Elasticity: Resistance and recovery from distortion of shape.Elasticity Imaging Techniques: Non-invasive imaging methods based on the mechanical response of an object to a vibrational or impulsive force. It is used for determining the viscoelastic properties of tissue, and thereby differentiating soft from hard inclusions in tissue such as microcalcifications, and some cancer lesions. Most techniques use ultrasound to create the images - eliciting the response with an ultrasonic radiation force and/or recording displacements of the tissue by Doppler ultrasonography.Elastic Modulus: Numerical expression indicating the measure of stiffness in a material. It is defined by the ratio of stress in a unit area of substance to the resulting deformation (strain). This allows the behavior of a material under load (such as bone) to be calculated.Viscosity: The resistance that a gaseous or liquid system offers to flow when it is subjected to shear stress. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Connectin: A giant elastic protein of molecular mass ranging from 2,993 kDa (cardiac), 3,300 kDa (psoas), to 3,700 kDa (soleus) having a kinase domain. The amino- terminal is involved in a Z line binding, and the carboxy-terminal region is bound to the myosin filament with an overlap between the counter-connectin filaments at the M line.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Microscopy, Atomic Force: A type of scanning probe microscopy in which a probe systematically rides across the surface of a sample being scanned in a raster pattern. The vertical position is recorded as a spring attached to the probe rises and falls in response to peaks and valleys on the surface. These deflections produce a topographic map of the sample.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Rheology: The study of the deformation and flow of matter, usually liquids or fluids, and of the plastic flow of solids. The concept covers consistency, dilatancy, liquefaction, resistance to flow, shearing, thixotrophy, and VISCOSITY.Hardness Tests: A test to determine the relative hardness of a metal, mineral, or other material according to one of several scales, such as Brinell, Mohs, Rockwell, Vickers, or Shore. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Elastic Tissue: Connective tissue comprised chiefly of elastic fibers. Elastic fibers have two components: ELASTIN and MICROFIBRILS.Ultrasonography, Mammary: Use of ultrasound for imaging the breast. The most frequent application is the diagnosis of neoplasms of the female breast.Compressive Strength: The maximum compression a material can withstand without failure. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p427)Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Finite Element Analysis: A computer based method of simulating or analyzing the behavior of structures or components.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Taxes: Governmental levies on property, inheritance, gifts, etc.ElastinMicroscopy, Scanning Probe: Scanning microscopy in which a very sharp probe is employed in close proximity to a surface, exploiting a particular surface-related property. When this property is local topography, the method is atomic force microscopy (MICROSCOPY, ATOMIC FORCE), and when it is local conductivity, the method is scanning tunneling microscopy (MICROSCOPY, SCANNING TUNNELING).Elastomers: A generic term for all substances having the properties of stretching under tension, high tensile strength, retracting rapidly, and recovering their original dimensions fully. They are generally POLYMERS.Hardness: The mechanical property of material that determines its resistance to force. HARDNESS TESTS measure this property.Compliance: Distensibility measure of a chamber such as the lungs (LUNG COMPLIANCE) or bladder. Compliance is expressed as a change in volume per unit change in pressure.Models, Chemical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of chemical processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Biophysics: The study of PHYSICAL PHENOMENA and PHYSICAL PROCESSES as applied to living things.Vascular Stiffness: Loss of vascular ELASTICITY due to factors such as AGING; and ARTERIOSCLEROSIS. Increased arterial stiffness is one of the RISK FACTORS for many CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.Acoustics: The branch of physics that deals with sound and sound waves. In medicine it is often applied in procedures in speech and hearing studies. With regard to the environment, it refers to the characteristics of a room, auditorium, theatre, building, etc. that determines the audibility or fidelity of sounds in it. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Nonlinear Dynamics: The study of systems which respond disproportionately (nonlinearly) to initial conditions or perturbing stimuli. Nonlinear systems may exhibit "chaos" which is classically characterized as sensitive dependence on initial conditions. Chaotic systems, while distinguished from more ordered periodic systems, are not random. When their behavior over time is appropriately displayed (in "phase space"), constraints are evident which are described by "strange attractors". Phase space representations of chaotic systems, or strange attractors, usually reveal fractal (FRACTALS) self-similarity across time scales. Natural, including biological, systems often display nonlinear dynamics and chaos.Gels: Colloids with a solid continuous phase and liquid as the dispersed phase; gels may be unstable when, due to temperature or other cause, the solid phase liquefies; the resulting colloid is called a sol.Biophysical Phenomena: The physical characteristics and processes of biological systems.Pliability: The quality or state of being able to be bent or creased repeatedly. (From Webster, 3d ed)Isodesmosine: 2-(4-Amino-4-carboxybutyl)-1-(5-amino-5-carboxypentyl)-3,5-bis(3-amino-3-carboxypropyl)pyridinium. A rare amino acid found in elastin, formed by condensation of four molecules of lysine into a pyridinium ring.