Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Malus: A plant genus in the family ROSACEAE, order Rosales, subclass Rosidae. It is best known as a source of the edible fruit (apple) and is cultivated in temperate climates worldwide.Margarine: A butterlike product made of refined vegetable oils, sometimes blended with animal fats, and emulsified usually with water or milk. It is used as a butter substitute. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Dietary Fats: Fats present in food, especially in animal products such as meat, meat products, butter, ghee. They are present in lower amounts in nuts, seeds, and avocados.Arachis hypogaea: A plant species of the family FABACEAE that yields edible seeds, the familiar peanuts, which contain protein, oil and lectins.Plant Oils: Oils derived from plants or plant products.Cacao: A tree of the family Sterculiaceae (or Byttneriaceae), usually Theobroma cacao, or its seeds, which after fermentation and roasting, yield cocoa and chocolate.Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Rosales: An order of the ANGIOSPERMS, subclass Rosidae. Its members include some of the most known ornamental and edible plants of temperate zones including roses, apples, cherries, and peaches.Cheese: A nutritious food consisting primarily of the curd or the semisolid substance formed when milk coagulates.Corn Oil: Oil from ZEA MAYS or corn plant.Sapotaceae: A plant family of the order Ebenales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida that are tropical trees which have elongate latex cells. Several members bear sweet edible fruits and produce triterpenoid saponins.Flavoring Agents: Substances added to foods and medicine to improve the quality of taste.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Dairy Products: Raw and processed or manufactured milk and milk-derived products. These are usually from cows (bovine) but are also from goats, sheep, reindeer, and water buffalo.Fatty Acids: Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Pyrus: A plant genus of the family ROSACEAE known for the edible fruit.Soybean Oil: Oil from soybean or soybean plant.Hydrogenation: Addition of hydrogen to a compound, especially to an unsaturated fat or fatty acid. (From Stedman, 26th ed)Food Analysis: Measurement and evaluation of the components of substances to be taken as FOOD.Linoleic Acids, Conjugated: A collective term for a group of around nine geometric and positional isomers of LINOLEIC ACID in which the trans/cis double bonds are conjugated, where double bonds alternate with single bonds.Trans Fatty Acids: UNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS that contain at least one double bond in the trans configuration, which results in a greater bond angle than the cis configuration. This results in a more extended fatty acid chain similar to SATURATED FATTY ACIDS, with closer packing and reduced fluidity. HYDROGENATION of unsaturated fatty acids increases the trans content.Stearic Acids: A group of compounds that are derivatives of octadecanoic acid which is one of the most abundant fatty acids found in animal lipids. (Stedman, 25th ed)Lipids: A generic term for fats and lipoids, the alcohol-ether-soluble constituents of protoplasm, which are insoluble in water. They comprise the fats, fatty oils, essential oils, waxes, phospholipids, glycolipids, sulfolipids, aminolipids, chromolipids (lipochromes), and fatty acids. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated: Fatty acids which are unsaturated in only one position.Rosmarinus: A plant genus of the LAMIACEAE family. It is known as a spice and medicinal plant.Diacetyl: Carrier of aroma of butter, vinegar, coffee, and other foods.Beverages: Liquids that are suitable for drinking. (From Merriam Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Fats: The glyceryl esters of a fatty acid, or of a mixture of fatty acids. They are generally odorless, colorless, and tasteless if pure, but they may be flavored according to origin. Fats are insoluble in water, soluble in most organic solvents. They occur in animal and vegetable tissue and are generally obtained by boiling or by extraction under pressure. They are important in the diet (DIETARY FATS) as a source of energy. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Aflatoxin M1: A 4-hydroxylated metabolite of AFLATOXIN B1, one of the MYCOTOXINS from ASPERGILLUS tainted food. It is associated with LIVER damage and cancer resulting from its P450 activation to the epoxide which alkylates DNA. Toxicity depends on the balance of liver enzymes that activate it (CYTOCHROME P-450) and others that detoxify it (GLUTATHIONE S TRANSFERASE) (Pharmac Ther 50.443 1991). Primates & rat are sensitive while mouse and hamster are tolerant (Canc Res 29.236 1969).TriglyceridesFood Preservation: Procedures or techniques used to keep food from spoiling.Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Food Habits: Acquired or learned food preferences.Food Preservatives: Substances capable of inhibiting, retarding or arresting the process of fermentation, acidification or other deterioration of foods.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Salmonella Food Poisoning: Poisoning caused by ingestion of food harboring species of SALMONELLA. Conditions of raising, shipping, slaughtering, and marketing of domestic animals contribute to the spread of this bacterium in the food supply.Prunus: A plant genus in the family ROSACEAE, order Rosales, subclass Rosidae. It is best known as a source of edible fruits such as apricot, plum, peach, cherry, and almond.Fats, Unsaturated: Fats containing one or more double bonds, as from oleic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid.Lycopersicon esculentum: A plant species of the family SOLANACEAE, native of South America, widely cultivated for their edible, fleshy, usually red fruit.Oleic Acids: A group of fatty acids that contain 18 carbon atoms and a double bond at the omega 9 carbon.Cholesterol: The principal sterol of all higher animals, distributed in body tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord, and in animal fats and oils.Postprandial Period: The time frame after a meal or FOOD INTAKE.Tephritidae: A large family of fruit flies in the order DIPTERA, comprising over 4,500 species in about 100 genera. They have patterned wings and brightly colored bodies and are found predominantly in the tropical latitudes.Helianthus: A genus herbs of the Asteraceae family. The SEEDS yield oil and are used as food and animal feed; the roots of Helianthus tuberosus (Jerusalem artichoke) are edible.Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Food Packaging: Containers, packaging, and packaging materials for processed and raw foods and beverages. It includes packaging intended to be used for storage and also used for preparation of foods such as microwave food containers versus COOKING AND EATING UTENSILS. Packaging materials may be intended for food contact or designated non-contact, for example, shipping containers. FOOD LABELING is also available.Bread: Baked food product made of flour or meal that is moistened, kneaded, and sometimes fermented. A major food since prehistoric times, it has been made in various forms using a variety of ingredients and methods.Lipoproteins: Lipid-protein complexes involved in the transportation and metabolism of lipids in the body. They are spherical particles consisting of a hydrophobic core of TRIGLYCERIDES and CHOLESTEROL ESTERS surrounded by a layer of hydrophilic free CHOLESTEROL; PHOSPHOLIPIDS; and APOLIPOPROTEINS. Lipoproteins are classified by their varying buoyant density and sizes.Oils: Unctuous combustible substances that are liquid or easily liquefiable on warming, and are soluble in ether but insoluble in water. Such substances, depending on their origin, are classified as animal, mineral, or vegetable oils. Depending on their behavior on heating, they are volatile or fixed. (Dorland, 28th ed)Fragaria: A plant genus of the family ROSACEAE known for the edible fruit.Butter: The fatty portion of milk, separated as a soft yellowish solid when milk or cream is churned. It is processed for cooking and table use. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Rosaceae: The rose plant family in the order ROSALES and class Magnoliopsida. They are generally woody plants. A number of the species of this family contain cyanogenic compounds.