French Guiana: A French overseas department on the northeast coast of South America. Its capital is Cayenne. It was first settled by the French in 1604. Early development was hindered because of the presence of a penal colony. The name of the country and the capital are variants of Guyana, possibly from the native Indian Guarani guai (born) + ana (kin), implying a united and interrelated race of people. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p418 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p195)France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Polynesia: The collective name for the islands of the central Pacific Ocean, including the Austral Islands, Cook Islands, Easter Island, HAWAII; NEW ZEALAND; Phoenix Islands, PITCAIRN ISLAND; SAMOA; TONGA; Tuamotu Archipelago, Wake Island, and Wallis and Futuna Islands. Polynesians are of the Caucasoid race, but many are of mixed origin. Polynesia is from the Greek poly, many + nesos, island, with reference to the many islands in the group. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p966 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p426)Guadeloupe: The name of two islands of the West Indies, separated by a narrow channel. Their capital is Basse-Terre. They were discovered by Columbus in 1493, occupied by the French in 1635, held by the British at various times between 1759 and 1813, transferred to Sweden in 1813, and restored to France in 1816. Its status was changed from colony to a French overseas department in 1946. Columbus named it in honor of the monastery of Santa Maria de Guadalupe in Spain. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p470 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p221)Martinique: An island in the Lesser Antilles, one of the Windward Islands. Its capital is Fort-de-France. It was discovered by Columbus in 1502 and from its settlement in 1635 by the French it passed into and out of Dutch and British hands. It was made a French overseas department in 1946. One account of the name tells of native women on the shore calling "Madinina" as Columbus approached the island. The meaning was never discovered but was entered on early charts as Martinique, influenced by the name of St. Martin. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p734 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p339)ParisFounder Effect: A phenomenon that is observed when a small subgroup of a larger POPULATION establishes itself as a separate and isolated entity. The subgroup's GENE POOL carries only a fraction of the genetic diversity of the parental population resulting in an increased frequency of certain diseases in the subgroup, especially those diseases known to be autosomal recessive.French Revolution: Conflict during which traditional monarchy was ended and modern government functions were instituted.Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Quebec: A province of eastern Canada. Its capital is Quebec. The region belonged to France from 1627 to 1763 when it was lost to the British. The name is from the Algonquian quilibek meaning the place where waters narrow, referring to the gradually narrowing channel of the St. Lawrence or to the narrows of the river at Cape Diamond. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p993 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p440)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Translating: Conversion from one language to another language.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.West Indies: Islands lying between southeastern North America and northern South America, enclosing the Caribbean Sea. They comprise the Greater Antilles (CUBA; DOMINICAN REPUBLIC; HAITI; JAMAICA; and PUERTO RICO), the Lesser Antilles (ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA and the other Leeward Islands, BARBADOS; MARTINIQUE and the other Windward Islands, NETHERLANDS ANTILLES; VIRGIN ISLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES, BRITISH VIRGINI ISLANDS, and the islands north of Venezuela which include TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO), and the BAHAMAS. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1330)Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Haplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Multilingualism: The ability to speak, read, or write several languages or many languages with some facility. Bilingualism is the most common form. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Africa, Northern: The geographical area of Africa comprising ALGERIA; EGYPT; LIBYA; MOROCCO; and TUNISIA. It includes also the vast deserts and oases of the Sahara. It is often referred to as North Africa, French-speaking Africa, or the Maghreb. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p856)Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Translations: Products resulting from the conversion of one language to another.Linguistics: The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Cross-Cultural Comparison: Comparison of various psychological, sociological, or cultural factors in order to assess the similarities or diversities occurring in two or more different cultures or societies.Fabaceae: The large family of plants characterized by pods. Some are edible and some cause LATHYRISM or FAVISM and other forms of poisoning. Other species yield useful materials like gums from ACACIA and various LECTINS like PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS from PHASEOLUS. Many of them harbor NITROGEN FIXATION bacteria on their roots. Many but not all species of "beans" belong to this family.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Indians, South American: Individual members of South American ethnic groups with historic ancestral origins in Asia.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.BelgiumPolymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.EuropeOccupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Ciguatera Poisoning: Poisoning caused by ingestion of SEAFOOD containing microgram levels of CIGUATOXINS. The poisoning is characterized by gastrointestinal, neurological and cardiovascular disturbances.