congenital) or acquired due to injury or surgery.

There are two main types of diaphragmatic hernias:

1. Bochdalek hernia: This is a congenital defect that occurs when the posterior portion of the diaphragm fails to close properly during fetal development, creating an opening through which abdominal organs can move into the chest cavity. It is more common on the left side and can lead to pulmonary hypoplasia (underdevelopment of the lungs) and other complications if not detected and treated early.
2. Morgagni hernia: This is a less common type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia that occurs when there is an opening in the anterior portion of the diaphragm, allowing abdominal organs to move into the chest cavity near the sternum. It tends to be asymptomatic and may not be discovered until adulthood.

Acquired diaphragmatic hernias can result from trauma, such as a car accident or penetrating injury, which causes a tear in the diaphragm. In some cases, surgical procedures involving the abdomen or chest can also lead to a diaphragmatic hernia.

Symptoms of a diaphragmatic hernia may include difficulty breathing, chest pain, vomiting, and bowel obstruction. Treatment typically involves surgery to repair the defect in the diaphragm and return the abdominal organs to their proper position.

Treatment failure is a term used in medicine to describe the situation when a prescribed treatment or intervention is not achieving the desired therapeutic goals or objectives. This may occur due to various reasons, such as:

1. Development of drug resistance by the pathogen or disease being treated.
2. Inadequate dosage or frequency of the medication.
3. Poor adherence or compliance to the treatment regimen by the patient.
4. The presence of underlying conditions or comorbidities that may affect the efficacy of the treatment.
5. The severity or progression of the disease despite appropriate treatment.

When treatment failure occurs, healthcare providers may need to reassess the patient's condition and modify the treatment plan accordingly, which may include adjusting the dosage, changing the medication, adding new medications, or considering alternative treatments.

Wandering spleen, also known as "splenoptosis," is a rare condition where the spleen is not fixed in its normal location in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen. Instead, it moves freely within the abdominal cavity due to the absence or laxity of its supporting ligaments. This can lead to twisting of the splenic vessels (splenic torsion), which can result in decreased blood flow to the spleen and subsequent infarction (tissue death). Symptoms may include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and a palpable mass in the abdomen. In some cases, wandering spleen may be asymptomatic and discovered incidentally during imaging studies. Treatment typically involves surgical fixation of the spleen to prevent torsion or, if necessary, splenectomy (removal of the spleen).

Gastrointestinal endoscopy is a medical procedure that allows direct visualization of the inner lining of the digestive tract, which includes the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine (colon), and sometimes the upper part of the small intestine (duodenum). This procedure is performed using an endoscope, a long, thin, flexible tube with a light and camera at its tip. The endoscope is inserted through the mouth for upper endoscopy or through the rectum for lower endoscopy (colonoscopy), and the images captured by the camera are transmitted to a monitor for the physician to view.

Gastrointestinal endoscopy can help diagnose various conditions, such as inflammation, ulcers, tumors, polyps, or bleeding in the digestive tract. It can also be used for therapeutic purposes, such as removing polyps, taking tissue samples (biopsies), treating bleeding, and performing other interventions to manage certain digestive diseases.

There are different types of gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures, including:

1. Upper Endoscopy (Esophagogastroduodenoscopy or EGD): This procedure examines the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum.
2. Colonoscopy: This procedure examines the colon and rectum.
3. Sigmoidoscopy: A limited examination of the lower part of the colon (sigmoid colon) using a shorter endoscope.
4. Enteroscopy: An examination of the small intestine, which can be performed using various techniques, such as push enteroscopy, single-balloon enteroscopy, or double-balloon enteroscopy.
5. Capsule Endoscopy: A procedure that involves swallowing a small capsule containing a camera, which captures images of the digestive tract as it passes through.

Gastrointestinal endoscopy is generally considered safe when performed by experienced medical professionals. However, like any medical procedure, there are potential risks and complications, such as bleeding, infection, perforation, or adverse reactions to sedatives used during the procedure. Patients should discuss these risks with their healthcare provider before undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy.

Cineradiography is a medical imaging technique that combines fluoroscopy and cinematography to record moving images of the internal structures of a patient's body. It uses a special X-ray machine with a high-speed image intensifier and a movie camera or video recorder to capture real-time, dynamic visualizations of bodily functions such as swallowing, digestion, or muscle movements.

During cineradiography, a continuous X-ray beam is passed through the patient's body while the image intensifier converts the X-rays into visible light, which is then captured by the camera or video recorder. The resulting film or digital recordings can be played back in slow motion or frame by frame to analyze the movement and function of internal organs and structures.

Cineradiography has largely been replaced by newer imaging technologies such as CT and MRI, which offer higher resolution and more detailed images without the use of radiation. However, it is still used in some specialized applications where real-time, dynamic visualization is essential for diagnosis or treatment planning.

Acellular dermis is a type of processed connective tissue graft used in surgical procedures, particularly in reconstructive surgery. It is derived from human or animal skin, but has had the epidermis and cells of the dermis removed, leaving behind the intact extracellular matrix (ECM). This ECM includes proteins such as collagen and elastin, which provide structural support, and growth factors, which can help to stimulate tissue regeneration.

The acellular nature of the graft means that it is less likely to be rejected by the recipient's immune system, making it a useful option for patients who may not be good candidates for autografts (tissue transplanted from another part of their own body) or allografts (tissue transplanted from another person). Acellular dermis can be used to repair and rebuild damaged skin, as well as to augment soft tissue in areas such as the face and breast.

There are several different brands and types of acellular dermis available, each with its own specific composition and indications for use. Some common examples include AlloDerm, FlexHD, and Integra Dermal Regeneration Template. The choice of graft may depend on factors such as the size and location of the defect being treated, as well as the patient's individual needs and medical history.

Stomach volvulus is a medical condition that involves the twisting or rotation of the stomach around its axis, leading to obstruction of the inflow and outflow of the stomach. This can result in strangulation of the blood supply to the stomach wall, potentially causing ischemia, necrosis, and perforation if not promptly treated. It is a surgical emergency that requires immediate medical attention. The condition can be congenital or acquired, with the acquired form being more common and often associated with underlying conditions such as gastric distention, laxity of gastrocolic ligaments, or previous abdominal surgery.

Artificial organs are medical devices that are implanted in the human body to replace the function of a damaged, diseased, or failing organ. These devices can be made from a variety of materials, including metals, plastics, and synthetic biomaterials. They are designed to mimic the structure and function of natural organs as closely as possible, with the goal of improving the patient's quality of life and extending their lifespan.

