Tissue Engineering: Generating tissue in vitro for clinical applications, such as replacing wounded tissues or impaired organs. The use of TISSUE SCAFFOLDING enables the generation of complex multi-layered tissues and tissue structures.Tissue Scaffolds: Cell growth support structures composed of BIOCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS. They are specially designed solid support matrices for cell attachment in TISSUE ENGINEERING and GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION uses.Biocompatible Materials: Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.Bioreactors: Tools or devices for generating products using the synthetic or chemical conversion capacity of a biological system. They can be classical fermentors, cell culture perfusion systems, or enzyme bioreactors. For production of proteins or enzymes, recombinant microorganisms such as bacteria, mammalian cells, or insect or plant cells are usually chosen.Hydrogel: A network of cross-linked hydrophilic macromolecules used in biomedical applications.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Bone-marrow-derived, non-hematopoietic cells that support HEMATOPOETIC STEM CELLS. They have also been isolated from other organs and tissues such as UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD, umbilical vein subendothelium, and WHARTON JELLY. These cells are considered to be a source of multipotent stem cells because they include subpopulations of mesenchymal stem cells.Regeneration: The physiological renewal, repair, or replacement of tissue.Cell Culture Techniques: Methods for maintaining or growing CELLS in vitro.Extracellular Matrix: A meshwork-like substance found within the extracellular space and in association with the basement membrane of the cell surface. It promotes cellular proliferation and provides a supporting structure to which cells or cell lysates in culture dishes adhere.Protein Engineering: Procedures by which protein structure and function are changed or created in vitro by altering existing or synthesizing new structural genes that direct the synthesis of proteins with sought-after properties. Such procedures may include the design of MOLECULAR MODELS of proteins using COMPUTER GRAPHICS or other molecular modeling techniques; site-specific mutagenesis (MUTAGENESIS, SITE-SPECIFIC) of existing genes; and DIRECTED MOLECULAR EVOLUTION techniques to create new genes.Biomedical Engineering: Application of principles and practices of engineering science to biomedical research and health care.Genetic Engineering: Directed modification of the gene complement of a living organism by such techniques as altering the DNA, substituting genetic material by means of a virus, transplanting whole nuclei, transplanting cell hybrids, etc.Chondrocytes: Polymorphic cells that form cartilage.Hydrogels: Water swollen, rigid, 3-dimensional network of cross-linked, hydrophilic macromolecules, 20-95% water. They are used in paints, printing inks, foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Porosity: Condition of having pores or open spaces. This often refers to bones, bone implants, or bone cements, but can refer to the porous state of any solid substance.Bioartificial Organs: Artificial organs that are composites of biomaterials and cells. The biomaterial can act as a membrane (container) as in BIOARTIFICIAL LIVER or a scaffold as in bioartificial skin.Regenerative Medicine: A field of medicine concerned with developing and using strategies aimed at repair or replacement of damaged, diseased, or metabolically deficient organs, tissues, and cells via TISSUE ENGINEERING; CELL TRANSPLANTATION; and ARTIFICIAL ORGANS and BIOARTIFICIAL ORGANS and tissues.Polyesters: Polymers of organic acids and alcohols, with ester linkages--usually polyethylene terephthalate; can be cured into hard plastic, films or tapes, or fibers which can be woven into fabrics, meshes or velours.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Nanofibers: Submicron-sized fibers with diameters typically between 50 and 500 nanometers. The very small dimension of these fibers can generate a high surface area to volume ratio, which makes them potential candidates for various biomedical and other applications.Guided Tissue Regeneration: Procedures for enhancing and directing tissue repair and renewal processes, such as BONE REGENERATION; NERVE REGENERATION; etc. They involve surgically implanting growth conducive tracks or conduits (TISSUE SCAFFOLDING) at the damaged site to stimulate and control the location of cell repopulation. The tracks or conduits are made from synthetic and/or natural materials and may include support cells and induction factors for CELL GROWTH PROCESSES; or CELL MIGRATION.Bone Regeneration: Renewal or repair of lost bone tissue. It excludes BONY CALLUS formed after BONE FRACTURES but not yet replaced by hard bone.Biomimetic Materials: Materials fabricated by BIOMIMETICS techniques, i.e., based on natural processes found in biological systems.Metabolic Engineering: Methods and techniques used to genetically modify cells' biosynthetic product output and develop conditions for growing the cells as BIOREACTORS.Polymers: Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).Decanoates: Salts and esters of the 10-carbon monocarboxylic acid-decanoic acid.Absorbable Implants: Implants constructed of materials designed to be absorbed by the body without producing an immune response. They are usually composed of plastics and are frequently used in orthopedics and orthodontics.Bioengineering: The application of engineering principles and methods to living organisms or biological systems.Polyglycolic Acid: A biocompatible polymer used as a surgical suture material.Osteogenesis: The process of bone formation. Histogenesis of bone including ossification.