A type of mutation in which a number of NUCLEOTIDES deleted from or inserted into a protein coding sequence is not divisible by three, thereby causing an alteration in the READING FRAMES of the entire coding sequence downstream of the mutation. These mutations may be induced by certain types of MUTAGENS or may occur spontaneously.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
A mutation caused by the substitution of one nucleotide for another. This results in the DNA molecule having a change in a single base pair.
A mutation in which a codon is mutated to one directing the incorporation of a different amino acid. This substitution may result in an inactive or unstable product. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, King & Stansfield, 5th ed)
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.
A directed change in translational READING FRAMES that allows the production of a single protein from two or more OVERLAPPING GENES. The process is programmed by the nucleotide sequence of the MRNA and is sometimes also affected by the secondary or tertiary mRNA structure. It has been described mainly in VIRUSES (especially RETROVIRUSES); RETROTRANSPOSONS; and bacterial insertion elements but also in some cellular genes.
Biochemical identification of mutational changes in a nucleotide sequence.
An amino acid-specifying codon that has been converted to a stop codon (CODON, TERMINATOR) by mutation. Its occurance is abnormal causing premature termination of protein translation and results in production of truncated and non-functional proteins. A nonsense mutation is one that converts an amino acid-specific codon to a stop codon.
The parts of a transcript of a split GENE remaining after the INTRONS are removed. They are spliced together to become a MESSENGER RNA or other functional RNA.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Any detectable and heritable alteration in the lineage of germ cells. Mutations in these cells (i.e., "generative" cells ancestral to the gametes) are transmitted to progeny while those in somatic cells are not.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
Deletion of sequences of nucleic acids from the genetic material of an individual.
Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
An individual having different alleles at one or more loci regarding a specific character.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
An individual in which both alleles at a given locus are identical.
Variation in a population's DNA sequence that is detected by determining alterations in the conformation of denatured DNA fragments. Denatured DNA fragments are allowed to renature under conditions that prevent the formation of double-stranded DNA and allow secondary structure to form in single stranded fragments. These fragments are then run through polyacrylamide gels to detect variations in the secondary structure that is manifested as an alteration in migration through the gels.
A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).
A set of three nucleotides in a protein coding sequence that specifies individual amino acids or a termination signal (CODON, TERMINATOR). Most codons are universal, but some organisms do not produce the transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER) complementary to all codons. These codons are referred to as unassigned codons (CODONS, NONSENSE).
Mutation process that restores the wild-type PHENOTYPE in an organism possessing a mutationally altered GENOTYPE. The second "suppressor" mutation may be on a different gene, on the same gene but located at a distance from the site of the primary mutation, or in extrachromosomal genes (EXTRACHROMOSOMAL INHERITANCE).
Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.
Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE only in the homozygous state.
Any codon that signals the termination of genetic translation (TRANSLATION, GENETIC). PEPTIDE TERMINATION FACTORS bind to the stop codon and trigger the hydrolysis of the aminoacyl bond connecting the completed polypeptide to the tRNA. Terminator codons do not specify amino acids.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
A highly fluorescent anti-infective dye used clinically as a topical antiseptic and experimentally as a mutagen, due to its interaction with DNA. It is also used as an intracellular pH indicator.
Topical antiseptic used mainly in wound dressings.
Chemical agents that increase the rate of genetic mutation by interfering with the function of nucleic acids. A clastogen is a specific mutagen that causes breaks in chromosomes.
A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
The presence of an uncomplimentary base in double-stranded DNA caused by spontaneous deamination of cytosine or adenine, mismatching during homologous recombination, or errors in DNA replication. Multiple, sequential base pair mismatches lead to formation of heteroduplex DNA; (NUCLEIC ACID HETERODUPLEXES).
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.
A characteristic symptom complex.
The magnitude of INBREEDING in humans.
Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.
Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.
A sequence of successive nucleotide triplets that are read as CODONS specifying AMINO ACIDS and begin with an INITIATOR CODON and end with a stop codon (CODON, TERMINATOR).
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
The naturally occurring or experimentally induced replacement of one or more AMINO ACIDS in a protein with another. If a functionally equivalent amino acid is substituted, the protein may retain wild-type activity. Substitution may also diminish, enhance, or eliminate protein function. Experimentally induced substitution is often used to study enzyme activities and binding site properties.
The number of mutations that occur in a specific sequence, GENE, or GENOME over a specified period of time such as years, CELL DIVISIONS, or generations.
Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.
Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE both in the homozygous and the heterozygous state.
A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.
Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
The reconstruction of a continuous two-stranded DNA molecule without mismatch from a molecule which contained damaged regions. The major repair mechanisms are excision repair, in which defective regions in one strand are excised and resynthesized using the complementary base pairing information in the intact strand; photoreactivation repair, in which the lethal and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light are eliminated; and post-replication repair, in which the primary lesions are not repaired, but the gaps in one daughter duplex are filled in by incorporation of portions of the other (undamaged) daughter duplex. Excision repair and post-replication repair are sometimes referred to as "dark repair" because they do not require light.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
Acridines are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds containing two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 3 of a planar, unsaturated ring system, which have been widely used in chemotherapy and have also found applications in dye industries and fluorescence microscopy.
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
The three possible sequences of CODONS by which GENETIC TRANSLATION may occur from one nucleotide sequence. A segment of mRNA 5'AUCCGA3' could be translated as 5'AUC.. or 5'UCC.. or 5'CCG.., depending on the location of the START CODON.
'Abnormalities, Multiple' is a broad term referring to the presence of two or more structural or functional anomalies in an individual, which may be genetic or environmental in origin, and can affect various systems and organs of the body.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
That part of the genome that corresponds to the complete complement of EXONS of an organism or cell.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
DEFICIENS is a homeotic gene involved in the genetic control of Antirrhinum majus flower development. Its protein is one of the four founder proteins that structurally define the superfamily of MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS.
A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.
A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.
The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME.
Nucleotide sequences located at the ends of EXONS and recognized in pre-messenger RNA by SPLICEOSOMES. They are joined during the RNA SPLICING reaction, forming the junctions between exons.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation.
The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.
The occurrence of highly polymorphic mono- and dinucleotide MICROSATELLITE REPEATS in somatic cells. It is a form of genome instability associated with defects in DNA MISMATCH REPAIR.
Use of restriction endonucleases to analyze and generate a physical map of genomes, genes, or other segments of DNA.
Detection of a MUTATION; GENOTYPE; KARYOTYPE; or specific ALLELES associated with genetic traits, heritable diseases, or predisposition to a disease, or that may lead to the disease in descendants. It includes prenatal genetic testing.
A phenomenon that is observed when a small subgroup of a larger POPULATION establishes itself as a separate and isolated entity. The subgroup's GENE POOL carries only a fraction of the genetic diversity of the parental population resulting in an increased frequency of certain diseases in the subgroup, especially those diseases known to be autosomal recessive.
One of the two types of ACTIVIN RECEPTORS. They are membrane protein kinases belonging to the family of PROTEIN-SERINE-THREONINE KINASES. The major type II activin receptors are ActR-IIA and ActR-IIB.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.
Hereditary, progressive degeneration of the neuroepithelium of the retina characterized by night blindness and progressive contraction of the visual field.
The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.
Genetic diseases that are linked to gene mutations on the X CHROMOSOME in humans (X CHROMOSOME, HUMAN) or the X CHROMOSOME in other species. Included here are animal models of human X-linked diseases.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
Sequences of DNA in the genes that are located between the EXONS. They are transcribed along with the exons but are removed from the primary gene transcript by RNA SPLICING to leave mature RNA. Some introns code for separate genes.
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
DNA present in neoplastic tissue.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.
A serotype of Salmonella enterica that is a frequent agent of Salmonella gastroenteritis in humans. It also causes PARATYPHOID FEVER.
The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.
Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.
Mild or moderate loss of motor function accompanied by spasticity in the lower extremities. This condition is a manifestation of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES that cause injury to the motor cortex or descending motor pathways.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
Actual loss of portion of a chromosome.
Tumor suppressor genes located on the short arm of human chromosome 17 and coding for the phosphoprotein p53.
A hepatic carcinogen whose mechanism of activation involves N-hydroxylation to the aryl hydroxamic acid followed by enzymatic sulfonation to sulfoxyfluorenylacetamide. It is used to study the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of aromatic amines.
The process by which a DNA molecule is duplicated.
The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.
Genes bearing close resemblance to known genes at different loci, but rendered non-functional by additions or deletions in structure that prevent normal transcription or translation. When lacking introns and containing a poly-A segment near the downstream end (as a result of reverse copying from processed nuclear RNA into double-stranded DNA), they are called processed genes.
DNA-dependent DNA polymerases found in bacteria, animal and plant cells. During the replication process, these enzymes catalyze the addition of deoxyribonucleotide residues to the end of a DNA strand in the presence of DNA as template-primer. They also possess exonuclease activity and therefore function in DNA repair.
Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the teeth.
Sequences of DNA or RNA that occur in multiple copies. There are several types: INTERSPERSED REPETITIVE SEQUENCES are copies of transposable elements (DNA TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS or RETROELEMENTS) dispersed throughout the genome. TERMINAL REPEAT SEQUENCES flank both ends of another sequence, for example, the long terminal repeats (LTRs) on RETROVIRUSES. Variations may be direct repeats, those occurring in the same direction, or inverted repeats, those opposite to each other in direction. TANDEM REPEAT SEQUENCES are copies which lie adjacent to each other, direct or inverted (INVERTED REPEAT SEQUENCES).
The sequential set of three nucleotides in TRANSFER RNA that interacts with its complement in MESSENGER RNA, the CODON, during translation in the ribosome.
Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.
Acridines which are substituted in any position by one or more amino groups or substituted amino groups.
In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.
Genes that have a suppressor allele or suppressor mutation (SUPPRESSION, GENETIC) which cancels the effect of a previous mutation, enabling the wild-type phenotype to be maintained or partially restored. For example, amber suppressors cancel the effect of an AMBER NONSENSE MUTATION.
A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.
A DNA repair pathway involved in correction of errors introduced during DNA replication when an incorrect base, which cannot form hydrogen bonds with the corresponding base in the parent strand, is incorporated into the daughter strand. Excinucleases recognize the BASE PAIR MISMATCH and cause a segment of polynucleotide chain to be excised from the daughter strand, thereby removing the mismatched base. (from Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2001)
The ultimate exclusion of nonsense sequences or intervening sequences (introns) before the final RNA transcript is sent to the cytoplasm.
Tests of chemical substances and physical agents for mutagenic potential. They include microbial, insect, mammalian cell, and whole animal tests.
Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.
Proteins obtained from ESCHERICHIA COLI.
Polyprotein products of a fused portion of retroviral mRNA containing the gag and pol genes. The polyprotein is synthesized only five percent of the time since pol is out of frame with gag, and is generated by ribosomal frameshifting.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
A group of connective tissue diseases in which skin hangs in loose pendulous folds. It is believed to be associated with decreased elastic tissue formation as well as an abnormality in elastin formation. Cutis laxa is usually a genetic disease, but acquired cases have been reported. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28)
MutS homolog 2 protein is found throughout eukaryotes and is a homolog of the MUTS DNA MISMATCH-BINDING PROTEIN. It plays an essential role in meiotic RECOMBINATION and DNA REPAIR of mismatched NUCLEOTIDES.
A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.
The genetic unit consisting of three structural genes, an operator and a regulatory gene. The regulatory gene controls the synthesis of the three structural genes: BETA-GALACTOSIDASE and beta-galactoside permease (involved with the metabolism of lactose), and beta-thiogalactoside acetyltransferase.
Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.
Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.
Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the eye; may also be hereditary.
Synthetic or natural oligonucleotides used in hybridization studies in order to identify and study specific nucleic acid fragments, e.g., DNA segments near or within a specific gene locus or gene. The probe hybridizes with a specific mRNA, if present. Conventional techniques used for testing for the hybridization product include dot blot assays, Southern blot assays, and DNA:RNA hybrid-specific antibody tests. Conventional labels for the probe include the radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin.
Heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders comprising at least four recognized types, all having in common varying degrees of hypopigmentation of the skin, hair, and eyes. The two most common are the tyrosinase-positive and tyrosinase-negative types.
Tumor suppressor genes located in the 5q21 region on the long arm of human chromosome 5. The mutation of these genes is associated with familial adenomatous polyposis (ADENOMATOUS POLYPOSIS COLI) and GARDNER SYNDROME, as well as some sporadic colorectal cancers.
The loss of one allele at a specific locus, caused by a deletion mutation; or loss of a chromosome from a chromosome pair, resulting in abnormal HEMIZYGOSITY. It is detected when heterozygous markers for a locus appear monomorphic because one of the ALLELES was deleted.
A tumor suppressor gene (GENES, TUMOR SUPPRESSOR) located on human CHROMOSOME 17 at locus 17q21. Mutations of this gene are associated with the formation of HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER SYNDROME. It encodes a large nuclear protein that is a component of DNA repair pathways.
Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom.
'Eye proteins' are structural or functional proteins, such as crystallins, opsins, and collagens, located in various parts of the eye, including the cornea, lens, retina, and aqueous humor, that contribute to maintaining transparency, refractive power, phototransduction, and overall integrity of the visual system.
A copy number variation that results in reduced GENE DOSAGE due to any loss-of-function mutation. The loss of heterozygosity is associated with abnormal phenotypes or diseased states because the remaining gene is insufficient.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.
Group of mostly hereditary disorders characterized by thickening of the palms and soles as a result of excessive keratin formation leading to hypertrophy of the stratum corneum (hyperkeratosis).
Cell-surface proteins that bind transforming growth factor beta and trigger changes influencing the behavior of cells. Two types of transforming growth factor receptors have been recognized. They differ in affinity for different members of the transforming growth factor beta family and in cellular mechanisms of action.
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
The analysis of a sequence such as a region of a chromosome, a haplotype, a gene, or an allele for its involvement in controlling the phenotype of a specific trait, metabolic pathway, or disease.
The functional hereditary units of VIRUSES.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
The meaning ascribed to the BASE SEQUENCE with respect to how it is translated into AMINO ACID SEQUENCE. The start, stop, and order of amino acids of a protein is specified by consecutive triplets of nucleotides called codons (CODON).
The functional hereditary units of FUNGI.
Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.
Double-stranded nucleic acid molecules (DNA-DNA or DNA-RNA) which contain regions of nucleotide mismatches (non-complementary). In vivo, these heteroduplexes can result from mutation or genetic recombination; in vitro, they are formed by nucleic acid hybridization. Electron microscopic analysis of the resulting heteroduplexes facilitates the mapping of regions of base sequence homology of nucleic acids.
Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.
The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
CELL LINES derived from the CV-1 cell line by transformation with a replication origin defective mutant of SV40 VIRUS, which codes for wild type large T antigen (ANTIGENS, POLYOMAVIRUS TRANSFORMING). They are used for transfection and cloning. (The CV-1 cell line was derived from the kidney of an adult male African green monkey (CERCOPITHECUS AETHIOPS).)
The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.
Double-stranded DNA of MITOCHONDRIA. In eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GENOME is circular and codes for ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and about 10 proteins.
A group of autosomal-dominant inherited diseases in which COLON CANCER arises in discrete adenomas. Unlike FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI with hundreds of polyps, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal neoplasms occur much later, in the fourth and fifth decades. HNPCC has been associated with germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes. It has been subdivided into Lynch syndrome I or site-specific colonic cancer, and LYNCH SYNDROME II which includes extracolonic cancer.
A group of hereditary disorders involving tissues and structures derived from the embryonic ectoderm. They are characterized by the presence of abnormalities at birth and involvement of both the epidermis and skin appendages. They are generally nonprogressive and diffuse. Various forms exist, including anhidrotic and hidrotic dysplasias, FOCAL DERMAL HYPOPLASIA, and aplasia cutis congenita.
Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.
A group of alkylating agents derived from mustard gas, with the sulfur replaced by nitrogen. They were formerly used as toxicants and vesicants, but now function as antineoplastic agents. These compounds are also powerful mutagens, teratogens, immunosuppressants, and carcinogens.
An mRNA metabolic process that distinguishes a normal STOP CODON from a premature stop codon (NONSENSE CODON) and facilitates rapid degradation of aberrant mRNAs containing premature stop codons.
Variation occurring within a species in the presence or length of DNA fragment generated by a specific endonuclease at a specific site in the genome. Such variations are generated by mutations that create or abolish recognition sites for these enzymes or change the length of the fragment.
Unsaturated derivatives of PREGNANES.
Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.
Proteins obtained from the species SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.
The proportion of one particular in the total of all ALLELES for one genetic locus in a breeding POPULATION.

