Fresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Aquaporins: A class of porins that allow the passage of WATER and other small molecules across CELL MEMBRANES.Aquaporin 1: Aquaporin 1 forms a water-specific channel that is constitutively expressed at the PLASMA MEMBRANE of ERYTHROCYTES and KIDNEY TUBULES, PROXIMAL. It provides these cells with a high permeability to WATER. In humans polymorphisms of this protein result in the Colton blood group antigen.Water Movements: The flow of water in enviromental bodies of water such as rivers, oceans, water supplies, aquariums, etc. It includes currents, tides, and waves.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Water Supply: Means or process of supplying water (as for a community) usually including reservoirs, tunnels, and pipelines and often the watershed from which the water is ultimately drawn. (Webster, 3d ed)Body Water: Fluids composed mainly of water found within the body.Osmosis: Tendency of fluids (e.g., water) to move from the less concentrated to the more concentrated side of a semipermeable membrane.Water-Electrolyte Balance: The balance of fluid in the BODY FLUID COMPARTMENTS; total BODY WATER; BLOOD VOLUME; EXTRACELLULAR SPACE; INTRACELLULAR SPACE, maintained by processes in the body that regulate the intake and excretion of WATER and ELECTROLYTES, particularly SODIUM and POTASSIUM.Gills: Paired respiratory organs of fishes and some amphibians that are analogous to lungs. They are richly supplied with blood vessels by which oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged directly with the environment.Pinus ponderosa: A plant species of the genus PINUS that contains isocupressic acid.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Aquaporin 4: Aquaporin 4 is the major water-selective channel in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM of mammals.Demeclocycline: A TETRACYCLINE analog having a 7-chloro and a 6-methyl. Because it is excreted more slowly than TETRACYCLINE, it maintains effective blood levels for longer periods of time.Aquaporin 3: Aquaporin 3 is an aquaglyceroporin that is expressed in the KIDNEY COLLECTING DUCTS and is constitutively localized at the basolateral MEMBRANE.Tilapia: A freshwater fish used as an experimental organism and for food. This genus of the family Cichlidae (CICHLIDS) inhabits Central and South America (one species extends north into Texas), West Indies, Africa, Madagascar, Syria, and coastal India.Aquaporin 5: Aquaporin 5 is a water-specific channel protein that is expressed primarily in alveolar, tracheal, and upper bronchial EPITHELIUM. It plays an important role in maintaining water HOMEOSTASIS in the LUNGS and may also regulate release of SALIVA and TEARS in the SALIVARY GLANDS and the LACRIMAL GLAND.Cell Membrane Permeability: A quality of cell membranes which permits the passage of solvents and solutes into and out of cells.Water Pollutants, Chemical: Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.Osmotic Pressure: The pressure required to prevent the passage of solvent through a semipermeable membrane that separates a pure solvent from a solution of the solvent and solute or that separates different concentrations of a solution. It is proportional to the osmolality of the solution.Mercuric Chloride: Mercury chloride (HgCl2). A highly toxic compound that volatizes slightly at ordinary temperature and appreciably at 100 degrees C. It is corrosive to mucous membranes and used as a topical antiseptic and disinfectant.Serous Membrane: A thin lining of closed cavities of the body, consisting of a single layer of squamous epithelial cells (MESOTHELIUM) resting on a thin layer of CONNECTIVE TISSUE, and covered with secreted clear fluid from blood and lymph vessels. Major serous membranes in the body include PERICARDIUM; PERITONEUM; and PLEURA.Osmolar Concentration: The concentration of osmotically active particles in solution expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per liter of solution. Osmolality is expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per kilogram of solvent.Water Pollution: Contamination of bodies of water (such as LAKES; RIVERS; SEAS; and GROUNDWATER.)Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Water Purification: Any of several processes in which undesirable impurities in water are removed or neutralized; for example, chlorination, filtration, primary treatment, ion exchange, and distillation. It includes treatment of WASTE WATER to provide potable and hygienic water in a controlled or closed environment as well as provision of public drinking water supplies.Plant Stems: Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Wetlands: Environments or habitats at the interface between truly terrestrial ecosystems and truly aquatic systems making them different from each yet highly dependent on both. Adaptations to low soil oxygen characterize many wetland species.AnguillaFishes: A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Salinity: Degree of saltiness, which is largely the OSMOLAR CONCENTRATION of SODIUM CHLORIDE plus any other SALTS present. It is an ecological factor of considerable importance, influencing the types of organisms that live in an ENVIRONMENT.Eye Movements: Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.Water Quality: A rating of a body of water based on measurable physical, chemical, and biological characteristics.Salmonidae: A family of anadromous fish comprising SALMON; TROUT; whitefish; and graylings. They are the most important food and game fishes. Their habitat is the northern Atlantic and Pacific, both marine and inland, and the Great Lakes. (Nelson: Fishes of the World, 1976, p97)Permeability: Property of membranes and other structures to permit passage of light, heat, gases, liquids, metabolites, and mineral ions.Chlorides: Inorganic compounds derived from hydrochloric acid that contain the Cl- ion.Eels: Common name for an order (Anguilliformes) of voracious, elongate, snakelike teleost fishes.Water Pollutants: Substances or organisms which pollute the water or bodies of water. Use for water pollutants in general or those for which there is no specific heading.Rivers: Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).Biological Transport, Active: The movement of materials across cell membranes and epithelial layers against an electrochemical gradient, requiring the expenditure of metabolic energy.Elapidae: A family of extremely venomous snakes, comprising coral snakes, cobras, mambas, kraits, and sea snakes. They are widely distributed, being found in the southern United States, South America, Africa, southern Asia, Australia, and the Pacific Islands. The elapids include three subfamilies: Elapinae, Hydrophiinae, and Lauticaudinae. Like the viperids, they have venom fangs in the front part of the upper jaw. The mambas of Africa are the most dangerous of all snakes by virtue of their