Exploitation through misrepresentation of the facts or concealment of the purposes of the exploiter.
Intentional falsification of scientific data by presentation of fraudulent or incomplete or uncorroborated findings as scientific fact.
Referral by physicians to testing or treatment facilities in which they have financial interest. The practice is regulated by the Ethics in Patient Referrals Act of 1989.
The fraudulent misrepresentation of the diagnosis and treatment of disease.
A system of government in which there is free and equal participation by the people in the political decision-making process.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Moscow" is a city and the capital of Russia, it doesn't have a medical definition. If you have any medical or health-related questions, I would be happy to try to help answer them.
Insurance providing coverage for physical injury suffered as a result of unavoidable circumstances.
Passing off as one's own the work of another without credit.
Authors' withdrawal or disavowal of their participation in performing research or writing the results of their study.
The design, completion, and filing of forms with the insurer.
The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)

Health care programs: fraud and abuse; revised OIG civil money penalties resulting from public law 104-191. Office of Inspector General (OIG), HHS. Final rule. (1/124)

This final rule revises the OIG's civil money penalty (CMP) authorities, in conjunction with new and revised provisions set forth in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. Among other provisions, this final rulemaking codifies new CMPs for excluded individuals retaining ownership or control interest in an entity; upcoding and claims for medically unnecessary services; offering inducements to beneficiaries; and false certification of eligibility for home health services. This rule also codifies a number of technical corrections to the regulations governing OIG's sanction authorities.  (+info)

Privacy Act; implementation. Office of Inspector General (OIG), HHS. Final rule. (2/124)

This final rule exempts the new system of records, the Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank (HIPDB), from certain provisions of the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a). The establishment of the HIPDB is required by section 1128E of the Social Security Act (the Act), as added by section 221(a) of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996. Section 1128E of the Act directed the Secretary to establish a national health care fraud and abuse data collection program for the reporting and disclosing of certain final adverse actions taken against health care providers, suppliers or practitioners, and to maintain a data base of final adverse actions taken against health care providers, suppliers and practitioners. Regulations implementing the new HIPDB were published in the Federal Register on October 26, 1999 (64 FR 57740). The exemption being set forth in this rule applies to investigative materials compiled for law enforcement purposes.  (+info)

Unconventional dentistry: Part III. Legal and regulatory issues. (3/124)

This is the third in a series of 5 articles providing a contemporary overview and introduction to unconventional dentistry (UD) and its correlation to unconventional medicine (UM). UD presents issues of dental quackery, fraud and malpractice, and it also engenders professional concerns about public protection and professional risks. Case reports illustrate numerous issues. The reader is encouraged to evaluate the cases for problems related to malpractice, fraud, ethics, behaviours and professionalism. A discussion of ethical issues is beyond the scope of this paper.  (+info)

An on-site audit of the South African trial of high-dose chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer and associated publications. (4/124)

PURPOSE: The randomized study reported by Bezwoda et al of high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) for treatment of metastatic breast cancer was audited on site to verify the study results. Additional published studies were reviewed to determine whether they had been subject to the required institutional oversight. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ninety patients were reported to have been randomized and treated on this trial. A log of the names, hospital numbers, entry dates, and regimen received had been provided by the principal investigator. A search of more than 15,000 sets of medical records available from two Johannesburg hospitals was performed to locate records for as many of these 90 patients as possible. Standard auditing techniques were used. Additional clinical trials published by Bezwoda were compared against the minutes of the University of the Witwatersrand Committee for Research on Human Subjects to verify review and approval. RESULTS: Records for only 61 of the 90 patients could be found. Of these 61, only 27 had sufficient records to verify eligibility for the trial by the published criteria. Of these 27, 18 did not meet one or more eligibility criteria. Only 25 patients appeared to have received their assigned therapy temporally associated with their enrollment date, and all but three of these 25 received HDC. The treatment details of individual patients were at great variance from the published data. Nine other trials reported by Bezwoda were not reviewed or approved by the appropriate institutional committee despite statements to the contrary in the publications. CONCLUSION: The multiple publications of this study do not report verifiable data, and nine other publications coauthored by the principal investigator contain at least one major untrue statement.  (+info)