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Citrus sinensis: A plant species of the genus CITRUS, family RUTACEAE that provides the familiar orange fruit which is also a source of orange oil.Diatomaceous Earth: A form of SILICON DIOXIDE composed of skeletons of prehistoric aquatic plants which is used for its ABSORPTION quality, taking up 1.5-4 times its weight in water. The microscopic sharp edges are useful for insect control but can also be an inhalation hazard. It has been used in baked goods and animal feed. Kieselguhr is German for flint + earthy sediment.Diet Surveys: Systematic collections of factual data pertaining to the diet of a human population within a given geographic area.Dietary Fats, Unsaturated: Unsaturated fats or oils used in foods or as a food.Fatty Acids, Unsaturated: FATTY ACIDS in which the carbon chain contains one or more double or triple carbon-carbon bonds.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Nuts: Botanically, a type of single-seeded fruit in which the pericarp enclosing the seed is a hard woody shell. In common usage the term is used loosely for any hard, oil-rich kernel. Of those commonly eaten, only hazel, filbert, and chestnut are strictly nuts. Walnuts, pecans, almonds, and coconuts are really drupes. Brazil nuts, pistachios, macadamias, and cashews are really seeds with a hard shell derived from the testa rather than the pericarp.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Anthocyanins: A group of FLAVONOIDS derived from FLAVONOLS, which lack the ketone oxygen at the 4-position. They are glycosylated versions of cyanidin, pelargonidin or delphinidin. The conjugated bonds result in blue, red, and purple colors in flowers of plants.Fish Oils: Oils high in unsaturated fats extracted from the bodies of fish or fish parts, especially the LIVER. Those from the liver are usually high in VITAMIN A. The oils are used as DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS. They are also used in soaps and detergents and as protective coatings.Food Preferences: The selection of one food over another.Ethylenes: Derivatives of ethylene, a simple organic gas of biological origin with many industrial and biological use.Food: Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.Biological Availability: The extent to which the active ingredient of a drug dosage form becomes available at the site of drug action or in a biological medium believed to reflect accessibility to a site of action.Cooking: The art or practice of preparing food. It includes the preparation of special foods for diets in various diseases.Theobromine: 3,7-Dimethylxanthine. The principle alkaloid in Theobroma cacao (the cacao bean) and other plants. A xanthine alkaloid that is used as a bronchodilator and as a vasodilator. It has a weaker diuretic activity than THEOPHYLLINE and is also a less powerful stimulant of smooth muscle. It has practically no stimulant effect on the central nervous system. It was formerly used as a diuretic and in the treatment of angina pectoris and hypertension. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, pp1318-9)Thoracic Duct: The largest lymphatic vessel that passes through the chest and drains into the SUBCLAVIAN VEIN.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Cholesterol, LDL: Cholesterol which is contained in or bound to low density lipoproteins (LDL), including CHOLESTEROL ESTERS and free cholesterol.Eggs: Animal reproductive bodies, or the contents thereof, used as food. The concept is differentiated from OVUM, the anatomic or physiologic entity.Proanthocyanidins: Dimers and oligomers of flavan-3-ol units (CATECHIN analogs) linked mainly through C4 to C8 bonds to leucoanthocyanidins. They are structurally similar to ANTHOCYANINS but are the result of a different fork in biosynthetic pathways.Polygalacturonase: A cell wall-degrading enzyme found in microorganisms and higher plants. It catalyzes the random hydrolysis of 1,4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. EC 3.2.1.15.Cholesterol, HDL: Cholesterol which is contained in or bound to high-density lipoproteins (HDL), including CHOLESTEROL ESTERS and free cholesterol.Intestinal Absorption: Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.Citrus: A plant genus of the family RUTACEAE. They bear the familiar citrus fruits including oranges, grapefruit, lemons, and limes. There are many hybrids which makes the nomenclature confusing.Energy Intake: Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.Cholesterol, Dietary: Cholesterol present in food, especially in animal products.Chylomicrons: A class of lipoproteins that carry dietary CHOLESTEROL and TRIGLYCERIDES from the SMALL INTESTINE to the tissues. Their density (0.93-1.006 g/ml) is the same as that of VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS.Oleic Acid: An unsaturated fatty acid that is the most widely distributed and abundant fatty acid in nature. It is used commercially in the preparation of oleates and lotions, and as a pharmaceutical solvent. (Stedman, 26th ed)Pectins: High molecular weight polysaccharides present in the cell walls of all plants. Pectins cement cell walls together. They are used as emulsifiers and stabilizers in the food industry. They have been tried for a variety of therapeutic uses including as antidiarrheals, where they are now generally considered ineffective, and in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia.Dietary Carbohydrates: Carbohydrates present in food comprising digestible sugars and starches and indigestible cellulose and other dietary fibers. The former are the major source of energy. The sugars are in beet and cane sugar, fruits, honey, sweet corn, corn syrup, milk and milk products, etc.; the starches are in cereal grains, legumes (FABACEAE), tubers, etc. (From Claudio & Lagua, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Dictionary, 3d ed, p32, p277)Diet, Fat-Restricted: A diet that contains limited amounts of fat with less than 30% of calories from all fats and less than 10% from saturated fat. Such a diet is used in control of HYPERLIPIDEMIAS. (From Bondy et al, Metabolic Control and Disease, 8th ed, pp468-70; Dorland, 27th ed)Actinidia: A plant species of the family ACTINIDIACEAE, order Theales.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Crataegus: A genus in the family ROSACEAE of shrubs and small trees native to the North Temperate Zone. It is best known for a traditional medication for the heart.Taste: The ability to detect chemicals through gustatory receptors in the mouth, including those on the TONGUE; the PALATE; the PHARYNX; and the EPIGLOTTIS.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Isomerism: The phenomenon whereby certain chemical compounds have structures that are different although the compounds possess the same elemental composition. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Patulin: 4-Hydroxy-4H-furo(3,2-c)pyran-2(6H)-one. A mycotoxin produced by several species of Aspergillus and Penicillium. It is found in unfermented apple and grape juice and field crops. It has antibiotic properties and has been shown to be carcinogenic and mutagenic and causes chromosome damage in biological systems.Linoleic Acid: A doubly unsaturated fatty acid, occurring widely in plant glycosides. It is an essential fatty acid in mammalian nutrition and is used in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins and cell membranes. (From Stedman, 26th ed)Flexiviridae: A family of RNA plant viruses that infect a wide range of herbaceous and woody plant species. There are at least eight genera including POTEXVIRUS and CARLAVIRUS, both of which are highly immunogenic.Discriminant Analysis: A statistical analytic technique used with discrete dependent variables, concerned with separating sets of observed values and allocating new values. It is sometimes used instead of regression analysis.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Phenols: Benzene derivatives that include one or more hydroxyl groups attached to the ring structure.Phytoplasma: A genus of minute bacteria in the family ACHOLEPLASMATACEAE that inhabit phloem sieve elements of infected PLANTS and cause symptoms such as yellowing, phyllody, and witches' brooms. Organisms lack a CELL WALL and thus are similar to MYCOPLASMA in animals. They are transmitted by over 100 species of INSECTS especially leafhoppers, planthoppers, and PSYLLIDS.Digestion: The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.Polyphenols: A large class of organic compounds having more than one PHENOL group.Apolipoproteins: Protein components on the surface of LIPOPROTEINS. They form a layer surrounding the hydrophobic lipid core. There are several classes of apolipoproteins with each playing a different role in lipid transport and LIPID METABOLISM. These proteins are synthesized mainly in the LIVER and the INTESTINES.