size, speed, and highly toxic venom. (Goin, Goin, and Zug, Introduction to Herpetology, 3d ed, p329-33)Acidic Glycosphingolipids: A subclass of GLYCOSPHINGOLIPIDS containing large polar heads made up of several sugar units. One or more of their terminal sugar units are bound to a negatively charged molecule at pH 7. Members of this class include: GANGLIOSIDES, uronoglycosphingolipids, SULFOGLYCOSPHINGOLIPIDS, phosphoglycosphingolipids, and phosphonoglycosphingolipids.Trout: Various fish of the family SALMONIDAE, usually smaller than salmon. They are mostly restricted to cool clear freshwater. Some are anadromous. They are highly regarded for their handsome colors, rich well-flavored flesh, and gameness as an angling fish. The genera Salvelinus, Salmo, and ONCORHYNCHUS have been introduced virtually throughout the world.Intestinal Absorption: Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Crustacea: A large subphylum of mostly marine ARTHROPODS containing over 42,000 species. They include familiar arthropods such as lobsters (NEPHROPIDAE), crabs (BRACHYURA), shrimp (PENAEIDAE), and barnacles (THORACICA).Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Potassium: An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Water Deprivation: The withholding of water in a structured experimental situation.Trematode Infections: Infections caused by infestation with worms of the class Trematoda.Queensland: A state in northeastern Australia. Its capital is Brisbane. Its coast was first visited by Captain Cook in 1770 and its first settlement (penal) was located on Moreton Bay in 1824. The name Cooksland was first proposed but honor to Queen Victoria prevailed. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p996 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p441)Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Sodium Chloride: A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.Trematoda: Class of parasitic flukes consisting of three subclasses, Monogenea, Aspidogastrea, and Digenea. The digenetic trematodes are the only ones found in man. They are endoparasites and require two hosts to complete their life cycle.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Head Movements: Voluntary or involuntary motion of head that may be relative to or independent of body; includes animals and humans.Movement Disorders: Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.Water SofteningDrinking: The consumption of liquids.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Chlorophyta: A phylum of photosynthetic EUKARYOTA bearing double membrane-bound plastids containing chlorophyll a and b. They comprise the classical green algae, and represent over 7000 species that live in a variety of primarily aquatic habitats. Only about ten percent are marine species, most live in freshwater.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Fish Diseases: Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).Plant Viral Movement Proteins: Viral proteins that facilitate the movement of viruses between plant cells by means of PLASMODESMATA, channels that traverse the plant cell walls.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Base Composition: The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Fetal Movement: Physical activity of the FETUS in utero. Gross or fine fetal body movement can be monitored by the mother, PALPATION, or ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Genes, rRNA: Genes, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which are transcribed to produce the RNA which is incorporated into RIBOSOMES. Prokaryotic rRNA genes are usually found in OPERONS dispersed throughout the GENOME, whereas eukaryotic rRNA genes are clustered, multicistronic transcriptional units.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Fatty Acids: Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Korea: Former kingdom, located on Korea Peninsula between Sea of Japan and Yellow Sea on east coast of Asia. In 1948, the kingdom ceased and two independent countries were formed, divided by the 38th parallel.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Cyanobacteria: A phylum of oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria comprised of unicellular to multicellular bacteria possessing CHLOROPHYLL a and carrying out oxygenic PHOTOSYNTHESIS. Cyanobacteria are the only known organisms capable of fixing both CARBON DIOXIDE (in the presence of light) and NITROGEN. Cell morphology can include nitrogen-fixing heterocysts and/or resting cells called akinetes. Formerly called blue-green algae, cyanobacteria were traditionally treated as ALGAE.Water Wells: Constructions built to access underground water.Saccades: An abrupt voluntary shift in ocular fixation from one point to another, as occurs in reading.Arm: The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.Filtration: A process of separating particulate matter from a fluid, such as air or a liquid, by passing the fluid carrier through a medium that will not pass the particulates. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Dehydration: The condition that results from excessive loss of water from a living organism.Chlorine: A greenish-yellow, diatomic gas that is a member of the halogen family of elements. It has the atomic symbol Cl, atomic number 17, and atomic weight 70.906. It is a powerful irritant that can cause fatal pulmonary edema. Chlorine is used in manufacturing, as a reagent in synthetic chemistry, for water purification, and in the production of chlorinated lime, which is used in fabric bleaching.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Immersion: The placing of a body or a part thereof into a liquid.Waste Water: Contaminated water generated as a waste product of human activity.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Plant Transpiration: The loss of water vapor by plants to the atmosphere. It occurs mainly from the leaves through pores (stomata) whose primary function is gas exchange. The water is replaced by a continuous column of water moving upwards from the roots within the xylem vessels. (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Fixation, Ocular: The positioning and accommodation of eyes that allows the image to be brought into place on the FOVEA CENTRALIS of each eye.Water Cycle: Circulation of water among various ecological systems, in various states, on, above, and below the surface of the earth.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Eye Movement Measurements: Methods and procedures for recording EYE MOVEMENTS.Disinfection: Rendering pathogens harmless through the use of heat, antiseptics, antibacterial agents, etc.Sewage: Refuse liquid or waste matter carried off by sewers.Motor Cortex: Area of the FRONTAL LOBE concerned with primary motor control located in the dorsal PRECENTRAL GYRUS immediately anterior to the central sulcus. It is comprised of three areas: the primary motor cortex located on the anterior paracentral lobule on the medial surface of the brain; the premotor cortex located anterior to the primary motor cortex; and the supplementary motor area located on the midline surface of the hemisphere anterior to the primary motor cortex.