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Silk: A continuous protein fiber consisting primarily of FIBROINS. It is synthesized by a variety of INSECTS and ARACHNIDS.Elastomers: A generic term for all substances having the properties of stretching under tension, high tensile strength, retracting rapidly, and recovering their original dimensions fully. They are generally POLYMERS.Chitosan: Deacetylated CHITIN, a linear polysaccharide of deacetylated beta-1,4-D-glucosamine. It is used in HYDROGEL and to treat WOUNDS.Microtechnology: Manufacturing technology for making microscopic devices in the micrometer range (typically 1-100 micrometers), such as integrated circuits or MEMS. The process usually involves replication and parallel fabrication of hundreds or millions of identical structures using various thin film deposition techniques and carried out in environmentally-controlled clean rooms.Compressive Strength: The maximum compression a material can withstand without failure. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p427)Chondrogenesis: The formation of cartilage. This process is directed by CHONDROCYTES which continually divide and lay down matrix during development. It is sometimes a precursor to OSTEOGENESIS.Mechanical Phenomena: The properties and processes of materials that affect their behavior under force.Nanostructures: Materials which have structured components with at least one dimension in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. These include NANOCOMPOSITES; NANOPARTICLES; NANOTUBES; and NANOWIRES.Implants, Experimental: Artificial substitutes for body parts and materials inserted into organisms during experimental studies.Cartilage: A non-vascular form of connective tissue composed of CHONDROCYTES embedded in a matrix that includes CHONDROITIN SULFATE and various types of FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. There are three major types: HYALINE CARTILAGE; FIBROCARTILAGE; and ELASTIC CARTILAGE.Biomimetics: An interdisciplinary field in materials science, ENGINEERING, and BIOLOGY, studying the use of biological principles for synthesis or fabrication of BIOMIMETIC MATERIALS.Calcium Phosphates: Calcium salts of phosphoric acid. These compounds are frequently used as calcium supplements.Hexuronic Acids: Term used to designate tetrahydroxy aldehydic acids obtained by oxidation of hexose sugars, i.e. glucuronic acid, galacturonic acid, etc. Historically, the name hexuronic acid was originally given to ascorbic acid.Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Glucuronic Acid: A sugar acid formed by the oxidation of the C-6 carbon of GLUCOSE. In addition to being a key intermediate metabolite of the uronic acid pathway, glucuronic acid also plays a role in the detoxification of certain drugs and toxins by conjugating with them to form GLUCURONIDES.Alginates: Salts of alginic acid that are extracted from marine kelp and used to make dental impressions and as absorbent material for surgical dressings.Bone Substitutes: Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Indigo Carmine: Indolesulfonic acid used as a dye in renal function testing for the detection of nitrates and chlorates, and in the testing of milk.BooksScience: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.
"A Single Component Conducting Polymer Hydrogel as a Scaffold for Tissue Engineering". Advanced Functional Materials. 22: 2692- ... "A Single Component Conducting Polymer Hydrogel as a Scaffold for Tissue Engineering" - Advanced Functional Materials (2012) " ... He was elected as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering in 2003. He received the RACI ... "2017 NSW Scientist of the Year - NSW Chief Scientist & Engineer". www.chiefscientist.nsw.gov.au. Retrieved 2017-11-27. " ...
"Functional organ replacement: The new technology of tissue engineering". Surgery Technology International. Vacanti was born in ... She was a schoolteacher and an administrator for the Tissue Engineering Society. He was interested in engineering as a child, ... He co-founded the Tissue Engineering Society, and holds a number of patents related to stem cells. He was President of the ... Vacanti says that he coined the term tissue engineering in 1991 in the context of organ replacement, though it had been used ...
... toward a functional biological model ventricle". Tissue Engineering. Part A. 14 (2): 215-225. doi:10.1089/tea.2007.0351. ISSN ... Vianello, F., & Poznansky, M. C. (n.d.). Generation of a Tissue-Engineered Thymic Organoid. Immunological Tolerance, 163-170. ... demonstrate a generalized method for organ bud formation from diverse tissues by combining pluripotent stem cell-derived tissue ... They are derived from one or a few cells from a tissue, embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells, which can self- ...
Gelatin has been widely utilized as a biomaterial for engineered tissues. The formation of gelatin scaffolds is dictated by the ... Hoch, Eva (2013). "Chemical tailoring of gelatin to adjust its chemical and physical properties for functional bioprinting". ... Markstedt, Kajsa (2015). "3D Bioprinting Human Chondrocytes with Nanocellulose-Alginate Bioink for Cartilage Tissue Engineering ... Other companies such as Regenhu has developed standardized bioinks for bone tissue. 3D printing 3D bioprinting List of 3D ...
Research has also been conducted into the engineering of heart valves. Tissue-engineered heart valves derived from human cells ... The basic functional and structural unit of the kidney is nephron, which is mainly composed of four components: the glomerulus ... In humans with non-injured tissues, the tissue is naturally regenerated over time; by default these tissues have new cells ... Indeed, in 2008, there was a successful clinical transplantation of a tissue-engineered trachea in a 30-year-old woman with end ...
In particular his research focuses on bioactive glasses and composites, bioactive coatings, tissue engineering scaffolds and ... He is also a pioneer of the field of electrophoretic deposition applied to biomedical and functional materials. Boccaccini is ... and earned his engineering degree in Nuclear Engineering at Instituto Balseiro, S. C. de Bariloche, Argentina in 1987. He then ... The fields of research of Boccaccini in the broad field of materials science and engineering focus on biomaterials for a ...