Fraud-and-abuse enforcement in Medicare: finding middle ground. (5/124)

Medicare fraud and abuse cost billions of dollars each year. Yet Congress is considering legislation to hamper enforcement. Providers' anger over enforcement led to a congressional compromise several years ago to limit excesses. If providers and their advocates were to hobble enforcement, this could provoke a backlash. Instead, the existing compromise should be strengthened to accommodate legitimate provider concerns while allowing enforcement against major fraud and abuse. Government should further confine, structure, and check its discretion in applying the False Claims Act. Enhancing the Health Care Financing Administration's capacity to ensure that contractors pay claims properly would remove additional points of friction.  (+info)

Consumers versus managed care: the new class actions. (6/124)

The plaintiffs in pending consumer class-action lawsuits against health maintenance organizations (HMOs) should fail in their claims for damages for fraud under federal anti-racketeering legislation. Although HMOs have regularly failed to disclose their business methods and have not strictly honored their contractual coverage promises, the circumstances in which they introduced cost controls into a market sadly lacking them suggest motives not deserving punitive sanctions. Courts could easily find that HMOs violated the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), however. Injunctive relief compelling more extensive disclosures and clearer contracts might well legitimize HMOs' methods and generally improve the performance of the health care marketplace.  (+info)

Medicare program; civil money penalties, assessments, and revised sanction authorities. Final rule with comment period. (7/124)

This final rule with comment period is a technical rule that updates our civil money penalty (CMP) regulations to add CMP authorities already enacted as part of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) and delegated to us. The rule delineates our authority to assess penalties for: failure to bill outpatient therapy services or comprehensive outpatient rehabilitation services (CORS) on an assignment-related basis, failure to bill ambulance services on an assignment-related basis, failure to provide an itemized statement for Medicare items and services to a Medicare beneficiary upon his/her request, and failure of physicians or nonphysician practitioners to provide diagnostic codes for items or services they furnish or failure to provide this information to the entity furnishing the item or service ordered by the practitioner. The rule also contains technical changes to further conform our current CMP rules to changes in the statute enacted by the BBA.  (+info)

Providing long-term care benefits in cash: moving to a disability model. (8/124)

This paper examines the role of a disability approach to the allocation of long-term care benefits. It first highlights the important elements of long-term care that support a disability model. It then reviews the advantages and disadvantages of this approach relative to the traditional indemnity model and summarizes key features of selected domestic and international programs that offer a disability-type benefit. The paper identifies and elaborates on the major implementation challenges and concludes with a recommendation for further examination of the costs and benefits of this approach to the public coffers, the private market, and long-term care consumers.  (+info)

In the context of medical law and ethics, fraud refers to a deliberate and intentional deception or misrepresentation of facts, motivated by personal gain, which is made by a person or entity in a position of trust, such as a healthcare professional or organization. This deception can occur through various means, including the provision of false information, the concealment of important facts, or the manipulation of data.

Medical fraud can take many forms, including:

1. Billing fraud: This occurs when healthcare providers submit false claims to insurance companies or government programs like Medicare and Medicaid for services that were not provided, were unnecessary, or were more expensive than the services actually rendered.
2. Prescription fraud: Healthcare professionals may engage in prescription fraud by writing unnecessary prescriptions for controlled substances, such as opioids, for their own use or to sell on the black market. They may also alter prescriptions or use stolen identities to obtain these drugs.
3. Research fraud: Scientists and researchers can commit fraud by manipulating or falsifying data in clinical trials, experiments, or studies to support predetermined outcomes or to secure funding and recognition.
4. Credentialing fraud: Healthcare professionals may misrepresent their qualifications, licenses, or certifications to gain employment or admitting privileges at healthcare facilities.
5. Identity theft: Stealing someone's personal information to obtain medical services, prescription medications, or insurance benefits is another form of medical fraud.

Medical fraud not only has severe legal consequences for those found guilty but also undermines the trust between patients and healthcare providers, jeopardizes patient safety, and contributes to rising healthcare costs.