Transfer RNA modification status influences retroviral ribosomal frameshifting. (1/2000)

The possibility of whether tRNAs with and without a highly modified base in their anticodon loop may influence the level of retroviral ribosomal frameshifting was examined. Rabbit reticulocyte lysates were programmed with mRNA encoding UUU or AAC at the frameshift site and the corresponding Phe tRNA with or without the highly modified wyebutoxine (Y) base on the 3' side of its anticodon or Asn tRNA with or without the highly modified queuine (Q) base in the wobble position of its anticodon added. Phe and Asn tRNAs without the Y or Q base, respectively, stimulated the level of frameshifting, suggesting that the frameshift event is influenced by tRNA modification status. In addition, when AAU occurred immediately upstream of UUU as the penultimate frameshift site codon, addition of tRNAAsn without the Q base reduced the stimulatory effect of tRNAPhe without the Y base, whereas addition of tRNAAsn with the Q base did not alter the stimulatory effect. The addition of tRNAAsn without the Q base and tRNAPhe with the Y base inhibited frameshifting. The latter studies suggest an interplay between the tRNAs decoded at the penulimate frameshift and frameshift site codons that is also influenced by tRNA modification status. These data may be intrepreted as indicating that a hypomodified isoacceptor modulates frameshifting in an upward manner when utilized at the frameshift site codon, but modulates frameshifting in a downward manner when utilized at the penultimate frameshift site codon.  (+info)

Mutations in the nebulin gene associated with autosomal recessive nemaline myopathy. (2/2000)

The congenital nemaline myopathies are rare hereditary muscle disorders characterized by the presence in the muscle fibers of nemaline bodies consisting of proteins derived from the Z disc and thin filament. In a single large Australian family with an autosomal dominant form of nemaline myopathy, the disease is caused by a mutation in the alpha-tropomyosin gene TPM3. The typical form of nemaline myopathy is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, the locus of which we previously assigned to chromosome 2q21.2-q22. We show here that mutations in the nebulin gene located within this region are associated with the disease. The nebulin protein is a giant protein found in the thin filaments of striated muscle. A variety of nebulin isoforms are thought to contribute to the molecular diversity of Z discs. We have studied the 3' end of the 20. 8-kb cDNA encoding the Z disc part of the 800-kDa protein and describe six disease-associated mutations in patients from five families of different ethnic origins. In two families with consanguineous parents, the patients were homozygous for point mutations. In one family with nonconsanguineous parents, the affected siblings were compound heterozygotes for two different mutations, and in two further families with one detected mutation each, haplotypes are compatible with compound heterozygosity. Immunofluorescence studies with antibodies specific to the C-terminal region of nebulin indicate that the mutations may cause protein truncation possibly associated with loss of fiber-type diversity, which may be relevant to disease pathogenesis.  (+info)

Mutated epithelial cadherin is associated with increased tumorigenicity and loss of adhesion and of responsiveness to the motogenic trefoil factor 2 in colon carcinoma cells. (3/2000)