The photoactivatable TIVA tag is engineered to capture the mRNA of a single cell in complex tissues. TIVA tags are created ... The functional components of the tag can be summarized as following: Biotin: binds to streptavidin beads for tag isolation. Cy3 ... The tissue is embedded in parafin which infiltrates the microscopic spaces present throughout the tissue. The embedded tissue ... This prevents the postmortem degeneration of the tissue and hardens soft tissue. The tissue is dehydrated using ethanol and the ...
"WIPO Publishes Patent of President and Fellows of Harvard College for "Methods of Generating Functional Human Tissue" (American ... "National Academy of Engineering Elects 84 Members and 22 Foreign Members". National Academy of Engineering. February 8, 2017. ... including patents for inventions as varied as methods to 3D print functional human tissue and microbattery cells. She is a ... and 3D scaffolds and microvascular architectures for cell culture and tissue engineering. As of early 2017, Lewis is the author ...
Ellis-Behnke, R.; Jonas, J.B. Redefining tissue engineering for nanomedicine in ophthalmology. Acta Ophthalmol. 2011, 89, e108- ... Peptide nanofiber scaffold for brain repair and axon regeneration with functional return of vision. PNAS. 2006, 103, 5054-5059 ... In nano neuro knitting, these methods are applied specifically to the repair of tissues of the nervous system. Nano neuro ... Whereas previous research has attempted to graft nerve tissue to the optic tract and resulted in complications (leg ...
She specializes in tissue engineering. Bouten studied functional anatomy, biomechanics and exercise physiology at the Vrije ... In 1998 she became assistant professor of Cellular Biomechanics and in 2002 associate professor of tissue engineering. In 2010 ... Carlijn V.C. Bouten (born 1967) is a Dutch professor of Cell-Matrix Interactions at the department of Biomedical Engineering of ...
An infusion of engineered endothelial cells may be able to engraft into injured tissue and acquire the capacity to repair the ... Endothelial cells generated from mouse embryonic stem cells were functional, transplantable and responsive to ... Such cells can be transplanted into different tissues, become educated by the tissue and acquire the characteristic phenotype ... Endothelial cells possess tissue-specific genes that code for unique growth factors, adhesion molecules and factors regulating ...
Tissue Engineering Part A. 15 (2): 331-342. doi:10.1089/ten.tea.2008.0145. PMID 19193130. Bauwens, C. L. L.; Peerani, R.; ... of Human Liver Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Line Cells Demonstrate Distinct Global Gene Expression Patterns and Functional ... Tissue Engineering Part A. 16 (2): 629-641. doi:10.1089/ten.tea.2009.0458. PMC 2813151 . PMID 20001738. Chang, T. T.; Hughes- ... Tissue Engineering Part A. 17 (15-16): 1901-1909. doi:10.1089/ten.TEA.2010.0563. PMID 21417693. Eiraku, M.; Takata, N.; ...
"Polyphosphazene Polymers for Tissue Engineering: An Analysis of Material Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications". Soft ... Functional Mater. 21 (14): 2641-2651. doi:10.1002/adfm.201100275. CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Allcock, H. R ... Weikel, A. L., Lee, D., Krogman, N. R., Allcock, H. R. (2010). Polymer Engineering Sci. 92A: 114-125. Missing or empty ,title ... Polymer Engineering Sci. 15 (5): 321-338. doi:10.1002/pen.760150502. CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) US 4945139 ...
They must degrade over time to make way for the body to regrow tissue. Engineered treatments do not induce an immune response ... Functional electrical stimulation (FES) uses coordinated electric shocks to muscles to cause them to contract in a walking ... and tissue engineering approaches for spinal cord injury". Journal of Controlled Release. 219: 141-54. doi:10.1016/j.jconrel. ... scar tissue buildup, and rejection normally caused by surface implants rubbing against nerve tissue. Silva, N.A.; Sousa, N.; ...
... utilize them as biocompatible scaffodls for tissue engineering. In 2010, a team led by Uygun in the Center for Engineering in ... Center for Engineering in Medicine, 2 March 2011, retrieved 13 May 2011 Mass. General researchers develop functional, ... "Center for Engineering in Medicine" of the Massachusetts General Hospital, where he became the leader of the Organ Engineering ... Center for Engineering in Medicine Center for Engineering in Medicine list of publications (PubMed). ...
As tissue replacements, nanocomposite hydrogels need to interact with cells and form functional tissues. With the incorporated ... Researchers have been looking for a material that can mimic tissue properties to make the tissue engineering process more ... The electrical conducting property is necessary for the hydrogels to start forming functional tissues and be used as imaging ... The high stress-absorbing property makes them a potential candidate for cartilage tissue engineering. Most inorganic ...