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Skin Aging: The process of aging due to changes in the structure and elasticity of the skin over time. It may be a part of physiological aging or it may be due to the effects of ultraviolet radiation, usually through exposure to sunlight.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Ultrasonics: A subfield of acoustics dealing in the radio frequency range higher than acoustic SOUND waves (approximately above 20 kilohertz). Ultrasonic radiation is used therapeutically (DIATHERMY and ULTRASONIC THERAPY) to generate HEAT and to selectively destroy tissues. It is also used in diagnostics, for example, ULTRASONOGRAPHY; ECHOENCEPHALOGRAPHY; and ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY, to visually display echoes received from irradiated tissues.Shear Strength: The internal resistance of a material to moving some parts of it parallel to a fixed plane, in contrast to stretching (TENSILE STRENGTH) or compression (COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH). Ionic crystals are brittle because, when subjected to shear, ions of the same charge are brought next to each other, which causes repulsion.Mechanical Processes: The behaviors of materials under force.Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Methods developed to aid in the interpretation of ultrasound, radiographic images, etc., for diagnosis of disease.Mechanics: The branch of physics which deals with the motions of material bodies, including kinematics, dynamics, and statics. When the laws of mechanics are applied to living structures, as to the locomotor system, it is referred to as BIOMECHANICAL PHENOMENA. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Radial Artery: The direct continuation of the brachial trunk, originating at the bifurcation of the brachial artery opposite the neck of the radius. Its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to the three regions in which the vessel is situated, the forearm, wrist, and hand.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Thermodynamics: A rigorously mathematical analysis of energy relationships (heat, work, temperature, and equilibrium). It describes systems whose states are determined by thermal parameters, such as temperature, in addition to mechanical and electromagnetic parameters. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed)Desmosine: A rare amino acid found in elastin, formed by condensation of four molecules of lysine into a pyridinium ring.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Microscopy, Acoustic: A scientific tool based on ULTRASONOGRAPHY and used not only for the observation of microstructure in metalwork but also in living tissue. In biomedical application, the acoustic propagation speed in normal and abnormal tissues can be quantified to distinguish their tissue elasticity and other properties.Microfibrils: Components of the extracellular matrix consisting primarily of fibrillin. They are essential for the integrity of elastic fibers.Erythrocyte Deformability: Ability of ERYTHROCYTES to change shape as they pass through narrow spaces, such as the microvasculature.Hydrogels: Water swollen, rigid, 3-dimensional network of cross-linked, hydrophilic macromolecules, 20-95% water. They are used in paints, printing inks, foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Myalgia: Painful sensation in the muscles.Acrylic ResinsMathematics: The deductive study of shape, quantity, and dependence. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Entropy: The measure of that part of the heat or energy of a system which is not available to perform work. Entropy increases in all natural (spontaneous and irreversible) processes. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Hoof and Claw: Highly keratinized processes that are sharp and curved, or flat with pointed margins. They are found especially at the end of the limbs in certain animals.Vocal Cords: A pair of cone-shaped elastic mucous membrane projecting from the laryngeal wall and forming a narrow slit between them. Each contains a thickened free edge (vocal ligament) extending from the THYROID CARTILAGE to the ARYTENOID CARTILAGE, and a VOCAL MUSCLE that shortens or relaxes the vocal cord to control sound production.Phantoms, Imaging: Devices or objects in various imaging techniques used to visualize or enhance visualization by simulating conditions encountered in the procedure. Phantoms are used very often in procedures employing or measuring x-irradiation or radioactive material to evaluate performance. Phantoms often have properties similar to human tissue. Water demonstrates absorbing properties similar to normal tissue, hence water-filled phantoms are used to map radiation levels. Phantoms are used also as teaching aids to simulate real conditions with x-ray or ultrasonic machines. (From Iturralde, Dictionary and Handbook of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Imaging, 1990)Extracellular Matrix: A meshwork-like substance found within the extracellular space and in association with the basement membrane of the cell surface. It promotes cellular proliferation and provides a supporting structure to which cells or cell lysates in culture dishes adhere.Tropoelastin: A salt-soluble precursor of elastin. Lysyl oxidase is instrumental in converting it to elastin in connective tissue.