Epithelial (E)-cadherin and its associated cytoplasmic proteins (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-catenins) are important mediators of epithelial cell-cell adhesion and intracellular signaling. Much evidence exists suggesting a tumor/invasion suppressor role for E-cadherin, and loss of expression, as well as mutations, has been described in a number of epithelial cancers. To investigate whether E-cadherin gene (CDH1) mutations occur in colorectal cancer, we screened 49 human colon carcinoma cell lines from 43 patients by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and direct sequencing. In addition to silent changes, polymorphisms, and intronic variants in a number of the cell lines, we detected frameshift single-base deletions in repeat regions of exon 3 (codons 120 and 126) causing premature truncations at codon 216 in four replication-error-positive (RER+) cell lines (LS174T, HCT116, GP2d, and GP5d) derived from 3 patients. In LS174T such a mutation inevitably contributes to its lack of E-cadherin protein expression and function. Transfection of full-length E-cadherin cDNA into LS174T cells enhanced intercellular adhesion, induced differentiation, retarded proliferation, inhibited tumorigenicity, and restored responsiveness to the migratory effects induced by the motogenic trefoil factor 2 (human spasmolytic polypeptide). These results indicate that, although inactivating E-cadherin mutations occur relatively infrequently in colorectal cancer cell lines overall (3/43 = 7%), they are more common in cells with an RER+ phenotype (3/10 = 30%) and may contribute to the dysfunction of the E-cadherin-catenin-mediated adhesion/signaling system commonly seen in these tumors. These results also indicate that normal E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion can restore the ability of colonic tumor cells to respond to trefoil factor 2.  (+info)

Mutations in the organic cation/carnitine transporter OCTN2 in primary carnitine deficiency. (4/2000)

Primary carnitine deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of fatty acid oxidation caused by defective carnitine transport. This disease presents early in life with hypoketotic hypoglycemia or later in life with skeletal myopathy or cardiomyopathy. The gene for this condition maps to 5q31.2-32 and OCTN2, an organic cation/carnitine transporter, also maps to the same chromosomal region. Here we test the causative role of OCTN2 in primary carnitine deficiency by searching for mutations in this gene in affected patients. Fibroblasts from patients with primary carnitine deficiency lacked mediated carnitine transport. Transfection of patient's fibroblasts with the OCTN2 cDNA partially restored carnitine transport. Sequencing of the OCTN2 gene revealed different mutations in two unrelated patients. The first patient was homozygous (and both parents heterozygous) for a single base pair substitution converting the codon for Arg-282 to a STOP codon (R282X). The second patient was a compound heterozygote for a paternal 1-bp insertion producing a STOP codon (Y401X) and a maternal 1-bp deletion that produced a frameshift creating a subsequent STOP codon (458X). These mutations decreased the levels of mature OCTN2 mRNA and resulted in nonfunctional transporters, confirming that defects in the organic cation/carnitine transporter OCTN2 are responsible for primary carnitine deficiency.  (+info)

Infrequent translation of a nonsense codon is sufficient to decrease mRNA level. (5/2000)

In many organisms nonsense mutations decrease the level of mRNA. In the case of mammalian cells, it is still controversial whether translation is required for this nonsense-mediated RNA decrease (NMD). Although previous analyzes have shown that conditions that impede translation termination at nonsense codons also prevent NMD, the residual level of termination was unknown in these experiments. Moreover, the conditions used to impede termination might also have interfered with NMD in other ways. Because of these uncertainties, we have tested the effects of limiting translation of a nonsense codon in a different way, using two mutations in the immunoglobulin mu heavy chain gene. For this purpose we exploited an exceptional nonsense mutation at codon 3, which efficiently terminates translation but nonetheless maintains a high level of mu mRNA. We have shown 1) that translation of Ter462 in the double mutant occurs at only approximately 4% the normal frequency, and 2) that Ter462 in cis with Ter3 can induce NMD. That is, translation of Ter462 at this low (4%) frequency is sufficient to induce NMD.  (+info)

p53 mutations in human cutaneous melanoma correlate with sun exposure but are not always involved in melanomagenesis. (6/2000)

In melanoma, the relationship between sun exposure and the origin of mutations in either the N-ras oncogene or the p53 tumour-suppressor gene is not as clear as in other types of skin cancer. We have previously shown that mutations in the N-ras gene occur more frequently in melanomas originating from sun-exposed body sites, indicating that these mutations are UV induced. To investigate whether sun exposure also affects p53 in melanoma, we analysed 81 melanoma specimens for mutations in the p53 gene. The mutation frequency is higher than thus far reported: 17 specimens (21%) harbour one or more p53 mutations. Strikingly, 17 out of 22 mutations in p53 are of the C:G to TA or CC:GG to TT:AA transitional type, strongly suggesting an aetiology involving UV exposure. Interestingly, the p53 mutation frequency in metastases was much lower than in primary tumours. In the case of metastases, a role for sun exposure was indicated by the finding that the mutations are present exclusively in skin metastases and not in internal metastases. Together with a relatively frequent occurrence of silent third-base pair mutations in primary melanomas, this indicates that the p53 mutations, at least in these tumours, have not contributed to melanomagenesis and may have originated after establishment of the primary tumour.  (+info)

High frequency of germ-line BRCA2 mutations among Hungarian male breast cancer patients without family history. (7/2000)

To determine the contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations to the pathogenesis of male breast cancer in Hungary, the country with the highest male breast cancer mortality rates in continental Europe, a series of 18 male breast cancer patients and three patients with gynecomastia was analyzed for germ-line mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2. Although no germ-line BRCA1 mutation was observed, 6 of the 18 male breast cancer cases (33%) carried truncating mutations in the BRCA2 gene. Unexpectedly, none of them reported a family history for breast/ovarian cancer. Four of six truncating mutations were novel, and two mutations were recurrent. Four patients (22%) had a family history of breast/ovarian cancer in at least one first- or second-degree relative; however, no BRCA2 mutation was identified among them. No mutation was identified in either of the genes in the gynecomastias. These results provide evidence for a strong genetic component of male breast cancer in Hungary.  (+info)

How translational accuracy influences reading frame maintenance. (8/2000)

Most missense errors have little effect on protein function, since they only exchange one amino acid for another. However, processivity errors, frameshifting or premature termination result in a synthesis of an incomplete peptide. There may be a connection between missense and processivity errors, since processivity errors now appear to result from a second error occurring after recruitment of an errant aminoacyl-tRNA, either spontaneous dissociation causing premature termination or translational frameshifting. This is clearest in programmed translational frameshifting where the mRNA programs errant reading by a near-cognate tRNA; this error promotes a second frameshifting error (a dual-error model of frameshifting). The same mechanism can explain frameshifting by suppressor tRNAs, even those with expanded anticodon loops. The previous model that suppressor tRNAs induce quadruplet translocation now appears incorrect for most, and perhaps for all of them. We suggest that the 'spontaneous' tRNA-induced frameshifting and 'programmed' mRNA-induced frameshifting use the same mechanism, although the frequency of frameshifting is very different. This new model of frameshifting suggests that the tRNA is not acting as the yardstick to measure out the length of the translocation step. Rather, the translocation of 3 nucleotides may be an inherent feature of the ribosome.  (+info)

A frameshift mutation is a type of genetic mutation that occurs when the addition or deletion of nucleotides in a DNA sequence is not divisible by three. Since DNA is read in groups of three nucleotides (codons), which each specify an amino acid, this can shift the "reading frame," leading to the insertion or deletion of one or more amino acids in the resulting protein. This can cause a protein to be significantly different from the normal protein, often resulting in a nonfunctional protein and potentially causing disease. Frameshift mutations are typically caused by insertions or deletions of nucleotides, but they can also result from more complex genetic rearrangements.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

A point mutation is a type of genetic mutation where a single nucleotide base (A, T, C, or G) in DNA is altered, deleted, or substituted with another nucleotide. Point mutations can have various effects on the organism, depending on the location of the mutation and whether it affects the function of any genes. Some point mutations may not have any noticeable effect, while others might lead to changes in the amino acids that make up proteins, potentially causing diseases or altering traits. Point mutations can occur spontaneously due to errors during DNA replication or be inherited from parents.

A missense mutation is a type of point mutation in which a single nucleotide change results in the substitution of a different amino acid in the protein that is encoded by the affected gene. This occurs when the altered codon (a sequence of three nucleotides that corresponds to a specific amino acid) specifies a different amino acid than the original one. The function and/or stability of the resulting protein may be affected, depending on the type and location of the missense mutation. Missense mutations can have various effects, ranging from benign to severe, depending on the importance of the changed amino acid for the protein's structure or function.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

I must clarify that the term "pedigree" is not typically used in medical definitions. Instead, it is often employed in genetics and breeding, where it refers to the recorded ancestry of an individual or a family, tracing the inheritance of specific traits or diseases. In human genetics, a pedigree can help illustrate the pattern of genetic inheritance in families over multiple generations. However, it is not a medical term with a specific clinical definition.

'Frameshifting, ribosomal' refers to a type of genetic modification that occurs during translation, the process by which messenger RNA (mRNA) is translated into a protein. Specifically, frameshifting is a type of error or programmed change in the reading frame of the mRNA as it is being translated by the ribosome.

In ribosomal frameshifting, the ribosome shifts the reading frame of the mRNA by one or two nucleotides, resulting in an entirely different sequence of amino acids being incorporated into the growing polypeptide chain. This can lead to the production of a truncated or elongated protein, or a completely different protein altogether.

There are two types of ribosomal frameshifting: programmed -1 frameshifting and programmed +1 frameshifting. Programmed -1 frameshifting involves a -1 shift in the reading frame, resulting in the incorporation of a different set of three nucleotides (a codon) into the polypeptide chain. Programmed +1 frameshifting involves a +1 shift in the reading frame, with similar consequences.

Ribosomal frameshifting is a tightly regulated process that plays an important role in gene expression and can have significant consequences for protein function and cellular physiology. It is also implicated in certain genetic diseases and viral infections.

DNA Mutational Analysis is a laboratory test used to identify genetic variations or changes (mutations) in the DNA sequence of a gene. This type of analysis can be used to diagnose genetic disorders, predict the risk of developing certain diseases, determine the most effective treatment for cancer, or assess the likelihood of passing on an inherited condition to offspring.