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.New Brunswick: A province of eastern Canada, one of the Maritime Provinces with NOVA SCOTIA; PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND; and sometimes NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR. Its capital is Fredericton. It was named in honor of King George III, of the House of Hanover, also called Brunswick. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p828 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p375)Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Military Personnel: Persons including soldiers involved with the armed forces.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Genetic Linkage: The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).General Practitioners: Physicians whose practice is not restricted to a specific field of MEDICINE.Phaseolus: A plant genus in the family FABACEAE which is the source of edible beans and the lectin PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS.SwitzerlandSubject Headings: Terms or expressions which provide the major means of access by subject to the bibliographic unit.Travel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Wine: Fermented juice of fresh grapes or of other fruit or plant products used as a beverage.Alouatta: A genus of the subfamily ALOUATTINAE, family ATELIDAE, inhabiting the forests of Central and South America. Howlers travel in groups and define their territories by howling accompanied by vigorously shaking and breaking branches.beta-Hexosaminidase alpha Chain: The alpha subunit of hexosaminidase A. Mutations in the gene that encodes this protein can result in loss of hexosaminidase A activity and are linked to TAY-SACHS DISEASE.Comoros: A group of Indian Ocean Islands, the islands of Great Comoro, Anjouan, Mayotte, and Moheli, lying between northeast Mozambique and northwest Madagascar. The capital is Moroni. In 1914 they became a colony attached to Madagascar administratively and were made a French overseas territory in 1947. Except for Mayotte which remained French, Comoros became an independent republic in 1975. Comoros represents the Arabic qamar, moon, said by some scholars to be linked with the mystical Mountains of the Moon said to be somewhere in equatorial Africa. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p283 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p122)Biflavonoids: Dimers (homo and hetero) of FLAVONOIDS.Heterozygote: An individual having different alleles at one or more loci regarding a specific character.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Reunion: One of the Indian Ocean Islands, east of Madagascar. Its capital is Saint-Denis. It was discovered in 1507 by the Portuguese and claimed by France in 1638. It was first colonized in 1662 as Isle de Bourbon but renamed Reunion in 1793. In 1946 it was made an overseas department of France. The name commemorates the reunion of the revolutionaries from Marseilles with the National Guard in Paris in 1792. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1011; Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p454; French Embassy)Tunisia: A country in northern Africa between ALGERIA and LIBYA. Its capital is Tunis.Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length: Variation occurring within a species in the presence or length of DNA fragment generated by a specific endonuclease at a specific site in the genome. Such variations are generated by mutations that create or abolish recognition sites for these enzymes or change the length of the fragment.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Power Plants: Units that convert some other form of energy into electrical energy.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Medical Subject Headings: Controlled vocabulary thesaurus produced by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. It consists of sets of terms naming descriptors in a hierarchical structure that permits searching at various levels of specificity.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2: A subclass of DIABETES MELLITUS that is not INSULIN-responsive or dependent (NIDDM). It is characterized initially by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA; and eventually by GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; HYPERGLYCEMIA; and overt diabetes. Type II diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop KETOSIS but often exhibit OBESITY.Djibouti: A republic in eastern Africa, on the Gulf of Aden at the entrance to the Red Sea. Djibouti is also the name of its capital.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Linkage Disequilibrium: Nonrandom association of linked genes. This is the tendency of the alleles of two separate but already linked loci to be found together more frequently than would be expected by chance alone.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Penetrance: The percent frequency with which a dominant or homozygous recessive gene or gene combination manifests itself in the phenotype of the carriers. (From Glossary of Genetics, 5th ed)Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Submarine Medicine: The field of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of people in submarines or sealabs.Indian Ocean Islands: Numerous islands in the Indian Ocean situated east of Madagascar, north to the Arabian Sea and east to Sri Lanka. Included are COMOROS (republic), MADAGASCAR (republic), Maldives (republic), MAURITIUS (parliamentary democracy), Pemba (administered by Tanzania), REUNION (a department of France), and SEYCHELLES (republic).DNA Mutational Analysis: Biochemical identification of mutational changes in a nucleotide sequence.Dictionaries, MedicalHospitals, University: Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.Dengue: An acute febrile disease transmitted by the bite of AEDES mosquitoes infected with DENGUE VIRUS. It is self-limiting and characterized by fever, myalgia, headache, and rash. SEVERE DENGUE is a more virulent form of dengue.Proanthocyanidins: Dimers and oligomers of flavan-3-ol units (CATECHIN analogs) linked mainly through C4 to C8 bonds to leucoanthocyanidins. They are structurally similar to ANTHOCYANINS but are the result of a different fork in biosynthetic pathways.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.North AmericaCatalogs, LibraryGypsies: Ethnic group originating in India and entering Europe in the 14th or 15th century.