Scientific misconduct is defined by the US Department of Health and Human Services as "fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism in proposing, performing, or reviewing research, or in reporting research results." Fabrication means making up data or results that never occurred. Falsification means manipulating research materials, equipment, or processes, or changing or omitting data or results such that the research is not accurately represented in the research record. Plagiarism is the appropriation of another person's ideas, processes, results, or words without giving appropriate credit.

Scientific misconduct also includes other practices that seriously deviate from those that are commonly accepted within the scientific community for proposing, conducting, or reporting research. It does not include honest error or differences of opinion.

It is important to note that scientific misconduct can have serious consequences for the individuals involved and for the integrity of the scientific enterprise as a whole. It is essential that researchers adhere to the highest standards of integrity in order to maintain public trust in science and to ensure that research results are reliable and reproducible.

Physician Self-Referral, also known as the Stark Law, is a federal regulation that prohibits physicians from referring their patients to certain healthcare services or providers with whom they have a financial relationship, unless an exception applies. The law is designed to prevent conflicts of interest and ensure that physician referrals are based on the patient's medical needs rather than financial considerations.

The Stark Law covers designated health services (DHS) such as clinical laboratory services, physical therapy, radiology, radiation therapy, durable medical equipment, home health services, outpatient prescription drugs, and inpatient and outpatient hospital services. It applies to referrals made by physicians who have a financial relationship with the DHS entity, such as ownership, investment, or compensation arrangements.

Violations of the Stark Law can result in significant civil penalties, including fines and exclusion from federal healthcare programs. However, there are several exceptions to the law, such as in-office ancillary services, rural provider exceptions, and academic medical center exceptions, among others. It is essential for physicians and healthcare providers to understand and comply with the Stark Law and its exceptions to avoid legal and financial consequences.

Quackery is defined in the medical context as the promotion of fraudulent or unproven medical practices and treatments. Quacks, or individuals who practice quackery, often claim to have expertise in areas of medicine that they do not actually possess. They may use manipulative marketing techniques to exploit individuals' fears and vulnerabilities, promising quick cures or miracle treatments for various ailments.

Quackery can be harmful because it can lead people to choose ineffective or even dangerous treatments instead of evidence-based medical care. It is important for healthcare providers and consumers alike to be aware of quackery and to promote scientific literacy and critical thinking when evaluating medical claims.

I am not aware of a specific medical definition for "democracy" as it is a political science term. However, democracy generally refers to a system of government in which power is vested in the people, who rule either directly or through freely elected representatives. It is based on the principles of equality, freedom, and the rule of law.

In the context of healthcare, the concept of democracy may refer to the idea of patient-centered care, where patients are actively involved in decision-making about their own health and healthcare. This approach recognizes the importance of individual autonomy, informed consent, and shared decision-making between patients and healthcare providers. It also emphasizes the need for transparency, accountability, and responsiveness in healthcare systems and organizations.

Therefore, while "democracy" may not have a specific medical definition, its principles are relevant to the provision of high-quality, ethical, and compassionate healthcare.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Moscow" is not a medical term. It is the capital city of Russia. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, I'd be happy to help!

Accident insurance is a type of coverage that provides benefits in the event of an unexpected injury or accident. This type of insurance is designed to help protect individuals from financial losses due to medical expenses, lost wages, and other costs associated with an accidental injury. Accident insurance policies typically cover events such as falls, motor vehicle accidents, sports injuries, and other unforeseen accidents. Benefits may include reimbursement for medical bills, disability payments, or even death benefits in the event of a fatal accident. It's important to note that accident insurance is not a substitute for comprehensive health insurance coverage, but rather a supplement to help cover out-of-pocket costs associated with accidents.

Plagiarism is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a more general term that refers to the practice of using someone else's ideas, words, or creative expressions without giving credit to the original author. This can include copying and pasting text from another source without providing proper citation, failing to put quotation marks around borrowed language, or presenting another person's work as one's own.

Plagiarism is considered unethical in academic, professional, and creative settings because it involves stealing someone else's intellectual property and passing it off as one's own. It can have serious consequences, including damage to one's reputation, loss of credibility, and even legal action in some cases.