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.Hypercholesterolemia: A condition with abnormally high levels of CHOLESTEROL in the blood. It is defined as a cholesterol value exceeding the 95th percentile for the population.Lipid Metabolism: Physiological processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of LIPIDS.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Lipid Peroxidation: Peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of lipids using hydrogen peroxide as an electron acceptor.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Plant Structures: The parts of plants, including SEEDS.Salmonella: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that utilizes citrate as a sole carbon source. It is pathogenic for humans, causing enteric fevers, gastroenteritis, and bacteremia. Food poisoning is the most common clinical manifestation. Organisms within this genus are separated on the basis of antigenic characteristics, sugar fermentation patterns, and bacteriophage susceptibility.Carotenoids: The general name for a group of fat-soluble pigments found in green, yellow, and leafy vegetables, and yellow fruits. They are aliphatic hydrocarbons consisting of a polyisoprene backbone.Capsicum: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. The hot peppers yield CAPSAICIN, which activates VANILLOID RECEPTORS. Several varieties have sweet or pungent edible fruits that are used as vegetables when fresh and spices when the pods are dried.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Flavonoids: A group of phenyl benzopyrans named for having structures like FLAVONES.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Passiflora: A plant genus of the family Passifloraceae, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. They are vines with ornamental flowers and edible fruit.Pigmentation: Coloration or discoloration of a part by a pigment.Ananas: A plant genus of the family BROMELIACEAE known for the edible fruit that is the source of BROMELAINS.Factor XI: Stable blood coagulation factor involved in the intrinsic pathway. The activated form XIa activates factor IX to IXa. Deficiency of factor XI is often called hemophilia C.Ascomycota: A phylum of fungi which have cross-walls or septa in the mycelium. The perfect state is characterized by the formation of a saclike cell (ascus) containing ascospores. Most pathogenic fungi with a known perfect state belong to this phylum.Chlorogenic Acid: A naturally occurring phenolic acid which is a carcinogenic inhibitor. It has also been shown to prevent paraquat-induced oxidative stress in rats. (From J Chromatogr A 1996;741(2):223-31; Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 1996;60(5):765-68).Biflavonoids: Dimers (homo and hetero) of FLAVONOIDS.Phloem: Plant tissue that carries nutrients, especially sucrose, by turgor pressure. Movement is bidirectional, in contrast to XYLEM where it is only upward. Phloem originates and grows outwards from meristematic cells (MERISTEM) in the vascular cambium. P-proteins, a type of LECTINS, are characteristically found in phloem.RNA, Plant: Ribonucleic acid in plants having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Diospyros: A plant genus of the family EBENACEAE, order Ebenales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida best known for the edible fruit and the antibacterial activity and compounds of the wood.Insulin: A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1).Mangifera: A plant genus of the family ANACARDIACEAE best known for the edible fruit.Mesocricetus: A genus of the family Muridae having three species. The present domesticated strains were developed from individuals brought from Syria. They are widely used in biomedical research.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Botrytis: A mitosporic Leotiales fungal genus of plant pathogens. It has teleomorphs in the genus Botryotina.Bile Acids and Salts: Steroid acids and salts. The primary bile acids are derived from cholesterol in the liver and usually conjugated with glycine or taurine. The secondary bile acids are further modified by bacteria in the intestine. They play an important role in the digestion and absorption of fat. They have also been used pharmacologically, especially in the treatment of gallstones.Plant Shoots: New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.Cucumis melo: A plant species of the family CUCURBITACEAE, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae known for the melon fruits with reticulated (net) surface including cantaloupes, honeydew, casaba, and Persian melons.Microcomputers: Small computers using LSI (large-scale integration) microprocessor chips as the CPU (central processing unit) and semiconductor memories for compact, inexpensive storage of program instructions and data. They are smaller and less expensive than minicomputers and are usually built into a dedicated system where they are optimized for a particular application. "Microprocessor" may refer to just the CPU or the entire microcomputer.Weight Gain: Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.Arecaceae: The palm family of order Arecales, subclass Arecidae, class Liliopsida.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Fungicides, Industrial: Chemicals that kill or inhibit the growth of fungi in agricultural applications, on wood, plastics, or other materials, in swimming pools, etc.Vitis: A plant genus in the family VITACEAE, order Rhamnales, subclass Rosidae. It is a woody vine cultivated worldwide. It is best known for grapes, the edible fruit and used to make WINE and raisins.Antioxidants: Naturally occurring or synthetic substances that inhibit or retard the oxidation of a substance to which it is added. They counteract the harmful and damaging effects of oxidation in animal tissues.Insect Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous insects through chemical, biological, or other means.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Penicillium: A mitosporic Trichocomaceae fungal genus that develops fruiting organs resembling a broom. When identified, teleomorphs include EUPENICILLIUM and TALAROMYCES. Several species (but especially PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM) are sources of the antibiotic penicillin.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Flavonols: A group of 3-hydroxy-4-keto-FLAVONOIDS.Alternaria: A mitosporic Loculoascomycetes fungal genus including several plant pathogens and at least one species which produces a highly phytotoxic antibiotic. Its teleomorph is Lewia.CyclopropanesPhospholipids: Lipids containing one or more phosphate groups, particularly those derived from either glycerol (phosphoglycerides see GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS) or sphingosine (SPHINGOLIPIDS). They are polar lipids that are of great importance for the structure and function of cell membranes and are the most abundant of membrane lipids, although not stored in large amounts in the system.Cucurbitaceae: The gourd plant family of the order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. It is sometimes placed in its own order, Cucurbitales. 'Melon' generally refers to CUCUMIS; CITRULLUS; or MOMORDICA.Litchi: A plant genus of the family SAPINDACEAE that bears sweet fruits. Unusual fatty acids such as cyclopropanoic fatty acids have been identified in the seeds.Genome, Plant: The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field: Gel electrophoresis in which the direction of the electric field is changed periodically. This technique is similar to other electrophoretic methods normally used to separate double-stranded DNA molecules ranging in size up to tens of thousands of base-pairs. However, by alternating the electric field direction one is able to separate DNA molecules up to several million base-pairs in length.Plant Stems: Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)EuropeMusa: A plant genus of the family Musaceae, order Zingiberales, subclass Zingiberidae, class Liliopsida.Pantoea: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, straight rods which are motile by peritrichous flagella. Most strains produce a yellow pigment. This organism is isolated from plant surfaces, seeds, soil, and water, as well as from animals and human wounds, blood, and urine. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Citrullus: A plant genus of the family CUCURBITACEAE known for the edible fruit.Particle Size: Relating to the size of solids.Expressed Sequence Tags: Partial cDNA (DNA, COMPLEMENTARY) sequences that are unique to the cDNAs from which they were derived.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Annona: A plant genus of the family ANNONACEAE. It has edible fruit and seeds which contain acetogenins and benzoquinazoline and other alkaloids.Chiroptera: Order of mammals whose members are adapted for flight. It includes bats, flying foxes, and fruit bats.Plant Growth Regulators: Any of the hormones produced naturally in plants and active in controlling growth and other functions. There are three primary classes: auxins, cytokinins, and gibberellins.Ceratitis capitata: A species of fruit fly originating in sub-Saharan Africa but widely distributed worldwide. One of the most destructive fruit pests, its larvae feed and develop on many different fruits and some vegetables.Volatilization: A phase transition from liquid state to gas state, which is affected by Raoult's law. It can be accomplished by fractional distillation.Crops, Agricultural: Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Olea: A plant genus of the family Oleaceae. The olive fruit is the source of olive oil.Spectrum Analysis: The measurement of the amplitude of the components of a complex waveform throughout the frequency range of the waveform. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Volatile Organic Compounds: Organic compounds that have a relatively high VAPOR PRESSURE at room temperature.Erwinia: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms are associated with plants as pathogens, saprophytes, or as constituents of the epiphytic flora.DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.Snails: Marine, freshwater, or terrestrial mollusks of the class Gastropoda. Most have an enclosing spiral shell, and several genera harbor parasites pathogenic to man.Punicaceae: A plant family of the order Myrtales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida that is a small family with a single genus.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Ascorbic Acid: A six carbon compound related to glucose. It is found naturally in citrus fruits and many vegetables. Ascorbic acid is an essential nutrient in human diets, and necessary to maintain connective tissue and bone. Its biologically active form, vitamin C, functions as a reducing agent and coenzyme in several metabolic pathways. Vitamin C is considered an antioxidant.Pest Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous plants, insects, or other animals. This includes control of plants that serve as habitats or food sources for animal pests.Lipoproteins, LDL: A class of lipoproteins of small size (18-25 nm) and light (1.019-1.063 g/ml) particles with a core composed mainly of CHOLESTEROL ESTERS and smaller amounts of TRIGLYCERIDES. The surface monolayer consists mostly of PHOSPHOLIPIDS, a single copy of APOLIPOPROTEIN B-100, and free cholesterol molecules. The main LDL function is to transport cholesterol and cholesterol esters to extrahepatic tissues.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Carica: A plant genus of the family Caricaceae, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. It is the source of edible fruit and PAPAIN.Sapindaceae: The soapberry plant family of the order Sapindales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida. Some members contain SAPONINS.
Kamagong, Mabolo, Butter fruit, Velvet-apple Diospyros blepharophylla Standl. Diospyros blumutensis Ng Diospyros boala De Wild ... Sand Apple Diospyros changii R.H.Miao Diospyros chartacea Wall. ex A.DC. Diospyros cherrieri F.White Diospyros chevalieri De ... Gold Apple Diospyros decaryana H.Perrier Diospyros defectrix Fletcher Diospyros dendo Welw. ex Hiern Diospyros densiflora Wall ... Red-fruited Ebony Diospyros maclurei Merr. Diospyros macrocarpa Hiern Diospyros macrophylla Blume Diospyros madecassa H.Perrier ...
Kamagong, Mabolo, Butter fruit, Velvet-apple Diospyros duclouxii Diospyros ebenum J.Koenig ex Retz. - Ceylon ebony, India ebony ... The green fruits are rich in tannins and thus avoided by most herbivores; when ripe they are eagerly eaten by many animals ... Some are valued for their hard, heavy, dark timber, and some for their fruit. Some are useful as ornamentals and many are of ... The emblem of the Japanese island of Ishigaki is the Yaeyama kokutan (D. ferrea). The Gold apple (D. decandra), called "Trái ...
Zest Sweet Mustard Pickles Fruit Butter Jam Double Fruit Low Sugar Preserves Simply Fruit Sugar Free Organic Peanut butter Jif ... also apple butter and cranberry sauce) Santa Cruz Organic (also peanut butter, chocolate and caramel sauce, and applesauces) ... Later, he prepared apple butter and sold it from the back of a horse-drawn wagon. The company was incorporated in 1921. The J. ... peanut butter) After the Fall (juices) 1998 Adams (peanut butter) 2002 Jif (peanut butter) Crisco (oils) 2004 International ...
Either pan-fried or only cooked they are commonly eaten with melted butter, cinnamon sugar, apple sauce or fruit preserves. ... apple sauce or other fruit preserves, but they are more famous in hearty dishes and this form of preparation is not too common ... The bright and consistent flesh is often pan-fried in butter, but can also be served steamed or smoked. Filderkraut is a ... Beignets are also very famous and are commonly prepared with apples and served with vanilla sauce. A broad range of different ...
People were able to enjoy apples again and spread their bread with butter instead of margarine. Now it was possible to choose ... Soon, display windows began showing merchandise long absent; fruits, vegetables, and various food products. ...
1-Undecanol is found naturally in many foods such as fruits (including apples and bananas), butter, eggs and cooked pork. ...
It is all-purpose, being used for fresh eating, cider, apple butter, and pies. It is similar to cultivars 'Arkansas Black', ' ... Downing, A.J; Downing, Charles (1883). The fruits and fruit-trees of America. New York: John Wiley & Sons. p. 441. Beach, S.A ... Winesap' is an old apple cultivar of unknown origin. The apples are sweet with a tangy finish. It can be used for eating, ... A View of the Cultivation of Fruit Trees. Coxe and other authors mention its use for cider. 'Winesap' was a popular apple in ...
Crops and fruit such as butter tea, citrus fruit, apple, chestnut, pear, persimmon, passion fruit, star anise, sugar cane and ...
... or peanut butter and jelly, or, in Canada, savoury pie, as well as some fruit, chips, dessert and a drink such as juice, milk, ... ISBN 978-1-84537-634-5. R. W. Apple, Jr. (7 December 2010). Far Flung and Well Fed: The Food Writing of R.W. Apple, Jr. St. ... In the summer, a few dishes of fresh fruit should be added to the luncheon, or, instead of this, a compote of fruit or fruit ... There is a large variety of Brazilian fruits, such as cupuaçu, cashew fruit and nut, fruta do conde, amora, maracujá, papaya, ...
Fruit butters are generally made from larger fruits, such as apples, plums, peaches or grapes. Cook until softened and run ... Fruit butter[edit]. Main article: Fruit butter. Fruit butter, in this context, refers to a process where the whole fruit is ... In Canada, fruit jam is categorized into two types: fruit jam and fruit jam with pectin. Both types contain fruit, fruit pulp ... Other names include: chutney, confit, conserve, fruit butter, fruit curd, fruit spread, jelly, and marmalade. ...
Kieffer pears and apple varietals are used to make pear butter and apple butter. Also popular are bread and butter pickles, ... European fruits-especially apples and pears-can grow in the mountains, and sweet fried apples are a common side dish. ... Appalachia uses butter extensively but makes little use of cheese, and eats more wild game (as well as wild fruits and ... may be served with butter, jelly, fruit preserves, honey, gravy or sorghum molasses), pimento cheese, boiled or baked sweet ...