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.History, 16th Century: Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Lod Score: The total relative probability, expressed on a logarithmic scale, that a linkage relationship exists among selected loci. Lod is an acronym for "logarithmic odds."Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Molecular Epidemiology: The application of molecular biology to the answering of epidemiological questions. The examination of patterns of changes in DNA to implicate particular carcinogens and the use of molecular markers to predict which individuals are at highest risk for a disease are common examples.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Hospital Bed Capacity, 300 to 499Acrylamide: A colorless, odorless, highly water soluble vinyl monomer formed from the hydration of acrylonitrile. It is primarily used in research laboratories for electrophoresis, chromatography, and electron microscopy and in the sewage and wastewater treatment industries.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Post-Exposure Prophylaxis: The prevention of infection or disease following exposure to a pathogen.Pelvimetry: Measurement of the dimensions and capacity of the pelvis. It includes cephalopelvimetry (measurement of fetal head size in relation to maternal pelvic capacity), a prognostic guide to the management of LABOR, OBSTETRIC associated with disproportion.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Pinus: A plant genus in the family PINACEAE, order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta. They are evergreen trees mainly in temperate climates.Diet Records: Records of nutrient intake over a specific period of time, usually kept by the patient.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Vitis: A plant genus in the family VITACEAE, order Rhamnales, subclass Rosidae. It is a woody vine cultivated worldwide. It is best known for grapes, the edible fruit and used to make WINE and raisins.PaintingsEuthanasia: The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Military Medicine: The practice of medicine as applied to special circumstances associated with military operations.Insect Vectors: Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.Suriname: A republic in the north of South America, bordered on the west by GUYANA (British Guiana) and on the east by FRENCH GUIANA. Its capital is Paramaribo. It was formerly called Netherlands Guiana or Dutch Guiana or Surinam. Suriname was first settled by the English in 1651 but was ceded to the Dutch by treaty in 1667. It became an autonomous territory under the Dutch crown in 1954 and gained independence in 1975. The country was named for the Surinam River but the meaning of that name is uncertain. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1167 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p526)Drug Utilization: The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.Food Habits: Acquired or learned food preferences.Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field: Gel electrophoresis in which the direction of the electric field is changed periodically. This technique is similar to other electrophoretic methods normally used to separate double-stranded DNA molecules ranging in size up to tens of thousands of base-pairs. However, by alternating the electric field direction one is able to separate DNA molecules up to several million base-pairs in length.Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems: Systems developed for collecting reports from government agencies, manufacturers, hospitals, physicians, and other sources on adverse drug reactions.Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII: An autosomal recessive glycogen storage disease in which there is deficient expression of 6-phosphofructose 1-kinase in muscle (PHOSPHOFRUCTOKINASE-1, MUSCLE TYPE) resulting in abnormal deposition of glycogen in muscle tissue. These patients have severe congenital muscular dystrophy and are exercise intolerant.Unified Medical Language System: A research and development program initiated by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE to build knowledge sources for the purpose of aiding the development of systems that help health professionals retrieve and integrate biomedical information. The knowledge sources can be used to link disparate information systems to overcome retrieval problems caused by differences in terminology and the scattering of relevant information across many databases. The three knowledge sources are the Metathesaurus, the Semantic Network, and the Specialist Lexicon.Radioactive Fallout: The material that descends to the earth or water well beyond the site of a surface or subsurface nuclear explosion. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Chemical and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Genes, Dominant: Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE both in the homozygous and the heterozygous state.Alphavirus Infections: Virus diseases caused by members of the ALPHAVIRUS genus of the family TOGAVIRIDAE.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).
"Ismaël Isaac" (in French). ivoire-music.com. Archived from the original on October 29, 2009. Retrieved October 17, 2009. Roots ... "Crash du 16 août : « On n'oublie pas »" [Crash of August 16: "We don't forget"] (in French). Martinique France-Antilles. ... Many of his songs are politically and socially motivated, and are mainly sung in his native language of Dioula, French and in ... French; English;Ashanti and Wolof. After two more years in Paris, Blondy returned to his homeland in 1998, with a new album, ...
"Affoussiata Bamba-Lamine reconnait sa défaite après s'être autoproclamée "élue"". Diaspo Ivoire (in French). 22 December 2016. ... Bamba-Lamine practiced law in France, becoming a member of the Paris bar in 2001. In 2002, Bamba-Lamine became a legal advisor ... "Affoussiata Bamba" (in French). Abidjan.net. "Profils comparés: Yasmina Ouegnin-Affoussiata Bamba Lamine". ICI Abidjan (in ... Alain, Serge (13 January 2016). "Côte d'Ivoire : Ministres, au nom du père et du fils". Alerte Info (in French). Retrieved 26 ...