Examination of the functional effects of CARP hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutations in engineered heart tissue demonstrated ... "Impact of ANKRD1 mutations associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy on contraction parameters of engineered heart tissue". ... CARP mRNA expression was shown to be 30-fold elevated in skeletal muscle tissue. A wide spectrum of clinical features have been ... "Profiling of skeletal muscle Ankrd2 protein in human cardiac tissue and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes". Histochemistry and Cell ...
Experimental generation of a tissue-engineered functional and vascularized trachea. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2004; 128: 900-6 ... Host-integration of a tissue-engineered airway patch: 2-year follow-up in a single patient. Tissue Eng Part A. 2015; 21: 573-9 ... Walles works on regenerative medicine and tissue engineering research. Being a thoracic surgeon, he focused on the generation ... CHAZ 2010 ; 11 : 561-5 Brucklacher U, Walles T. Nationale und europäische Rahmenbedingungen für Tissue Engineering. Pharma ...
"Amniotic Fluid-Derived Stem Cells for Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering Applications". Tissue Engineering. 19: 368-379. doi: ... 2012). "Valproic acid confers functional pluripotency to human amniotic fluid stem cells in a transgene-free approach". Mol ... A small amount of amniotic fluid provides a large enough quantity of cells for the tissue engineering process and could help ... Possible applications include the use of amniotic stem cells for foetal tissue engineering to reconstruct birth defects in ...
He and the researchers in his lab have made advances in tissue engineering, such as the creation of engineered blood vessels ... Niklason, LE; Gao, J; Abbott, WM; Hirschi, KK; Houser, S; Marini, R; Langer, R (1999). "Functional arteries grown in vitro". ... 2005). "Engineering vascularized skeletal muscle tissue". Nature Biotechnology. 23 (7): 879-84. doi:10.1038/nbt1109. PMID ... Vacanti, Joseph P; Langer, Robert (July 1999). "Tissue engineering: the design and fabrication of living replacement devices ...
Researchers have had many successful advances in the engineering of cardiovascular tissue and have looked towards using ... decellularized and recellularized cadaveric hearts in order to create a functional organ. Decellularization-recellularization ... "Cardiac Tissue Engineering and the Bioartificial Heart". Revista Española de Cardiología (English Edition). 66 (5): 391-399. ... A bioartificial heart is an engineered heart that contains the extracellular structure of a decellularized heart and cellular ...
Disease-modeling by engineered heart tissue (EHT) technology with cardiac cells from heterozygous or homozygous Mybpc3-targeted ... Brickson S, Fitzsimons DP, Pereira L, Hacker T, Valdivia H, Moss RL (Apr 2007). "In vivo left ventricular functional capacity ... "Contractile abnormalities and altered drug response in engineered heart tissue from Mybpc3-targeted knock-in mice". Journal of ... Ran FA, Hsu PD, Wright J, Agarwala V, Scott DA, Zhang F (Nov 2013). "Genome engineering using the CRISPR-Cas9 system". Nature ...
Research dedicated to alternative skin grafts is currently within the purview of tissue engineering. Multiple engineered tissue ... as well as difficulty in mimicking that exact mechanical and biological properties of functional skin. However, benefits range ... Advanced Tissue Sciences Inc.: learning from the past, a case study for regenerative medicine. Tissue engineering of ... or other tissues. Other biological phenomena such as tissue inflammation can also be considered expansion (see tissue ...
Among the major challenges now facing tissue engineering is the need for more complex functionality, as well as both functional ... Tissue engineering involves the use of a tissue scaffold for the formation of new viable tissue for a medical purpose. While it ... Clinical Tissue Engineering Center State of Ohio Initiative for Tissue Engineering (National Center for Regenerative Medicine) ... Doris Taylor's heart in a jar Tissue-engineered airway Tissue-engineered vessels Artificial skin constructed from human skin ...
... and protein functional annotation. The goal of the Tissue Engineering Unit is to provide researchers with cutting edge ... and tissue regeneration. Systems Biology research includes dynamic gene regulatory networks and systems neuroscience. Some ... and the molecular underpinnings of cellular operations pertaining to tissue homeostasis and cancer. Gene regulation studies ...
Functional web - emphasizes the functional significance of certain connections having strong interaction strength and greater ... "Detritus can be broadly defined as any form of non-living organic matter, including different types of plant tissue (e.g. leaf ... Trophic species are functional groups that have the same predators and prey in a food web. Common examples of an aggregated ... Functional webs have compartments, which are sub-groups in the larger network where there are different densities and strengths ...
Tissue engineeringEdit. Main article: Tissue engineering. Tissue engineering, like genetic engineering (see below), is a major ... Pioneer in Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES)[35]. *Nicholas A. Peppas - Chaired Professor in Engineering, University of ... Clinical engineeringEdit. Main article: Clinical engineering. Clinical engineering is the branch of biomedical engineering ... Biomedical engineering (BME) or medical engineering is the application of engineering principles and design concepts to ...
Tissue engineering, cell engineering, orthopedics, bone remodeling, wound healing, mechanotransduction, signal transduction, ... Cognitive neuroengineering, functional brain imaging, near infrared spectroscopy, medical sensor development, biomedical signal ... Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and the ... Biomedical Engineering. Major: Biomedical Engineering. Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering (BSBE). ...
Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Biomaterials and tissue engineering is designed to provide students with advanced training ... Cognitive neuroengineering, functional brain imaging, near infrared spectroscopy, medical sensor development, biomedical signal ... Tissue engineering, cell engineering, orthopedics, bone remodeling, wound healing, mechanotransduction, signal transduction, ... engineering systems, and mathematical and engineering tools. Biomedical engineers require the analytical tools and broad ...
... tissue-engineering scaffolds and biomaterials for the repair of bone and other related musculoskeletal tissue, nerve tissue ... with a focus in the development of functional biomaterials that can accelerate repair utilizing stem cells and other cell types ... Lecture on Tissue Engineering (Fall 2001-2003). Mechanical Foundations of Biomedical Engineering, Undergraduate Level. Lectures ... Lecture on Adult Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering Applications, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Fall 2004 ...
To earn a higher salary, compare accredited engineering concentrations, and research technical certificate programs in your ... Get the facts about Honolulu Community College biomedical engineering. ... LEAD DESIGN ENGINEER. Scientific Research Corporation. Provides functional and technical guidance to less experienced engineers ... Self-assembly of these structures may lead to new breakthroughs in artificial tissue generation. Micron-scale mechanical ...
uGrip II: A novel functional hybrid prosthetic hand design. By: Brianne Doherty, Kevin Mackiw, Raj Patel & Ashley Polhemus. ... Development and Study of a Hybrid Tissue Scaffold Fabrication System for Neurotrophin Delivery ... Thirty one TCNJ engineering students (28 biomedical engineering majors and 3 mechanical engineering majors) students presented ... Constance Hall (Biomedical Engineering) and Dr. Manish Paliwal (Mechanical Engineering). The other teams were as follows:. A ...
Pharmaceutical Sciences and Engineering, Physiological approach Modeling, Regenerative drugs and Tissue Engineering, ... Neural structures Engineering, Orthopaedics, Prosthetics and Orthotics, Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive know-how, ... Biafore Evaluation of Collagen-hydroxyapatite Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering ... mobile and Biomolecular Engineering, scientific Engineering, Computational Bioengineering, Computer-Integrated and Computer- ...
... Stefano Focaroli,1 Gabriella Teti,1 ... "Calcium/Cobalt Alginate Beads as Functional Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering," Stem Cells International, vol. 2016, ...
... Stefano Focaroli,1 Gabriella Teti,1 ... The field of tissue engineering currently offers some of the most promising strategies for cartilage restoration, in which ... Articular cartilage is a highly organized tissue with complex biomechanical properties. However, injuries to the cartilage ... due to the poor intrinsic capacity of this tissue for self-healing. Although various approaches are proposed for the ...
Buy the Paperback Book Functional Tissue Engineering by Farshid Guilak at Indigo.ca, Canadas largest bookstore. + Get Free ... Design Parameters for Tissue Engineering * Design Parameters for Functional Tissue Engineering * Tissue Engineering a Heart: ... Functional Tissue Engineering also provides an invaluable resource to help tissue engineers incorporate these functional ... Functional Tissue Engineering will be useful to students and researchers as it will remind tissue engineers of the clinical ...
Their influences on cell functions and promotive effects on tissue regeneration are then highlighted. ... Their influences on cell functions and promotive effects on tissue regeneration are then highlighted. ... has been used as an attractive and efficient process to restore the original tissue structures and functions through the ... has been used as an attractive and efficient process to restore the original tissue structures and functions through the ...
Biomimetic L-aspartic acid-derived functional poly(ester amide)s for vascular tissue engineering.. [Darryl K Knight, Elizabeth ... Vinculin expression at the cell periphery suggested that HCASMCs formed focal adhesions on the functional PEAs, while the ... that PEAs containing aspartic acid are viable biomaterials for further investigation in vascular tissue engineering. ... and immunofluorescence demonstrated the conjugation of transforming growth factor-β1 to the surface of the functional PEA ...
A tissue-engineered corneal endothelium is of interest for corneal regeneration and for in vitro testing of ocular drugs. In ... Functional Reconstruction of Corneal Endothelium Using Nanotopography for Tissue-Engineering Applications Benjamin Kim Kiat Teo ... Functional Reconstruction of Corneal Endothelium Using Nanotopography for Tissue-Engineering Applications Benjamin Kim Kiat Teo ... Engineering topography: Effects on corneal cell behavior and integration into corneal tissue engineering. Xiong S, Gao H, Qin L ...
"The use of functional tissue-like models during pre-clinical studies will provide unprecedented insights into human-relevant ... More progress in building functional human tissues Harvard materials scientists have bioprinted a tubular 3D renal architecture ... BOSTON) - Toward the ultimate goal of engineering human tissues and organs that can mimic native function for use in drug ... "The current work further expands our bioprinting platform to create functional human tissue architectures with both ...
... Suuronen, Erik J. University of ... for the function of engineered tissues. We observe that the presence of nerves in a tissue engineered (TE) human cornea model ... innervation; tissue engineering; toxicology; 2-photon microscopy; cornea National Category Engineering and Technology ... and prosthetic delivery has melded with the field of tissue engineering to make simulated tissues. In addition to their roles ...