The test involves extracting DNA from a patient's sample (such as blood, saliva, or tissue), amplifying specific regions of interest using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and then sequencing those regions to determine the precise order of nucleotide bases in the DNA molecule. The resulting sequence is then compared to reference sequences to identify any variations or mutations that may be present.

DNA Mutational Analysis can detect a wide range of genetic changes, including single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions, deletions, duplications, and rearrangements. The test is often used in conjunction with other diagnostic tests and clinical evaluations to provide a comprehensive assessment of a patient's genetic profile.

It is important to note that not all mutations are pathogenic or associated with disease, and the interpretation of DNA Mutational Analysis results requires careful consideration of the patient's medical history, family history, and other relevant factors.

A nonsense codon is a sequence of three nucleotides in DNA or RNA that does not code for an amino acid. Instead, it signals the end of the protein-coding region of a gene and triggers the termination of translation, the process by which the genetic code is translated into a protein.

In DNA, the nonsense codons are UAA, UAG, and UGA, which are also known as "stop codons." When these codons are encountered during translation, they cause the release of the newly synthesized polypeptide chain from the ribosome, bringing the process of protein synthesis to a halt.

Nonsense mutations are changes in the DNA sequence that result in the appearance of a nonsense codon where an amino acid-coding codon used to be. These types of mutations can lead to premature termination of translation and the production of truncated, nonfunctional proteins, which can cause genetic diseases or contribute to cancer development.

Exons are the coding regions of DNA that remain in the mature, processed mRNA after the removal of non-coding intronic sequences during RNA splicing. These exons contain the information necessary to encode proteins, as they specify the sequence of amino acids within a polypeptide chain. The arrangement and order of exons can vary between different genes and even between different versions of the same gene (alternative splicing), allowing for the generation of multiple protein isoforms from a single gene. This complexity in exon structure and usage significantly contributes to the diversity and functionality of the proteome.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

A germ-line mutation is a genetic change that occurs in the egg or sperm cells (gametes), and thus can be passed down from parents to their offspring. These mutations are present throughout the entire body of the offspring, as they are incorporated into the DNA of every cell during embryonic development.

Germ-line mutations differ from somatic mutations, which occur in other cells of the body that are not involved in reproduction. While somatic mutations can contribute to the development of cancer and other diseases within an individual, they are not passed down to future generations.

It's important to note that germ-line mutations can have significant implications for medical genetics and inherited diseases. For example, if a parent has a germ-line mutation in a gene associated with a particular disease, their offspring may have an increased risk of developing that disease as well.

A phenotype is the physical or biochemical expression of an organism's genes, or the observable traits and characteristics resulting from the interaction of its genetic constitution (genotype) with environmental factors. These characteristics can include appearance, development, behavior, and resistance to disease, among others. Phenotypes can vary widely, even among individuals with identical genotypes, due to differences in environmental influences, gene expression, and genetic interactions.

A sequence deletion in a genetic context refers to the removal or absence of one or more nucleotides (the building blocks of DNA or RNA) from a specific region in a DNA or RNA molecule. This type of mutation can lead to the loss of genetic information, potentially resulting in changes in the function or expression of a gene. If the deletion involves a critical portion of the gene, it can cause diseases, depending on the role of that gene in the body. The size of the deleted sequence can vary, ranging from a single nucleotide to a large segment of DNA.

An allele is a variant form of a gene that is located at a specific position on a specific chromosome. Alleles are alternative forms of the same gene that arise by mutation and are found at the same locus or position on homologous chromosomes.

Each person typically inherits two copies of each gene, one from each parent. If the two alleles are identical, a person is said to be homozygous for that trait. If the alleles are different, the person is heterozygous.

For example, the ABO blood group system has three alleles, A, B, and O, which determine a person's blood type. If a person inherits two A alleles, they will have type A blood; if they inherit one A and one B allele, they will have type AB blood; if they inherit two B alleles, they will have type B blood; and if they inherit two O alleles, they will have type O blood.

Alleles can also influence traits such as eye color, hair color, height, and other physical characteristics. Some alleles are dominant, meaning that only one copy of the allele is needed to express the trait, while others are recessive, meaning that two copies of the allele are needed to express the trait.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a laboratory technique used to amplify specific regions of DNA. It enables the production of thousands to millions of copies of a particular DNA sequence in a rapid and efficient manner, making it an essential tool in various fields such as molecular biology, medical diagnostics, forensic science, and research.

The PCR process involves repeated cycles of heating and cooling to separate the DNA strands, allow primers (short sequences of single-stranded DNA) to attach to the target regions, and extend these primers using an enzyme called Taq polymerase, resulting in the exponential amplification of the desired DNA segment.

In a medical context, PCR is often used for detecting and quantifying specific pathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in clinical samples, identifying genetic mutations or polymorphisms associated with diseases, monitoring disease progression, and evaluating treatment effectiveness.

A heterozygote is an individual who has inherited two different alleles (versions) of a particular gene, one from each parent. This means that the individual's genotype for that gene contains both a dominant and a recessive allele. The dominant allele will be expressed phenotypically (outwardly visible), while the recessive allele may or may not have any effect on the individual's observable traits, depending on the specific gene and its function. Heterozygotes are often represented as 'Aa', where 'A' is the dominant allele and 'a' is the recessive allele.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

A homozygote is an individual who has inherited the same allele (version of a gene) from both parents and therefore possesses two identical copies of that allele at a specific genetic locus. This can result in either having two dominant alleles (homozygous dominant) or two recessive alleles (homozygous recessive). In contrast, a heterozygote has inherited different alleles from each parent for a particular gene.

The term "homozygote" is used in genetics to describe the genetic makeup of an individual at a specific locus on their chromosomes. Homozygosity can play a significant role in determining an individual's phenotype (observable traits), as having two identical alleles can strengthen the expression of certain characteristics compared to having just one dominant and one recessive allele.

Single-Stranded Conformational Polymorphism (SSCP) is not a medical condition but rather a laboratory technique used in molecular biology and genetics. It refers to the phenomenon where a single-stranded DNA or RNA molecule can adopt different conformations or shapes based on its nucleotide sequence, even if the difference in the sequence is as small as a single base pair change. This property is used in SSCP analysis to detect mutations or variations in DNA or RNA sequences.

In SSCP analysis, the denatured single-stranded DNA or RNA sample is subjected to electrophoresis on a non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel. The different conformations of the single-stranded molecules migrate at different rates in the gel, creating multiple bands that can be visualized by staining or other detection methods. The presence of additional bands or shifts in band patterns can indicate the presence of a sequence variant or mutation.

SSCP analysis is often used as a screening tool for genetic diseases, cancer, and infectious diseases to identify genetic variations associated with these conditions. However, it has largely been replaced by more sensitive and accurate methods such as next-generation sequencing.

Microsatellite repeats, also known as short tandem repeats (STRs), are repetitive DNA sequences made up of units of 1-6 base pairs that are repeated in a head-to-tail manner. These repeats are spread throughout the human genome and are highly polymorphic, meaning they can have different numbers of repeat units in different individuals.

Microsatellites are useful as genetic markers because of their high degree of variability. They are commonly used in forensic science to identify individuals, in genealogy to trace ancestry, and in medical research to study genetic diseases and disorders. Mutations in microsatellite repeats have been associated with various neurological conditions, including Huntington's disease and fragile X syndrome.

A codon is a sequence of three adjacent nucleotides in DNA or RNA that specifies the insertion of a particular amino acid during protein synthesis, or signals the beginning or end of translation. In DNA, these triplets are read during transcription to produce a complementary mRNA molecule, which is then translated into a polypeptide chain during translation. There are 64 possible codons in the standard genetic code, with 61 encoding for specific amino acids and three serving as stop codons that signal the termination of protein synthesis.

Genetic suppression is a concept in genetics that refers to the phenomenon where the expression or function of one gene is reduced or silenced by another gene. This can occur through various mechanisms such as:

* Allelic exclusion: When only one allele (version) of a gene is expressed, while the other is suppressed.
* Epigenetic modifications: Chemical changes to the DNA or histone proteins that package DNA can result in the suppression of gene expression.
* RNA interference: Small RNAs can bind to and degrade specific mRNAs (messenger RNAs), preventing their translation into proteins.
* Transcriptional repression: Proteins called transcription factors can bind to DNA and prevent the recruitment of RNA polymerase, which is necessary for gene transcription.

Genetic suppression plays a crucial role in regulating gene expression and maintaining proper cellular function. It can also contribute to diseases such as cancer when genes that suppress tumor growth are suppressed themselves.

Mutagenesis is the process by which the genetic material (DNA or RNA) of an organism is changed in a way that can alter its phenotype, or observable traits. These changes, known as mutations, can be caused by various factors such as chemicals, radiation, or viruses. Some mutations may have no effect on the organism, while others can cause harm, including diseases and cancer. Mutagenesis is a crucial area of study in genetics and molecular biology, with implications for understanding evolution, genetic disorders, and the development of new medical treatments.

Recessive genes refer to the alleles (versions of a gene) that will only be expressed when an individual has two copies of that particular allele, one inherited from each parent. If an individual inherits one recessive allele and one dominant allele for a particular gene, the dominant allele will be expressed and the recessive allele will have no effect on the individual's phenotype (observable traits).

Recessive genes can still play a role in determining an individual's genetic makeup and can be passed down through generations even if they are not expressed. If two carriers of a recessive gene have children, there is a 25% chance that their offspring will inherit two copies of the recessive allele and exhibit the associated recessive trait.

Examples of genetic disorders caused by recessive genes include cystic fibrosis, sickle cell anemia, and albinism.

A codon is a sequence of three adjacent nucleotides in DNA or RNA that specifies a particular amino acid during the process of protein synthesis, or codes for the termination of translation. In DNA, these triplets are read in a 5' to 3' direction, while in mRNA, they are read in a 5' to 3' direction as well. There are 64 possible codons (4^3) in the genetic code, and 61 of them specify amino acids. The remaining three codons, UAA, UAG, and UGA, are terminator or stop codons that signal the end of protein synthesis.