Flavors included Natural Vanilla, Chocolate Chip, Peanut Butter Graham, and Apple Cinnamon Graham. Another version of the ... Fruit Snacks: "Farley's" made these in the shape of ninja turtles and villains. Assorted flavors. Pizza Crunchabungas: Pizza ... Also released was Pizza Mini Slices which had the odd topping of apple with a green colored crust. Hostess Teenage Mutant Ninja ...
The book provides recipes for various forms of bread, such as buttered loaves; for apple fritters; preserves and pickles; and a ... A recipe for dressing a shoulder of mutton calls for the use of the newly-available citrus fruits: Take a showlder of mutton ... Since butter, sugar, eggs and flour were all rationed, English dishes such as pies and cakes became hard to make from ... Secondly, butter becomes an important ingredient in sauces, a trend which continued in later centuries. Thirdly, herbs, which ...
... French Toast Pretz Grilled Curry Pretz Bakery Flat Style Pretz Takoyaki Pretz Mabo Tofu Pretz Apple Pretz Salt Butter ... Fruits Pretz Blueberry Cheese Double Pretz Matcha Vanilla Double Pretz Ebi Chili Pretz (aka Shrimp Chili Sauce Pretz, also ... Honey and Pomelo Pretz Baked Potato Pretz Cheese and Potato Pretz Butter Pretz Bacon Pretz Maple Syrup Pretz Maple and Butter ... Giant Apple Pretz (sold in Japan) Giant Okonomiyaki Pretz (sold in Japan) Similar snacks have been around in Germany, Austria ...
... mostly apples) are caramelized in butter and sugar before the tart is baked. Angel wings Baba au rhum Beignet Bichon au citron ... A profiterole, sometimes referred to as a cream puff in other cultures Tarte Tatin is an upside-down tart in which the fruit ( ...
... sour fruit juice, in this case probably from apples], and butter, fill your pyes, bake them, and ice them. The following is ... I: Boiling II: Beef III: Heads IV: Roasting V: Sallets VI: Frying VII: Puddings VIII: Souces and Jellies IX: Baking X: Fruit XI ... She describes the book as "in some ways an old-fashioned collection with savoury dishes laden with sugar and dried fruits", yet ... apples], season it with nutmeg, cinnamon, ginger, pepper, caraway-seed, currans, minced raisons, rose-water, minced lemon peel ...
It is often applied to spread fruit products such as apple butter. Fats such as cocoa butter and shea butter that remain solid ... including food items such as maple butter and witch's butter and nonfood items such as baby bottom butter, hyena butter, and ... producing what is called a compound butter or composite butter (sometimes also called composed butter). Compound butters can be ... Butter is packed into the lid. The water acts as a seal to keep the butter fresh, and also keeps the butter from overheating in ...
"Fruit butters are generally made from larger fruits, such as apples, plums, peaches or grapes. Cook until softened and run ... In Canada, fruit jam is categorized into two types: fruit jam and fruit jam with pectin. Both types contain fruit, fruit pulp ... Conserves may also include dried fruit or nuts. Fruit butter, in this context, refers to a process where the whole fruit is ... For this purpose, "fruit" is considered to include fruits that are not usually treated in a culinary sense as fruits, such as ...
The apple pie had to wait for the planting of European varieties, brought across the Atlantic, to become fruit-bearing apple ... Along with the apples people commonly use, cinnamon, salt, butter, and most importantly sugar. Though most of the old recipes ... Food portal Apfelstrudel (apple strudel), an Austrian pie-like dish made with dough, apples, sugar and spices Apple cake Apple ... The apple pie is one of the United State's signature comfort foods. Apple pie can be made with all sorts of different apples. ...
Apple Brown Betty (or apple pudding) consists of alternating layers of apples and sweetened buttered bread crumbs or crackers, ... These may substitute other fruits, such as peaches, berries, or pears, for the apples. Apple crisp is a relatively modern dish ... Apple cobbler (also known as apple slump, apple grunt, and apple pandowdy) is an old recipe in which the baked apples are ... Ingredients usually include cooked apples, butter, sugar, flour, cinnamon, and often oats and brown sugar, ginger, and/or ...
... apple butter was the only type of fruit preserve normally rendered into fruit leather. In Europe, an apple butter is ... Applebutter Festival Apple butter recipe The original easy apple butter recipe Homemade apple butter recipe -. ... During the preparation, apples are cored for apple sauces but not for apple butter, allowing it to have a much stronger apple ... Apple butter and apple sauce also have different uses. Popular ways of using apple butter include, condiment or spreads for ...
However, if done right[vague], the newly made fruit butter or paste can have a texture similar to dairy butter. Apple butter ... Apple butter and plum butter are common examples. Fruit pastes, popular in Latin American countries, are similar but more ... while fruit butters usually come in wide-mouthed jars. The fruit is cooked at first, but not too much[vague], as the fruit will ... A fruit butter is a sweet spread made of fruit cooked to a paste, then lightly sweetened. It falls into the same category as ...
Apples can be cooked down into sauce, apple butter or fruit preserves, baked in an oven and served with custard, and made into ... A cooking apple is an apple that is used primarily for cooking, as opposed to a dessert apple, which is eaten raw. Cooking ... In the UK roast pork is commonly served with cold apple sauce made from boiled and mashed apples. Bramley apple is by far the ... Food portal Apple pie List of apple cultivars List of apple dishes The new Oxford book of food plants,Vaughan & Geissler http ...
"Fruit butters are generally made from larger fruits, such as apples, plums, peaches or grapes. Cook until softened and run ... Fruit butterEdit. Main article: Fruit butter. Fruit butter, in this context, refers to a process where the whole fruit is ... In Canada, fruit jam is categorized into two types: fruit jam and fruit jam with pectin. Both types contain fruit, fruit pulp ... Cookbook: Fruit preserves Media: Fruit preserves. Many varieties of fruit preserves are made globally, including sweet fruit ...
The women managing the orchard, beekeeping and milking of the cows and produced apples, apple butter, apple cider,and dairy ... 0.10 9 Cans Fruit - $0.45 6 old Bags - $0.25 Table spread - x The surviving outbuildings include a red brick, two room building ... This is likely to be where the dairy butter, apple butter and cider were being processed. A second outbuilding in the form of a ... We had a couple 'mipes' of Turnips & a four [bushels] cabbages,...1 bbl apple butter. There were some grain bags on the farm, 6 ...
... , also known as crystallized fruit or glacé fruit, has existed since the 14th century. Whole fruit, smaller pieces of fruit, or pieces of peel, are placed in heated sugar syrup, which absorbs the moisture from within the fruit and eventually preserves it. Depending on size and type of fruit, this process of preservation can take from several days to several months.[1] This process allows the fruit to retain its quality for a year.[2] The continual process of drenching the fruit in syrup causes the fruit to become saturated with sugar, preventing the growth of spoilage microorganisms due to the unfavourable osmotic pressure this creates.[3] Fruits that are commonly candied include dates, cherries, pineapple, and a root, ginger.[4] The principal candied peels are orange and citron; these with candied lemon peel are the ...