Some examples of artificial organs include:

1. Artificial heart: A device that is implanted in the chest to replace the function of a failing heart. It can be used as a temporary or permanent solution for patients with end-stage heart failure.
2. Artificial pancreas: A device that is used to treat type 1 diabetes by regulating blood sugar levels. It consists of an insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitor, which work together to deliver insulin automatically based on the patient's needs.
3. Artificial kidney: A device that filters waste products from the blood, similar to a natural kidney. It can be used as a temporary or permanent solution for patients with end-stage renal disease.
4. Artificial lung: A device that helps patients with respiratory failure breathe by exchanging oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.
5. Artificial bladder: A device that is implanted in the body to help patients with bladder dysfunction urinate.
6. Artificial eyes: Prosthetic devices that are used to replace a missing or damaged eye, providing cosmetic and sometimes functional benefits.

It's important to note that while artificial organs can significantly improve the quality of life for many patients, they are not without risks. Complications such as infection, rejection, and device failure can occur, and ongoing medical care is necessary to monitor and manage these risks.

A gastric fistula is an abnormal connection or passage between the stomach and another organ or the skin surface. This condition can occur as a result of complications from surgery, injury, infection, or certain diseases such as cancer. Symptoms may include persistent drainage from the site of the fistula, pain, malnutrition, and infection. Treatment typically involves surgical repair of the fistula and management of any underlying conditions.

The postoperative period is the time following a surgical procedure during which the patient's response to the surgery and anesthesia is monitored, and any complications or adverse effects are managed. This period can vary in length depending on the type of surgery and the individual patient's needs, but it typically includes the immediate recovery phase in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) or recovery room, as well as any additional time spent in the hospital for monitoring and management of pain, wound healing, and other aspects of postoperative care.

The goals of postoperative care are to ensure the patient's safety and comfort, promote optimal healing and rehabilitation, and minimize the risk of complications such as infection, bleeding, or other postoperative issues. The specific interventions and treatments provided during this period will depend on a variety of factors, including the type and extent of surgery performed, the patient's overall health and medical history, and any individualized care plans developed in consultation with the patient and their healthcare team.

The umbilicus, also known as the navel, is the scar left on the abdominal wall after the removal of the umbilical cord in a newborn. The umbilical cord connects the developing fetus to the placenta in the uterus during pregnancy, providing essential nutrients and oxygen while removing waste products. After birth, the cord is clamped and cut, leaving behind a small stump that eventually dries up and falls off, leaving the umbilicus. In adults, it typically appears as a slight depression or dimple on the abdomen.

Dilation, also known as dilatation, refers to the process of expanding or enlarging a body passage or cavity. In medical terms, it typically refers to the widening of a bodily opening or hollow organ, allowing for increased flow or access. This can occur naturally, such as during childbirth when the cervix dilates to allow for the passage of a baby, or it can be induced through medical procedures or interventions.

For example, dilation of the pupils is a natural response to darkness or certain medications, while dilation of blood vessels is a common side effect of some drugs and can also occur in response to changes in temperature or emotional state. Dilation of the stomach or intestines may be necessary for medical procedures such as endoscopies or surgeries.

It's important to note that dilation can also refer to the abnormal enlargement of a body part, such as dilated cardiomyopathy, which refers to an enlarged and weakened heart muscle.

"Length of Stay" (LOS) is a term commonly used in healthcare to refer to the amount of time a patient spends receiving care in a hospital, clinic, or other healthcare facility. It is typically measured in hours, days, or weeks and can be used as a metric for various purposes such as resource planning, quality assessment, and reimbursement. The length of stay can vary depending on the type of illness or injury, the severity of the condition, the patient's response to treatment, and other factors. It is an important consideration in healthcare management and can have significant implications for both patients and providers.

A laparoscope is a type of medical instrument called an endoscope, which is used to examine the interior of a body cavity or organ. Specifically, a laparoscope is a long, thin tube with a high-intensity light and a high-resolution camera attached to it. This device allows surgeons to view the abdominal cavity through small incisions, without having to make large, invasive cuts.

During a laparoscopic procedure, the surgeon will insert the laparoscope through a small incision in the abdomen, typically near the navel. The camera sends images back to a monitor, giving the surgeon a clear view of the organs and tissues inside the body. This allows for more precise and less invasive surgical procedures, often resulting in faster recovery times and fewer complications compared to traditional open surgery.

Laparoscopes are commonly used in a variety of surgical procedures, including:

1. Gynecological surgeries (e.g., hysterectomies, ovarian cyst removals)
2. Gallbladder removal (cholecystectomy)
3. Gastrointestinal surgeries (e.g., removing benign or malignant tumors)
4. Hernia repairs
5. Bariatric surgeries for weight loss (e.g., gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy)

While laparoscopes provide numerous benefits over open surgery, they still require specialized training and expertise to use effectively and safely.

The digestive system is a series of organs that work together to convert food into nutrients and energy. Digestive system surgical procedures involve operations on any part of the digestive system, including the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, liver, pancreas, and gallbladder. These procedures can be performed for a variety of reasons, such as to treat diseases, repair damage, or remove cancerous growths.

Some common digestive system surgical procedures include:

1. Gastric bypass surgery: A procedure in which the stomach is divided into two parts and the smaller part is connected directly to the small intestine, bypassing a portion of the stomach and upper small intestine. This procedure is used to treat severe obesity.
2. Colonoscopy: A procedure in which a flexible tube with a camera on the end is inserted into the rectum and colon to examine the lining for polyps, cancer, or other abnormalities.
3. Colectomy: A procedure in which all or part of the colon is removed, often due to cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, or diverticulitis.
4. Gastrostomy: A procedure in which a hole is made through the abdominal wall and into the stomach to create an opening for feeding. This is often done for patients who have difficulty swallowing.
5. Esophagectomy: A procedure in which all or part of the esophagus is removed, often due to cancer. The remaining esophagus is then reconnected to the stomach or small intestine.
6. Liver resection: A procedure in which a portion of the liver is removed, often due to cancer or other diseases.
7. Pancreatectomy: A procedure in which all or part of the pancreas is removed, often due to cancer or chronic pancreatitis.
8. Cholecystectomy: A procedure in which the gallbladder is removed, often due to gallstones or inflammation.

These are just a few examples of digestive system surgical procedures. There are many other types of operations that can be performed on the digestive system depending on the specific needs and condition of each patient.

Surgical stapling is a medical technique that uses specialized staplers to place linear staple lines to close surgical incisions, connect or remove organs and tissues during surgical procedures. Surgical staples are made of titanium or stainless steel and can be absorbable or non-absorbable. They provide secure, fast, and accurate wound closure, reducing the risk of infection and promoting faster healing compared to traditional suturing methods.

The surgical stapler consists of a handle, an anvil, and a cartridge containing multiple staples. The device is loaded with staple cartridges and used to approximate tissue edges before deploying the staples. Once the staples are placed, the stapler is removed, leaving the staple line in place.

Surgical stapling has various applications, including gastrointestinal anastomosis, lung resection, vascular anastomosis, and skin closure. It is widely used in different types of surgeries, such as open, laparoscopic, and robotic-assisted procedures. The use of surgical stapling requires proper training and expertise to ensure optimal patient outcomes.