Terminator codons, also known as nonsense codons, do not code for any amino acids. Instead, they cause the release of the newly synthesized polypeptide chain from the ribosome, which is the complex machinery responsible for translating the genetic code into a protein. This process is called termination or translation termination.

In prokaryotic cells, termination occurs when a release factor recognizes and binds to the stop codon in the A site of the ribosome. This triggers the hydrolysis of the peptidyl-tRNA bond, releasing the completed polypeptide chain from the tRNA and the ribosome. In eukaryotic cells, a similar process occurs, but it involves different release factors and additional steps to ensure accurate termination.

In summary, a codon is a sequence of three adjacent nucleotides in DNA or RNA that specifies an amino acid or signals the end of protein synthesis. Terminator codons are specific codons that do not code for any amino acids and instead signal the end of translation, leading to the release of the newly synthesized polypeptide chain from the ribosome.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

Aminacrine is a type of medication known as an antineoplastic agent or chemotherapeutic drug. It is primarily used in the treatment of certain types of cancer. Aminacrine works by interfering with the DNA replication process within cancer cells, which helps to inhibit the growth and proliferation of these cells.

The chemical name for aminacrine is 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride monohydrate. It has a yellowish crystalline appearance and is typically administered intravenously in a hospital setting. Common side effects of aminacrine include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, mouth sores, and hair loss. More serious side effects can include heart rhythm abnormalities, seizures, and lung or kidney damage.

It's important to note that the use of aminacrine is typically reserved for cases where other cancer treatments have not been effective, due to its potential for serious side effects. As with all medications, it should be used under the close supervision of a healthcare professional.

Proflavine is an antimicrobial agent, specifically a type of dye known as an acridine dye. It is used primarily as a topical antiseptic and disinfectant. Proflavine works by intercalating into DNA, which disrupts the structure of the DNA molecule and prevents bacterial replication.

It's important to note that proflavine has been largely replaced by other more effective and safer antimicrobial agents in clinical practice. It is still used in some research settings and for certain specific applications, such as staining tissues for microscopic examination.

Proflavine should be used with caution, as it can cause skin irritation and may have harmful effects if ingested or absorbed through the skin. As with any medication, it should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Mutagens are physical or chemical agents that can cause permanent changes in the structure of genetic material, including DNA and chromosomes, leading to mutations. These mutations can be passed down to future generations and may increase the risk of cancer and other diseases. Examples of mutagens include ultraviolet (UV) radiation, tobacco smoke, and certain chemicals found in industrial settings. It is important to note that not all mutations are harmful, but some can have negative effects on health and development.

Gene deletion is a type of mutation where a segment of DNA, containing one or more genes, is permanently lost or removed from a chromosome. This can occur due to various genetic mechanisms such as homologous recombination, non-homologous end joining, or other types of genomic rearrangements.

The deletion of a gene can have varying effects on the organism, depending on the function of the deleted gene and its importance for normal physiological processes. If the deleted gene is essential for survival, the deletion may result in embryonic lethality or developmental abnormalities. However, if the gene is non-essential or has redundant functions, the deletion may not have any noticeable effects on the organism's phenotype.

Gene deletions can also be used as a tool in genetic research to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes. For example, researchers may use gene deletion techniques to create genetically modified animal models to investigate the impact of gene deletion on disease progression or development.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

A base pair mismatch is a type of mutation that occurs during the replication or repair of DNA, where two incompatible nucleotides pair up instead of the usual complementary bases (adenine-thymine or cytosine-guanine). This can result in the substitution of one base pair for another and may lead to changes in the genetic code, potentially causing errors in protein synthesis and possibly contributing to genetic disorders or diseases, including cancer.

DNA primers are short single-stranded DNA molecules that serve as a starting point for DNA synthesis. They are typically used in laboratory techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The primer binds to a complementary sequence on the DNA template through base pairing, providing a free 3'-hydroxyl group for the DNA polymerase enzyme to add nucleotides and synthesize a new strand of DNA. This allows for specific and targeted amplification or analysis of a particular region of interest within a larger DNA molecule.

Genotype, in genetics, refers to the complete heritable genetic makeup of an individual organism, including all of its genes. It is the set of instructions contained in an organism's DNA for the development and function of that organism. The genotype is the basis for an individual's inherited traits, and it can be contrasted with an individual's phenotype, which refers to the observable physical or biochemical characteristics of an organism that result from the expression of its genes in combination with environmental influences.

It is important to note that an individual's genotype is not necessarily identical to their genetic sequence. Some genes have multiple forms called alleles, and an individual may inherit different alleles for a given gene from each parent. The combination of alleles that an individual inherits for a particular gene is known as their genotype for that gene.

Understanding an individual's genotype can provide important information about their susceptibility to certain diseases, their response to drugs and other treatments, and their risk of passing on inherited genetic disorders to their offspring.

A syndrome, in medical terms, is a set of symptoms that collectively indicate or characterize a disease, disorder, or underlying pathological process. It's essentially a collection of signs and/or symptoms that frequently occur together and can suggest a particular cause or condition, even though the exact physiological mechanisms might not be fully understood.

For example, Down syndrome is characterized by specific physical features, cognitive delays, and other developmental issues resulting from an extra copy of chromosome 21. Similarly, metabolic syndromes like diabetes mellitus type 2 involve a group of risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels that collectively increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

It's important to note that a syndrome is not a specific diagnosis; rather, it's a pattern of symptoms that can help guide further diagnostic evaluation and management.

Consanguinity is a medical and genetic term that refers to the degree of genetic relationship between two individuals who share common ancestors. Consanguineous relationships exist when people are related by blood, through a common ancestor or siblings who have children together. The closer the relationship between the two individuals, the higher the degree of consanguinity.

The degree of consanguinity is typically expressed as a percentage or fraction, with higher values indicating a closer genetic relationship. For example, first-degree relatives, such as parents and children or full siblings, share approximately 50% of their genes and have a consanguinity coefficient of 0.25 (or 25%).

Consanguinity can increase the risk of certain genetic disorders and birth defects in offspring due to the increased likelihood of sharing harmful recessive genes. The risks depend on the degree of consanguinity, with closer relationships carrying higher risks. It is important for individuals who are planning to have children and have a history of consanguinity to consider genetic counseling and testing to assess their risk of passing on genetic disorders.

A plasmid is a small, circular, double-stranded DNA molecule that is separate from the chromosomal DNA of a bacterium or other organism. Plasmids are typically not essential for the survival of the organism, but they can confer beneficial traits such as antibiotic resistance or the ability to degrade certain types of pollutants.

Plasmids are capable of replicating independently of the chromosomal DNA and can be transferred between bacteria through a process called conjugation. They often contain genes that provide resistance to antibiotics, heavy metals, and other environmental stressors. Plasmids have also been engineered for use in molecular biology as cloning vectors, allowing scientists to replicate and manipulate specific DNA sequences.

Plasmids are important tools in genetic engineering and biotechnology because they can be easily manipulated and transferred between organisms. They have been used to produce vaccines, diagnostic tests, and genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for various applications, including agriculture, medicine, and industry.

Site-directed mutagenesis is a molecular biology technique used to introduce specific and targeted changes to a specific DNA sequence. This process involves creating a new variant of a gene or a specific region of interest within a DNA molecule by introducing a planned, deliberate change, or mutation, at a predetermined site within the DNA sequence.

The methodology typically involves the use of molecular tools such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, and/or ligases to introduce the desired mutation(s) into a plasmid or other vector containing the target DNA sequence. The resulting modified DNA molecule can then be used to transform host cells, allowing for the production of large quantities of the mutated gene or protein for further study.

Site-directed mutagenesis is a valuable tool in basic research, drug discovery, and biotechnology applications where specific changes to a DNA sequence are required to understand gene function, investigate protein structure/function relationships, or engineer novel biological properties into existing genes or proteins.

An open reading frame (ORF) is a continuous stretch of DNA or RNA sequence that has the potential to be translated into a protein. It begins with a start codon (usually "ATG" in DNA, which corresponds to "AUG" in RNA) and ends with a stop codon ("TAA", "TAG", or "TGA" in DNA; "UAA", "UAG", or "UGA" in RNA). The sequence between these two points is called a coding sequence (CDS), which, when transcribed into mRNA and translated into amino acids, forms a polypeptide chain.

In eukaryotic cells, ORFs can be located in either protein-coding genes or non-coding regions of the genome. In prokaryotic cells, multiple ORFs may be present on a single strand of DNA, often organized into operons that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule.

It's important to note that not all ORFs necessarily represent functional proteins; some may be pseudogenes or result from errors in genome annotation. Therefore, additional experimental evidence is typically required to confirm the expression and functionality of a given ORF.

A bacterial gene is a segment of DNA (or RNA in some viruses) that contains the genetic information necessary for the synthesis of a functional bacterial protein or RNA molecule. These genes are responsible for encoding various characteristics and functions of bacteria such as metabolism, reproduction, and resistance to antibiotics. They can be transmitted between bacteria through horizontal gene transfer mechanisms like conjugation, transformation, and transduction. Bacterial genes are often organized into operons, which are clusters of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule.

It's important to note that the term "bacterial gene" is used to describe genetic elements found in bacteria, but not all genetic elements in bacteria are considered genes. For example, some DNA sequences may not encode functional products and are therefore not considered genes. Additionally, some bacterial genes may be plasmid-borne or phage-borne, rather than being located on the bacterial chromosome.

An amino acid substitution is a type of mutation in which one amino acid in a protein is replaced by another. This occurs when there is a change in the DNA sequence that codes for a particular amino acid in a protein. The genetic code is redundant, meaning that most amino acids are encoded by more than one codon (a sequence of three nucleotides). As a result, a single base pair change in the DNA sequence may not necessarily lead to an amino acid substitution. However, if a change does occur, it can have a variety of effects on the protein's structure and function, depending on the nature of the substituted amino acids. Some substitutions may be harmless, while others may alter the protein's activity or stability, leading to disease.