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Micromanipulation: The performance of dissections, injections, surgery, etc., by the use of micromanipulators (attachments to a microscope) that manipulate tiny instruments.Sarcomeres: The repeating contractile units of the MYOFIBRIL, delimited by Z bands along its length.Decanoates: Salts and esters of the 10-carbon monocarboxylic acid-decanoic acid.Metabolism: The chemical reactions that occur within the cells, tissues, or an organism. These processes include both the biosynthesis (ANABOLISM) and the breakdown (CATABOLISM) of organic materials utilized by the living organism.Muscle Proteins: The protein constituents of muscle, the major ones being ACTINS and MYOSINS. More than a dozen accessory proteins exist including TROPONIN; TROPOMYOSIN; and DYSTROPHIN.Membrane Fluidity: The motion of phospholipid molecules within the lipid bilayer, dependent on the classes of phospholipids present, their fatty acid composition and degree of unsaturation of the acyl chains, the cholesterol concentration, and temperature.Nanotechnology: The development and use of techniques to study physical phenomena and construct structures in the nanoscale size range or smaller.Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Skin Physiological Phenomena: The functions of the skin in the human and animal body. It includes the pigmentation of the skin.Polyurethanes: A group of thermoplastic or thermosetting polymers containing polyisocyanate. They are used as ELASTOMERS, as coatings, as fibers and as foams.Silk: A continuous protein fiber consisting primarily of FIBROINS. It is synthesized by a variety of INSECTS and ARACHNIDS.Actins: Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.Surface Tension: The force acting on the surface of a liquid, tending to minimize the area of the surface. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Optical Tweezers: A technique that uses LASERS to trap, image, and manipulate small objects (biomolecules, supramolecular assembles, DENDRIMERS) in three dimensional space. (From Glossary of Biotechnology and Nanobiotechnology Terms, 4th ed.)Molecular Conformation: The characteristic three-dimensional shape of a molecule.Polymers: Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Models, Econometric: The application of mathematical formulas and statistical techniques to the testing and quantifying of economic theories and the solution of economic problems.Cytoskeleton: The network of filaments, tubules, and interconnecting filamentous bridges which give shape, structure, and organization to the cytoplasm.Mechanotransduction, Cellular: The process by which cells convert mechanical stimuli into a chemical response. It can occur in both cells specialized for sensing mechanical cues such as MECHANORECEPTORS, and in parenchymal cells whose primary function is not mechanosensory.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Hydrogel: A network of cross-linked hydrophilic macromolecules used in biomedical applications.Lipid Bilayers: Layers of lipid molecules which are two molecules thick. Bilayer systems are frequently studied as models of biological membranes.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Biocompatible Materials: Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.Population Growth: Increase, over a specific period of time, in the number of individuals living in a country or region.Tissue Scaffolds: Cell growth support structures composed of BIOCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS. They are specially designed solid support matrices for cell attachment in TISSUE ENGINEERING and GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION uses.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Actin Cytoskeleton: Fibers composed of MICROFILAMENT PROTEINS, which are predominately ACTIN. They are the smallest of the cytoskeletal filaments.Phase Transition: A change of a substance from one form or state to another.Spiders: Arthropods of the class ARACHNIDA, order Araneae. Except for mites and ticks, spiders constitute the largest order of arachnids, with approximately 37,000 species having been described. The majority of spiders are harmless, although some species can be regarded as moderately harmful since their bites can lead to quite severe local symptoms. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, p508; Smith, Insects and Other Arthropods of Medical Importance, 1973, pp424-430)Fibrillar Collagens: A family of structurally related collagens that form the characteristic collagen fibril bundles seen in CONNECTIVE TISSUE.Tendons: Fibrous bands or cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE at the ends of SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS that serve to attach the MUSCLES to bones and other structures.Molecular Dynamics Simulation: A computer simulation developed to study the motion of molecules over a period of time.Nanofibers: Submicron-sized fibers with diameters typically between 50 and 500 nanometers. The very small dimension of these fibers can generate a high surface area to volume ratio, which makes them potential candidates for various biomedical and other applications.Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Tradescantia: A plant genus of the family COMMELINACEAE that is used in genotoxic bioassays.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Biopolymers: Polymers synthesized by living organisms. They play a role in the formation of macromolecular structures and are synthesized via the covalent linkage of biological molecules, especially AMINO ACIDS; NUCLEOTIDES; and CARBOHYDRATES.Polymerization: Chemical reaction in which monomeric components are combined to form POLYMERS (e.g., POLYMETHYLMETHACRYLATE).Microbubbles: Small encapsulated gas bubbles (diameters of micrometers) that can be used as CONTRAST MEDIA, and in other diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Upon exposure to sufficiently intense ultrasound, microbubbles will cavitate, rupture, disappear, release gas content. Such characteristics of the microbubbles can be used to enhance diagnostic tests, dissolve blood clots, and deliver drugs or genes for therapy.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Tropocollagen: The molecular unit of collagen fibrils that consist of repeating three-stranded polypeptide units arranged head to tail in parallel bundles. It is a right-handed triple helix composed of 2 polypeptide chains. It is rich in glycine, proline, hydroxyproline, and hydroxylysine.Image Enhancement: Improvement of the quality of a picture by various techniques, including computer processing, digital filtering, echocardiographic techniques, light and ultrastructural MICROSCOPY, fluorescence spectrometry and microscopy, scintigraphy, and in vitro image processing at the molecular level.Erythrocyte Membrane: The semi-permeable outer structure of a red blood cell. It is known as a red cell 'ghost' after HEMOLYSIS.Capsulorhexis: The making of a continuous circular tear in the anterior capsule during cataract surgery in order to allow expression or phacoemulsification of the nucleus of the lens. (Dorland, 28th ed)Biomedical Engineering: Application of principles and practices of engineering science to biomedical research and health care.Interferometry: Measurement of distances or movements by means of the phenomena caused by the interference of two rays of light (optical interferometry) or of sound (acoustic interferometry).Anisotropy: A physical property showing different values in relation to the direction in or along which the measurement is made. The physical property may be with regard to thermal or electric conductivity or light refraction. In crystallography, it describes crystals whose index of refraction varies with the direction of the incident light. It is also called acolotropy and colotropy. The opposite of anisotropy is isotropy wherein the same values characterize the object when measured along axes in all directions.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Methacrylates: Acrylic acids or acrylates which are substituted in the C-2 position with a methyl group.Bioengineering: The application of engineering principles and methods to living organisms or biological systems.Scattering, Radiation: The diversion of RADIATION (thermal, electromagnetic, or nuclear) from its original path as a result of interactions or collisions with atoms, molecules, or larger particles in the atmosphere or other media. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Vibration: A continuing periodic change in displacement with respect to a fixed reference. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Enzymes: Biological molecules that possess catalytic activity. They may occur naturally or be synthetically created. Enzymes are usually proteins, however CATALYTIC RNA and CATALYTIC DNA molecules have also been identified.Metacarpus: The region of the HAND between the WRIST and the FINGERS.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Cell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Porosity: Condition of having pores or open spaces. This often refers to bones, bone implants, or bone cements, but can refer to the porous state of any solid substance.Motion: Physical motion, i.e., a change in position of a body or subject as a result of an external force. It is distinguished from MOVEMENT, a process resulting from biological activity.Adhesiveness: A property of the surface of an object that makes it stick to another surface.Protein Kinases: A family of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of ATP and a protein to ADP and a phosphoprotein.Dermis: A layer of vascularized connective tissue underneath the EPIDERMIS. The surface of the dermis contains innervated papillae. Embedded in or beneath the dermis are SWEAT GLANDS; HAIR FOLLICLES; and SEBACEOUS GLANDS.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Connective Tissue: Tissue that supports and binds other tissues. It consists of CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS embedded in a large amount of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX.
"Lung elasticity, thorax and age". Archived from the original on 2 May 2016. Retrieved 14 April 2016. Peter Mattei (15 February ... 2011). Fundamentals of Pediatric Surgery. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 315. ISBN 978-1-4419-6643-8. Anton H. ... making use of the elasticity of the chest wall, including the costal cartilages, in particular in young cases. Physical ...
This implies that quantum entanglement is the fundamental property that gives rise to spacetime. AdS/CFT correspondence Mark ... "Gravity as Theory of Defects in a Crystal with Only Second-Gradient Elasticity". Annalen der Physik. 44: 117. Bibcode:1987AnP ...