Antacids are a type of medication that is used to neutralize stomach acid and provide rapid relief from symptoms such as heartburn, indigestion, and stomach discomfort. They work by chemically reacting with the stomach acid to reduce its acidity. Antacids may contain one or more active ingredients, including aluminum hydroxide, calcium carbonate, magnesium hydroxide, and sodium bicarbonate.

Antacids are available over-the-counter in various forms, such as tablets, chewable tablets, liquids, and powders. They can provide quick relief from acid reflux and related symptoms; however, they may not be effective for treating the underlying cause of these symptoms. Therefore, if you experience frequent or severe symptoms, it is recommended to consult a healthcare professional for further evaluation and treatment.

Hoarseness is a condition characterized by an abnormal change in the quality of voice, making it sound rough, breathy, strained, or weak. Medically, it's described as a disorder of phonation, which is the process of producing sound by vibrating the vocal cords in the larynx (voice box). Hoarseness can be caused by various factors, such as inflammation, irritation, or injury to the vocal cords, and may result in symptoms like altered voice pitch, volume, and clarity. It's essential to consult a healthcare professional if hoarseness persists for more than two weeks, especially if it's accompanied by other concerning symptoms like difficulty swallowing or breathing.

Heartburn is not a cardiac condition, but rather a digestive disorder. The medical term for heartburn is "pyrosis." It is characterized by a burning sensation in the chest or throat, caused by the reflux of stomach acid into the esophagus. This backflow of acid can irritate the lining of the esophagus, leading to discomfort and pain. Heartburn often occurs after eating, when lying down, or during bending over, and it can be worsened by certain foods, drinks, or medications. Chronic or severe heartburn may indicate a more serious condition, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

Barrett esophagus is a condition in which the tissue lining of the lower esophagus changes, becoming more like the tissue that lines the intestines (intestinal metaplasia). This change can increase the risk of developing esophageal adenocarcinoma, a type of cancer. The exact cause of Barrett esophagus is not known, but it is often associated with long-term gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as chronic acid reflux.

In Barrett esophagus, the normal squamous cells that line the lower esophagus are replaced by columnar epithelial cells. This change is usually detected during an upper endoscopy and biopsy. The diagnosis of Barrett esophagus is confirmed when the biopsy shows intestinal metaplasia in the lower esophagus.

It's important to note that not everyone with GERD will develop Barrett esophagus, and not everyone with Barrett esophagus will develop esophageal cancer. However, if you have been diagnosed with Barrett esophagus, your healthcare provider may recommend regular endoscopies and biopsies to monitor the condition and reduce the risk of cancer. Treatment options for Barrett esophagus include medications to control acid reflux, lifestyle changes, and in some cases, surgery.

Gastric emptying is the process by which the stomach empties its contents into the small intestine. In medical terms, it refers to the rate and amount of food that leaves the stomach and enters the duodenum, which is the first part of the small intestine. This process is regulated by several factors, including the volume and composition of the meal, hormonal signals, and neural mechanisms. Abnormalities in gastric emptying can lead to various gastrointestinal symptoms and disorders, such as gastroparesis, where the stomach's ability to empty food is delayed.

Peristalsis is an involuntary muscular movement that occurs in the digestive tract, including the esophagus, stomach, and intestines. It is characterized by alternate contraction and relaxation of the smooth muscles in the walls of these organs, which creates a wave-like motion that helps propel food, fluids, and waste through the digestive system.

The process of peristalsis begins with a narrowing or constriction of the muscle in one area of the digestive tract, followed by a relaxation of the muscle in the adjacent area. This creates a localized contraction that moves along the length of the organ, pushing its contents forward. The wave of contractions continues to move along the digestive tract until it reaches the anus, where waste is eliminated from the body.

Peristalsis plays a crucial role in maintaining proper digestion and absorption of nutrients, as well as in the elimination of waste products from the body. Disorders that affect peristalsis, such as gastrointestinal motility disorders, can lead to symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, constipation, or diarrhea.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Recurrence, in a medical context, refers to the return of symptoms or signs of a disease after a period of improvement or remission. It indicates that the condition has not been fully eradicated and may require further treatment. Recurrence is often used to describe situations where a disease such as cancer comes back after initial treatment, but it can also apply to other medical conditions. The likelihood of recurrence varies depending on the type of disease and individual patient factors.