In the context of medical research and writing, plagiarism is taken very seriously and can result in sanctions such as retraction of published articles, loss of funding, or damage to professional standing. It is important for medical professionals and researchers to always give credit where credit is due and to properly cite any sources they use in their work.

"Retraction of publication" is the process by which a published article or paper is withdrawn from the scientific literature due to significant errors, misconduct, or unethical behavior found in the study. The retraction may be initiated by the authors themselves, the journal editorial board, or the publisher. A retraction notice is typically issued, explaining the reasons for the retraction and providing details about the original publication. This ensures that the scientific record remains accurate and reliable, while also alerting readers to any concerns with the validity of the research findings.

Insurance claim reporting is the process of informing an insurance company about a potential claim that an insured individual or business intends to make under their insurance policy. This report typically includes details about the incident or loss, such as the date, time, location, and type of damage or injury, as well as any relevant documentation, such as police reports or medical records.

The purpose of insurance claim reporting is to initiate the claims process and provide the insurance company with the necessary information to evaluate the claim and determine coverage. The insured individual or business may be required to submit additional information or evidence to support their claim, and the insurance company will conduct an investigation to assess the validity and value of the claim.

Prompt and accurate reporting of insurance claims is important to ensure that the claim is processed in a timely manner and to avoid any potential delays or denials of coverage based on late reporting. It is also important to provide complete and truthful information during the claims process, as misrepresentations or false statements can lead to claim denials or even fraud investigations.

Professional ethics in the medical field are a set of principles that guide physicians and other healthcare professionals in their interactions with patients, colleagues, and society. These ethical standards are based on values such as respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. They help to ensure that medical professionals provide high-quality care that is safe, effective, and respectful of patients' rights and dignity.

Some key principles of professional ethics in medicine include:

1. Respect for autonomy: Healthcare professionals should respect patients' right to make their own decisions about their healthcare, including the right to refuse treatment.
2. Non-maleficence: Medical professionals have a duty to avoid causing harm to their patients. This includes avoiding unnecessary tests or treatments that may cause harm or waste resources.
3. Beneficence: Healthcare professionals have a duty to act in the best interests of their patients and to promote their well-being.
4. Justice: Medical professionals should treat all patients fairly and without discrimination, and should work to ensure that healthcare resources are distributed equitably.
5. Confidentiality: Medical professionals have a duty to keep patient information confidential, unless the patient gives permission to share it or there is a legal or ethical obligation to disclose it.
6. Professional competence: Medical professionals have a duty to maintain their knowledge and skills, and to provide care that meets accepted standards of practice.
7. Honesty and integrity: Medical professionals should be honest and truthful in their interactions with patients, colleagues, and other stakeholders. They should avoid conflicts of interest and should disclose any potential conflicts to patients and others.
8. Responsibility to society: Medical professionals have a responsibility to contribute to the health and well-being of society as a whole, including advocating for policies that promote public health and addressing health disparities.

