Cooking: The art or practice of preparing food. It includes the preparation of special foods for diets in various diseases.Soybean Oil: Oil from soybean or soybean plant.Plant Oils: Oils derived from plants or plant products.Acrylamide: A colorless, odorless, highly water soluble vinyl monomer formed from the hydration of acrylonitrile. It is primarily used in research laboratories for electrophoresis, chromatography, and electron microscopy and in the sewage and wastewater treatment industries.Salvia officinalis: A plant species of the Salvia genus known as a spice and medicinal plant.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Oils: Unctuous combustible substances that are liquid or easily liquefiable on warming, and are soluble in ether but insoluble in water. Such substances, depending on their origin, are classified as animal, mineral, or vegetable oils. Depending on their behavior on heating, they are volatile or fixed. (Dorland, 28th ed)Food Technology: The application of knowledge to the food industry.Rosmarinus: A plant genus of the LAMIACEAE family. It is known as a spice and medicinal plant.Dietary Fats, Unsaturated: Unsaturated fats or oils used in foods or as a food.Food Analysis: Measurement and evaluation of the components of substances to be taken as FOOD.Hot Temperature: Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Oxidation-Reduction: A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).Ships: Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.South CarolinaEncyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Air Ambulances: Fixed-wing aircraft or helicopters equipped for air transport of patients.Diving: An activity in which the organism plunges into water. It includes scuba and bell diving. Diving as natural behavior of animals goes here, as well as diving in decompression experiments with humans or animals.Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Coral Reefs: Marine ridges composed of living CORALS, coral skeletons, calcareous algae, and other organisms, mixed with minerals and organic matter. They are found most commonly in tropical waters and support other animal and plant life.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Organizations, Nonprofit: Organizations which are not operated for a profit and may be supported by endowments or private contributions.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.MedlinePlus: NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Food Safety: Activities involved in ensuring the safety of FOOD including avoidance of bacterial and other contamination.Onions: Herbaceous biennial plants and their edible bulbs, belonging to the Liliaceae.Foodborne Diseases: Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.Plasma Gases: Ionized gases, consisting of free electrons and ionized atoms or molecules which collectively behave differently than gas, solid, or liquid. Plasma gases are used in biomedical fields in surface modification; biological decontamination; dentistry (e.g., PLASMA ARC DENTAL CURING LIGHTS); and in other treatments (e.g., ARGON PLASMA COAGULATION).Air Filters: Barriers used to separate and remove PARTICULATE MATTER from air.Filtration: A process of separating particulate matter from a fluid, such as air or a liquid, by passing the fluid carrier through a medium that will not pass the particulates. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Odors: The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Receptors, Odorant: Proteins, usually projecting from the cilia of olfactory receptor neurons, that specifically bind odorant molecules and trigger responses in the neurons. The large number of different odorant receptors appears to arise from several gene families or subfamilies rather than from DNA rearrangement.Ventilation: Supplying a building or house, their rooms and corridors, with fresh air. The controlling of the environment thus may be in public or domestic sites and in medical or non-medical locales. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Humidity: A measure of the amount of WATER VAPOR in the air.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.RestaurantsTrans Fatty Acids: UNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS that contain at least one double bond in the trans configuration, which results in a greater bond angle than the cis configuration. This results in a more extended fatty acid chain similar to SATURATED FATTY ACIDS, with closer packing and reduced fluidity. HYDROGENATION of unsaturated fatty acids increases the trans content.WingTurkeys: Large woodland game BIRDS in the subfamily Meleagridinae, family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. Formerly they were considered a distinct family, Melegrididae.Food Preferences: The selection of one food over another.TurkeyHoney: A sweet viscous liquid food, produced in the honey sacs of various bees from nectar collected from flowers. The nectar is ripened into honey by inversion of its sucrose sugar into fructose and glucose. It is somewhat acidic and has mild antiseptic properties, being sometimes used in the treatment of burns and lacerations.Flight, Animal: The use of wings or wing-like appendages to remain aloft and move through the air.Mass Behavior: Collective behavior of an aggregate of individuals giving the appearance of unity of attitude, feeling, and motivation.Fishes: A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.Cookbooks as Topic: Set of instructions about how to prepare food for eating using specific instructions.Fish Diseases: Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).Baseball: A competitive nine-member team sport including softball.Physicochemical Processes: Physical reactions involved in the formation of or changes in the structure of atoms and molecules and their interactions.Fish Oils: Oils high in unsaturated fats extracted from the bodies of fish or fish parts, especially the LIVER. Those from the liver are usually high in VITAMIN A. The oils are used as DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS. They are also used in soaps and detergents and as protective coatings.