William Lowrie (1997). Fundamentals of geophysics. Cambridge University Press. p. 158. ISBN 0-521-46728-4. Lars Stixrude and ... Carolina Lithgow-Bertolloni (2005). "Mineralogy and elasticity of the oceanic upper mantle: Origin of the low-velocity zone" ( ...
By employing the band mapping process, several fundamental physical properties of a solid can be determined. The properties ... Elasticity; Electrical/Magnetic properties; and Optical properties. The electronic states in the solid are described by energy ...
Shifting demand for both locally sourced goods and for imported products is a fundamental part of development. The structural ... Patterns and changes in sectoral employment drive demand shifts through the income elasticity. ...
Drawing upon fundamental works in classical homogenization theory, Berlyand advanced the methods of homogenization in many ... D. thesis studied the homogenization of elasticity problems. He worked at the Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics in Moscow. ... elasticity, and material science. His mathematical modeling explains striking experimental result in the collective swimming of ...
Abseiling, however, is best done with a static rope or, alternately, with a dynamic rope with low elasticity. Kernmantle rope ... National Fire Protection Association (2008). Fundamentals of Fire Fighter Skills. Jones & Bartlett Learning. p. 498. ISBN ...
Tobolsky made fundamental contributions in the fields of rheology, rubber elasticity, polymerization kinetics and ...
Shear-wave elasticity imaging (SWEI)Edit. In shear-wave elasticity imaging (SWEI),[7] similar to ARFI, a 'push' is induced deep ... 1] A Review of Optical Coherence Elastography: Fundamentals, Techniques and Prospects. IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in ... One strength of MRE is the resulting 3D elasticity map, which can cover an entire organ.[2] Because MRI is not limited by air ... Shear wave elasticity imaging: a new ultrasonic technology of medical diagnostics. Ultrasound Med Biol. 1998; 24(9): 1419-35. ...
doi:10.2478/s13531-012-0013-5. Engineering fundamentals page on medium-carbon steel Engineering fundamentals page on high- ... As with most strengthening techniques for steel, Young's modulus (elasticity) is unaffected. All treatments of steel trade ... Modulus of Elasticity, Strength Properties of Metals - Iron and Steel, retrieved 23 April 2009 . Degarmo, p. 377. "Low-carbon ... Engineering fundamentals page on low-carbon steel Elert, Glenn, Density of Steel, retrieved 23 April 2009 . ...
... is a laboratory technique used in geology and material science to measure fundamental material properties involving elasticity ... The natural frequency depends on the elasticity, size, and shape of the object -- RUS exploits this property of solids to ... Angel, R. J.; Jackson, J. M.; Reichmann, H. J.; Speziale, S. (2009). "Elasticity measurements on minerals: A review". European ... Interest in elastic properties made its entrance with 17th century philosophers, but the real theory of elasticity, indicating ...
ISBN 0-632-05759-9 Mohammed Ameen (2005), "Computational Elasticity: Theory of Elasticity and Finite and Boundary Element ... Cauchy's fundamental lemma is equivalent to Newton's third law of motion of action and reaction, and is expressed as − T ( n ... ISBN 81-7319-244-8 John Conrad Jaeger, N. G. W. Cook, and R. W. Zimmerman (2007), "Fundamentals of Rock Mechanics" (4th edition ... A consequence of Cauchy's postulate is Cauchy's Fundamental Lemma, also called the Cauchy reciprocal theorem, which states that ...
Lezioni su le condizioni fisiche della elasticità, 1867 - Lessons on the physical conditions of elasticity. I Principj fisici ... Elementi di fisica, 1873 - Fundamentals of physics Su alcuni principj di elettrostatica, 1873 - On some principles of ...
Giacovazzo, C; Monaco HL; Viterbo D; Scordari F; Gilli G; Zanotti G; Catti M (1992). Fundamentals of Crystallography. Oxford: ... and elasticity. It also helps in the understanding of phase diagrams and phase equilibrium. ... Bonding in ceramics and glasses uses covalent and ionic-covalent types with SiO2 (silica or sand) as a fundamental building ... The study of thermodynamics is fundamental to materials science. It forms the foundation to treat general phenomena in ...
Robert Hooke discovers the fundamental law of elasticity when he finds that the stress (force) exerted is proportional to the ...