Financial crimes Forgery Fortune telling fraud Fraud deterrence Fraud in the factum Fraud in parapsychology Fraud Squad (UK) ... Fraud can violate civil law (e.g., a fraud victim may sue the fraud perpetrator to avoid the fraud or recover monetary ... The main fraud offences are common law fraud, uttering, embezzlement, and statutory fraud. The Fraud Act 2006 does not apply in ... Internal fraud, also known as "insider fraud", is fraud committed or attempted by someone within an organisation such as an ...
... is a legal fiction describing a situation where a person or entity gained an unfair advantage over another ... Intent does not need to be shown as in the case of actual fraud. Some unfair methods may include not telling customers about ...
"Fyre Fraud". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved January 24, 2019. Allen, Nick (January 16, 2019). "Fyre Fraud Movie Review ... Netflix's Fyre Festival doc beats out Hulu's version for best documentary Emmy nomination Fyre Fraud at IMDb Fyre Fraud on Hulu ... Fyre Fraud would be a powerful documentary that used Fyre Festival as a springboard for a more incisive examination of fraud in ... Instead, Fyre Fraud is content to exist as a dark comedy of sorts, poking fun at the players involved without really absorbing ...
Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Finance fraud, Organized crime activity). ...
... is based on the premise that fraud is not a random occurrence; fraud occurs where the conditions are right for ... Fraud deterrence is not earlier fraud detection, and this is often a confusing point. Fraud detection involves a review of ... Fraud deterrence attacks the root causes and enablers of fraud; this analysis could reveal potential fraud opportunities in the ... Breaking the Fraud Triangle is the key to fraud deterrence. Breaking the Fraud Triangle implies that an organization must ...
"Film Review: 'Fraud'". May 9, 2016. "Hot Docs 2016 Q&A: Fraud director Dean Fleischer-Camp , Toronto Film Scene". Archived from ... 2021 Fraud (2016), retrieved October 9, 2021 Animation portal Internet portal Fraud Archived 2016-06-11 at the Wayback Machine ... Fraud is a 2016 conceptual documentary film directed by Dean Fleischer Camp. The film is made up of re-edited homevideos ... "Fraud Film Review" Archived 2020-07-01 at the Wayback Machine "POV's Documentary Blog , PBS". PBS. Archived from the original ...
In April 2020, a 20-year voter fraud study by MIT University found the level of fraud "exceedingly rare" since it occurs only ... Electoral fraud, sometimes referred to as election manipulation, voter fraud or vote rigging, involves illegal interference ... of fraud. Election forensics can be combined with other fraud detection and prevention strategies, such as in-person monitoring ... To prevent fraud in central tabulation, there has to be a public list of the results from every single polling place. This is ...
Soft fraud, which is far more common than hard fraud, is sometimes also referred to as opportunistic fraud. This type of fraud ... Insurance fraud can be classified as either hard fraud or soft fraud. Hard fraud occurs when someone deliberately plans or ... "Insurance Fraud." National Health Care Anti-Fraud Association. "The Problem of Health Care Fraud." Hyman, David A. "Health Care ... "Serious and Complex Fraud." p. 127. Ministry of Justice. "Fraud Act 2006." "Insurance Fraud Taskforce". Gov.UK. Retrieved March ...
Fraud is not a total heist film, neither does it quite follow the conventions and cliches of a crime caper. "Mr. Fraud is a ... At the same time it's not a mindless medley as Mr Fraud also has a focused storyline to keep the viewers hooked. Mr Fraud zooms ... Fraud". Sify.com. 19 May 2014. Retrieved 19 May 2014. Paresh C. Palicha (19 May 2014). "Review: Mr Fraud does not entertain". ... Fraud. Finally, Exhibitors Federation allowed to release Mr. Fraud, but imposed a blanket ban on B. Unnikrishnan. Liberty ...
Advance fee fraud Business logic abuse Carding (fraud) Credit card fraud Email fraud Employment scams FBI Forex scam Fraud ... Online fraud appears in many forms. It ranges from email spam to online scams. Internet fraud can occur even if partly based on ... Internet fraud is a type of cybercrime fraud or deception which makes use of the Internet and could involve hiding of ... Internet fraud is not considered a single, distinctive crime but covers a range of illegal and illicit actions that are ...
ISBN 978-1-59605-237-6. fraud Facts, information, pictures , Encyclopedia.com articles about fraud. 2014. fraud Facts, ... fraud Facts, information, pictures , Encyclopedia.com articles about fraud. 2014. fraud Facts, information, pictures , ... Unconscious fraud is fraud committed by somebody who does not consciously realise that they are deceiving others. Examples ... As the frauds committed under this category lacked physical phenomena, it can be constituted as unconscious fraud. Gale ...