Mutation rate is the frequency at which spontaneous or induced genetic changes (mutations) occur in an organism's DNA or RNA. It is typically measured as the number of mutations per unit of time, such as per generation, per cell division, or per base pair. Mutation rates can vary widely depending on factors such as the specific gene or genomic region involved, the type of mutation (e.g., point mutation, insertion, deletion), and the environmental conditions.

Mutations can have a range of effects on an organism's fitness, from neutral to deleterious to beneficial. A high mutation rate can increase genetic diversity within a population but may also increase the risk of harmful mutations that can lead to diseases or reduced viability. Conversely, a low mutation rate can reduce genetic variation and limit the potential for adaptation to changing environments.

DNA-binding proteins are a type of protein that have the ability to bind to DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), the genetic material of organisms. These proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as regulation of gene expression, DNA replication, repair and recombination.

The binding of DNA-binding proteins to specific DNA sequences is mediated by non-covalent interactions, including electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals forces. The specificity of binding is determined by the recognition of particular nucleotide sequences or structural features of the DNA molecule.

DNA-binding proteins can be classified into several categories based on their structure and function, such as transcription factors, histones, and restriction enzymes. Transcription factors are a major class of DNA-binding proteins that regulate gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences in the promoter region of genes and recruiting other proteins to modulate transcription. Histones are DNA-binding proteins that package DNA into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin structure. Restriction enzymes are DNA-binding proteins that recognize and cleave specific DNA sequences, and are widely used in molecular biology research and biotechnology applications.

Dominant genes refer to the alleles (versions of a gene) that are fully expressed in an individual's phenotype, even if only one copy of the gene is present. In dominant inheritance patterns, an individual needs only to receive one dominant allele from either parent to express the associated trait. This is in contrast to recessive genes, where both copies of the gene must be the recessive allele for the trait to be expressed. Dominant genes are represented by uppercase letters (e.g., 'A') and recessive genes by lowercase letters (e.g., 'a'). If an individual inherits one dominant allele (A) from either parent, they will express the dominant trait (A).

A genetic complementation test is a laboratory procedure used in molecular genetics to determine whether two mutated genes can complement each other's function, indicating that they are located at different loci and represent separate alleles. This test involves introducing a normal or wild-type copy of one gene into a cell containing a mutant version of the same gene, and then observing whether the presence of the normal gene restores the normal function of the mutated gene. If the introduction of the normal gene results in the restoration of the normal phenotype, it suggests that the two genes are located at different loci and can complement each other's function. However, if the introduction of the normal gene does not restore the normal phenotype, it suggests that the two genes are located at the same locus and represent different alleles of the same gene. This test is commonly used to map genes and identify genetic interactions in a variety of organisms, including bacteria, yeast, and animals.

Chromosome mapping, also known as physical mapping, is the process of determining the location and order of specific genes or genetic markers on a chromosome. This is typically done by using various laboratory techniques to identify landmarks along the chromosome, such as restriction enzyme cutting sites or patterns of DNA sequence repeats. The resulting map provides important information about the organization and structure of the genome, and can be used for a variety of purposes, including identifying the location of genes associated with genetic diseases, studying evolutionary relationships between organisms, and developing genetic markers for use in breeding or forensic applications.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

DNA repair is the process by which cells identify and correct damage to the DNA molecules that encode their genome. DNA can be damaged by a variety of internal and external factors, such as radiation, chemicals, and metabolic byproducts. If left unrepaired, this damage can lead to mutations, which may in turn lead to cancer and other diseases.

There are several different mechanisms for repairing DNA damage, including:

1. Base excision repair (BER): This process repairs damage to a single base in the DNA molecule. An enzyme called a glycosylase removes the damaged base, leaving a gap that is then filled in by other enzymes.
2. Nucleotide excision repair (NER): This process repairs more severe damage, such as bulky adducts or crosslinks between the two strands of the DNA molecule. An enzyme cuts out a section of the damaged DNA, and the gap is then filled in by other enzymes.
3. Mismatch repair (MMR): This process repairs errors that occur during DNA replication, such as mismatched bases or small insertions or deletions. Specialized enzymes recognize the error and remove a section of the newly synthesized strand, which is then replaced by new nucleotides.
4. Double-strand break repair (DSBR): This process repairs breaks in both strands of the DNA molecule. There are two main pathways for DSBR: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ directly rejoins the broken ends, while HR uses a template from a sister chromatid to repair the break.

Overall, DNA repair is a crucial process that helps maintain genome stability and prevent the development of diseases caused by genetic mutations.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

Acridines are a class of heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds that contain a nucleus of three fused benzene rings and a nitrogen atom. They have a wide range of applications, including in the development of chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer and antibacterial, antifungal, and antiparasitic drugs. Some acridines also exhibit fluorescent properties and are used in research and diagnostic applications.

In medicine, some acridine derivatives have been found to intercalate with DNA, disrupting its structure and function, which can lead to the death of cancer cells. For example, the acridine derivative proflavin has been used as an antiseptic and in the treatment of certain types of cancer. However, many acridines also have toxic side effects, limiting their clinical use.

It is important to note that while acridines have potential therapeutic uses, they should only be used under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional, as they can cause harm if not used properly.

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the genetic material present in the cells of organisms where it is responsible for the storage and transmission of hereditary information. DNA is a long molecule that consists of two strands coiled together to form a double helix. Each strand is made up of a series of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - that are linked together by phosphate and sugar groups. The sequence of these bases along the length of the molecule encodes genetic information, with A always pairing with T and C always pairing with G. This base-pairing allows for the replication and transcription of DNA, which are essential processes in the functioning and reproduction of all living organisms.

A "reading frame" in genetics refers to the way nucleotides in DNA or RNA are grouped and read in multiples of three to form amino acids during protein synthesis. In other words, it is a continuous sequence of codons that starts with an initiation codon (usually AUG) and ends with a termination codon (UAA, UAG, or UGA).

There are three possible reading frames for every DNA or RNA sequence: one forward frame and two backward frames. In the forward frame, the sequence is read from the 5' end to the 3' end, while in the two backward frames, the sequence is read from the 3' end to the 5' end, but in a different register.

It is important to note that the genetic code is degenerate, meaning that most amino acids can be encoded by more than one codon. This means that a single change in the nucleotide sequence can shift the reading frame and result in a completely different protein sequence or even a premature stop codon, leading to truncated or nonfunctional proteins.

'Abnormalities, Multiple' is a broad term that refers to the presence of two or more structural or functional anomalies in an individual. These abnormalities can be present at birth (congenital) or can develop later in life (acquired). They can affect various organs and systems of the body and can vary greatly in severity and impact on a person's health and well-being.

Multiple abnormalities can occur due to genetic factors, environmental influences, or a combination of both. Chromosomal abnormalities, gene mutations, exposure to teratogens (substances that cause birth defects), and maternal infections during pregnancy are some of the common causes of multiple congenital abnormalities.

Examples of multiple congenital abnormalities include Down syndrome, Turner syndrome, and VATER/VACTERL association. Acquired multiple abnormalities can result from conditions such as trauma, infection, degenerative diseases, or cancer.

The medical evaluation and management of individuals with multiple abnormalities depend on the specific abnormalities present and their impact on the individual's health and functioning. A multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals is often involved in the care of these individuals to address their complex needs.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

The exome is the part of the genome that contains all the protein-coding regions. It represents less than 2% of the human genome but accounts for about 85% of disease-causing mutations. Exome sequencing, therefore, is a cost-effective and efficient method to identify genetic variants associated with various diseases, including cancer, neurological disorders, and inherited genetic conditions.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

In genetics, sequence alignment is the process of arranging two or more DNA, RNA, or protein sequences to identify regions of similarity or homology between them. This is often done using computational methods to compare the nucleotide or amino acid sequences and identify matching patterns, which can provide insight into evolutionary relationships, functional domains, or potential genetic disorders. The alignment process typically involves adjusting gaps and mismatches in the sequences to maximize the similarity between them, resulting in an aligned sequence that can be visually represented and analyzed.

I'm not aware of a medical term called "DEFICIENS protein." It is possible that you may have misspelled the name or it could be a term specific to a certain context, such as a research lab or a specific medical condition.

In general, a deficiency in a particular protein can lead to various medical conditions depending on the function of that protein. Proteins play crucial roles in the body, including acting as enzymes, hormones, structural components, and transporters. A deficiency in a particular protein can result from genetic mutations, poor nutrition, or other factors.

If you meant to ask about a specific protein, please provide more context or check the spelling, so I can give you a more accurate answer.

"Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a scientific name used in the field of microbiology. It refers to a species of yeast that is commonly used in various industrial processes, such as baking and brewing. It's also widely used in scientific research due to its genetic tractability and eukaryotic cellular organization.

However, it does have some relevance to medical fields like medicine and nutrition. For example, certain strains of S. cerevisiae are used as probiotics, which can provide health benefits when consumed. They may help support gut health, enhance the immune system, and even assist in the digestion of certain nutrients.

In summary, "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is a species of yeast with various industrial and potential medical applications.

A gene is a specific sequence of nucleotides in DNA that carries genetic information. Genes are the fundamental units of heredity and are responsible for the development and function of all living organisms. They code for proteins or RNA molecules, which carry out various functions within cells and are essential for the structure, function, and regulation of the body's tissues and organs.

Each gene has a specific location on a chromosome, and each person inherits two copies of every gene, one from each parent. Variations in the sequence of nucleotides in a gene can lead to differences in traits between individuals, including physical characteristics, susceptibility to disease, and responses to environmental factors.

Medical genetics is the study of genes and their role in health and disease. It involves understanding how genes contribute to the development and progression of various medical conditions, as well as identifying genetic risk factors and developing strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

Genetic linkage is the phenomenon where two or more genetic loci (locations on a chromosome) tend to be inherited together because they are close to each other on the same chromosome. This occurs during the process of sexual reproduction, where homologous chromosomes pair up and exchange genetic material through a process called crossing over.

The closer two loci are to each other on a chromosome, the lower the probability that they will be separated by a crossover event. As a result, they are more likely to be inherited together and are said to be linked. The degree of linkage between two loci can be measured by their recombination frequency, which is the percentage of meiotic events in which a crossover occurs between them.