Purpose of Review Tissue engineering has expanded into a highly versatile manufacturing landscape that holds great promise for ... 3D bioprinted functional and contractile cardiac tissue constructs. Tissue Eng A. 2017;23:S96-6.Google Scholar ... Biomaterials for cardiac tissue engineering. Regen Med Tissue Eng. 2013:275-323.Google Scholar ... Reis LA, Chiu LLY, Feric N, Fu L, Radisic M. Biomaterials in myocardial tissue engineering. J Tissue Eng Regen Med. 2016;10(1): ...
Our contributions in the area of tendon functional tissue engineering have the potential to create functional load-bearing ... our group has been continuously improving tendon repair using a functional tissue engineering (FTE) paradigm. This paradigm was ... Fundamental to the new FTE paradigm was the need to determine in vivo forces to which the repair tissue might be exposed. We ... Functional tissue engineering for tendon repair: A multidisciplinary strategy using mesenchymal stem cells, bioscaffolds, and ...
Functional reconstruction of corneal endothelium using nanotopography for tissue-engineering applications. Authors: Teo, B.K.K. ... Functional reconstruction of corneal endothelium using nanotopography for tissue-engineering applications. Acta Biomaterialia 8 ... A tissue-engineered corneal endothelium is of interest for corneal regeneration and for in vitro testing of ocular drugs. In ...
Expansion in the presence of FGF-2 enhances the functional development of cartilaginous tissues engineered using infrapatellar ... Expansion in the presence of FGF-2 enhances the functional development of cartilaginous tissues engineered using infrapatellar ... Expansion in the presence of FGF-2 enhances the functional development of cartilaginous tissues engineered using infrapatellar ... was to investigate the longer term effects of FGF-2 expansion on the functional development of cartilaginous tissues engineered ...
Functional characterization revealed that the cardiac cells cultured in 3D tissues exhibited higher contraction speed and rate ... In vitro tissue models that can provide efficient and accurate drug toxicity screening are highly desired for preclinical drug ... Cardiac tissues were fabricated via cellular self-assembly of human transgene-free induced pluripotent stem cells-derived ... Thus, our 3D cardiac tissue model shows great potential to be used for early safety evaluation in drug development and drug ...
Digoxin and adenosine triphosphate enhance the functional properties of tissue-engineered cartilage. Tissue Engineering - Part ... Digoxin and adenosine triphosphate enhance the functional properties of tissue-engineered cartilage. Tissue Engineering - Part ... Digoxin and adenosine triphosphate enhance the functional properties of tissue-engineered cartilage. In: Tissue Engineering - ... Digoxin and adenosine triphosphate enhance the functional properties of tissue-engineered cartilage, Tissue Engineering - Part ...
... of tissue produce fully functional livers.Many diseases, including cirrhosis and hepatitis, can lead to liver failure. ... "Engineered liver tissue expands after transplant." Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 24 Jul. 2017. Web.. 10 Dec. 2017. , ... Using tissue engineering, researchers show a way forward for treating type 1 diabetes by implanting insulin-producing islet ... In 2011, she developed an engineered tissue scaffold, about the size and shape of a contact lens, that could be implanted into ...
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Tissue engineered, in vitro models to examine how interactions with the extracellular matrix influence adipocyte behavior and ... Soft tissue regeneration and reconstruction for filling of soft tissue defects caused by trauma, tumor resections or congenital ... BellasFATLab part of Women Empowering Engineering Summer Camp Comments Off on BellasFATLab part of Women Empowering Engineering ... We study how adipocytes, the main cell type found in adipose tissue (fat), interact with their microenvironment to learn how ...
Binil Starly, Associate Directors, CMI Functional Tissue Engineering. Dr. Ke Cheng is an Associate Professor in the College of ... The mission of this program is to promote innovation and translation of tissue engineered products and regenerative medicine ... As a manufacturing engineer, Dr. Starly will be able to identify, develop and find resources needed to build key platforms to ... help translate engineered cell, tissue and organ systems to an industrial scale operation. Such enabling platforms will allow ...