In a Nissen fundoplication, also called a complete fundoplication, the fundus is wrapped the entire 360 degrees around the ... A Nissen fundoplication, or laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication when performed via laparoscopic surgery, is a surgical procedure ... Outcomes comparing laparoscopic fundoplication to robotic fundoplication show similar clinical outcomes, but robotic ... therapy may also benefit from fundoplication. In a fundoplication, the gastric fundus (upper part) of the stomach is wrapped, ...
... may improve symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease, at least in the short term. ... Transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) is an endoscope treatment designed to relieve symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux ... In January 2016, a unique code for the transoral incisionless fundoplication procedure was created and implemented. As of 2016 ... "AMA creates CPT code for transoral incisionless fundoplication procedure for GERD". www.healio.com. Retrieved 2017-06-06. "TIF ...
Georgeson, K. E. (1998-03-01). "Laparoscopic Fundoplication and Gastrostomy". Surgical Innovation. 5 (1): 25-30. doi:10.1177/ ...
Multiple failed nissen fundoplication surgeries. Roux-en-Y reconstruction following partial or complete gastrectomy for stomach ...
It is similar to the Nissen fundoplication. Though far less common owing to a greater degree of difficulty, studies indicate a ...
One surgical procedure used is called Nissen fundoplication. In fundoplication, the gastric fundus (upper part) of the stomach ... If the condition does not improve with medications, a surgery to carry out a laparoscopic fundoplication may be an option. ... Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication - Information for patients (PDF) (Report). Oxford University Hospitals NHS. December 2021. ... Migaczewski M, Pędziwiatr M, Matłok M, Budzyński A (2013). "Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication in the treatment of Barrett's ...
The Nissen fundoplication, a surgical procedure for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease, is named after him. ... Schein, Moshe, Schein, Heidi and Wise, Leslie (1999). "Rudolf Nissen: The man behind the fundoplication". Surgery. 125 (3): 347 ...
Additionally an operation known as a Nissen fundoplication can reduce the reflux of acid from the stomach into the esophagus. ... February 2004). "Barrett's esophagus: the role of laparoscopic fundoplication". The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 77 (2): 393-6. ...
When medical management fails, Nissen fundoplication can be offered. However, patients should be advised that surgery may not ...
In Dor or anterior fundoplication, which is the most common method, part of the stomach (the fundus) is laid over the front of ... Nissen or complete fundoplication (wrapping the fundus all the way around the oesophagus) is generally not considered advisable ... Therefore, this surgery is often combined with partial fundoplication to reduce the incidence of postoperative acid reflux. ... In Toupet or posterior fundoplication, the fundus is passed around the back of the oesophagus instead. ...
It has been suggested as an alternative to Nissen fundoplication for these cases. Preliminary studies have shown it may have a ... an alternative to fundoplication?". Journal of Pediatric Surgery. 40 (6): 915-919. doi:10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2005.03.004. ISSN ... "Esophagogastric dissociation versus fundoplication: Which is best for severely neurologically impaired children?". Journal of ...
When comparing different fundoplication techniques, partial posterior fundoplication surgery is more effective than partial ... anterior fundoplication surgery, and partial fundoplication has better outcomes than total fundoplication. Esophagogastric ... Compared to Nissen fundoplication procedures, the procedure has shown a reduction in complications such as gas bloat syndrome ... Transoral incisionless fundoplication, which uses a device called Esophyx, may be effective. Acid perfusion test Esophageal ...
Together they have four children.[citation needed] Rudolf Nissen and the World Revolution of Fundoplication. Johann Ambrosius ... "Rudolf Nissen and the World Revolution of Fundoplication"". The European Journal of Surgery. 166 (9): 750. doi:10.1080/ ... inventor of the Nissen fundoplication. Liebermann-Meffert married Eduard Karl Heinz Liebermann. ...
The Nissen fundoplication procedure consists of a 360 degree transabdominal fundoplication. A fundoplication is the suturing of ... Is Laparoscopic Always Best Fundoplication Surgery for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Fundoplication Surgery for ... The Nissen fundoplication procedure was first performed by Rudolph Nissen in 1955.[citation needed] A laparoscopic hernia ... Among them are the Nissen Fundoplication and the general laparoscopic hernia repair. There are two types of hiatal hernias. The ...
Surgery is usually a Nissen fundoplication and is performed by a surgeon. Complications of longstanding GERD can include ...
2002) Laparoscopic fundoplication reduce recurrence of Barret's esophagus and may reverse metaplasia (2006). The results of ... Under his leadership doctoral thesis on topics of laparoscopic appendectomy, laparoscopic fundoplication, laparoscopic bile ... fundoplication, liver, pancreas, gastric, bowel, colon resections, portal vein ligations, gasto-yeyunostomy, splenectomy, ...
... and a Nissen fundoplication. On August 27, 2013, Murnaghan returned home from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, where she ...
The two doctors successfully completed a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication surgery on a patient named Claudette Fortier. In ...
Often used in conjunction with Nissen or Belsey fundoplication to treat gastro-oesophageal reflux disease The Dor ... September 2004). "Heller myotomy versus Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication for achalasia: a prospective randomized double- ... fundoplication may be performed together with the Heller myotomy to reduce the incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease ...
Fundoplication is stomach surgery in which the fundus is wrapped around the lower esophagus and stitched into place. It is used ...
Tracheotomy Dental surgery Diagnostic endoscopy Nissen fundoplication Other surgical procedures are available to try to help ...
If the symptoms do not improve with medications, a surgery known as laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication may be an option. About ...
... trial assessing the effect of heated carbon dioxide for insufflation on pain and recovery after laparoscopic fundoplication". ...
The most recommended fundoplication to complement Heller myotomy is Dor fundoplication, which consists of a 180- to 200-degree ... Watson DI, Törnqvist B (2016). "Anterior Partial Fundoplication". Fundoplication Surgery. pp. 109-121. doi:10.1007/978-3-319- ... "Randomized controlled trial of laparoscopic Heller myotomy plus Dor fundoplication versus Nissen fundoplication for achalasia: ... A partial fundoplication or "wrap", where the fundus (Part of the stomach which hangs above the connection to the oesophagus) ...
World's smallest patient (Nissen fundoplication in a 5.7 pound infant) to undergo gastric reflux surgery using the da Vinci ...
Patients with a positive impedance-pH monitoring test may benefit from acid-reduction therapy such as fundoplication surgery or ... endoscopic fundoplication techniques.[citation needed] Pritchett JM, Aslam M, Slaughter JC, Ness RM, Garrett CG, Vaezi MF ( ...
Severe cases of GERD may be refractory to these medications and require fundoplication, a surgery in which the gastroesophageal ...
ISBN 978-0-12-803685-3. Yuan N, Wang CH, Trela A, Albanese CT (June 2007). "Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication during ...
Nissen fundoplication, cryoablation renal tumor, and Heller myotomy. The D'Arrigo Family Specialty Services offers a wide range ...
Placement of a feeding tube, fundoplication, and surgeries to correct hernias or other gastrointestinal structural problems are ...
In a Nissen fundoplication, also called a complete fundoplication, the fundus is wrapped the entire 360 degrees around the ... A Nissen fundoplication, or laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication when performed via laparoscopic surgery, is a surgical procedure ... Outcomes comparing laparoscopic fundoplication to robotic fundoplication show similar clinical outcomes, but robotic ... therapy may also benefit from fundoplication. In a fundoplication, the gastric fundus (upper part) of the stomach is wrapped, ...
Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication (TIF) is a minimally invasive procedure with no incisions in the abdomen used by surgeons ... Fundoplication is a medical term used described folding of the stomach around the esophagus to construct a valve at the ... Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication (TIF) is a minimally invasive procedure with no incisions in the abdomen used by surgeons ... The valve is similar to that created by laparoscopic partial fundoplication. The valve is created by folding the tissue and ...
... described the first fundoplication in the 1950s for treatment of severe reflux esophagitis. His original procedure used a 360º ... encoded search term (Open Nissen Fundoplication) and Open Nissen Fundoplication What to Read Next on Medscape ... Open Nissen Fundoplication Periprocedural Care. Updated: Nov 21, 2022 * Author: Nicole E Sharp, MD; Chief Editor: Vikram Kate, ... Laparoscopic fundoplication in neonates and young infants: Failure rate and need for redo at a high-volume center. J Pediatr ...
Fundoplication clips are located inferior to the diaphragm. There is no evidence of hold up at the level of the fundoplication ... Nissen fundoplication. A Nissen fundoplication operation corrects the problem of acid reflux. The operation can be performed ... The problem of postoperative dysphagia is more common after a total fundoplication (Nissen) than a partial fundoplication. A ... Nissen fundoplication. A partial fundoplication is an option for patients such as Ms A with significant oesophageal dysmotility ...
... Surgery. 1998 Jul; ... Background: The introduction of laparoscopic fundoplication (LF) has lowered the threshold for operation in patients with ...
Laparoscopic Redo Nissen Fundoplication with Esophageal Diverticulectomy. Sachin S Kukreja, MD, James R Wallace, MD PhD, ... At time of redo laparoscopic fundoplication, a tissue plane to separate the wrap could not be recognized. Further dissection ... The patient is a 32-year-old female who had undergone laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication six years previously for severe ... An Upper Gastrointestinal contrast study also showed an intact fundoplication; however, a hiatal hernia with a paraesophageal ...
Once your operation is over, youll be taken to the recovery room where youll wake up. A nurse will be there to check your wounds, blood pressure and pulse.. You may have a drain in your abdomen to remove any fluid. This will be removed before you leave hospital.. You may also have a drip (infusion) going into your arm. This will keep you hydrated until youre able to drink.. When youre ready, a nurse will take you to your room. ...
During fundoplication surgery, the upper curve of the stomach (the fundus) is wrapped around the esophagus. Then its sewn into ... Fundoplication Surgery for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Fundoplication Surgery for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease ( ... Fundoplication surgery is most often used to treat GERD symptoms that are likely to be caused in part by a hiatal hernia and ... During fundoplication surgery, the upper curve of the stomach (the fundus) is wrapped around the esophagus. . Then it's ...
Iatrogenic thoracic migration of the stomach complicating laparoscopic nissen fundoplication. Download Prime PubMed App to ... AdultAgedFemaleFundoplicationGastroesophageal RefluxHernia, HiatalHumansIatrogenic DiseaseLaparoscopyLaparotomyMaleMiddle Aged ... Iatrogenic Thoracic Migration of the Stomach Complicating Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication. Surg Endosc. 2000;14(6):540-2. ... Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication complicated by late gastroesophageal herniation and intrathoracic perforation: a case report ...
Nissen fundoplication, PEH, penrose drain, soft diet, Valsalva maneuver, wrap ...
A video case report of stomach intestinal pylorus sparing surgery with laparoscopic fundoplication: a surgical procedure to ... A video case report of stomach intestinal pylorus sparing surgery with laparoscopic fundoplication: a surgical procedure to ...
Fundoplication is a surgical procedure used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease. ... Also known as: fundoplication surgery, anti-reflux surgery.. What is fundoplication? Fundoplication is a surgical procedure ... Are you trying to schedule an appointment for the Fundoplication?. You do not need to make an appointment for this service. To ... recurrence of the reflux and breathing problems are potential risks of fundoplication. ...
Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication (TIF®) Procedure. Share Do you have persistent reflux? Its an extremely common problem ...
Disclaimer: Hospitals, long-term care facilities, and clinics across the province provide all wait time information displayed on this website. Wait times are based on historical data and do not include emergency/priority cases.. ...
... , Anti-Reflux Surgery, Antireflux Surgery. ... Nissen Fundoplication, Anti-Reflux Surgery, Antireflux Surgery ...
Fundoplication (Acid Reflux Surgery). Fundoplication is a surgical procedure for treating GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease ... Surgery or fundoplication also has been able to be done with an endoscope, which shortens the hospital stay and recovery. ... Traditionally, fundoplication, a procedure that serves to strengthen or recreate the muscular valve (lower esophageal sphincter ... Eighty percent of patients with GERD also have a hiatal hernia, and during the fundoplication procedure, the hernial sac may ...
The fundoplication valve will help prevent stomach contents from refluxing back up into the esophagus. In some cases, the ... Although spitting up is normal, GERD may require a procedure called fundoplication. Before the procedure, the child will be ... fundoplication, fundus, gastroesophageal, gastrostomy, general, given, happen, happens, heartburn, heels, help, hiatus, hole, ...
A fundoplication is performed for people with proven gastro-oesophageal reflux that cant be managed with medication alone. It ... Fundoplication - Anti-Reflux Surgeryadmin-mighty2022-02-06T22:41:38+11:00 A fundoplication is performed for people with proven ... It can be wrapped around the front (anterior fundoplication) or the back (posterior fundoplication) and can be wrapped around ... To perform a fundoplication, the surgeon disconnects the upper part of the stomach (the fundus) from the surrounding tissues to ...
Fundoplication surgery involves reorienting the connection between the esophagus and the stomach, with the goal of controlling ... Nissen Fundoplication Overview. Fundoplication surgery involves reorienting the connection between the esophagus and the ... The surgeon should outline whether the fundoplication will be partial or complete:. *In a complete, or Nissen, fundoplication, ... Without complications, the fundoplication procedure typically takes one to two hours. For a patient whose GERD is related to a ...
Posts about Nissen Fundoplication written by Jamie Grant ... Tag: Nissen Fundoplication. Another Test. Published on October ... Failed Nissen Fundoplication, Gastroenterology, GERD, Laryngeal Cleft, Long Gap Esophageal Atresia, Nissen Fundoplication, ...
What Is Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication?. Transoral incisionless fundoplication is a procedure to reconstruct your bodys ... Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication. We offer advanced therapies for GERD, including incisionless esophagus reconstruction, a ... This creates a collar that acts as a tight seal between your stomach and esophagus (fundoplication). ... By reconstructing your bodys natural reflux barrier, transoral incisionless fundoplication fixes the underlying cause of your ...
When other treatments dont help, your provider may advise a surgery called fundoplication. Read on to learn more. ... During fundoplication, the LES is restructured. This is done by wrapping the very top of the stomach around the lower part of ... Surgery for GERD (Fundoplication). You have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This health problem causes food and fluid ... Your healthcare provider is now advising a surgery called fundoplication. This surgery is used most often when GERD causes ...
... fundoplication GEJ GERD GERD-HRQL hiatal hernia hiatal hernia repair Hill Grade laparoscopic fundoplication LES Lifestyle ... Transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) offers an endoscopic approach to the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease ( ... Long-term reported outcomes of transoral incisionless fundoplication: an 8-year cohort study. ... up 270 degree animate subjects Antireflux Surgery page Atypical LPR Clinical Results Page EGD ELF endoscopic fundoplication ...