Ouédraogo, Alexise Evelyne (2008-08-12). "Côte d`Ivoire: Lancement du prix Alfred Dan Moussa de la presse en ligne pour la paix ... He came to this post in 2007, succeeding Hervé Bourges, a former president of Radio France Internationale. "Alfred Dan Moussa ( ... in French). Retrieved 2008-08-29. "Togo". Attacks on the Press in 2005. Committee to Protect Journalists. Retrieved 2008-08-28 ... Cote d' Ivoire)". African Development Information Services. 2007-08-03. Retrieved 2008-09-03. ...
List of presidential candidates, Ivoire Sondage website (in French). Africa Research Bulletin (1991), page 10,311. List of MFA ... at National Assembly website (in French). John Rapley, Ivoirien Capitalism: African Entrepreneurs in Côte d'Ivoire (1993), ... deputies, National Assembly website (in French). "Côte d'Ivoire: Ministers to meet in rebel capital on Thursday", IRIN, 19 May ...
... in French). www.ivoire-music.com. Archived from the original on October 29, 2009. Retrieved October 17, 2009. The Leopard Man's ...
Born in France and of Ivorian descent, Koffi represented the Ivory Coast U23s in a 2-0 friendly defeat to Burkina Faso U23 on ... ". "Football-International : Ervin Koffi passe pro - Sport-ivoire.ci". www.sport-ivoire.ci. Erwin Koffi at Soccerway. ... "France - E. Koffi - Profile with news, career statistics and history - Soccerway". soccerway.com. Retrieved 2016-09-08. " ...
"Coopération Côte d´Ivoire-Grande Bretagne" [Cooperation Côte d´Ivoire-United Kingdom] (in French). 1 September 2016. Retrieved ...
"Préemption d'un ivoire de Pierre-Simon Jaillot par le Louvre - La Tribune de l'Art". www.latribunedelart.com (in French). ... Pierre Simon Jaillot is a French sculptor of ivory objects born in Avignon-lès-Saint-Claude in 1631, died on September 23, 1681 ... Secret Memoirs to Serve to the History of the Republic of Letters in France since 1762 , Vol 34, Paris, p. 347 . Émile Bellier ... "Baroque Ivory Carving in France and England", "National Art Collections Review", 1984, p. 106-108 . Christian Theuerkauff, " ...
Although initially a venue for French-speaking journalists to convene, over time the UPF became a professional union. It is an ... Ouédraogo, Alexise Evelyne (2008-08-12). "Côte d`Ivoire: Lancement du prix Alfred Dan Moussa de la presse en ligne pour la paix ... Agence France-Presse "Players and skills". Ministère des Affaires étrangères et européennes. 2006-02-20. Retrieved 2008-08-28 ... "U.P.F" (in French). Union internationale de la presse francophone. Archived from the original on 2008-06-11. Retrieved 2008-08- ...
Ivoire written by Jean Regnaud, Atomium, 1990; translated in Dutch Aleksis Strogonov 3 albums, with Jean Regnaud, 1993-1998 ... Émile Bravo (born 18 September 1964) is a French comics artist. Émile Bravo was born in Paris in 1964 from Spanish parents (a ... After his studies, he started working for the magazine Marie-France and as an illustrator, before publishing his first comic ... Le Saux, Laurence (4 May 2008). "Dans l'atelier d'Emile Bravo". BoDoï (in French). Retrieved 31 August 2012. Nebreda, Marcos ( ...
1991 - Arte Bienal in Cuenca, Ecuador and "Regard sur Haiti" in Dinard, France. He tours Museums and Galleries in Paris. Group ... He then heads an Exhibit of Haitian Arts at the Hotel Ivoire, in Ivory Coast and takes part in a drawing show at Le Grand ... Later he exhibited in Guadeloupe and French Guyana where he also met local artists and discusseed Art in the region. 1980 - One ... Palais, in Paris, France. 1988 - Exhibit with Ralph Chapoteau, Katia San Millan and Obes Faustin at the Galeria Boinayel in ...
Serge Deble fortsætter i Kina‚ bold.dk, 21 June 2017 http://www.sport-ivoire.ci/?p=1&id=7945 Serges Déblé at L'Équipe Football ... in French) Serges Déblé at Soccerway. ...
Los Angeles Ivoire Union: Organization of Ivorians living in the greater Seattle area Friends of Cote d'Ivoire The Association ... L'immigration ouest-africaine aux États-Unis (in French: African immigration in United States). Steffes, Tracy. "Ivorians". ... French is the national language of Cote D'Ivoire. In 1999, the Organisation des ressortissants de l'Ouest de la Côte d'Ivoire, ...