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Pursuit, Smooth: Eye movements that are slow, continuous, and conjugate and occur when a fixed object is moved slowly.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Swimming: An activity in which the body is propelled through water by specific movement of the arms and/or the legs. Swimming as propulsion through water by the movement of limbs, tail, or fins of animals is often studied as a form of PHYSICAL EXERTION or endurance.Fingers: Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.Cryopreservation: Preservation of cells, tissues, organs, or embryos by freezing. In histological preparations, cryopreservation or cryofixation is used to maintain the existing form, structure, and chemical composition of all the constituent elements of the specimens.Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Water Resources: Environmental reservoirs of water related to natural WATER CYCLE by which water is obtained for various purposes. This includes but is not limited to watersheds, aquifers and springs.Oxygen Isotopes: Stable oxygen atoms that have the same atomic number as the element oxygen, but differ in atomic weight. O-17 and 18 are stable oxygen isotopes.Deuterium Oxide: The isotopic compound of hydrogen of mass 2 (deuterium) with oxygen. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed) It is used to study mechanisms and rates of chemical or nuclear reactions, as well as biological processes.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Solvents: Liquids that dissolve other substances (solutes), generally solids, without any change in chemical composition, as, water containing sugar. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Water Pollutants, Radioactive: Pollutants, present in water or bodies of water, which exhibit radioactivity.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Extravascular Lung Water: Water content outside of the lung vasculature. About 80% of a normal lung is made up of water, including intracellular, interstitial, and blood water. Failure to maintain the normal homeostatic fluid exchange between the vascular space and the interstitium of the lungs can result in PULMONARY EDEMA and flooding of the alveolar space.Drinking Behavior: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of water and other liquids; includes rhythmic patterns of drinking (time intervals - onset and duration), frequency and satiety.Motor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Desiccation: Removal of moisture from a substance (chemical, food, tissue, etc.).Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Arsenic: A shiny gray element with atomic symbol As, atomic number 33, and atomic weight 75. It occurs throughout the universe, mostly in the form of metallic arsenides. Most forms are toxic. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), arsenic and certain arsenic compounds have been listed as known carcinogens. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Droughts: Prolonged dry periods in natural climate cycle. They are slow-onset phenomena caused by rainfall deficit combined with other predisposing factors.Macaca mulatta: A species of the genus MACACA inhabiting India, China, and other parts of Asia. The species is used extensively in biomedical research and adapts very well to living with humans.Air: The mixture of gases present in the earth's atmosphere consisting of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and small amounts of other gases.Thirst: A drive stemming from a physiological need for WATER.Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Thermodynamics: A rigorously mathematical analysis of energy relationships (heat, work, temperature, and equilibrium). It describes systems whose states are determined by thermal parameters, such as temperature, in addition to mechanical and electromagnetic parameters. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed)Bathing Beaches: Beaches, both natural and man-made, used for bathing and other activities.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Trihalomethanes: Methanes substituted with three halogen atoms, which may be the same or different.
Cyclops has a cosmopolitan distribution in fresh water, but is less frequent in brackish water. It lives along the plant- ... It swims with characteristic jerky movements. Cyclops has the capacity to survive unsuitable conditions by forming a cloak of ... Together with other similar-sized non-copepod fresh-water crustaceans, especially cladocera, they are commonly called water ... Straining of water through piece of fine cloth is sufficient to remove Cyclops. It can also be killed by boiling water, as it ...
... to anthropogenic loss of water quality and movement from habitat alteration. Northern studfish require clear water so control ... "Zoogeography of the Fishes of the Lower Ohio-upper Mississippi Basin." The Zoogeography of North American Freshwater Fishes. ... Their main diet consists of insects which they skim from the surface of the water but they have also been known to consume ... "Effects of Riffle Length on the Short-Term Movements of Fishes Among Stream Pools." Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic ...
It is usually found in regions with bodies of fresh water but can be found in almost every environment. It tends to form " ... Their ability to capture oxygen is further increased by their making undulating movements.[10] ... So do predatory water beetles in families such as the Dytiscidae and Hydrophilidae. The flying midges are eaten by fish and ... The natural foods reported include fresh fly droppings, nectar, pollen, honeydew, and various sugar-rich materials.[1] ...
The practice of turning fresh water lakes into toxic waste dump is a matter that concerns everyone.[2] The Canadian federal ... RAVEN works in close alliance with the growing movement of eNGOs (environmental non-governmental organizations). The ... Damage to the Athabasca water shed Two to four and a half barrels of water are required to produce a barrel of oil from the tar ... Tailings ponds include substances of concern for the water quality that discharge to surface waters: • salts • elevated sodium ...
"Home range and seasonal movement of taimen, Hucho taimen, in Mongolia". Ecology of Freshwater Fish. 19 (4): 545. doi:10.1111/j. ... The taimen lives in flowing water and is only occasionally found in lakes, usually near the mouth of a tributary. The taimen is ... not anadromous, but does show increased movement rates during the spawning season. The average home range size of taimen in the ...