He proved existence theorems for the fundamental problems of plane elasticity involving inhomogeneous anisotropic media: these ... In mathematical elasticity theory, Mikhlin was concerned by three themes: the plane problem (mainly from 1932 to 1935), the ... XII+338, Zbl 0077.09903 . The book of Mikhlin summarizing his results in the plane elasticity problem: according to Fichera ( ... 59-69, Zbl 0166.37505 . Mikhlin, Solomon G. (1973), "The spectrum of a family of operators in the theory of elasticity", ...
Fundamentals and elasticity Deformation Theory of Plasticity. ...
Fundamental elements of a ball routine include throwing, bouncing or rolling. The gymnast must use both hands and work on the ... It is made of either rubber or synthetic material (pliable plastic) provided it possesses the same elasticity as rubber. It is ...
... is a fundamental aspect of financial modeling and is one of the four Ps of the marketing mix, the other three aspects ... However, the other Ps of marketing will contribute to decreasing price elasticity and so enable price increases to drive ... Price modeling using econometric techniques can help measure price elasticity, and computer based modeling tools will often ...
Fundamental elements of a ball routine include throwing, bouncing or rolling. The gymnast must use both hands and work on the ... Ball It is made of either rubber or synthetic material (pliable plastic) provided it possesses the same elasticity as rubber. ... Fundamental requirements of a hoop routine include rotation around the hand or body and rolling, as well as swings, circles, ... The fundamental requirements of a rope routine include leaps and skipping. Other elements include swings, throws, circles, ...
An uncodified constitution is a type of constitution where the fundamental rules often take the form of customs, usage, ... An uncodified constitution has the advantages of elasticity, adaptability and resilience. A significant disadvantage, however, ... is that controversies may arise due to different understandings of the usages and customs which form the fundamental provisions ...
The salient feature of the SBM is to overcome the fictitious boundary in the method of fundamental solution, while keeping all ... and plane elasticity problem. There are the two techniques to evaluate the origin intensity factor. The first approach is to ... The basic idea is to introduce a concept of the origin intensity factor to isolate the singularity of the fundamental solutions ... In comparison, the method of fundamental solutions requires a fictitious boundary for placing the source points to avoid the ...
These elongated fibrils give leather its unique characteristics and fundamental attributes. If you grind these fibres into a ... The unique properties of skin which are transmogrified into leather (breathability, strength, elasticity, retention, ...
The solutions are derived from the equations of linear elasticity. The equations of elasticity are a system of 15 partial ... Regardless of approach, the formulation is based on the same three fundamental relations: equilibrium, constitutive, and ... Elasticity methods are available generally for an elastic solid of any shape. Individual members such as beams, columns, shafts ... The theory of elasticity allows the solution of structural elements of general geometry under general loading conditions, in ...
Combining fluid dynamics and elasticity is one goal of the research but the understanding and the predictions of the fluid ... The common theme of her fundamental research includes investigations of free-surface gravity water waves and bluff-body ...
Giacovazzo, C; Monaco HL; Viterbo D; Scordari F; Gilli G; Zanotti G; Catti M (1992). Fundamentals of Crystallography. Oxford: ... and elasticity. It also helps in the understanding of phase diagrams and phase equilibrium. ... Bonding in ceramics and glasses uses covalent and ionic-covalent types with SiO2 (silica or sand) as a fundamental building ... The study of thermodynamics is fundamental to materials science. It forms the foundation to treat general phenomena in ...
Biomedical engineers require the analytical tools and broad knowledge of modern engineering and science, fundamental ... tissue elasticity imaging, piezoelectric microcantilever force probes. ...
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More fundamental view on the elasticities of substitution and of derived demand / 140. Welcome to the IDEALS Repository. ... More fundamental view on the elasticities of substitution and of derived demand / 140. Murota, Takeshi ... More fundamental view on the elasticities of substitution and of derived demand / 140. ...
C. Elasticity. Continuum Elasticity. Elasticity of Structures. Molecular Basis of Elasticity. Microstructural Aspects of ... Continuum Visco-elasticity Applications of Visco-elasticity Theory Structural Aspects of Visco-elasticity E. Fracture. ... Fundamentals and Elasticity / Volume II: Plasticity, Visco-elasticity, and Fracture, 2 Volumes. Author: Gijsbertus de With ISBN ... Fundamentals and Elasticity / Volume II: Plasticity, Visco-elasticity, and Fracture, 2 Volumes ...
2008). Vocal fold elasticity of the Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni)-producing high fundamental frequency ... fundamental frequency. H&E. hematoxylin and eosin stains. L. string (or vocal fold) length. l. specimen length. l0. original ... Elasticity and stress relaxation of rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) vocal folds Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a ... Fundamental frequency (f0) predicted by the string model (Eqn 8). The linear and nonlinear stress responses for female (A) and ...