"Identification of voters in Cote d' Ivoire surpasses 5.4 mln, UN says". Xinhua. 12 March 2009. Text of the Resolution at undocs ... until 31 July 2009 and the French forces that support it, while also reducing the missions strength to one battalion and ... French supporting forces until 31 July". United Nations. 27 January 2009. "Population identification, disarmament, elections ...
Hotel Ivoire. The Ducor's various amenities, such as its pool, tennis courts, and a French restaurant, made it popular with ...
Throughout the early years of French rule, French military contingents were sent inland to establish new posts. The French ... Ivoire, European University Center for Peace Studies (EPU), Stadtschleining 2005 Background Note: Cote d'Ivoire. ... supply porters and food to the French forces, and ensure the protection of French trade and personnel. In return, the French ... without rights to representation in Africa or France. In 1905, the French officially abolished slavery in most of French West ...
... in French) Changement des fondements de la Côte d`Ivoire : Hymne national : "L`Ode à la Patrie" à la place de "l`Abidjanaise ... Play media (in French) L'histoire méconnue des hymnes nationaux africains - Radio France International (in French) Chant ... in French) Mathieu Ekra, Lumière sur l'Abidjanaise : l'hymne national, CEDA, 2000, ISBN 2863943650 (in English) Côte d'Ivoire: ... in French) The Republic's symbols on the Ivorian presidency's website Video of the Song of Abidjan, sung in its entirety Video ...
... near the Hôtel Ivoire. In the demonstrations that followed attacks on French and other international expatriates living in Côte ... The French army organised the looting in cooperation with prisoners who have been freed." Forum organised by the French weekly ... I'm not asking you to go and attack the French who came to live among us. Many French marched with us against the rebellion. ... During one of these airstrikes in Bouaké, a French base (in a school) was targeted and French soldiers were hit and nine of ...
Ivoire at: European University Center for Peace Studies (EPU), Stadtschleining 2005 Pictures of French soldiers posing in front ... At Abidjan's airport, French and Ivorian troops exchanged fire, and a French military plane was reportedly damaged. As the ... "French foreign minister's visit is first since 2003". France 24. 14 June 2008. Archived from the original on 20 May 2011. ... The Ivorian government claimed the attack on the French was unintentional, but the French insisted that the attack had been ...
Canada Department of Transport Newfoundland Air Transport Ivory Coast Air Ivoire Colombia ACES Colombia Denmark Cimber Air Dan- ... Fly Falcks Flyvetjeneste ♠ Fiji Air Pacific Fiji Airways France Air Paris Union Aéromaritime de Transport ♠ Ghana Ghana Airways ...
Australia Royal Australian Navy Biafra Biafran Air Force Ecuador Ecuadorian Air Force France French Air Force Ghana Ghana Air ... Time Air WestEx Airlines Czech Republic ABA Air Ivory Coast Air Ivoire Chad Government of Chad China Laoag Cuba Cubana de ... Air Congo Air Tropiques Denmark Maersk Air Newair Airservice Sterling Airways Egypt Air Sinai Finland Finnair France Air France ...
Ivoire, Croatia, Ecuador, Finland [2], France, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Indonesia, Italy [3], Indonesia [4], Japan, ... France); Topic: French Agriculture Special event: First time to mention the formation of permanent working groups 1988 31st ... Fehr (France) was elected as Secretary General. Also, the Dutch students were well prepared to organise a seminar in the ... New members: Belgium, Denmark, France and Sweden Special event: The exchange did exist in two parts: The exchange weeks and ...
Ivoire, Anseïs, and Gérard de Roussillon (Charlemagne's trusted adviser Naimes and the warrior-priest Turpin are, however, not ... French nobility Dukes in France List of French peerages List of French peers List of coats of arms of French peers Richard A. ... The Peerage of France (French: Pairie de France) was a hereditary distinction within the French nobility which appeared in 1180 ... French: Pair de France) was held by the greatest, highest-ranking members of the French nobility. French peerage thus differed ...
Meite was born in France to parents of Ivorian descent, and has represented the Ivory Coast U20s, and the Ivory Coast U23 team ... profil www.footballdatabase.eu sports reference retrieved 15 January 2012 http://sport-ivoire.ci/index.php?p=1&id=11494 http:// ... Yacoub Meite (born 10 February 1990 in Paris) is a French-born Ivorian footballer who plays for Swiss team FC Le Mont. Meite ...
On 4 April 2011 UN and French helicopters also began firing on pro-Gbagbo military installations, a French military spokesman ... http://www.undemocracy.com/S-RES-2000(2011)[permanent dead link] "COTE D IVOIRE: Security Council bolsters troubled ... "UN, French troops to stay in ICoast till January to help stage polls" Archived 20 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine., AFP, 29 ... Adam Nossiter (4 April 2011). "UN and France Strike Leader's Forces in Ivory Coast". New York Times. "Battle rages in Ivory ...