An aggregate fruit or etaerio (/ɛˈtɪərioʊ/)[1] is a fruit that develops from the merger of several ovaries that were separate in a single flower.[2] In contrast, a simple fruit develops from one ovary. In languages other than English, the meanings of aggregate and multiple fruit are reversed, so that aggregate fruits merge several flowers.[3] The differences in meaning are due to a reversal in the terminology by John Lindley, which has been followed by most English-language authors.[3][4]. Not all flowers with multiple ovaries form aggregate fruit; the ovaries of some flowers do not become tightly joined together to make a larger fruit. Aggregate fruits may also be accessory fruits, in which parts of the flower other than the ovary become fleshy and form part of the fruit. The individual parts of an aggregate fruit come in ...
In botany, a fruit is a plant structure that contains the plant's seeds. To a botanist, the word fruit is used only if it comes from the part of the flower which was an ovary.[1] It is an extra layer round the seeds, which may or may not be fleshy. However, even in the field of botany, there is no general agreement on how fruits should be classified. Many do have extra layers from other parts of the flower.[2] In general speech, and especially in cooking, fruits are a sweet product, and many botanical fruits are known as vegetables. This is how ordinary people use the words. On this page, we describe what botanists call a fruit. The fleshy part of a fruit is called the mesocarp. It is between the fruit's skin (exocarp) and the seeds. The white part of an apple, for example, is the "fleshy" part of the apple. Usually, when we eat a ...
Kellogg's created "Fruit Winders" in the UK, which is similar to the American Fruit by the Foot by General Mills, only in fewer flavors. Unlike Fruit by the Foot, Fruit Winders contain no artificial colorings and each flavor is made with real purée derived from the fruit it represents (e.g. the strawberry flavour contains real strawberry purée). Fruit Winders were introduced in the UK and Ireland in 2001 under the Kellogg's brand. The product was first called "Real Fruit Winders", which was later changed to "Screamin Fruit Winders" before being changed finally to "Kellogg's Fruit Winders". When the product first came out, the flavors were Orange, Strawberry and Blackcurrant, with Apple introduced shortly after. Later, a public call-in contest was held where people would vote for a new Fruit Winders flavor. The choices were ...
There are a number of home recipes for fruit salad that contain different kinds of fruit, or that use a different kind of sauce other than the fruit's own juice or syrup. Common ingredients used in fruit salads include strawberries, pineapple, honeydew, watermelon,[1] grapes, and kiwifruit.[2][3] Various recipes may call for the addition of nuts, fruit juices, certain vegetables, yogurt, or other ingredients. One variation is a Waldorf-style fruit salad, which uses a mayonnaise-based sauce. Other recipes use sour cream (such as in ambrosia), yogurt or even mustard as the primary sauce ingredient. A variation on fruit salad uses whipped cream mixed in with many varieties of fruits (usually a mixture of berries), and also often include miniature marshmallows. Rojak, a Malaysian fruit salad, uses a spicy sauce with peanuts and ...
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, children are failing to meet the recommended amount of the essential fruits and vegetables that they should eat daily (CDC, 2014). More specifically, The Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (2010) explained that in 2007, 60% of children did not meet the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Patterns fruit intake recommendations, and 93% did not meet vegetable recommendations (Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010). This inadequate consumption of fruits and vegetables has become evident in recent years in the quality of children's diets, and is a significant contributor to the obesity epidemic (Pearson, 2009). Fruit and vegetables play a vital role in providing children with essential nutrients for healthy growth and development. The vast variety of essential vitamins and minerals provided by consuming a range of fruits and vegetables ensure optimal ...
... is a snack made with General Mills (GM) in the brand line Betty Crocker.[1] It was introduced in 1991 in North America and is still in production. Fruit by the Foot is very similar to GM's Fruit Roll-Ups in its presentation of being rolled up within itself, but differs in taste[citation needed], dimension and consumption methods. The similarity in name and concept is such that many people sometimes mistakenly refer to Fruit by the Foot as "Fruit Roll-Ups" and vice versa. Current marketing slogans include "3 Feet of Fun!" In the early 1990s, Fruit by the Foot came with stickers that kids put on their lunch boxes to show they had eaten Fruit by the Foot. It is also very similar to Kellogg's Fruit Winders sold in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Sugar, in multiple forms, is the major ingredient of Fruit by the Foot, as it makes up 9 grams of each 21 gram serving. Of the top ...
Multiple fruits are fruits that grow from more than one flower (called an inflorescence).[1][2] Each flower in the inflorescence produces a fruit, and then these join together.[3] There are also many multiple fruits that become dry later. In languages other than English, the meanings of multiple and aggregate fruit are reversed.[4] ...
Beware of false prophets, which come to you in sheep's clothing, but inwardly they are ravening wolves. Ye shall know them by their fruits. Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles? Even so every good tree bringeth forth good fruit; but a corrupt tree bringeth forth evil fruit. A good tree cannot bring forth evil fruit, neither can a corrupt tree bring forth good fruit. Every tree that bringeth not forth good fruit is hewn down, and cast into the fire. Wherefore by their fruits ye shall know them ...
... is a very recent research topic. It consists in the application of data mining techniques to agriculture. Recent technologies are nowadays able to provide a lot of information on agricultural-related activities, which can then be analyzed in order to find important information. A related, but not equivalent term is precision agriculture. Fruit defects are often recorded (for a multitude of reasons, sometimes for insurance reasons when exporting fruit overseas). It may be done manually or through computer vision (detecting surface defects when grading fruit). Spray diaries are a legal requirement in many countries and at the very least record the date of spray and the product name. It is known that spraying can have affect different fruit defects for different fruit. Fungicidal sprays are often used to prevent rots from being expressed on fruit. It is also known that some sprays can cause russeting on ...
A pome is an accessory fruit composed of one or more carpels surrounded by accessory tissue. The accessory tissue is interpreted by some specialists as an extension of the receptacle and is then referred to as "fruit cortex",[2] and by others as a fused hypanthium.[2] It is the most edible part of this fruit. The carpels of a pome are fused within the "core".[3] Although the epicarp, mesocarp, and endocarp of some other fruit types look very much like the skin, flesh, and core respectively of a pome, they are parts of the carpel (see diagram). The epicarp and mesocarp of a pome may be fleshy and difficult to distinguish from one another and from the hypanthial tissue. The endocarp forms a leathery or stony case around the seed, and corresponds to what is commonly called the core. Pome-type fruit with stony rather than leathery endocarp may be called a polypyrenous drupe.[4] The shriveled remains of the sepals, style and ...
The poor taste and lack of sugar in modern garden and commercial tomato varieties resulted from breeding tomatoes to ripen uniformly red. This change occurred after discovery of a mutant "u" phenotype in the mid 20th century that ripened "u"niformly. This was widely cross-bred to produce red fruit without the typical green ring around the stem on uncross-bred varieties. Prior to general introduction of this trait, most tomatoes produced more sugar during ripening, and were sweeter and more flavorful.[45][46]. Evidence has been found that 10-20% of the total carbon fixed in the fruit can be produced by photosynthesis in the developing fruit of the normal U phenotype. The u genetic mutation encodes a factor that produces defective chloroplasts with lower density in developing fruit, resulting in a lighter green colour of unripe fruit, and repression of sugars accumulation in the resulting ripe fruit by 10-15%. ...