Tortoise & Freshwater Turtle Specialist Group 1996. Graptemys flavimaculata. 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. ... Also, its habitat suffers from pollution and agricultural changes to water levels, affecting nesting beaches. "Turtle plinking ... Home range and seasonal movements of the turtle Graptemys flavimaculata. Journal of Herpetology 30 (3): 376-385. ... and some fresh plant matter. van Dijk, P.P. (2011). "Graptemys flavimaculata". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. ...
It had minute limbs, and probably swam using fish-like lateral body movements. Microbrachis probably fed on fresh water ...
Ecology of Freshwater Fish 17:219-230. Welsh, S.A., and S.A. Perry. 1998. Habitat partitioning in a community of darters in the ... Percina prefer low water velocity in riffle/pool transition areas primarily on top of woody debris in a sandy/boulder substrate ... Microhabitat use, movements and abundance of gilt darters ("Percina evides") in southern Appalachian (USA) streams. ... Geomorphology and fish assemblages in a Piedmont river basin, U.S.A. Freshwater Biology 48:1950-1970. Habera, J.W., M.A. Kulp, ...
"Fast examination of water quality using the automatic biotest ECOTOX based on the movement behavior of a freshwater flagellate ... Therefore, the presence of such substances is associated with random movement of the cells in the water column. For short term ... For example, copepods and other small water crustaceans that are present in many water bodies can be monitored for changes ( ... The SASS5 method is used by the South African Department of Water Affairs as a standard method for River Health Assessment, ...
101, [1], p. 621, [2], p. 622, [3]. Leidy, Joseph (1879). Fresh-water Rhizopods of North America. Washington: Government ... The effort of describing these motions, and explaining how they result in the cell's forward movement, has generated a large ... In 1879, Joseph Leidy suggested collapsing all the "common" large, freshwater amoebae into one species, which he proposed to ... ISBN 0-12-690647-5. Allen, RD; Allen, RS (1978). "Cytoplasmic Streaming in Amoeboid Movement". Annual Review of Biophysics and ...
Ecology of Freshwater Fish 17(2):318-327. Matheney, M. P. and C. F. Rabeni. 1995. Patterns of movement and habitat use by ... Spawning takes place in shallow water riffles usually during May, when the water temperature is about 15 °C. Breeding males ... Freshwater fishes of Canada. Fish. Res. Bd. Can. Bulletin 184:1-966. Grabowski, T. B., N. L. Ratterman, and J. J. Isely. 2008. ... The fish can be found in or next to riffle areas in warm water, medium sized creeks and small rivers. It can also occur in cold ...
V. Hydrothyria venosa, a fresh water lichen. New Phytologist 72: 155-160. Kieft, T. L., and V. Ahmadjian. 1989. Biological ice ... Relationship between carbohydrate movement and the symbiosis in lichens with green algae. Planta 103: 267-277. Jacobs, J. B., ... Movement of carbon products from alga to fungus as demonstrated by high resolution radioautography. New Phytologist 70: 47-50. ... Molecular biology of lichens-Search for plasmid DNA and the question of gene movement between bionts. pp. 2-21. Proceedings of ...
The fish tolerates fresh and saline waters, and rapid movements between them. It can live in a wide variety of water habitat ... The species has been collected from the waters of New South Wales since 1971. It is a Class 1 noxious fish in the state, its ... The adult can spend its whole life in freshwater, but the larvae generally develop in saltwater. The diet of the goby includes ... It may have arrived in ballast water or as eggs on biofouling animals such as oysters on ship hulls. Anglers using the goby as ...
... s sometimes cross oceanic waters to reach isolated seamounts. Movements of up to 140 km (87 mi) have been recorded ... There are unsubstantiated reports of this species from fresh water in the Philippines. ... The zebra shark occurs in the tropical waters of the Indo-Pacific region, from South Africa to the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf ... The meat is sold fresh or dried and salted for human consumption. Furthermore, the liver oil is used for vitamins, the fins for ...
Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems 20 (7): 756-761. Bustard, H.R. (1983). "Movement of wild Gharial, Gavialis gangeticus (Gmelin ... With body size increasing, they forage in deeper water. Gharials up to 120 cm (3.9 ft) prefer 1-3 m (3.3-9.8 ft) deep water, ... those up to 180 cm (5.9 ft) hunt and hide in 2-3 m (6.6-9.8 ft) deep water. Adult gharials prefer water deeper than 4 m (13 ft ... Like other crocodilians, the gharial is cold-blooded and uses sun basking to warm up and water to cool down. Despite its ...
... breeding sites during and immediately after spring are freshwater wetlands, while freshwater, brackish and saline wetland sites ... In saltwater marshes they may drink saline water and they have glands near their eyes through which they can excrete excess ... Little is known of the movements and habitats of the New Guinea populations.[10] ... They also visit freshwater lagoons in the vicinity, river and tidal pools, the edges of lakes and irrigated farmland. In ...
C. mossambicus) and water snakes. In Uganda, lungfish and catfish were mainly fed to the young. The big beak is sometimes used ... The shoebill is noted for its slow movements and tendency to remain still for long periods, resulting in repeated descriptions ... Play media The shoebill is distributed in freshwater swamps of central tropical Africa, from southern Sudan through parts of ... Frequently water and vegetation is snatched up during the strike and is spilled out from the edges of the mandibles. The ...
Australian Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research 32: 843-854. McClatchie, S., J. F. Middleton, and T. M. Ward (2006), Water ... Willis, J., and Hobday, A. J. (2007). Influence of upwelling on movement of southern bluefin tuna (Thunnus maccoyii) in the ... To replace the water moving offshore, cold waters from the ocean floor rise to the surface. During upwelling events, local sea ... nutrient-rich waters from the ocean floor. Because the deep water carries abundant nutrients up from the ocean floor, the ...