  • Not that a crisp, satisfyingly crunchy golden-brown crust on some deep-fried delectable is anything less than glorious, it's just some foods are, well, ugly. (ehow.com)
  • And every night of the week there's some fantastically juicy, crunchy and delicious fried bird to be found. (ajc.com)
  • After the success of the deep fried Mars Bar, chefs in Scotland have devised the ultimate high-calorie snack with deep fried butter balls. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • It is believed to be the first time deep fried butter has been on the menu in Scotland. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • All joking aside, and speaking as someone who is not above trying the new fried experiments brought out for fair season every year, this is the best look at what a fried stick of butter actually is that I've seen. (msnbc.com)
  • Even though watching the remains of the butter stick glop out of the middle of Anthony's "brunch" is a little stomach turning, I'm actually more interested in trying the fried butter now that I've seen it. (msnbc.com)
  • Drying the calamari allows it to sear faster and minimizes the inevitable popping and splattering you get with high-heat frying. (ehow.com)
  • Continue to stir-fry over a medium-high heat for 3-4 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through. (bbc.co.uk)
  • Cover, reduce heat to medium and, turning once, fry 6 to 8 minutes each side until chicken is no longer pink near bone. (womansday.com)
  • increase heat to high and fry 1 to 2 minutes longer to recrisp chicken. (womansday.com)
  • My grandmother's final and most crucial tip was to cook okra on high heat, which I translated into: If you want to have great-tasting okra, deep-fry it on high heat. (npr.org)
  • Heat oil in frying pan, medium-high heat. (everything2.com)
  • Heat 1cm/½in depth of oil in a medium frying pan over a medium-high heat. (bbc.co.uk)
  • Heat four tablespoons of oil in a large frying pan or wok over a medium heat. (bbc.co.uk)
  • Add the minced turkey, turn up the heat a bit and fry for about 3-4 minutes, stirring to break up the lumps as you do so. (bbc.co.uk)
  • Any refined vegetable oil with a high smoke point will do the job: corn, safflower, cottonseed, soybean, a "frying blend" mixture. (food52.com)
  • While these items are often purchased at a restaurant, deep fat frying is also a popular way to cook in home kitchens. (usda.gov)
  • Deep fat frying is a cooking method that can be used to cook foods such as fried chicken, French fries, and potato chips. (usda.gov)
  • Its LD product include frying machinery, Cook oil fiLDer, de-oiling machinery, seasoning machinery, sugar coating machinery, conveyor and other food equipment. (noahandthewhale.com)
  • BATON ROUGE, La. , Sept. 12, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- America's best-selling fish fry, Louisiana Fish Fry, introduces an all-in-one seasoned coating mix specially formulated for Air Fryers. (prnewswire.com)
  • Consumers already trust Louisiana Fish Fry to offer perfectly seasoned coating mixes for deep frying, so it was time to expand our options during a time of mindful eating and busy lifestyles,' states Caroline Gray , head of marketing at Louisiana Fish Fry. (prnewswire.com)
  • Founded in 1982, Louisiana Fish Fry manufactures and distributes a broad selection of Louisiana -inspired food products to a national customer base of leading grocery and mass market retailers as well as foodservice distributors. (prnewswire.com)
  • Stephen Fry has quit Plaxo after he became annoyed that the social networking site was revealing what he sees as too many personal details with anyone visiting the site - as opposed to designated contacts. (theregister.co.uk)
  • Deep-frying, on the other hand, involves totally immersing the food in hot oil, which is normally topped up and used several times before being disposed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Deep-frying is typically a much more involved process, and may require specialized oils for optimal results. (wikipedia.org)
  • Deep frying is now the basis of a very large and expanding worldwide industry. (wikipedia.org)
  • In deep-fat frying, low temperatures can substantially increase oil absorption, leaving the food greasy and unappetizing. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, deep frying in hot oil can be extremely dangerous. (usda.gov)
  • The following information provides important guidelines to prevent deep fat frying injuries at home, and to ensure that food is cooked to a safe temperature. (usda.gov)
  • What is deep fat frying? (usda.gov)
  • Deep frying is very fast and, when performed properly, destroys bacteria. (usda.gov)
  • Deep frying oil can reach temperatures of over 400 °F. When cooking at this temperature, extreme safety measures should be taken to prevent burning oneself or starting a fire. (usda.gov)