... a group of researchers has cast artificial proteins into a new solid biomaterial that very closely mimics the elasticity of ... Stem Cells - Fundamentals. Encyclopedia section of medindia gives general info about Stem Cells ... Muscle Generation may be Aided by New Biomaterial That Mimics Muscle Elasticity. ... a group of researchers has cast artificial proteins into a new solid biomaterial that very closely mimics the elasticity of ...
Theory of Elasticity, Theory of Elasticity. Their Course of theoretical physics, v. 7. ... Theory of Elasticity, Volume 7. Volume 7 of Course of Theoretical Physics Series. Volume 7 of Teoreticheskai︟a︟ fizika, ... Theory of Elasticity. Lev Davidovich Landau,Evgeniĭ Mikhaĭlovich Lifshit͡s,Evgenij M. Lifšic. Snippet view - 1959. ... Theory of Elasticity. Lev Davidovich Landau,Evgeniĭ Mikhaĭlovich Lifshit︟s︟. Snippet view - 1959. ...
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So why am I using the word elasticity, and how do we define elasticity? So elasticity is defined in a very specific way, is ... Maybe thats one of the reasons youre seeing low price elasticity in these settings. So thats one way to measure elasticity, ... So elasticity observed in the stores where we lowered the price by nine percent was one-third. What does that mean? Was the ... Measuring Price Elasticity. Para ver este video, habilita JavaScript y considera la posibilidad de actualizar tu navegador a ...
So why am I using the word elasticity, and how do we define elasticity? So elasticity is defined in a very specific way, is ... Maybe thats one of the reasons youre seeing low price elasticity in these settings. So thats one way to measure elasticity, ... So elasticity observed in the stores where we lowered the price by nine percent was one-third. What does that mean? Was the ... Let say I have a new online news surveys and I want to estimate price elasticity. So one of the things I could do is I could ...
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en] In this paper, both singular and hypersingular fundamental solutions of plane Cosserat elasticity are derived and given in ... Fundamental solutions and dual boundary element methods for fracture in plane Cosserat elasticity. ... The hypersingular fundamental solutions allow to formulate the analogue of Somigliana stress identity, which can be used to ... Fundamental solutions and dual boundary.pdf. Publisher postprint. 957.6 kB. Request a copy. ...
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Theory of elasticity *2.3. Elements *2.4. Fundamental explicit and implicit finite element analysis ...
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Re-arranging the equation for the elasticity, Δ. D. D. =. e. D. ,. X. ⋅. Δ. X. X. {\displaystyle {\begin{array}{l}{\frac {\ ... An elasticity is a measure of sensitivity of demand relative to a particular variable X. Specifically, an elasticity eD,X is ... Uses of elasticities[edit]. The real value of elasticities is that they provide a clear way to estimate demand changes. That is ... Transit fare elasticities are negative and inelastic (e.g., eD,Fare = -0.3). Demand drops with an increase in fares, but the ...
Part 1: The Material World 1. Fundamental Ideas Concerning Motion 2. The Motion of Bodies 3. Gravity and Gravitational Fields ... of Force 4. Elasticity 5. Impact 6. Waves 7. Acoustics Part 2: The Atomic Structure of Matter 1. The Classification of the ...
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Chapter 12 Equilibrium and Elasticity. Chapter 13 Gravitation. Chapter 14 Fluids. Chapter 15 Oscillations ... The 10th edition of Hallidays Fundamentals of Physics, Extended building upon previous issues by offering several new features ... Fundamentals of Physics 10th Edition All Access Pack Containing: E-Text Card, WileyPLUS and WileyPLUS Companion ... Fundamentals of Physics Extended, 10th Edition. David Halliday, Robert Resnick, Jearl Walker ...