Koulibaly, Mamadou (2003), La guerre de la France contre la Côte d'Ivoire (in French), Paris: Harmattan, ISBN 978-2-7475-5367-4 ... Ivoire Média, OCLC 29185113. ... French colonial era[edit]. Arrival in Kong of new French West ... The defeat of France in the Franco-Prussian War in 1871 and the subsequent annexation by Germany of the French province of ... The French built naval bases to keep out non-French traders and began a systematic pacification of the interior to stop raids ...
In English with summary in French. en. dc.subject.mesh. Schistosoma haematobium. en. ... Changes in human schistosomiasis levels after the construction of two large hydroelectric dams in central Côte d Ivoire / E. ... Changes in human schistosomiasis levels after the construction of two large hydroelectric dams in central Côte d Ivoire / E. ... Rapid screening for Schistosoma mansoni in western Côte d Ivoire using a simple school questionnaire / J. Utzinger ... [‎et ...
Besse ivoire. [ 5m / Italian / French ] * Asobigokoro. [ 31m / Izakaya (Japanese Style Pub) ] * Yuudammaru. [ 49m / Sushi / ...
Obviously food not quite up to level of London Rosewood (exec Chef Amandine there one of most famous in France, and Sommelier ...
YVO, YVES). One of the most notable bishops of France at the time of the Investiture .... Ivory. Ivory (French ivoire ; Italian ... French missionary, born at Orléans, France, 10 January, 1607; martyred at Ossernenon, .... Isaac of Armenia. (SAHAK) Catholicos ... Illinois, through the French, from Illini-wek, i.e., men ; the name used by themselves). An .... Illtyd, Saint. (Or ILTUTUS.) ... Isabel of France, Saint. Daughter of Louis VIII and of his wife, Blanche of Castille, born in March, 1225; died at .... ...
French manicure UV & LED gel - ivoire. For an extra-white or natural French manicure. ... French manicure UV & LED gel - extra-blanc. For an extra-white or natural French manicure. ... French manicure UV & LED gel - extra-blanc. For an extra-white or natural French manicure. ... French manicure UV & LED gel - pearl white. For an extra-white or natural French manicure.... ...
French manicure UV & LED gel - ivoire. For an extra-white or natural French manicure. ... French manicure UV & LED gel - extra-blanc. For an extra-white or natural French manicure. ... French manicure UV gel - trendy white. For an extra-white or natural French manicure. ... French manicure*Nail care*Nail lacquer removers*Nail art*Nail art lacquer*Pigments Nail art*Nail art paint*Nail art pens*Nail ...
French drains are another option. French drains are ditches that have been filled with gravel. It is okay to plant sod on top ... Cultivar: Ivoire Family:Onagraceae Size:Height: 2.5 ft. to 6 ft.. Width: 1.67 ft. to 3 ft. Plant Category:edibles, shrubs, ... More obtrusive, but a good solution where looks arent as important, think of the French drain as a ditch filled with gravel. ...
"Ismaël Isaac" (in French). ivoire-music.com. Archived from the original on October 29, 2009. Retrieved October 17, 2009. Roots ... "Crash du 16 août : « On noublie pas »" [Crash of August 16: "We dont forget"] (in French). Martinique France-Antilles. ... Many of his songs are politically and socially motivated, and are mainly sung in his native language of Dioula, French and in ... French; English;Ashanti and Wolof. After two more years in Paris, Blondy returned to his homeland in 1998, with a new album, ...
France is a true cultural beacon. Because of the number of artists that left their mark and the Revolution that served as base ... France / Nice The Glamour of Nice and the French Riviera. One doesnt simply go to Nice s beaches for sunshine - here you can ... France / Nantes Between Rivers, Art and Fiction. Its where we can go around different worlds in less than 80 days. Classic, ... France / Bordeaux Bordeaux: The City With the Taste of Wine. Mixing contemporary and old with harmony, Bordeaux is the homeland ...
"Affoussiata Bamba-Lamine reconnait sa défaite après sêtre autoproclamée "élue"". Diaspo Ivoire (in French). 22 December 2016. ... Bamba-Lamine practiced law in France, becoming a member of the Paris bar in 2001. In 2002, Bamba-Lamine became a legal advisor ... "Affoussiata Bamba" (in French). Abidjan.net. "Profils comparés: Yasmina Ouegnin-Affoussiata Bamba Lamine". ICI Abidjan (in ... Alain, Serge (13 January 2016). "Côte dIvoire : Ministres, au nom du père et du fils". Alerte Info (in French). Retrieved 26 ...