Makris, Konstantinos I.; Lee, Tommy; Mittal, Sumeet K. Roux-en-Y Reconstruction for Failed Fundoplication. Journal of ...
Open and Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication answers are found in the Pearsons General Thoracic powered by Unbound Medicine. ... "Open and Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication." Pearsons General Thoracic Surgery. STS Cardiothoracic Surgery E-Book, Chicago: ... Open and Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication. In: Darling GE, Baumgartner WA, Jacobs JP, eds. Pearsons General Thoracic Surgery ... TY - ELEC T1 - Open and Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication ID - 1418532 A1 - Khaitan,Puja,MD AU - Watson,Thomas,MD ED - Jacobs, ...
Learn how a laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery or Nissen Fundoplication repairs the valve at the end of the oesophagus in ... Anti-Reflux Surgery / Nissen Fundoplication Surgery What Is Anti-Reflux Surgery / Nissen Fundoplication?. Nissen Fundoplication ... How Does Anti-Reflux Surgery / Nissen Fundoplication Work?. Nissen Fundoplication can be performed as an open surgery or ... How Long Does It Take To Recover From Anti-Reflux Surgery / Nissen Fundoplication?. A patient who undergoes a fundoplication ...
Laparoscopic fundoplication is a keyhole procedure performed for patients with severe acid reflux, Barretts oesophagus and ... Laparoscopic fundoplication is a keyhole procedure performed for patients with severe acid reflux, Barretts oesophagus and ...
Compare top clinics for Floppy Nissen Fundoplication. Check the reviews, surgeons, costs, and latest prices (2023) to find the ... The original fundoplication technique as described by Rudolf Nissen in 1955 consisted in wrapping the fundus of the stomach ... use the gastric fundus to create the fundoplication; - make sure that the resistance generated by the anti-reflux mechanism ... The basic principles of a fundoplication are: - tension-free repositioning of the gastroesophageal junction (along with 2 cm of ...
... the use of various forms of fundoplication surgery, primarily the toupet fundoplication, is currently increasing. Nurses need ... Table 1. Complication Rates of Fundoplication Surgery. Postoperative Complications. Recurrence Rates. Repeat Surgical ... Toupet Fundoplication in the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease - Medscape - Aug 01, 2011. ... This article focuses on the outcomes associated with two fundoplication surgeries commonly used to treat GERD: nissen ...
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  • A Nissen fundoplication, or laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication when performed via laparoscopic surgery, is a surgical procedure to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and hiatal hernia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Nissen fundoplication is total (360°), but partial fundoplications known as Thal (270° anterior), Belsey (270° anterior transthoracic), Dor (anterior 180-200°), Lind (300° posterior), and Toupet fundoplications (posterior 270°) are alternative procedures with somewhat different indications and outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a Nissen fundoplication, also called a complete fundoplication, the fundus is wrapped the entire 360 degrees around the esophagus. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast, surgery for achalasia is generally accompanied by either a Dor or Toupet partial fundoplication, which is less likely than a Nissen wrap to aggravate the dysphagia that characterizes achalasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Nissen fundoplication reduces reflux by reinforcing the LES by increasing LES pressure and increasing the LES length. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nissen (complete) fundoplication is generally considered to be safe and effective, with a mortality rate of less than 1% and many of the most common post-operative complications minimized or eliminated by the partial fundoplication procedures now more commonly used. (wikipedia.org)
  • When compared to stand alone medical therapy with PPIs, Nissen fundoplication has been found to be superior in reducing acid reflux as well as the symptoms associated with reflux. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ms A underwent a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication operation, performed by Mr Breeze, on 17 September 1998 at Southern Cross Hospital, Tauranga. (hdc.org.nz)
  • It was determined that the wrap on her Nissen fundoplication was too tight, and Mr Breeze performed a further operation that day to loosen the wrap. (hdc.org.nz)
  • A Nissen fundoplication operation corrects the problem of acid reflux. (hdc.org.nz)
  • Mr Breeze advised that prior to mid-1997 he had been undertaking Nissen fundoplication surgery using the open approach (referred to as laparotomy) only. (hdc.org.nz)
  • To develop the laparoscopic technique, he attended two annual laparoscopic surgical conferences in Christchurch that addressed the technique of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication surgery, including live video demonstrations by an international surgeon, and arranged to attend a training course on laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication surgery at the Royal Adelaide Hospital in June 1997. (hdc.org.nz)
  • The patient is a 32-year-old female who had undergone laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication six years previously for severe gastroesophageal reflux and low-grade Barrett's dysplasia. (sages.org)
  • Intrathoracic gastric herniation after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening complication that may present in the early or late postoperative period. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Measures should be undertaken to prevent postoperative vomiting after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • In a complete, or Nissen, fundoplication, the cinched section of stomach is wrapped fully around the bottom of the esophagus, much like a buttoned shirt collar encircles a neck. (westernsurgical.com)
  • Basic tenets of a Nissen fundoplication, regardless of operative approach, include: Reduction of the hiatal hernia and hernia sac, adequate esophageal mobilization to create at least 2-3 cm of intra-abdominal esophagus, division of the short gastric vessels, crural repair, creation of a short (1-2 cm), floppy fundic wrap around a large esophageal dilator incorporating the esophagus, and avoidance of injury to the vagus nerves. (sts.org)
  • Despite high satisfaction rates after Nissen fundoplication, postoperative side effects, including dysphagia and gas-bloat, as well as recurrent reflux are potential risks. (sts.org)
  • Nissen Fundoplication is a procedure targeted at treating heartburn due to Gastroesophageal Reflux Disorder, more commonly referred to as GERD. (glsurgical.com.sg)
  • Nissen Fundoplication helps strengthen this opening to prevent food and acid from going back up. (glsurgical.com.sg)
  • What Is Anti-Reflux Surgery / Nissen Fundoplication Used To Treat? (glsurgical.com.sg)
  • Nissen Fundoplication is primarily used to treat patients with GERD, or in other cases, patients diagnosed with a hiatal hernia, where the stomach pushes against the diaphragm. (glsurgical.com.sg)
  • Nissen Fundoplication serves to tighten and reinforce the lower oesophageal sphincter (LES). (glsurgical.com.sg)
  • Nissen Fundoplication can be performed as an open surgery or laparoscopically. (glsurgical.com.sg)
  • On the other hand, most Nissen Fundoplication procedures are performed laparoscopically (also known as keyhole surgery. (glsurgical.com.sg)
  • In both procedures, a Nissen Fundoplication involves wrapping the entire upper part of the stomach around the oesophagus. (glsurgical.com.sg)
  • What To Expect With Anti-Reflux Surgery / Nissen Fundoplication? (glsurgical.com.sg)
  • The original fundoplication technique as described by Rudolf Nissen in 1955 consisted in wrapping the fundus of the stomach around the esophagus while leaving the gastrosplenic vessels and the diaphragmatic hiatus intact. (flymedi.com)
  • Learn more about Floppy Nissen Fundoplication in Turkey by comparing costs and reviewing the clinics and doctors. (flymedi.com)
  • This article focuses on the outcomes associated with two fundoplication surgeries commonly used to treat GERD: nissen fundoplication (NF) and toupet fundoplication (TF). (medscape.com)