Linkage analysis is an important tool in genetic research, as it allows researchers to identify and map genes that are associated with specific traits or diseases. By analyzing patterns of linkage between markers (identifiable DNA sequences) and phenotypes (observable traits), researchers can infer the location of genes that contribute to those traits or diseases on chromosomes.

RNA splice sites are specific sequences on the pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) molecule where the splicing process occurs during gene expression in eukaryotic cells. The pre-mRNA contains introns and exons, which are non-coding and coding regions of the RNA, respectively.

The splicing process removes the introns and joins together the exons to form a mature mRNA molecule that can be translated into a protein. The splice sites are recognized by the spliceosome, a complex of proteins and small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) that catalyze the splicing reaction.

There are two main types of splice sites: the 5' splice site and the 3' splice site. The 5' splice site is located at the junction between the 5' end of the intron and the 3' end of the exon, while the 3' splice site is located at the junction between the 3' end of the intron and the 5' end of the exon.

The 5' splice site contains a conserved GU sequence, while the 3' splice site contains a conserved AG sequence. These sequences are recognized by the snRNAs in the spliceosome, which bind to them and facilitate the splicing reaction.

Mutations or variations in RNA splice sites can lead to abnormal splicing and result in diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and genetic disorders.

Transcription factors are proteins that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression by controlling the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA (mRNA). They function by binding to specific DNA sequences, known as response elements, located in the promoter region or enhancer regions of target genes. This binding can either activate or repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the properties and interactions of the particular transcription factor. Transcription factors often act as part of a complex network of regulatory proteins that determine the precise spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development, differentiation, and homeostasis in an organism.

Insertional mutagenesis is a process of introducing new genetic material into an organism's genome at a specific location, which can result in a change or disruption of the function of the gene at that site. This technique is often used in molecular biology research to study gene function and regulation. The introduction of the foreign DNA is typically accomplished through the use of mobile genetic elements, such as transposons or viruses, which are capable of inserting themselves into the genome.

The insertion of the new genetic material can lead to a loss or gain of function in the affected gene, resulting in a mutation. This type of mutagenesis is called "insertional" because the mutation is caused by the insertion of foreign DNA into the genome. The effects of insertional mutagenesis can range from subtle changes in gene expression to the complete inactivation of a gene.

This technique has been widely used in genetic research, including the study of developmental biology, cancer, and genetic diseases. It is also used in the development of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for agricultural and industrial applications.

Tertiary protein structure refers to the three-dimensional arrangement of all the elements (polypeptide chains) of a single protein molecule. It is the highest level of structural organization and results from interactions between various side chains (R groups) of the amino acids that make up the protein. These interactions, which include hydrogen bonds, ionic bonds, van der Waals forces, and disulfide bridges, give the protein its unique shape and stability, which in turn determines its function. The tertiary structure of a protein can be stabilized by various factors such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain ions. Any changes in these factors can lead to denaturation, where the protein loses its tertiary structure and thus its function.

Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a genetic phenomenon characterized by alterations in the number of repeat units in microsatellites, which are short repetitive DNA sequences distributed throughout the genome. MSI arises due to defects in the DNA mismatch repair system, leading to accumulation of errors during DNA replication and cell division.

This condition is often associated with certain types of cancer, such as colorectal, endometrial, and gastric cancers. The presence of MSI in tumors may indicate a better prognosis and potential response to immunotherapy, particularly those targeting PD-1 or PD-L1 pathways.

MSI is typically determined through molecular testing, which compares the length of microsatellites in normal and tumor DNA samples. A high level of instability, known as MSI-High (MSI-H), is indicative of a dysfunctional mismatch repair system and increased likelihood of cancer development.

Restriction mapping is a technique used in molecular biology to identify the location and arrangement of specific restriction endonuclease recognition sites within a DNA molecule. Restriction endonucleases are enzymes that cut double-stranded DNA at specific sequences, producing fragments of various lengths. By digesting the DNA with different combinations of these enzymes and analyzing the resulting fragment sizes through techniques such as agarose gel electrophoresis, researchers can generate a restriction map - a visual representation of the locations and distances between recognition sites on the DNA molecule. This information is crucial for various applications, including cloning, genome analysis, and genetic engineering.

Genetic testing is a type of medical test that identifies changes in chromosomes, genes, or proteins. The results of a genetic test can confirm or rule out a suspected genetic condition or help determine a person's chance of developing or passing on a genetic disorder. Genetic tests are performed on a sample of blood, hair, skin, amniotic fluid (the fluid that surrounds a fetus during pregnancy), or other tissue. For example, a physician may recommend genetic testing to help diagnose a genetic condition, confirm the presence of a gene mutation known to increase the risk of developing certain cancers, or determine the chance for a couple to have a child with a genetic disorder.

There are several types of genetic tests, including:

* Diagnostic testing: This type of test is used to identify or confirm a suspected genetic condition in an individual. It may be performed before birth (prenatal testing) or at any time during a person's life.
* Predictive testing: This type of test is used to determine the likelihood that a person will develop a genetic disorder. It is typically offered to individuals who have a family history of a genetic condition but do not show any symptoms themselves.
* Carrier testing: This type of test is used to determine whether a person carries a gene mutation for a genetic disorder. It is often offered to couples who are planning to have children and have a family history of a genetic condition or belong to a population that has an increased risk of certain genetic disorders.
* Preimplantation genetic testing: This type of test is used in conjunction with in vitro fertilization (IVF) to identify genetic changes in embryos before they are implanted in the uterus. It can help couples who have a family history of a genetic disorder or who are at risk of having a child with a genetic condition to conceive a child who is free of the genetic change in question.
* Pharmacogenetic testing: This type of test is used to determine how an individual's genes may affect their response to certain medications. It can help healthcare providers choose the most effective medication and dosage for a patient, reducing the risk of adverse drug reactions.

It is important to note that genetic testing should be performed under the guidance of a qualified healthcare professional who can interpret the results and provide appropriate counseling and support.

The Founder Effect is a concept in population genetics that refers to the loss of genetic variation that occurs when a new colony is established by a small number of individuals from a larger population. This decrease in genetic diversity can lead to an increase in homozygosity, which can in turn result in a higher frequency of certain genetic disorders or traits within the founding population and its descendants. The Founder Effect is named after the "founding" members of the new colony who carry and pass on their particular set of genes to the next generations. It is one of the mechanisms that can lead to the formation of distinct populations or even new species over time.

Activin receptors, type II, are a subgroup of serine/threonine kinase receptors that play a crucial role in signal transduction pathways involved in various biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. There are two types of activin receptors, Type IIA (ACVR2A) and Type IIB (ACVR2B), which are single-pass transmembrane proteins with an extracellular domain that binds to activins and a cytoplasmic domain with kinase activity.

Activins are dimeric proteins that belong to the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily, and they play essential roles in regulating developmental processes, reproduction, and homeostasis. Activin receptors, type II, function as primary binding sites for activins, forming a complex with Type I activin receptors (ALK4, ALK5, or ALK7) to initiate downstream signaling cascades.

Once the activin-receptor complex is formed, the intracellular kinase domain of the Type II receptor phosphorylates and activates the Type I receptor, which in turn propagates the signal by recruiting and phosphorylating downstream effectors such as SMAD proteins. Activated SMADs then form a complex and translocate to the nucleus, where they regulate gene expression.

Dysregulation of activin receptors, type II, has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, fibrosis, and developmental disorders. Therefore, understanding their function and regulation is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to target these diseases.

Genetic models are theoretical frameworks used in genetics to describe and explain the inheritance patterns and genetic architecture of traits, diseases, or phenomena. These models are based on mathematical equations and statistical methods that incorporate information about gene frequencies, modes of inheritance, and the effects of environmental factors. They can be used to predict the probability of certain genetic outcomes, to understand the genetic basis of complex traits, and to inform medical management and treatment decisions.

There are several types of genetic models, including:

1. Mendelian models: These models describe the inheritance patterns of simple genetic traits that follow Mendel's laws of segregation and independent assortment. Examples include autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked inheritance.
2. Complex trait models: These models describe the inheritance patterns of complex traits that are influenced by multiple genes and environmental factors. Examples include heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.
3. Population genetics models: These models describe the distribution and frequency of genetic variants within populations over time. They can be used to study evolutionary processes, such as natural selection and genetic drift.
4. Quantitative genetics models: These models describe the relationship between genetic variation and phenotypic variation in continuous traits, such as height or IQ. They can be used to estimate heritability and to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that contribute to trait variation.
5. Statistical genetics models: These models use statistical methods to analyze genetic data and infer the presence of genetic associations or linkage. They can be used to identify genetic risk factors for diseases or traits.

Overall, genetic models are essential tools in genetics research and medical genetics, as they allow researchers to make predictions about genetic outcomes, test hypotheses about the genetic basis of traits and diseases, and develop strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

Genetic recombination is the process by which genetic material is exchanged between two similar or identical molecules of DNA during meiosis, resulting in new combinations of genes on each chromosome. This exchange occurs during crossover, where segments of DNA are swapped between non-sister homologous chromatids, creating genetic diversity among the offspring. It is a crucial mechanism for generating genetic variability and facilitating evolutionary change within populations. Additionally, recombination also plays an essential role in DNA repair processes through mechanisms such as homologous recombinational repair (HRR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ).

Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of rare, genetic disorders that involve a breakdown and loss of cells in the retina - a light-sensitive tissue located at the back of the eye. The retina converts light into electrical signals which are then sent to the brain and interpreted as visual images.

In RP, the cells that detect light (rods and cones) degenerate more slowly than other cells in the retina, leading to a progressive loss of vision. Symptoms typically begin in childhood with night blindness (difficulty seeing in low light), followed by a gradual narrowing of the visual field (tunnel vision). Over time, this can lead to significant vision loss and even blindness.