Ivoire. Noninvasive Hb measurements were attempted in 191 children 2-15 years of age and obtained in 102 (53.5%) children. The ... Hsu DP, French AJ, Madson SL, Palmer JM, Gidvani-Diaz V, , 2016. Evaluation of a noninvasive hemoglobin measurement device to ... 4 Centre Suisse de Recherches Scientifiques en Côte d'Ivoire, Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire. 5 Swiss Tropical and Public ... 3 Unité de Formation et de Recherche Biosciences, Université Félix Houphouët-Boigny, Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire. ...
Buy Michel Cluizel Ivoire, white chocolate bar. A sweet white chocolate bar by Michel Cluizel made with Bourbon Vanilla and ... Michel Cluizel of France. Often referred to as The Goldsmith of Chocolate, Michel Cluizel is one of the finest chocolate ...
Cote d'Ivoire Croatia Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador ... France French Guiana French Polynesia Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guam Guatemala ...
Cote d'Ivoire Croatia Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador ... France French Guiana French Polynesia Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guam Guatemala ... France In 2006, almost 30% of marine products came from aquaculture. Oysters and mussels accounted for the bulk of aquaculture ... In 2008, the quotas awarded to France under Council Regulation (EC) No. 40/2008 of 16 January 2008, amounted to 287 308 tonnes ...
Ivoire; Laboratoire de Physiologie Appliquee, Strasbourg, France; Institut de Neurologie Tropicale, Limoges, France ... France; Laboratoire de Physiologie, Faculty de Medecine, Niamey, Niger; Laboratoire de Physiologie, CHU de Yopougon, Abidjan, ... Cote d'Ivoire; Projet de Recherches Cliniques sur la Trypanosomiase; Daloa, Cote d' ...
MA, French Literature, Arizona State University. *DEA Conflict Resolution, University of Abidjan-Cocody, Cote Ivoire ... Director, Modern Languages; Associate Teaching Professor of French; Contact for French Study Abroad Course Approvals. Academic ... Associate Teaching Professor of French. Contact for French Study Abroad Course Approvals ... Paris, France: UNESCO, International Institute for Educational Planning.. *Baer, Susanne, Lucy Nowottnick, Maria Bustelo, ...
The country remains divided between ex-rebel and government forces, with UN and French peacekeepers holding a fragile buffer ...
Visiting the capital of France is something everyone should do at least once in a lifetime. ... France / Paris Daughter of Enlightenment. Few cities present such a relevant, broad cultural heritage. When it comes to the ... France / Paris Daughter of Enlightenment. Few cities present such a relevant, broad cultural heritage. When it comes to the ...
But one cannot survive without French for longer time duration. And business travelers need French on their tongue to close any ... The most established chain is Coq Ivoire. When you order, make sure that you let them know whether you want the intestines. You ... French (official), 60 native dialects with Dioula the most widely spoken Religion Christian 20-30%, Muslim 35-40%, indigenous ... Several thousand French and West African troops, and a moderately-sized United Nations contingent, remain in Côte dIvoire to ...
Ideal for bakers, Valrhona Ivoire white baking chocolate feves allow baking enthusiasts to use the secret of the professionals ... French foie gras. *Duck foie gras. *Goose foie gras. *Charcuterie. *Sausages and saucissons ...
Daniel speaks French and taught English in France for eight months after his undergraduate studies. ... ASCP-Cote-Ivoire-Workshop-Workshop-Slider-Website. Written by bvghseattlePosted on ... He is fluent in Dutch, Spanish, English, French, German and basic Japanese. ...
Air France, Emirates and more. Search and find deals on flights from Washington Dulles Intl. ... Pros: SFO - CDG (Air France) was a great journey in all respects. But the one major reason for that was, the middle seat was ... Canada EN FR Chile 中国 Colombia Costa Rica Danmark Deutschland DE EN Dominican Republic Ecuador El Salvador España ES CA France ... Pros: Food quality was above average (compared to Air France, for instance). On-board entertainment system offers a lot of ...
Text in French. Limited to an edition of 380 numbered copies on Vergé Légende Ivoire. A history of Perrin as a printer and ... Text in French. This French edition limited to 200 numbered copies. Table of contents, acknowledgments. 212 specimens of modern ... London, England, and Paris, France: Ernest Benn and Éditions Albert Lévy, n.d. folio. cloth. xl, plates. ... typography from England, the United States, France, Italy, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Holland, and Sweden since the commencement ...