  • I had a Nissen Fundoplication procedure done last Oct. I have not have success with it at all. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Called the Nissen Fundoplication or stomach wrap, the procedure essentially involves wrapping the top part of the stomach around the lower esophageal sphincter like a belt using tiny instruments inserted through small abdominal incisions. (fauquierent.net)
  • The video below shows not only the same animation, but also actual surgical footage of the Nissen fundoplication performed by Dr. Kevin Gillian at the Virginia Heartburn and Hernia Institute . (fauquierent.net)
  • More than 95% of all fundoplications that I perform at Houston Heartburn and reflux Center are 360-degree fundoplication also known as Nissen fundoplication. (houstonheartburn.com)
  • The partial fundoplication, a 270-degree posterior wrap also known as Toupet fundoplication is as effective as a Nissen fundoplication in controlling GERD symptoms. (houstonheartburn.com)
  • I don't think we have solid evidence for such an assumption and I personally believe that a Toupet fundoplication is as durable as a Nissen fundoplication. (houstonheartburn.com)
  • If you had a Dor Fundoplication and you still have acid reflux, then revision to a Toupet or Nissen fundoplication can be performed by an experienced reflux specialist with good outcome. (houstonheartburn.com)
  • Open surgical procedures, such as Nissen fundoplication, have been a standard treatment option for GERD and hiatal hernias. (ncruralhealth.org)
  • Methods: We performed a systematic review of all clinical trials published between January 2004 and September 2015 describing the application of a mesh in the hiatal hernia repair during Nissen fundoplication for both GERD and hiatal hernia. (maastrichtuniversity.nl)
  • The procedure is called Nissen fundoplication. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Replies to I was wondering if anyone has had the reverse Nissen Fundoplication surgery? (mayoclinic.org)
  • I was wondering if anyone has had the reverse Nissen Fundoplication surgery? (mayoclinic.org)
  • I also was wondering about the statements I have read about not being able to burp or vomit after having the Nissen Fundoplication. (mayoclinic.org)
  • I couldn't burp or vomit after the Nissen Fundoplication. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Methods: This is an observational cross sectional study, conducted in a conventional sample of 48 patients, 2 to 16 years of age, at the UFTM Clinical Hospital and the Children's Hospital of Uberaba, divided into 3 groups, as follows: 16 patients without disabilities (Group WD), 15 patients with CP (Group CP), and 17 patients with CP submitted to gastrostomy and Nissen fundoplication (Group WCP). (bvsalud.org)
  • The most common indication for a fundoplication is GERD that has failed lifestyle modification and medical management. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication (TIF) is a minimally invasive procedure with no incisions in the abdomen used by surgeons at Massachusetts General Hospital to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) . (massgeneral.org)
  • Fundoplication surgery is most often used to treat GERD symptoms that are likely to be caused in part by a hiatal hernia and that have not been well controlled by medicines. (cigna.com)
  • Fundoplication is a surgical procedure used to treat GERD ( gastroesophageal reflux disease ). (nicklauschildrens.org)
  • Although spitting up is normal, GERD may require a procedure called fundoplication. (nucleusmedicalmedia.com)
  • Fundoplication surgery involves reorienting the connection between the esophagus and the stomach, with the goal of controlling gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (westernsurgical.com)
  • Studies suggest that fundoplication satisfactorily reduces or halts GERD symptoms for 80% to 90% of patients. (westernsurgical.com)
  • By reconstructing your body's natural reflux barrier, transoral incisionless fundoplication fixes the underlying cause of your GERD so you no longer need medication. (stanfordhealthcare.org)
  • Transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) offers an endoscopic approach to the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (gerdhelp.com)
  • Nurses need to be aware of treatment options and care of pediatric patients with severe GERD requiring surgical intervention, including common treatment modalities used prior to surgery and postoperative care necessary to promote positive results following fundoplication surgery. (medscape.com)
  • Transoral fundoplication has been repeatedly shown to be effective in selected patients suffering from gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) refractory to conservative treatment. (gerdhelp.com)
  • In this small group of patients with recurrent GERD following previous surgical treatment, transoral fundoplication has shown to be an effective tool to reduce symptoms and to improve QOL without the need for redo surgery, which is associated with an increased risk of morbidity. (gerdhelp.com)
  • A floppy and short 360-degree fundoplication is the gold standard approach to GERD treatment. (houstonheartburn.com)
  • Other indications for Toupet fundoplication include GERD cases in the setting of very poor esophageal motility. (houstonheartburn.com)
  • By addressing the underlying cause of GERD and hiatal hernias, laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication can significantly improve patients' overall quality of life. (ncruralhealth.org)
  • Laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication provides long-term relief for GERD and hiatal hernias. (ncruralhealth.org)
  • Background: Laparoscopic cruroplasty and fundoplication have become the gold standard in the treatment of hiatal hernia and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (maastrichtuniversity.nl)
  • This case demonstrates the issues of long-term fundoplication durability, the difficulties of revisional gastric surgery, and the risks of foreign bodies and erosion within the GI tract resulting in esophageal diverticulum formation. (sages.org)
  • During fundoplication surgery, the upper curve of the stomach (the fundus) is wrapped around the esophagus . (cigna.com)
  • fundoplication surgery, anti-reflux surgery. (nicklauschildrens.org)
  • Potential complications of fundoplication include perforation, abscess or herniation of tissues involved in surgery, excessive bleeding, collapsed lung and pneumonia though these complications are extremely rare. (westernsurgical.com)
  • Your healthcare provider is now advising a surgery called fundoplication. (kramesonline.com)
  • however, the use of various forms of fundoplication surgery, primarily the toupet fundoplication, is currently increasing. (medscape.com)
  • Durr, ML & Yang, SC 2008, ' Traumatic Right Paraesophageal Hernia After Belsey Mark IV Fundoplication ', Annals of Thoracic Surgery , vol. 85, no. 1, pp. 321-322. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • Laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication is a minimally invasive surgical procedure that offers several advantages over traditional open surgery. (ncruralhealth.org)
  • Laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication offers a minimally invasive approach, resulting in smaller incisions, reduced scarring, and faster recovery compared to open surgery. (ncruralhealth.org)
  • The minimally invasive nature of laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication reduces the risk of complications associated with open surgery. (ncruralhealth.org)
  • This article reports patient perceived symptomatic outcome at a median of 23 months after surgery for a consecutive series of 200 patients who underwent a laparoscopic anterior partial fundoplication for gastrooesophageal reflux disease (GORD). (elsevierpure.com)
  • Transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) is an advanced endoscopy procedure which mimics surgery but in a minimally invasive way. (alsgbi.org)
  • Quality of life in children who have undergone fundoplication surgery for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease: A review of literature. (bvsalud.org)
  • Gastric emptying studies should not be routinely obtained, because there is only limited evidence in the literature to support a correlation between gastric emptying test results and postoperative outcomes from fundoplication. (medscape.com)
  • Fundoplication and postoperative management. (hdc.org.nz)
  • Presence of Barrett's esophagus is not an indication, as the benefit of a fundoplication in preventing progression into adenocarcinoma is controversial. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a fundoplication, the gastric fundus (upper part) of the stomach is wrapped, or plicated, around the lower end of the esophagus and stitched in place, reinforcing the closing function of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). (wikipedia.org)