The jury found Jones liable for negligence, fraud, and other claims. There are many other types of fertility fraud, and they ... Sometimes other laws related to fertility fraud are used against the physician, such as mail, travel, or wire fraud, while ... Fertility fraud is the failure on the part of a fertility doctor to obtain consent from a patient before inseminating her with ... Stone faced trial in the case and was sentenced to three years probation for mail fraud. He was fined $50,000 by the judge in ...
... is a type of fraud in which drugs, legal or illegal, are cut or altered in such a way that diminishes their value ... Illegal drug fraud is rarely addressed in court, as victims rarely involve police, but legal drug fraud is on the rise. Its ... Fraud, Drug culture, Consumer fraud, Medical crime, Pseudoscience). ... Legal drug fraud occurs when a physician prescribes medication for a patient under false pretenses. This may be because the ...
The Internet Crime Complaint Center maintains a list of guidelines to avoid charity fraud when making a donation. Charity fraud ... Charity Fraud Give.org BBB Standards for Charity Accountability Haitian Earthquake Relief Fraud Alert IRS: Life Cycle of an ... Charity fraud is the act of using deception to obtain money from people who believe they are donating to a charity. Often, ... After Hurricane Ian in the U.S. in 2022, the FBI Tampa Bay office warned that charity fraud scammers were at work, going door ...
This means that religious fraud's relative to affinity fraud is that affinity fraud is a common tactic used to conduct ... false claims to being kosher or tax fraud. A specific form of religious fraud is pious fraud (Latin: pia fraus), whereby one ... Religious fraud is a term used for civil or criminal fraud carried out in the name of a religion or within a religion, e.g. ... Though religious fraud is more specified in that it only relates to affinity fraud done through the common bond of religion and ...
Fraud or Frauds may also refer to: Fraud (book), 2006 non-fiction book Fraud (film), 2016 conceptual documentary film Frauds ( ... film), 1993 Australian film Frauds (soundtrack), soundtrack of the 1993 film Fraud (TV series), 2022 Pakistani television ... Fraud is intentional deception to secure unfair or unlawful gain, or to deprive a victim of a legal right. ... series This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Fraud. If an internal link led you here, you may wish ...
... the State Department discovered 900 cases of passport fraud a year. Passport fraud is usually committed by: Stealing the ... "Passport and Visa Fraud". U.S. Department of State. "Passport Law of the People's Republic of China". www.china-embassy.org. ... Passport fraud is an act of intentional deception that involves forgery, alteration, or false use of a travel document, such as ... "Passport and Visa Fraud: A Quick Course". 2009-2017.state.gov. (Wikipedia articles needing context from October 2009, All ...
"Fraud and Error Preliminary 2011/12 Estimates". Fraud and Error in the Benefit System: Preliminary 2011/12 Estimates (Great ... In 2008, California spent three times as much in policing welfare fraud as the amount the fraud cost. The US Federal government ... This represents all types of fraud, not just recipient fraud. In many cases, the recipients were victims of stolen benefits. ... 59% of Australians said that welfare fraud is seriously wrong, while 38% think it is "wrong" but not seriously. Welfare fraud ...
Since then, Harry Fraud's production has been a staple among French's music, becoming Fraud's gateway to working with other ... Fraud has called The Alchemist as his favorite producer. Harry Fraud's production has been described as "New York tinged, ... "Harry Fraud Bio". Hot New Hip Hop. Retrieved August 11, 2021. "In The Lab with Harry Fraud". NahRight. February 27, 2014. ... Harry Fraud - Adrift // Free Mixtape @ DatPiff.com Harry Fraud "Adrift" Mixtape Download & Stream , Get The Latest Hip Hop News ...
... , also known as stock fraud and investment fraud, is a deceptive practice in the stock or commodities markets ... This type of fraud has been estimated to cost investors $1-3 billion annually. Microcap fraud includes pump and dump schemes ... Any buyers of the stock who are unaware of the fraud become victims once the price falls. The SEC says that Internet fraud ... List of securities frauds Accounting scandals Illicit financial flows Insider trading Microcap stock fraud Penny stock Pyramid ...