  • The Harvard team has also previously shown that these constructs could be scaled up to create thick, vascularized tissue constructs, sustained viable for more than a month in vitro . (harvard.edu)
  • Co-first authors of the study Kimberly Homan, a Wyss Research Associate, and David Kolesky, a Wyss Postdoctoral Fellow, stress that the most exciting aspect of the work is that - far beyond mimicking the form of the kidney's proximal tubule -it is a credible in vitro model that functions like living kidney tissue, representing a significant advance from traditional 2D cell culture. (harvard.edu)
  • In this review, we provide a summary of the current state-of-the-art bioengineering technologies used to create functional cardiac tissues for a variety of applications in vitro and in vivo. (springer.com)
  • In vitro tissue models that can provide efficient and accurate drug toxicity screening are highly desired for preclinical drug development and personalized therapy. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Such approaches are being developed in parallel with a confluence of technologies to improve diagnostic tools and criteria, better classify patients according to clinical symptoms and findings and improve the information content of in vitro cell and tissue-based assays. (fastcongress.com)
  • One source of osteoprogenitor cells is bone marrow stroma, which can be obtained from the patient - minimizing the risk of an immune response - directed in vitro to proliferate, and differentiate into a bone-like tissue. (vt.edu)
  • Thus, these studies suggest that intermittent fluid flow may be an attractive component of a biodynamic bioreactor for in vitro manufacture of clinically effective tissue engineered bone grafts. (vt.edu)
  • Following a discussion of the fundamental principles of tissue engineering applicable to heart valves, we examine three approaches to achieving the goal of an engineered tissue heart valve: (1) cell seeding of biodegradable synthetic scaffolds, (2) cell seeding of processed tissue scaffolds, and (3) in-vivo repopulation by circulating endogenous cells of implanted substrates without prior in-vitro cell seeding. (springer.com)
  • Woodruff, M.A. An Assessment of Cell Culture Plate Surface Chemistry for in Vitro Studies of Tissue Engineering Scaffolds. (mdpi.com)
  • As a novel strategy to help alleviate this problem, we have developed in vitro procedures using Ca 2+ -free solutions of polyethylene glycol (PEG solutions), which within minutes induce functional and morphological continuity (PEG-induced fusion) between the cut or crushed ends of myelinated sciatic or spinal axons in rats. (jneurosci.org)
  • Organ-on-a-chip technology produces 3D mini-organs or tissues in microfluidics, mimicking complex structures and cellular interactions in vivo , and thus provides functional in vitro organ models to study fundamental mechanisms of disease development, drug toxicity screening and drug development. (google.com)
  • Three-dimensional in vitro bioreactors, including nanotechnology and microfluidics-based bioreactors that recapitulate normal and pathological tissue development, structure and function. (nih.gov)
  • There are seven stages of the present protocol: isolation of mice TDSCs, culture and expansion of mice TDSCs, preparation of stimulation culture medium for cell sheet formation, cell sheet formation by culturing in stimulation medium, preparation of 3D tendon stem cell construct, assembly of the uniaxial-stretching mechanical stimulation complex, and evaluation of the mechanical stimulated in vitro tendon-like tissue. (jove.com)
  • Applications that qualify for this funding will focus on engineering 3-D in vitro microphysiological immune system tissues, adding immune system responsiveness to existing in vitro platforms, and/or in vitro modeling of autoimmune diseases and inflammation. (nih.gov)
  • For example, the use of animal models or human-fetal-tissue-based in vitro models in biomedical research raises ethical issues and frequently these models do not completely recapitulate human physiology and pathology. (nih.gov)
  • This thesis uses a multiscale approach to identify and manipulate physiologic and in vitro developmental milieus towards the functional repair of articular cartilage. (rice.edu)
  • In the subsequent decades, multiple labs were able to generate different types of organs in vitro through the dissociation and reaggregation of organ tissues obtained from amphibians and embryonic chicks. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the advent of the field of stem cell biology, the potential of stem cells to form organs in vitro was realized early on with the observation that when stem cells form teratomas or embryoid body, the differentiated cells can organize into different structures resembling those found in multiple tissue types. (wikipedia.org)
  • These tissues provide a unique in vitro model to study cardiac physiology with a species-specific advantage over cultured animal cells in experimental studies. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to their roles as tissue substitutes for transplantation, these simulated tissues may provide more accurate models and environments for toxicology testing and the study of peripheral nerves. (diva-portal.org)
  • Instead of waiting for our bodies to regrow or repair damage after an injury or disease, scientists could grow complex, fully functional tissues in a laboratory for transplantation into patients. (news-medical.net)
  • In each case, there are limitations to conventional surgical approaches and existing prosthetic devices, serious complications associated with transplantation, and critical shortages of available donor tissues. (springer.com)
  • Tissue defects in poorly vascularized recipient areas require the transplantation of replacement tissue that creates a donor-site defect elsewhere in the body. (wiley.com)
  • The objective of this study was to determine whether other known Ca 2+ modulators, digoxin and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), can be employed as novel stimuli to increase collagen synthesis and functional properties of engineered cartilage. (elsevier.com)
  • Moreover, the scaffold demonstrated significant anticancer cell activity.In conclusion, the combination of protein engineering and fiber fabrication in this study has created a set of novel technologies to prepare bioactive scaffolds with characteristics of good compatibility, antimicrobial activity, and anticancer effect, which has a promising potential for biomedical applications such as skin reconstruction, wound treatment, and healing in TERM. (edu.hk)
  • The fourth and last part focuses on larger-scale biomedical applications of the LbL method such as engineered tissues and implant coatings. (wiley.com)