  • while in a Toupet (posterior) fundoplication, the fundus is wrapped around the back of the esophagus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fundoplication is a medical term used described folding of the stomach around the esophagus to construct a valve at the junction of the stomach and esophagus. (massgeneral.org)
  • When the stomach is folded 240° or less around the esophagus it is described as a partial fundoplication. (massgeneral.org)
  • The fundoplication valve will help prevent stomach contents from refluxing back up into the esophagus. (nucleusmedicalmedia.com)
  • With fundoplication, the surgeon cinches up the top section of stomach, called the fundus, against and around the esophagus, like a collar. (westernsurgical.com)
  • Partial fundoplication (Dor procedure) involves wrapping the stomach only partway around the esophagus, or (Toupet procedure) repositioning the stomach against the side of the esophagus. (westernsurgical.com)
  • This creates a collar that acts as a tight seal between your stomach and esophagus (fundoplication). (stanfordhealthcare.org)
  • TIF is an abbreviation for Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication. (massgeneral.org)
  • Transoral incisionless fundoplication is a procedure to reconstruct your body's natural antireflux barrier (lower esophageal sphincter) without incisions or visible scars. (stanfordhealthcare.org)
  • What to expect during Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication (TIF) Procedure? (rx.health)
  • ‌ Transoral endoscopic incisionless fundoplication - Mayo Clinic . (rx.health)
  • Patient underwent laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair with concomitant transoral incisionless fundoplication (cTIF). (ssat.com)
  • Surgeries or endoscopic procedures such as Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication are typically reserved for cases who are not responsive to maximal medical therapy. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • I had a 190-200 partial fundoplication and small hiatal hernia repair on 12/11/17. (houstonheartburn.com)
  • The valve is similar to that created by laparoscopic partial fundoplication. (massgeneral.org)
  • Surgeon wants to do a partial gastrectomy w/ a Roux-en-y. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Objective: The goal of this study was to review the authors' results with laparoscopic cardiomyotomy and partial fundoplication for achalasia. (elsevierpure.com)
  • After a brief experience with a thoracoscopic approach, the authors elected to perform cardiomyotomy laparoscopically, in combination with a partial fundoplication (anterior or posterior). (elsevierpure.com)
  • The aim of this randomized, crossover study was to determine if transoral fundoplication (TF) could further improve clinical outcomes in partial responders to high-dose (HD) proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and to evaluate durability of TF. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Without complications, the fundoplication procedure typically takes one to two hours. (westernsurgical.com)
  • Conclusions: Laparoscopic cardiomyotomy and fundoplication appears to provide definitive treatment of achalasia with rapid rehabilitation and few complications. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Outcomes comparing laparoscopic fundoplication to robotic fundoplication show similar clinical outcomes, but robotic fundoplication is more likely to have an increased length of operative time and financial cost. (wikipedia.org)
  • Six months before the accident, she underwent an elective Belsey Mark IV fundoplication to reduce a hiatal hernia. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • From February 2009 to December 2011, 15 patients with a median age of 46.3 years (range 32- 68 years) underwent transoral fundoplication at three centres. (gerdhelp.com)
  • To perform a fundoplication, the surgeon disconnects the upper part of the stomach (the fundus) from the surrounding tissues to ensure that it is mobile enough to wrap around the junction between the oesophagus (food pipe) and the stomach. (nbugi.com.au)
  • In severe cases of GORD that cannot be treated by medication, individuals may be referred to a surgeon who may recommend a complex surgical procedure called fundoplication. (hje.org.uk)
  • Toupet fundoplication is, however, believed to be less durable than a 360-degree fundoplication. (houstonheartburn.com)
  • When I construct a Toupet fundoplication I place deep sutures into the esophageal wall to include esophageal mucosa. (houstonheartburn.com)
  • At Houston Heartburn and reflux Center, we use Toupet fundoplication when the gastric fundus is not large enough to construct a floppy 360-degree fundoplication. (houstonheartburn.com)
  • I prefer a Toupet fundoplication following Heller myotomy for several reasons. (houstonheartburn.com)
  • However, advances in surgical techniques have led to the development of laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication, a minimally invasive procedure that provides effective and durable relief for patients. (ncruralhealth.org)
  • After laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication, patients are generally monitored for a short period in the recovery room before being discharged. (ncruralhealth.org)
  • For these patients, a complete fundoplication could exacerbate the condition. (westernsurgical.com)
  • The transoral fundoplication (TF) technique has combined symptomatic success with an acceptable safety profile and few post fundoplication side effects [ 9 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Transoral fundoplication was performed using the EsophyX® or Plicator™ device. (gerdhelp.com)
  • It can be wrapped around the front (anterior fundoplication) or the back (posterior fundoplication) and can be wrapped around partially or completely. (nbugi.com.au)
  • A posterior fundoplication was performed in 32 patients, anterior fundoplication in 7 patients, and no fundoplication in 1 patient. (elsevierpure.com)
  • This is an anterior fundoplication that some surgeons still use concomitant with a Heller myotomy for achalasia treatment. (houstonheartburn.com)
  • The introduction of laparoscopic fundoplication (LF) has lowered the threshold for operation in patients with symptoms attributed to gastroesophageal reflux. (nih.gov)
  • With either approach, fundoplication leaves patients very satisfied 70% to 80% of the time, according to follow-up studies. (westernsurgical.com)
  • In a recent study of 191 fundoplication patients, nearly 90 percent said they would be willing to undergo the procedure again. (westernsurgical.com)
  • Laparoscopic fundoplication is a keyhole procedure performed for patients with severe acid reflux, Barrett's oesophagus and symptomatic hiatus hernias that no longer respond to medication. (drmohitjain.com)
  • Three patients had previous laparoscopic fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Ils ont aussi donné 11 conférences et reçu en consultation 137 patients. (who.int)
  • Routine prophylactic laparoscopic cholecystectomy before Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is controversial, but laparoscopic cholecystectomy should clearly precede or be performed concurrently with RYGB in patients with a history of gallbladder pathology. (medscape.com)
  • Au total, 247 stagiaires et patients ont répondu à une enquête d'évaluation en 22 items. (who.int)
  • People who have fundoplication are less likely to need daily medication, and their symptoms are likely to be reduced if medication is halted. (westernsurgical.com)
  • prior to fundoplication it was 517.3 ( just above the minimum)….if there were any promotility drugs availiable then your symptoms mayhave been not so severe. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring (with or without impedance testing) should be utilized to document pathologic gastroesophageal reflux when other objective indications for fundoplication (such as the presence of Los Angeles Grade C or D erosive esophagitis or a large hiatal hernia) are lacking. (sts.org)
  • The traumatic paraesophageal hernia traversed the diaphragm at a weakness opposite the fundoplication. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • At time of redo laparoscopic fundoplication, a tissue plane to separate the wrap could not be recognized. (sages.org)
  • Fundoplication involves wrapping the upper part of the stomach (fundus) around the lower end of the oesophagus and stitching it in place to artificially reinforce a weak lower oesophegeal sphincter. (hje.org.uk)
  • Laparoscopic Heller myotomy and fundoplication was performed through five upper abdominal trocars. (elsevierpure.com)