Fraud: Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo and the May 2004 Elections is a 2006 book about the electoral scandal surrounding Gloria ... 2006). Fraud: Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo and the May 2004 Elections. University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City: CenPEG. ... Silverio, Ina Alleco R. (November 19, 2006). "Book Review: Robbing the 2004 Polls Review of Fraud: Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo and ... Ina Alleco R. Silverio, writing for the news website Bulatlat, gave Fraud a positive review, praising its "staggering" ...
In the United States, computer fraud is specifically proscribed by the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), which criminalizes ... Computer and Internet Fraud "Computer fraud". Computer Hope. Retrieved 19 June 2023. Kevin Jakopchek (2014-01-01). ""Obtaining ... Computer fraud is the use of computers, the Internet, Internet devices, and Internet services to defraud people or ... Types of computer fraud include: Distributing hoax emails Accessing unauthorized computers Engaging in data mining via spyware ...
... may mean either to falsely claim the right to a coat of arms (or other component of heraldic display) for ... Genealogical fraud, Fraud, All stub articles, Heraldry stubs). ... Both can be seen as a kind of fraud and an infringement of ...
... is a type of financial fraud using round numbers. It is frequently caught by the over usage of certain ... "Round numbers: A fingerprint of fraud". Journal of Accountancy. May 1, 2018. "When Rounding Up Costs You Money: More SNF Fraud ... "Dusting your data for fraud's fingerprints: Six number patterns that fraudsters use". www.fraud-magazine.com. " ... A notable example of rounding fraud was committed by the India-based company Satyam Computer Services which was detected in ...
... is a type of fraud in which the perpetrator uses an inaccurate or fictitious address to steal money or other ... Address fraud has been committed by parents attempting to get their children into a public school in a jurisdiction other than ... "Ann Coulter Voting Fraud Case Likely Will Be Turned Over to Prosecutors, Florida Elections Chief Says , Fox News". foxnews.com ... "Economic slowdown fuels fraud - Business Credit News UK". creditman.biz. Archived from the original on 2011-07-06. Retrieved ...
The scope of franchise fraud is also narrower than the scope of ordinary common law fraud action. The Indiana Supreme Court ... Is Accused of Franchise Fraud". The New York Times. Mencimer, Stephanie (February 2009). "Franchise Fraud: Wake Up and Smell ... and the identification of what was procured by the fraud. [… However,] the plaintiff in a franchise fraud action must ... Franchise fraud is defined by the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation as a pyramid scheme. The FBI website states: " ...
Masterminds Behind Pharmaceutical Fraud Deserve Prison Time Blowing the Whistle on Health Care Fraud Health Care Fraud ... Violations Off Label Marketing Best Price Fraud CME Fraud Medicaid Price Reporting Manufactured Compound Drugs Involve fraud ... Big Pharma (2006) by Jacky Law Bad Pharma (2012) by Ben Goldacre Drug fraud Health care fraud Lists about the pharmaceutical ... These include: Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) Violations, Off Label Marketing, Best Price Fraud, CME Fraud, Medicaid Price ...
The fraud, together with failures in management strategy, resulted in bankruptcy (2001) and then restructuring of the company. ... Tunneling or tunnelling is financial fraud committed by "the transfer of assets and profits out of firms for the benefit of ... The main conditions enabling such a fraud is weak law against conflict of interests, non-existent legal liability of managers ... tunelář for the person committing fraud) during the first half of the 1990s, when several large, previously privatised banks ...
Employee fraud: Assistance from employees to return stolen goods for full retail price. Open-box fraud: Purchasing an item from ... has been described by industry advocates as a form of return fraud. Wardrobing is a form of return fraud where an item is ... Bush who resigned after being arrested for return fraud "Retail Refund Fraud and Abuse". LPM Insider. 21 January 2013. ... Return fraud is the act of defrauding a retail store by means of the return process. There are various ways in which this crime ...
... , Medicare and Medicaid (United States), Insurance fraud, Fraud in the United States, Fraud). ... "Medicare Fraud Center - Report Medicare Fraud Here". "Who can become a Medicare fraud whistleblower?". "Alleged misconduct by ... Benefit fraud Zone Program Integrity Contractor "Medicare Fraud and Fraud in Other Government Healthcare Programs". Retrieved ... "Medicare Fraud Reporting Center - Report Medicare Fraud Here - What is Medicare Fraud?". Medicarefraudcenter.org. Retrieved ...

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