  • Currently, adults who undergo replacement of diseased valves by either mechanical prosthetic or tissue valves (including bioprosthetic valves [porcine aortic valve or bovine pericardial xenograft], cadaveric allograft, or pulmonary-to-aortic autograft valves [Ross procedure]) generally have enhanced survival and quality of life. (springer.com)
  • Application of mechanical forces and electrical stimulation in shaping functional characteristics of engineered tissues. (nih.gov)
  • Inflammation resolution, wound healing, connective tissue remodeling and scarless wound healing. (nih.gov)
  • Over the past 8 years, our group has been continuously improving tendon repair using a functional tissue engineering (FTE) paradigm. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The goal of this study was to optimize a biologically derived scaffold for tendon tissue engineering using equine flexor digitorum superficialis tendons. (vt.edu)
  • These decellularized tendon scaffolds (DTS) are suitable for complex tissue engineering applications, as they provide a clean slate for cell culture while maintaining native three-dimensional architecture. (vt.edu)
  • Collagens are fibrous proteins that serve as the building blocks of skin, tendon, bone, and other connective tissues. (nih.gov)
  • Here, the present protocol describes a method based on a three-dimensional (3D) uniaxial stretching system to stimulate the TDSCs to differentiate into tendon-like tissues. (jove.com)
  • Moreover, the tendon-like tissue is potentially used to promote tendon healing in tendon injury as an engineered autologous graft. (jove.com)
  • That said, creating the more biologically relevant third dimension of tissue models requires a multidisciplinary approach and multidisciplinary expertise. (fastcongress.com)
  • Therapeutic products are also categorized into synthetic materials, biologically derived materials, genetically engineered materials, and small molecules and biologics based on material. (bccresearch.com)
  • Tissue engineering merges aspects of engineering and biology, and many rapid achievements in this field have arisen in part from significant advances in cell and molecular biology. (indigo.ca)
  • We study how adipocytes, the main cell type found in adipose tissue (fat), interact with their microenvironment to learn how fat functions under normal and disease conditions. (temple.edu)
  • The viability of a tissue-engineered product relies on cell-biomaterial interaction and the design of an appropriate 3-D microenvironment. (fastcongress.com)
  • From Asymmetric stem cell division to tissue engineering. (cam.ac.uk)
  • Traditionally, 3D scaffolds are cultured within tissue culture plates to enable reproducible cell seeding and ease of culture media change. (mdpi.com)
  • These results indicate that there is no advantage in using non-treated plates to improve initial cell seeding in 3D polymeric tissue engineering scaffolds, however non-treated plates may provide an improved metabolic environment for long-term studies. (mdpi.com)
  • We hope to achieve these goals by elucidating the fundamental mechanisms that govern cell-biomaterial and cell-cell interactions and apply these in advanced scaffold designs that are tailored to function at the interface of multiple tissues. (columbia.edu)
  • Recellularization was achieved, though methodological advances are required regarding cell seeding strategies and functional assessment. (nature.com)
  • The described methodology produced a urethra bioscaffold that retained vital ECM proteins and was liable to cell repopulation, a crucial first step towards the generation of urethra bioscaffold-based Tissue Engineering products. (nature.com)
  • Therapeutic products are further segmented into cell therapy, gene therapy, tissue engineering, and small molecules and biologics based on product type. (bccresearch.com)
  • and most cell types could be grown and expanded outside of the body, with the exception of the liver, nerve and pancreas, as these tissue types need stem cell populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell engineering exploits the principles and methods of engineering to the complication of cell and molecular biology of both a basic and applied nature. (omicsonline.org)
  • A novel injectable hydrogel system for cell delivery in craniofacial bone tissue engineering was developed in this work. (rice.edu)
  • We observe that the presence of nerves in a tissue engineered (TE) human cornea model enhances the growth of the epithelium and the formation of its protective mucin layer. (diva-portal.org)
  • After a 2-month culture period, the engineered arteries are then carefully decellularized, leaving behind an acellular, human collagenous matrix. (ucsd.edu)
  • There are all too many people in the world who are happy to partake in the growing hope of engineered longevity and human rejuvenation, but who then sit back and do nothing to help bring about that desired future. (fightaging.org)
  • The human body is held together by an intricate cable system of tendons and muscles, engineered b. (innovationtoronto.com)
  • The aim for these techniques is to be used in the near future to regenerate any tissue in the human body. (wikipedia.org)
  • the endometrium is the only human tissue that completely regenerates consistently after a disruption and interruption of the morphology. (wikipedia.org)
  • This FOA is part of a broader effort by NIH to encourage the development of validated alternatives to the use of human fetal tissue in biomedical research, as indicated in NOT-OD-19-042 . (nih.gov)
  • however, the distribution and organization of many of these structures is characteristic of neonatal heart tissue rather than adult human heart muscle. (wikipedia.org)
  • To try to reestablish functional connections after severance of CNS axons (whose proximal stumps normally do not regenerate), strategies have been designed to induce outgrowths from proximal stumps of surviving axons and/or to generate axonal outgrowths from donor tissues. (jneurosci.org)
  • In a study of mice with damaged livers, the researchers found that after being implanted in the abdomen, the tiny structures expanded 50-fold and were able to perform normal liver tissue functions. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The researchers produced DAVEI using recombinant protein engineering and used HIV-1 pseudoviruses to demonstrate that it can physically rupture and irreversibly inactivate the virus particles. (scitechdaily.com)
  • Researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and Ohio State's College of Engineering have developed a new technology, Tissue Nanotransfection (TNT), that can generate any c. (innovationtoronto.com)