The poor taste and lack of sugar in modern garden and commercial tomato varieties resulted from breeding tomatoes to ripen uniformly red. This change occurred after discovery of a mutant "u" phenotype in the mid 20th century that ripened "u"niformly. This was widely cross-bred to produce red fruit without the typical green ring around the stem on uncross-bred varieties. Prior to general introduction of this trait, most tomatoes produced more sugar during ripening, and were sweeter and more flavorful.[40][41] Evidence has been found that 10-20% of the total carbon fixed in the fruit can be produced by photosynthesis in the developing fruit of the normal U phenotype. The u genetic mutation encodes a factor that produces defective chloroplasts with lower density in developing fruit, resulting in a lighter green colour of unripe fruit, and repression of sugars accumulation in the resulting ripe fruit by 10-15%. ...
... apple Nutrition - BellaOnline Nutrition Database - BellaOnline is committed to helping our visitors become healthy and happy. ... Fruit butters, apple. Food Group: Sweets. Long Description: Fruit butters, apple. Short Description: FRUIT BUTTERS,APPLE. ... Fruit butters, apple Nutrition. This page is all about the nutrition of Fruit butters, apple. Learn about the carbs, calories, ... Fruit butters, apple Nutrition Information - Full Details. All values shown in the detailed view below are per 100g of material ...
All we do is let the pure essence of apples and cider cook down into a perfectly smooth spread. 9oz jar. ... Apple Butter is made the old-fashioned way, in a big kettle and it has no additional sweeteners or spices added. ... Apple Butter is made the old-fashioned way, in a big kettle and it has no additional sweeteners or spices added. All we do is ... let the pure essence of apples and cider cook down into a perfectly smooth spread. 9oz jar. ...
Learn about the number of calories and nutritional and diet information for Shiloh Farms All Natural Apple Butter Fruit Spread ... Comprehensive nutrition resource for Shiloh Farms All Natural Apple Butter Fruit Spread. ...
of apple butter in my life and love it but had never made it. I started by reading Marisas post on how to make fruit butters ... for the apple butter, the recipe is based off of Food in Jars fruit butter techniques, using some of my favorite spices. Its ... I love fruit butters… have made nectarine, apple and paradise (using the ratios of apple, cranberry and quince that go into ... Fruit Butters: Peaches, Pears, and Apples. Were planning on going apple picking this weekend, and Im loving the search for ...
How about trying this maple apple butter recipe: it is an easy fruit recipe for kids. They can even help you make it and of ... Remember the waffle apple butter snack recipe I shared a while ago? I… ... Want to incorporate more fruits in your childs diet? ... Maple Apple Butter Recipe: Easy Fruit Recipe for Kids Course: ... Maple Apple Butter Recipe: Easy Fruit Recipe for kids. Maple Apple Butter Recipe: Easy Fruit Recipe for kids. Jump to Recipe ...
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Fruits, being acidic foods, can be processed safely in a boiling-water bath. However, some people prefer to pressure-process ... Processing is essential to ensure safety when canning fruits. ... Directions for Canning Fruit. Apple Butter. Use Jonathan, ... When a rim of liquid does not separate around the edge of the butter, it is ready for canning. Fill hot apple butter into ... Blends of unsweetened apple, pineapple and white grape juice also are good for filling over solid fruit pieces. Adjust head ...
Customers can purchase real soursop fruit in a glass jar by visiting Grin Real Nature. Customers can also purchase soursop pulp ... What are some good fruit dip recipes that use Cool Whip?. * Q: What is an easy recipe for apple butter?. ... The company claims that because of its innovative storing process, the fruit tastes just like it would if picked fresh from the ... Customers can purchase real soursop fruit in a glass jar by visiting Grin Real Nature. Customers can also purchase soursop pulp ...
Apples and Almond Butter. For a snack for that combines creaminess and crunch, slice up a medium-sized apple. Leave the skin ( ... You can easily slice and eat the fruit (yes, avocados are of the fruit family) or mix it into salsa to scoop with whole-grain ... Unlike fruit juices that remove the fiber from fruit, smoothies keep this and other nutrients intact. Try this 30-second recipe ... "Fruit smoothies and milkshakes are good calorie boosters if you need to gain weight, Jamieson-Petonic adds. ...
3. Apples and Peanut Butter. If you slice apples ahead of time, sprinkle them with lemon juice to keep them from turning brown. ... 5. Fruit Smoothies. Older children can easily make their own smoothies with fruit and juice. Keeping frozen fruit on hand makes ... 9. Fruit Salads. Take advantage of all those fresh berries! Combine cut-up berries with a dollop of greek yogurt for a fast ... Spread peanut butter on a flour tortilla, sprinkle with raisins or dried cranberries, and roll! ...
Apple with almond butter dip. Prepare individual pots of sliced apples and almond butter for a healthy snack that is high in ... Dried fruits, nuts and seeds. Create your own trail mix with a selection of your favourite dried fruits, seeds, nuts and a few ... Cheese and apple skewers. Super easy to do - simply cut cheese and apples into cubes and thread them onto cocktail sticks ... Fruit kebabs. Skewer chopped strawberries, raspberries, blueberries and mango (or any of your favourite fruits) and lightly ...
Organic apple butter, crisp, candied walnuts. Housemade granola, spoon fruit. Brown sugar raisins and milk ... The apple pie a la mode was the dessert of choice to be split, and we were content. Its a large slice so it was perfect for ... It was a great meal, especially the pumpkin soup with apple compote, and the opera torte for desert. Thank you Article One! ... The salad bar was disappointing, only greens and a few vegetables and fruits. The price was too high considering the limited ...
Looking for fruit recipes for these and many other fruits? Check out our collection of fruit recipes, from the simple to the ... Apple Butter Have you ever made a Paleo apple butter recipe? Learn how to make apple… More ... Fruit. Apples, bananas and pears, oh my! Looking for fruit recipes for these and many other fruits? Check out our collection of ... 15 Fruit Recipes: Pear Recipes, Apple Recipes, Banana Recipes & More from USA Pears and Swiss Diamond. ...
Its not a jam, guys, its a jelly-like fruit number that will scratch that itch when mixed with some nut butter...but it aint ... Made with concentrated fruit extracts and natural flavors, but no calorie, fat, carbs, gluten or sugars of any kind. Delicious ... Walden Farms, Strawberry Fruit Spread, 12 oz (340 g). By. Walden Farms. ... Walden Farms, Strawberry Fruit Spread, 12 oz (340 g). By. Walden Farms. ...
I dont eat a lot of fruit, but I do like apple and banana slices spread with almond butter. Without looking it up, Im ... Butter. Ditto.. Fruit. The above principle applies here as well. Fruit can play a healthy role in the PB, but too much can ... Butters 10 years ago I always thought even paleo eaters should avoid bacon due to how much its processed? And butter was non- ... So a wide variety of vegetables and fruits are important. Unlike my father who just tries to eat apples as his only source of ...