  • A number of reasons could limit the applicability of the model: (i) non-bending collective motions, (ii) non-linear elasticity terms, (iii) a length scale dependence of K , (iv) breakdown of the mean field approach. (esrf.eu)
  • The correspondence between the nonlinear viscoelastic and the nonlinear elastic constitutive relations is found first, and then two elasticity recovery correspondence principles are deduced. (cnki.com.cn)
  • Edited by two pioneers in the field, 'Fundamentals of Frictions and Wear at the Nanoscale' is suitable both as first introduction to this fascinating subject, and also as a reference for researchers wishing to improve their knowledge of nanotribology and to keep up with the latest results in this field. (springer.com)
  • By translating this basic mechanical concept to the nanoscale, essentially measuring the elasticity of materials that are just a few hundred atoms across, it will open up huge opportunities for electronics and ICT. (tcd.ie)
  • The author examines such topics as the kinematics of vibration (including harmonic motions and non-harmonic periodic motions), degrees of freedom, gyroscopic effects, relaxation oscillations, Rayleigh's method, natural frequencies of torsional vibration, Karman vortices, and systems with variable elasticity. (doverpublications.com)
  • We explicitly give a linear frame of the elasticity tensor space in which the representation of the rotation group is decomposed into irreducible subspaces. (aimsciences.org)
  • Thanks to five independent invariants choosen among six, an elasticity tensor in 2D can be represented by a compact line or, in degenerated cases, by a circle or a point. (aimsciences.org)
  • The elasticity tensor space, parameterized with these invariants, consists in the union of a manifold of dimension $5$, two volumes and a surface. (aimsciences.org)
  • His current research interests pertain to the physical chemistry of polymers, including the elasticity of polymer networks, hybrid organic-inorganic composites, liquid-crystalline polymers, and a variety of computer simulations. (cambridge.org)
  • This unit covers the fundamentals of polymer structure, polymer synthesis and the chemical behaviours of polymers, both natural and synthetic. (sheffield.ac.uk)
  • In this study, I tested if stress-strain and stress-relaxation behavior of rhesus monkey ( Macaca mulatta ) vocal folds allows the prediction of a species' natural fundamental frequency range across its entire vocal repertoire as well as of frequency contours within a single call type. (biologists.org)
  • The discrepancy between predicted maximum fundamental frequency and what has been recorded in rhesus monkeys is currently ascribed to the difficulty in predicting the behavior of the lamina propria at very high strain. (biologists.org)
  • The hypersingular fundamental solutions allow to formulate the analogue of Somigliana stress identity, which can be used to obtain the stress and couple-stress fields inside the domain from the boundary values of the displacements, microrotation and stress and couple-stress tractions. (uni.lu)
  • 23. N. Kinoshita and T. Mura, On boundary value problem of elasticity , Res. (ams.org)
  • The 10th edition of Halliday's Fundamentals of Physics, Extended building upon previous issues by offering several new features and additions. (wiley.com)
  • Dear teacher is this statement is true:when we apply deforming force on body its molecular arrangement changes leading to strain now due to property of elasticity body restores itself by restoring force called stress.so the correct sequence will be deforming force then strain then stress. (topperlearning.com)
  • Review of the first edition: 'This book is an introductory level, thoroughly referenced presentation of rubberlike elasticity in a concise but clear manner … In summary, the average reader should find Rubberlike Elasticity, A Molecular Primer useful and quite interesting. (cambridge.org)
  • The reader is presented with a short, but well written and presented account of all the major aspects of rubberlike elasticity, and is left with the impression of having dined rather well…[A] welcome addition to academic reading lists … This book is eminently readable and well produced. (cambridge.org)
  • No other book on the market today can match the 30-year success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! (ecampus.com)
  • In a breezy, easy-to-understand the book offers a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and helps readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving. (ecampus.com)
  • The first third of the book contains the fundamentals of the theory of elasticity. (springer.com)
  • However, most of the current studies focus on examining the effects of NP elasticity on nonspecific NP-cell interactions, while the effects of NP elasticity on receptor-mediated cellular interactions remain much less understood despite the fact that specific ligand-receptor interaction has proven to play a critical role in the cellular sensing of external mechanical cues ( 17 ). (sciencemag.org)
  • Housing markets have been established as fundamental to understanding business cycles, financial market stability, labor mobility, household wealth, individual portfolio allocation, and urban dynamics. (ssrn.com)
  • Recent years have seen large increases in the prices of houses, farm products, and oil, often with little clear connection to economic fundamentals. (ssrn.com)
  • This lesson outlines the reason for this great fit and analyzes fundamental UCS-related concepts such as service profiles, templates, pools, and management tools. (ciscopress.com)
  • Includes both the relevant fundamental concepts and the extensive practical knowledge base on which manufacturing research, development, and design depend. (stonybrook.edu)
  • Fundamental concepts of structured programming and algorithmic problem solving using technical computing commercial packages (e.g. (uaeu.ac.ae)