  • Because of this hazard, it is highly recommended to have a kitchen fire extinguisher available when deep-frying. (usda.gov)
  • Water is a very dangerous liquid when deep frying. (usda.gov)
  • Do not let water get into the hot fat or use water to cool, or clean the appliance while food is deep-frying. (usda.gov)
  • Each kind of oil has a unique taste and nutrient makeup but all are safe to use for deep-frying. (usda.gov)
  • If you are deep frying frozen food, make sure any freezer burn or excess ice is removed. (usda.gov)
  • If available, use a candy or deep frying thermometer to ensure the oil reaches and stays at the correct temperature. (usda.gov)
  • When the oil has reached the correct temperature, it is time to begin deep-frying. (usda.gov)
  • Kicked off by the question "How can we avoid the bad odours from deep-fat frying in restaurants and take-away food venues? (esa.int)
  • We'll dredge up some history, then take a deep-fried dive into what makes the perfect platter. (wbez.org)
  • Alas, my deep-frying began to catch up with my thighs, and I wondered if my okra-eating days were over. (npr.org)
  • Deep fry in sizzling lard until brown on both sides. (everything2.com)
  • It's summer time, and that means new deep-fried fair fare from "Chicken" Charlie Boghosian , who brought us Deep-Fried Kool-Ade last year. (neatorama.com)
  • At the San Diego County Fair going on now, Chicken Charlie's is offering Deep-Fried Breakfast Cereal. (neatorama.com)
  • Frying is the cooking of food in oil or another fat. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stir frying involves frying quickly at very high temperatures, requiring that the food be stirred continuously to prevent it from adhering to the cooking surface and burning. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fried products have consumer appeal in all age groups and in virtually all cultures, and the process is quick, can easily be made continuous for mass production, and the food emerges sterile and dry, with a relatively long shelf life. (wikipedia.org)
  • In starchy foods, low-temperature frying gives the starch in the food a chance to migrate and carmelize, producing a sweeter outcome. (wikipedia.org)
  • Take out the food you plan to fry and pat dry in order to prevent oil splatter when food is submerged. (usda.gov)
  • An order of french fries at a KFC fast food restaurant in New York, October 30, 2006. (reuters.com)
  • Guaranteed to get everyone to the table - Southern Fried Chicken from Chef Adrian Martin as part of the RTÉ Player Food Bites series. (rte.ie)
  • KFC: Fried chicken is health food! (slate.com)
  • Classic country comfort food with Beverly Hills fine dining elegance are fried up together at Bouchon Bistro's monthly Fried Chicken Night. (timeout.com)
  • Eating food fried in olive or sunflower oil is not linked to heart disease or premature death, a study has found. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Despite much research into the relation between dietary fat and coronary heart disease in recent decades, no prospective study has comprehensively investigated the association between consumption of fried food and subsequent risk of coronary heart disease. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • After adjustment for a large number of potential confounding factors, the hazard ratio of coronary heart disease for frequent versus infrequent intake of fried food was 1.08 (95% confidence interval 0.82 to 1.43). (telegraph.co.uk)
  • This result may seem surprising because frying is generally considered an unhealthy way of preparing food. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Fried food intake was assessed only once at study baseline, and dietary changes during follow-up could not be taken into account. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Existing data about the association between consumption of fried food and the risk of coronary heart disease are sparse and the findings inconsistent. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Taken together, the myth that frying food is generally bad for the heart is not supported by available evidence. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • The study by Guallar-Castillón and colleagues suggests that specific aspects of frying food are relevant, such as the oil used, together with other aspects of the diet. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Frying also increases the energy density of food and makes food more palatable, which may lead to the consumption of larger amounts. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • In a message on Twitter last Friday, Fry complained that Plaxo was "distributing my details to every casual passerby" and not just his online contacts. (theregister.co.uk)
  • Last month, Fry briefly threatened to quit Twitter, where he is followed by over a million people, after a fan criticised his updates to the social networking site as "boring. (theregister.co.uk)