It is found in cold, fresh waters with an optimal growth temperature below 16C. When grown on Cytophaga Agar, F. psychrophilum ... Motility is achieved by gliding, movement that does not involve the use of pili or flagella. The bacterium is positive for ... Cipriano, R. C., & Holt, R. A. (2005). Flavobacterium psychrophilum, cause of bacterial cold-water disease and rainbow trout ... Bath treatments with either water-soluble oxytetracyline or quaternary ammonium compounds are recommended, but such treatments ...
Ecology of Freshwater Fish 2008: 17: 219-230 Stauffer Jr., R.J., J.M. Boltz, and L.R. White. 1995. The Fishes of West Virginia ... Water temperatures at the time of breeding were 16-23˚C. Breeding was observed in the Little River of Tennessee from early June ... Microhabitat use, movements and abundance of gilt darters (Percina evides) in southern Appalachian (USA) streams. Ecology of ... The gilt darter (Percina evides) is a small freshwater fish in the genus Percina, a ray-finned fish in the perch family. It can ...
... warmer waters at dusk. During the day they can undertake vertical movements into waters of 300-500 m depth that can be as low ... "CSIRO PUBLISHING - Marine & Freshwater Research". csiro.au. Schaefer, Kurt M.; Fuller, Daniel W.; Miyabe, Naozumi (2005). " ... Bigeye tuna have a unique physiology which allows them to forage in deeper colder waters and tolerate oxygen-poor waters. ... Central Pacific bigeye migrate from subtropical waters in September to tropical waters in March. The fish also briefly travel ...
Stock access to water along the Murrumbidgee has had a particularly severe impact on the vegetation and habitat through ... Marine and Freshwater Research 60: 45-57 Minckley, W. L. 1995. Translocation as a tool for conserving imperilled fishes: ... Monitoring by telemetry reveals differences in movement and survival following hatchery or wild rearing of an endangered fish. ... Ecology Freshwater Fish 10: 177-183. Eldridge, D.J. and Simpson, R. 2001. Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus L.) impacts on ...
... larger sharks tend to occur in deeper water. Though it occupies the entire water column, it is most common close to the surface ... Stevens, J.D.; West, G.J.; Mcloughlin, K.J. (2000). "Movement, recapture patterns, and factors affecting the return rate of ... Marine and Freshwater Research. 61 (2): 253-262. doi:10.1071/MF09151. Lavery, S.; Shaklee, J.B. (1989). "Population genetics of ... Favoring the upper and middle parts of the water column, it can be found from the intertidal zone to a depth of 50 m (160 ft). ...
They are found in low-movement waters with a slow current and a muddy, silty, or sandy bottom. They prefer clear waters with ... It is recorded to live in freshwater within a tropical climate. Their habitat is benthopelagic. This species has the average ...
Mining activities pollute Lake Yojoa with heavy metals which is Honduras largest source of fresh water. Some rivers and streams ... There is population movement of the rural poor out of the countryside and into the urban centers. ... Total renewable water resources: 95.93 km3 (23.01 cu mi) (2011) Freshwater withdrawal (domestic/industrial/agricultural): total ... Honduras is a water-rich country. The most important river in Honduras is the Ulúa, which flows 400 km (250 mi) to the ...
... condition commonly occurs when fresh water meets seawater. In fact, the most extensive brackish water habitats worldwide are estuaries, where a river meets the sea. The River Thames flowing through London is a classic river estuary. The town of Teddington a few miles west of London marks the boundary between the tidal and non-tidal parts of the Thames, although it is still considered a freshwater river about as far east as Battersea insofar as the average salinity is very low and the fish fauna consists predominantly of freshwater species such as roach, dace, carp, perch, and pike. The Thames Estuary becomes brackish between Battersea and Gravesend, and the diversity of freshwater fish species present is smaller, primarily roach and ...
Water is a critical issue for the survival of all living organisms. Some can use salt water but many organisms including the great majority of higher plants and most mammals must have access to fresh water to live. Some terrestrial mammals, especially desert rodents, appear to survive without drinking, but they do generate water through the metabolism of cereal seeds, and they also have mechanisms to conserve water to the maximum degree. Fresh water creates a hypotonic environment for aquatic organisms. This is problematic for some organisms with pervious skins or with gill membranes, whose cell membranes may burst if excess water is not excreted. Some protists accomplish this using contractile vacuoles, while ...
Fresh water (also 'freshwater' or 'fresh-water') is water that does not have a lot of salt in it.. When people say 'fresh water', they usually mean water from the lakes, rivers, snow, and ice, which is not salty. It also can mean water that people can drink. The oceans and seas are made up of salt water, which people cannot drink.. However, people cannot drink all fresh water, because it might be contaminated. It might have harmful bacteria in it, or poisonous because of chemicals it contains. Water from a tap has been tested and treated so that it is safe to drink. This applies to most ...
Most of the Columbia's drainage basin (which, at 258,000 square miles or 670,000 square kilometres, is about the size of France)[186] lies roughly between the Rocky Mountains on the east and the Cascade Mountains on the west. In the United States and Canada the term watershed is often used to mean drainage basin. The term Columbia Basin is used to refer not only to the entire drainage basin but also to subsets of the river's full watershed, such as the relatively flat and unforested area in eastern Washington bounded by the Cascades, the Rocky Mountains, and the Blue Mountains.[187] Within the watershed are diverse landforms including mountains, arid plateaus, river valleys, rolling uplands, and deep gorges. Grand Teton National Park lies in the watershed, as well as parts of Yellowstone National Park, Glacier National Park, Mount Rainier National Park, and North Cascades ...