Allen, who speaks French and Kiswahili, says it takes openness, flexibility, a willingness to learn, a respect for other ways ... "The bad- oh just being caught in a little coup d´etat on Christmas eve in Abidjan, Cote d´ Ivoire in 1999. The machine guns ... Davis, who speaks "rusty French," says "The reality is it takes time to gain trust and to get buy-in from local counterparts. ... Gabon is a francophone country, so being able to speak French has helped out tremendously in my work some GAP countries such as ...
"The bad- oh just being caught in a little coup d´etat on Christmas eve in Abidjan, Cote d´ Ivoire in 1999. The machine guns ... Davis, who speaks "rusty French," says "The reality is it takes time to gain trust and to get buy-in from local counterparts. ...
  • She has a law degree from the Robert Schuman University in Strasbourg, a master's degree in law from the University of Paris X and a doctorate in comparative law from the Nancy 2 University in France. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bamba-Lamine practiced law in France, becoming a member of the Paris bar in 2001. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mus um National d Histoire Naturelle, Paris, France. (prota.org)
  • Demonstrations in Paris and other major cities continue in France and are expected to continue in the coming weeks. (state.gov)
  • The U.S. Embassy is advising official U.S. government travelers to avoid travel to Paris and other major cities in France on the weekends. (state.gov)
  • French Guiana is an overseas department of France. (state.gov)
  • You may enter French Guiana for up to 90 days for tourist and business purposes without a visa. (state.gov)
  • The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to French Guiana. (state.gov)
  • The local equivalent to the "911" emergency line in French Guiana is 112, but you are unlikely to find an English speaker answering your call. (state.gov)
  • You should also contact the U.S. Embassy in Suriname, which provides consular services for U.S. citizens in French Guiana, at (597) 556-700 ext. 2129 or (597) 710-1112 during evenings and weekends. (state.gov)
  • Relatively stable by regional standards, Ivory Coast established close political and economic ties with its West African neighbors while at the same time maintaining close relations to the West , especially France . (wikipedia.org)
  • the arrest of Wet'suwet'en activists and supporters protecting land rights within First Nation's territory on January 7, 2018, despite their nonviolence, is reported to have been accomplished in the sites of RCMP snipers. (nightslantern.ca)
  • The two bodies (NBA & AFD) announced their plan to jointly promote social inclusion by developing basketball infrastructure and conducting youth basketball programmes, events and initiatives in Nigeria, Côte d' Ivoire, Morocco, Senegal and other selected African countries. (thisdaylive.com)
  • Close ties to France since independence in 1966, the development of cocoa production for export, and foreign investment made Côte d'Ivoire one of the most prosperous of the tropical African states, but did not protect it from political turmoil. (wikitravel.org)
  • The Government of France does not recognize the 12-page U.S. emergency passport, issued by U.S. embassies and consulates overseas, as a valid travel document for visa-free entry into France. (state.gov)
  • Mais voil , en ent rinant la partition-scission de la C te d'Ivoire entre le Nord dont la gestion est confi e aux rebelles habill s de nouveaux v tements de d mocrates et le Sud laiss la gestion du Pr sident Gbagbo, la France a voulu nous rappeler les pop es napol oniennes dont on ne retient que le romantisme. (grioo.com)
  • Many of his songs are politically and socially motivated, and are mainly sung in his native language of Dioula, French and in English, though he occasionally uses other languages, for example, Arabic or Hebrew. (wikipedia.org)
  • Allen, who speaks French and Kiswahili, says it takes openness, flexibility, a willingness to learn, a respect for other ways of doing things, and a sense of humor to work effectively in different cultural settings. (cdc.gov)
  • Davis, who speaks "rusty French," says "The reality is it takes time to gain trust and to get buy-in from local counterparts. (cdc.gov)
  • The official language of the republic is French , with local indigenous languages also being widely used that include Baoulé , Dioula , Dan , Anyin , and Cebaara Senufo . (wikipedia.org)
  • If cheese and excellence in French cuisine (UNESCO Cultural Heritage) are two recognizable traits, the wines of Bordeaux and Champagne are also greatly renowned. (flytap.com)
  • Several thousand French and West African troops, and a moderately-sized United Nations contingent, remain in Côte d'Ivoire to maintain peace and facilitate the disarmament, demobilization, and rehabilitation process. (wikitravel.org)
  • Colonel Georges Guiai Bi Poin, who was in charge of a contingent of Ivorian gendarmes dispatched to control the crowd and coordinate with the French troops, says that the order to fire came from the commander of the latter, colonel D'Estremon. (pjmedia.com)
  • Exercise increased caution in France due to terrorism and civil unrest. (state.gov)
  • France Telecom-Orange is one of the world's leading telecommunications operators with 169,000 employees worldwide, including 102,000 employees in France, and sales of 45.5 billion euros in. (devex.com)