Fruits: Apples, bananas, oranges, pears, avocados, strawberries, blueberries, avocados and more.. *Tubers: Potatoes, sweet ... Dairy: Avoid most dairy, especially low-fat (some versions of paleo do include full-fat dairy like butter and cheese). ... So, other than grabbing an apple off of a tree, is there any way to treat yourself to a dessert thats paleo-friendly? The ... Sugar and High Fructose Corn Syrup: Soft drinks, fruit juices, table sugar, candy, pastries, ice cream and many others. ...
From Dexarae Tripletts Mixed Berry Pie; Carleans Sweet Potato-Coconut Custard Pie; Sister Chestermae Hayess Apple Butter Pie ... Karins Butter Rings); Jouhatortut (Christmas Tarts); Sekahedelmakeitto (Mixed Fruit Soup); and Kola karamellit (Kola Candies ... From Roasted Granny Apple Bisque with Apple-Ginger Compote and Curry Creme Fraiche; Wassail Punch; Tuscan Pancetta Soup; and ... The recipes are arranged in chapters for Berry Pies; Cereal Pies; Cream & Custard Pies; Fruit Pies; Nut & Sweet Vegetable Pies ...
5. Apples and Peanut Butter. Satisfy the afternoon munchies with this sweet-and-salty snack. "Apples contain pectin, which ... 8. Fruit Salad. In the dog days of summer, a fruit salad is a refreshing way to rehydrate. Loaded with vitamin C and fiber, ... 5. Apples and Peanut Butter. Satisfy the afternoon munchies with this sweet-and-salty snack. "Apples contain pectin, which ... 8. Fruit Salad. In the dog days of summer, a fruit salad is a refreshing way to rehydrate. Loaded with vitamin C and fiber, ...
Fruit Punch Syrup (Sirup Rasa Fruitpunch) - 18.58fl oz at EfoodDepot.com ... Buy Marjan Fruit Punch Syrup (Sirup Rasa Fruitpunch) - 18.58fl oz online. UPC: 8998888112415. ... Apfelschmaus (Apple Butter) - 16oz ($5.29) $4.85 Cacao Poeder (Cacao Powder) - 4.4oz ... Marjan Fruit Punch Syrup (Sirup Marjan Rasa Fruitpunch) in 18.58fl oz (550ml) bottle. Freshness and benefit from fruit can be ...
oooooo fruit butters!! I think I wanna make some too now! Hmmm Never tried making it before Angela, but I think fruit butters ... Your apple butter is looking lovely! I always start with making apple sauce on the stove top. I place apples (peeled and cored ... We have several trees so we always have a lot of apples. The recipe I used for crock pot apple butter says to put the apples in ... I made sugar free apple butter this year for the first time, after getting some advice from professional apple butter makers. I ...
Perfumes of sweet pear, apple, honey butter and cream. Silky, creamy texture with delicious dancing fruit on the palate ... Fruit Flavors of baked apple, lemon curd, pear and melon are accented with a bit of toasty oak ... Butter-Bomb creamy silk ribbons, a full mouth-feel, lemon blossom & orange zest with oaky apples ... Perfumes of sweet pear and apple, honey butter and cream. Silky creamy texture with delicious dancing on the palate ...
Our original Mini Fruit Focaccia gets a makeover. Check out the new and improved version thats moist, packed with flavor and ... Spoon 1 teaspoon apple butter in center of each round. Top each with 1 generous teaspoon walnuts and 1 generous teaspoon dried ... 1 Starch; 1/2 Fruit; 0 Other Carbohydrate; 0 Skim Milk; 0 Low-Fat Milk; 0 Milk; 0 Vegetable; 0 Very Lean Meat; 0 Lean Meat; 0 ... Its a recipe redo! Our original Mini Fruit Focaccia gets a makeover. Check out the new and improved version thats moist, ...
Serve apples topped with peanut butter.. *Create tasty treats with peanut butter and whole-wheat crackers. ... Also, make sure your child gets plenty of fiber-rich foods such as fresh fruits, dried fruits like prunes and raisins, dried ... Diluted 100% fruit juice (like pear, peach, or prune) is an option if your child is not drinking enough water. Also, limiting ... Add raisins, chopped or pureed apples, or prunes to the mix.. *Add bran to baking items such as cookies and muffins, or to ...
Butter. Ditto.. Fruit. The above principle applies here as well. Fruit can play a healthy role in the PB, but too much can ... Tailor your fruit intake to your desired Primal carb intake. As luck would have it, higher ORAC level fruits also tend to be ... 17] higher ORAC level fruits also tend to be lower on the glycemic scale: https://www.marksdailyapple.com/best-fruit-choices/ ... 16] especially if you?re trying to lose weight: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1256509/Eating-fruit-make-fat.html ...
  • Research has found that people who ate more pears and apples over a four-year period were able to lose on average 1.24 pounds. (wikihow.com)
  • In Europe, an apple butter is traditionally made which is closer to dense syrup, in the Netherlands (known as appelstroop, meaning apple syrup) and in Germany (known as apfelkraut) and frequently eaten on bread with (or without) thinly sliced cheese and with Sauerbraten. (wikipedia.org)
  • Taste - You get green apple and pear up front followed by some banana, clove and spicyness, then some fresh baked bread. (beeradvocate.com)
  • A soon as I opened the bottle I got aromas of bread, fruit, malt, and cloves. (beeradvocate.com)
  • Fruits, being acidic foods, can be processed safely in a boiling-water bath. (ndsu.edu)
  • By cutting high calorie foods like cheese and meat while adding a low calorie and high-fiber fruit such as a tomato, you will have a tasty, low calorie lunch. (wikihow.com)
  • These types of apples include: McIntosh (soft, creamy), Cortland (soft, sweet-and-tart, all-purpose), Granny Smith (tartness sweetens upon cooking, ideal complement to savory and salty foods). (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the best things about fall is how the humblest of foods-apples, squash, soup-are elevated to seasonal celebrity status. (mccormick.com)
  • However, people do not typically consider these foods to be fruits. (youngwomenshealth.org)
  • Frosts and freezes are upon us in many areas, and one field may be unhurt while one a mile a way can be damaged, so keep that in mind as you read the following: Apples are in season now, as are figs, and Fall raspberries are in season now. (pickyourown.org)
  • Arrange raspberries on baked batter, then carefully pour remaining batter around fruit. (latimes.com)
  • Tomatoes are going strong if frost hasn't happened in the field Late Apples, like Fuji's should be plentiful now. (pickyourown.org)
  • Because of this shorter cooking period, not as much pectin will be released from the fruit, and as such, conserves (particularly home-made conserves) will sometimes be slightly softer set than some jams. (wikipedia.org)
  • The study shows that pectin, a soluble fiber in apples, enhances the formation of the fatty acid butyrate in humans. (healingwell.com)
  • After all, I had a basket full of apples that were about to rot. (ourfamilyworld.com)
  • Connie Bachman, left, and Helen Dyke share a laugh and a bowl full of apples as volunteers fill the Grand Rapids fire station to prepare the fruit for the process that eventually will result in apple butter for its namesake festival. (toledoblade.com)
  • Raspberry Clafoutis, from the "Baked Desserts" section of the book, is a thick fruited pancake, baked in a gratin dish and served warm, fresh from the oven. (latimes.com)