... is water that has high mineral content (in contrast with "soft water"). Hard water is formed when water percolates through deposits of limestone and chalk which are largely made up of calcium and magnesium carbonates. Hard drinking water may have moderate health benefits, but can pose serious problems in industrial settings, where water hardness is monitored to avoid costly breakdowns in boilers, cooling towers, and other equipment that handles water. In domestic settings, hard water is often indicated by a lack of foam formation when soap is agitated in water, and by the formation of limescale in kettles and water heaters. Wherever ...
... s are similar to other animals in that they are multicellular, heterotrophic, lack cell walls and produce sperm cells. Unlike other animals, they lack true tissues and organs, and have no body symmetry. The shapes of their bodies are adapted for maximal efficiency of water flow through the central cavity, where it deposits nutrients, and leaves through a hole called the osculum. Many sponges have internal skeletons of spongin and/or spicules of calcium carbonate or silicon dioxide. All sponges are sessile aquatic animals. Although there are freshwater species, the great majority are marine (salt water) species, ranging from tidal zones to depths exceeding 8,800 m (5.5 mi).. While most of the approximately 5,000-10,000 known species feed on bacteria and other food particles in the water, some host photosynthesizing micro-organisms as endosymbionts and ...
The solute content of water is perhaps the most important aspect of water conditions, as total dissolved solids and other constituents can dramatically impact basic water chemistry, and therefore how organisms interact with their environment. Salt content, or salinity, is the most basic classification of water conditions. An aquarium may have freshwater (salinity below 0.5 PPT), simulating a lake or river environment; brackish water (a salt level of 0.5 to 30 PPT), simulating environments lying between fresh and salt, such as estuaries; and salt water or seawater (a salt level of 30 to 40 PPT), simulating an ocean or sea environment. Even higher salt concentrations are maintained in specialized tanks for ...
As Ontonagon became a more important Lake Superior port, it was realized that a navigational aid to shipping would be required.[4] Thus, in 1847, funds were appropriated to purchase land on which to site a lighthouse, and in 1850 a further $5000 was appropriated to build the structure.[4] Construction began in 1852 and was completed in 1853. The station was first lit with Lewis lamps, which were replaced in 1857 with a fifth-order Fresnel lens at a cost of $500.[4]. However, by 1866, the original wooden lighthouse had badly deteriorated, and plans were made to replace it.[4] A new brick structure was completed in 1867 by Detroit contractor W.F. Chittenden[3] at a cost of $14000,[5] and the lens was moved from the older wooden structure, which was then demolished.[4] In 1889, an iron galley was installed around the light to make window-washing easier.[5] In 1890, a kitchen addition to the keeper's quarters was constructed.[4]. Use of the light was discontinued in 1963, and it was officially ...
A group consisting of dozens of duplicates of Barry Allen's old friend Manuel Lago. Mob Rule first came into existence when Lago was tortured by a criminal organization called Basilisk. They cut off his fingers one by one and discovered that, because of a CIA experiment, he could regrow lost limbs and each severed limbs could grow into a full-grown duplicate of Manuel. Initially the duplicates worked with Manuel in his 'one-man' crusade against Basilisk, but when they began to die for no reason in the same order in which they were 'born', their new mission became to find a doctor who can find a cure so they can continue to live. Members of Mob Rule all identify each other by numbers based on the order in which they were 'born'. After encountering Mob Rule trying to steal a human genome re-coder, Barry Allen identifies his old friend Manuel Lago as one of the thieves. Later the next night, Manuel breaks into Barry's apartment being chased by Mob Rule, so Barry follows his friend. When Barry ...
Girard C. F. 1856. Researches upon the cyprinoid fishes inhabiting the fresh waters of the United States, west of the Mississippi Valley, from specimens in the museum of the Smithsonian Institution. Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila. v. 8. 165-213. ...
ഒരിക്കൽ മാർഗരറ്റ്, ക്ലാർക്ക് യൂണിവേഴ്സിറ്റിയിൽ നിന്നും ലിയോനാർഡ് ബ്ലെയിൻ നൈസുമായി (Leonard Blaine Nice) കൂടിക്കാഴ്ച നടത്തുകയുണ്ടായി. തുടർന്ന് 1908 -ൽ അവർ വിവാഹിതരായി. ഇവർക്ക് അഞ്ചു കുട്ടികൾ ജനിച്ചു. 1911 ഇൽ കോൺസ്റ്റൻസ് (Constance), 1912 ഇൽ മാർജറി (Marjorie), 1916 -ഇൽ ബാർബറ (Barbara), 1918-ഇൽ എലീനോർ ( Eleanor), 1922 ഇൽ ജനിച്ച ജാനെറ്റ് (Janet) എന്നിവരായിരുന്നു മക്കൾ. ഇവരിൽ ഒഹായോയിലെ കൊളംബസിൽ വെച്ച് ഒമ്പതാം വയസ്സിൽ ന്യുമോണിയ ബാധിച്ച് ...
Maréchal, C., 1991. Dimidiochromis. p. 76-78. A: J. Daget, J.-P. Gosse, G.G. Teugels i D.F.E. Thys van den Audenaerde (eds.) Check-list of the freshwater fishes of Africa (CLOFFA). ISNB, Brussel·les; MRAC, Tervuren; i ORSTOM, París. Vol. 4. ...
Maréchal, C. 1991. Microchromis. p. 266. A J. Daget, J.-P. Gosse, G.G. Teugels i D.F.E. Thys van den Audenaerde (eds.) Check-list of the freshwater fishes of Africa (CLOFFA). ISNB, Brussel·les; MRAC, Tervuren; i ORSTOM, París. Vol. 4. ...
... fresh water, saline water and atmospheric water is variable depending on a wide range of climatic variables. The water moves ... The water cycle describes the processes that drive the movement of water throughout the hydrosphere. However, much more water ... The sun, which drives the water cycle, heats water in oceans and seas. Water evaporates as water vapor into the air. Some ice ... The water cycle, also known as the hydrologic cycle or the hydrological cycle, describes the continuous movement of water on, ...
In addition, there is no difference between the water from our wells and the sea water… The main problem is that when there is ... "It is impossible for us to match the running water with the electricity, as to carry water from one area to the other, motors ... The situation is very hard, we have no water, we have no electricity, we have no work … If water and electricity would coincide ... The Gaza-blockade is causing an end to Gazas fresh water resources. in Features, Gaza, Reports August 7, 2016 ...
Freshwater Talk Podcasts. Episode Podcast: Jay Famiglietti, senior water scientist for NASA ... 2018 The Freshwater Trust. The Freshwater Trust protects and restores freshwater ecosystems. Using science, technology and ... movement. Earth Days Fine, but What About Earth Tomorrow?. May 2, 2014 ...
We Must Take Care of Nature, Because Without Rain There Is No Fresh Water. Mario Osava , Water & Sanitation , Latin America & ... We Must Take Care of Nature, Because Without Rain There Is No Fresh Water. Mario Osava , Latin America & the Caribbean ... How do you see the future of this movement?. A: I think the movement is growing by leaps and bounds, attracting more and more ... Working Together Is Key to Meeting Water Targets by 2030. Mario Osava , Water & Sanitation , Latin America & the Caribbean. ...
6.10 Substance budgets and movements 101. 6.11 Sediment-water relationships 104. 6.12 Further reading 106 ... 13 The communities of shallow standing waters: mires,shallow lakes and the littoral zone 280 ... It places increasing emphasis on the role of people in damaging and managing freshwaters as we move into the Anthropocene epoch ... The work will be of great value to undergraduate and graduate students, fellow researchers and water managers, and the plain ...
While this is welcome, the water challenges in the province are far from over and water users are urged […] ... See more ... Freshwater Dolphin Day October 24 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm * World Fisheries Day November 21 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm ... The provincial storage of water levels in Eastern Cape saw a marginal increase for the first time in many months due to the ... Archives for Global Catholic Climate Movement. Catholics announce petition campaign for climate action. March 28, 2015. Leave a ...
... fresh formation water that obscures the usual contrast of oil and water. ... Reliably tracking fluid movement and saturations. The 8.7-in-diameter open hole had been cored and logged with an extensive ... Difficulties monitoring in fresh formation water. An operator producing a California heavy oil reservoir by steamflooding ... However, the fields formation water is very fresh, so there would be no contrast in a conventionally logged capture cross ...
He tracked their movements for 12 months.. What we found is that they actually migrate off the main channel into the Vasse ... They really help us because they are all carnivores and what they love eating is mosquito larvae in the water, so they actually ... Freshwater fish unheralded but vital. Most native freshwater fish are small and go largely unnoticed by the public, but they ... Goldfish can cause a lot of problems once they become established in a freshwater system.. (. Supplied: Murdoch University. ). ...
Includes "animated" lures with realistic movements. Nice assortment of popular lure types. Freshwater and saltwater-safe. ... However, they do need to include attractive design for visual appeal, and working mechanisms for maximum impact in the water. ... A spoon lure uses a curved attachment to imitate the movements of an injured fish. Bass and other predatory lake fish tend to ... A. Fishing with lures often involves attracting fish by any means necessary, including color, size, movement and scent. If one ...
We used ultrasonic telemetry to examine movement patterns of 11 bat rays, Myliobatis californica, in Tomales Bay, California. ... Detection of weak water jets by the short-tailed stingray Dasyatis brevicaudata (Pisces: Dasyatidae). Copeia 1997: 881-883. ... A study of some thermal relations in the physiology and freshwater ecology of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). Amer. Zool. ... Mean bat ray movement rate was 8.84 m min−1 (range 4.49 to 13.40 m min−1) and was not significantly affected by size (p=0.592 ...
Freshwater. Movement patterns:. Full Migrant. Use and Trade [top] Use and Trade:. This species is well marketable. Its total ... Adults inhabit deep water, while juveniles are found in shallow water (Froese and Pauly 2003). It is not present in the ... Lates was introduced to Lake Victoria in the late 1950s and early 1960s (Coulter et al. 1986) from the shallow waters of Lake ... It is present in the brackish waters of Lake Mariout, near Alexandria.. Northeast Africa: It is found throughout the Nile ...
Freshwater; Marine. Movement patterns:. Full Migrant. Use and Trade [top] Use and Trade:. A certain percentage of sockeye are ... 1. Land/water protection -, 1.1. Site/area protection. 1. Land/water protection -, 1.2. Resource & habitat protection. 2. Land/ ... water management -, 2.1. Site/area management. 2. Land/water management -, 2.3. Habitat & natural process restoration. 3. ... In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management. Conservation sites identified:Yes, over entire range. In-Place Species ...
Effect of fish movement. Pp. 1-9 in Report of commission of Effect of fish movement surrounding Amagase dam. Ministry of Land, ... C in a total reaction volume of 10 μL containing 6.75 μL sterilized water, 0.08 mmol/L dNTP mixture, 0.25 U TaKaRa Ex Taq ( ... Isolated history of the coastal plant Lathyrus japonicus (Leguminosae) in Lake Biwa, an ancient freshwater lake. AoB Plants ... Recent colonization by a coastal plant of inland habitats at an ancient freshwater lake, Lake Biwa: multilocus sequencing and a ...
A new device that harnesses sunlight to produce pure vapor from seawater could last longer and produce cleaner water than other ... FULL STEAM AHEAD A new device that uses sunlight to generate clean water vapor from salty or dirty water could help produce ... Linking sense of touch to facial movement inches robots toward feeling pain By Laura Sanders. February 16, 2020. ... Up to 220 million people globally may be at risk of arsenic-contaminated water By Carolyn Gramling. May 21, 2020. ...
Nutrient Pollution Chokes Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems. February 19, 2009 Protecting drinking water and preventing harmful ... UH Mānoa researchers are using tracking devices to gain new insights into tiger shark movements in coastal waters around Maui ... Two samples of Ulva spp., that were deployed near shore on Maui, show large differences due to growth in coastal waters that ... More information: Daniel W. Amato et al, Impact of Submarine Groundwater Discharge on Marine Water Quality and Reef Biota of ...
... northward movement) and altitudes in response to climate warming and other factors. There are European examples of changes in ... particularly in water bodies used for public water supply and bathing. This may counteract nutrient load reduction measures. ... life cycle events (phenology) such as earlier spring phytoplankton bloom, appearance of clear-water phase, first day of flight ... Several freshwater species have shifted their ranges to higher latitudes ( ...
... northward movement) and altitudes in response to climate warming and other factors. There are European examples of changes in ... particularly in water bodies used for public water supply and bathing. This may counteract nutrient load reduction measures. ... life cycle events (phenology) such as earlier spring phytoplankton bloom, appearance of clear-water phase, first day of flight ... Several freshwater species have shifted their ranges to higher latitudes ( ...
In the present study, a small fresh water aquatic ecosystem was created into a small test tank to evaluate the movement and ... Movement and bioaccumulation of chromium in an artificial freshwater ecosystem. Movement and bioaccumulation of chromium in an ... Full text: Available Index: GHL / IMSEAR (South-East Asia) Main subject: Osmolar Concentration / Water Movements / Water ... The movement of the Cr (VI) was found to be from sediment to water during pre-treatment phase, after intoxication, from water ...
Limnology and Water Quality Management Conference scheduled on October 22-23, 2020 in October 2020 in London is for the ... Freshwater fisheries Environmental geology. Stratification and mixing. Water movements. Lake classification. Lakes and ponds. ... Limnology and Water Quality Management. ICLWQM 2020: 14. International Conference on Limnology and Water Quality Management ... Overview of water chemistry. Food webs. Phosphorus. Nitrogen. Carbon. Eutrophication. Algae and macrophytes. Zooplanton. ...
179 Movement. 180 Drifters. 181 Green. 182 Worms. 183 Fresh Water (x2). 184 Self-Portrait. 185 Cetaceans. 186 Pipefish. 187 ... 236 Cold Water (x2). 237 Coral Rainbows (x2). 238 Jellyfish (x2). 239 Couples (x2). 240 Teeth (x2). 241 Fresh Water (x2). 242 ... 135 Cold Water (x2). 136 Creepy Crawly. 137 Black and White (x2). 138 Scales (x2). 139 In the Muck (x2). 140 Divers (x2). 141 ... 282 Movement. 283 Macro. 284 Meals. 285 Sharks and Rays (x3). 286 Reefscapes (x3). 287 Conservation (x3). 288 fish faces (x3). ...
Fresh Water / chemistry. Geography. Oceans and Seas. Seawater* / chemistry. Water Movements*. From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database ... drainage basins that are unmonitored with regard to the combination of water-flow and nutrient-concentration measurements ... 5 to 10 times higher than the current standard and includes various spatial-aggregation possibilities of relevance for water ...
Fresh Water / analysis. Metals / analysis*. Particle Size. Rain / chemistry. Water / analysis*. Water Movements. Water ... and freshwater ambient water quality criteria were exceeded for Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in the first storm of the water year. ...
lamprey Eel-like, jawless vertebrate found in marine and fresh waters on both sides of the Atlantic. It feeds by attaching its ... When not attached to prey, they swim with undulating movements. The marine lampreys normally migrate into freshwater to spawn, ... Many freshwater lampreys are not parasitic.. Lampreys resemble eels in external appearance and, although not related to the ... lamprey, name for several primitive marine and freshwater jawless fishes of the order Petromyzontiformes. As in the other ...
Marine and Freshwater Research is an international journal publishing high-quality research and review articles in aquatic ... The degradation of freshwater ecosystems is a threat to biodiversity. We evaluated the influence of water quality on the ... Broad-scale coastal movements of white sharks off Western Australia described by passive acoustic telemetry data Marine and ... Marine and Freshwater Research. Marine and Freshwater Research is a multidisciplinary journal publishing original research and ...
There is nothing fresh about a new water tax * HR763 is climate leadership for the future ...
  • Precipitation falls on the ground, but what happens to that water depends greatly on the geography of the land at any particular place. (wikipedia.org)
  • The water moves from one reservoir to another, such as from river to ocean , or from the ocean to the atmosphere, by the physical processes of evaporation , condensation , precipitation , infiltration , surface runoff , and subsurface flow. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some precipitation falls as snow or hail, sleet, and can accumulate as ice cap s and glacier s, which can store frozen water for thousands of years. (wikipedia.org)
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