The condition is usually inherited and there are several different genes that have been associated with RP. The diagnosis is typically made based on a combination of genetic testing, family history, and clinical examination. Currently, there is no cure for RP, but researchers are actively working to develop new treatments that may help slow or stop the progression of the disease.

Protein biosynthesis is the process by which cells generate new proteins. It involves two major steps: transcription and translation. Transcription is the process of creating a complementary RNA copy of a sequence of DNA. This RNA copy, or messenger RNA (mRNA), carries the genetic information to the site of protein synthesis, the ribosome. During translation, the mRNA is read by transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules, which bring specific amino acids to the ribosome based on the sequence of nucleotides in the mRNA. The ribosome then links these amino acids together in the correct order to form a polypeptide chain, which may then fold into a functional protein. Protein biosynthesis is essential for the growth and maintenance of all living organisms.

X-linked genetic diseases refer to a group of disorders caused by mutations in genes located on the X chromosome. These conditions primarily affect males since they have only one X chromosome and therefore don't have a second normal copy of the gene to compensate for the mutated one. Females, who have two X chromosomes, are typically less affected because they usually have one normal copy of the gene on their other X chromosome.

Examples of X-linked genetic diseases include Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy, hemophilia A and B, color blindness, and fragile X syndrome. Symptoms and severity can vary widely depending on the specific condition and the nature of the genetic mutation involved. Treatment options depend on the particular disease but may include physical therapy, medication, or in some cases, gene therapy.

Genetic transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is used to create a complementary RNA molecule. This process is the first step in gene expression, where the genetic code in DNA is converted into a form that can be used to produce proteins or functional RNAs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase binds to the DNA template strand and reads the sequence of nucleotide bases. As it moves along the template, it adds complementary RNA nucleotides to the growing RNA chain, creating a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to the DNA template strand. Once transcription is complete, the RNA molecule may undergo further processing before it can be translated into protein or perform its functional role in the cell.

Transcription can be either "constitutive" or "regulated." Constitutive transcription occurs at a relatively constant rate and produces essential proteins that are required for basic cellular functions. Regulated transcription, on the other hand, is subject to control by various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing cells to respond to changing environmental conditions or developmental cues.

Introns are non-coding sequences of DNA that are present within the genes of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, animals, and humans. Introns are removed during the process of RNA splicing, in which the initial RNA transcript is cut and reconnected to form a mature, functional RNA molecule.

After the intron sequences are removed, the remaining coding sequences, known as exons, are joined together to create a continuous stretch of genetic information that can be translated into a protein or used to produce non-coding RNAs with specific functions. The removal of introns allows for greater flexibility in gene expression and regulation, enabling the generation of multiple proteins from a single gene through alternative splicing.

In summary, introns are non-coding DNA sequences within genes that are removed during RNA processing to create functional RNA molecules or proteins.

Carrier proteins, also known as transport proteins, are a type of protein that facilitates the movement of molecules across cell membranes. They are responsible for the selective and active transport of ions, sugars, amino acids, and other molecules from one side of the membrane to the other, against their concentration gradient. This process requires energy, usually in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate).

Carrier proteins have a specific binding site for the molecule they transport, and undergo conformational changes upon binding, which allows them to move the molecule across the membrane. Once the molecule has been transported, the carrier protein returns to its original conformation, ready to bind and transport another molecule.

Carrier proteins play a crucial role in maintaining the balance of ions and other molecules inside and outside of cells, and are essential for many physiological processes, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and nutrient uptake.

Transfection is a term used in molecular biology that refers to the process of deliberately introducing foreign genetic material (DNA, RNA or artificial gene constructs) into cells. This is typically done using chemical or physical methods, such as lipofection or electroporation. Transfection is widely used in research and medical settings for various purposes, including studying gene function, producing proteins, developing gene therapies, and creating genetically modified organisms. It's important to note that transfection is different from transduction, which is the process of introducing genetic material into cells using viruses as vectors.

The term "DNA, neoplasm" is not a standard medical term or concept. DNA refers to deoxyribonucleic acid, which is the genetic material present in the cells of living organisms. A neoplasm, on the other hand, is a tumor or growth of abnormal tissue that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

In some contexts, "DNA, neoplasm" may refer to genetic alterations found in cancer cells. These genetic changes can include mutations, amplifications, deletions, or rearrangements of DNA sequences that contribute to the development and progression of cancer. Identifying these genetic abnormalities can help doctors diagnose and treat certain types of cancer more effectively.

However, it's important to note that "DNA, neoplasm" is not a term that would typically be used in medical reports or research papers without further clarification. If you have any specific questions about DNA changes in cancer cells or neoplasms, I would recommend consulting with a healthcare professional or conducting further research on the topic.

Membrane proteins are a type of protein that are embedded in the lipid bilayer of biological membranes, such as the plasma membrane of cells or the inner membrane of mitochondria. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including:

1. Cell-cell recognition and signaling
2. Transport of molecules across the membrane (selective permeability)
3. Enzymatic reactions at the membrane surface
4. Energy transduction and conversion
5. Mechanosensation and signal transduction

Membrane proteins can be classified into two main categories: integral membrane proteins, which are permanently associated with the lipid bilayer, and peripheral membrane proteins, which are temporarily or loosely attached to the membrane surface. Integral membrane proteins can further be divided into three subcategories based on their topology:

1. Transmembrane proteins, which span the entire width of the lipid bilayer with one or more alpha-helices or beta-barrels.
2. Lipid-anchored proteins, which are covalently attached to lipids in the membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor or other lipid modifications.
3. Monotopic proteins, which are partially embedded in the membrane and have one or more domains exposed to either side of the bilayer.

Membrane proteins are essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and are targets for various therapeutic interventions, including drug development and gene therapy. However, their structural complexity and hydrophobicity make them challenging to study using traditional biochemical methods, requiring specialized techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

"Family Health" is not a term that has a single, widely accepted medical definition. However, in the context of healthcare and public health, "family health" often refers to the physical, mental, and social well-being of all members of a family unit. It includes the assessment, promotion, and prevention of health conditions that affect individual family members as well as the family as a whole.

Family health may also encompass interventions and programs that aim to strengthen family relationships, communication, and functioning, as these factors can have a significant impact on overall health outcomes. Additionally, family health may involve addressing social determinants of health, such as poverty, housing, and access to healthcare, which can affect the health of families and communities.

Overall, family health is a holistic approach to healthcare that recognizes the importance of considering the needs and experiences of all family members in promoting and maintaining good health.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

Nucleic acid conformation refers to the three-dimensional structure that nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) adopt as a result of the bonding patterns between the atoms within the molecule. The primary structure of nucleic acids is determined by the sequence of nucleotides, while the conformation is influenced by factors such as the sugar-phosphate backbone, base stacking, and hydrogen bonding.

Two common conformations of DNA are the B-form and the A-form. The B-form is a right-handed helix with a diameter of about 20 Å and a pitch of 34 Å, while the A-form has a smaller diameter (about 18 Å) and a shorter pitch (about 25 Å). RNA typically adopts an A-form conformation.

The conformation of nucleic acids can have significant implications for their function, as it can affect their ability to interact with other molecules such as proteins or drugs. Understanding the conformational properties of nucleic acids is therefore an important area of research in molecular biology and medicine.

"Salmonella enterica" serovar "Typhimurium" is a subspecies of the bacterial species Salmonella enterica, which is a gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium. It is a common cause of foodborne illness in humans and animals worldwide. The bacteria can be found in a variety of sources, including contaminated food and water, raw meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products.

The infection caused by Salmonella Typhimurium is typically self-limiting and results in gastroenteritis, which is characterized by symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, fever, and vomiting. However, in some cases, the infection can spread to other parts of the body and cause more severe illness, particularly in young children, older adults, and people with weakened immune systems.

Salmonella Typhimurium is a major public health concern due to its ability to cause outbreaks of foodborne illness, as well as its potential to develop antibiotic resistance. Proper food handling, preparation, and storage practices can help prevent the spread of Salmonella Typhimurium and other foodborne pathogens.

Sequence homology in nucleic acids refers to the similarity or identity between the nucleotide sequences of two or more DNA or RNA molecules. It is often used as a measure of biological relationship between genes, organisms, or populations. High sequence homology suggests a recent common ancestry or functional constraint, while low sequence homology may indicate a more distant relationship or different functions.

Nucleic acid sequence homology can be determined by various methods such as pairwise alignment, multiple sequence alignment, and statistical analysis. The degree of homology is typically expressed as a percentage of identical or similar nucleotides in a given window of comparison.

It's important to note that the interpretation of sequence homology depends on the biological context and the evolutionary distance between the sequences compared. Therefore, functional and experimental validation is often necessary to confirm the significance of sequence homology.

Nuclear proteins are a category of proteins that are primarily found in the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell. They play crucial roles in various nuclear functions, such as DNA replication, transcription, repair, and RNA processing. This group includes structural proteins like lamins, which form the nuclear lamina, and regulatory proteins, such as histones and transcription factors, that are involved in gene expression. Nuclear localization signals (NLS) often help target these proteins to the nucleus by interacting with importin proteins during active transport across the nuclear membrane.

Paraparesis, spastic type, is a medical term used to describe a condition characterized by partial weakness or loss of voluntary movement in the lower extremities (legs). The term "paraparesis" comes from Greek words "para" meaning beside or beyond, and "paresis" meaning loosening or relaxation.

In spastic paraparesis, the muscle tone is increased, causing stiffness and resistance to movement, particularly during quick or forceful movements. This increased muscle tone, also known as spasticity, results from an upper motor neuron lesion in the brain or spinal cord that affects the corticospinal tract, which carries signals from the brain to the muscles.

Spastic paraparesis can be caused by various conditions, including spinal cord injuries, multiple sclerosis, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and stroke, among others. The severity of symptoms may vary widely, ranging from mild weakness to complete paralysis. Treatment options for spastic paraparesis depend on the underlying cause and may include physical therapy, medications, surgery, or a combination of these approaches.

Molecular models are three-dimensional representations of molecular structures that are used in the field of molecular biology and chemistry to visualize and understand the spatial arrangement of atoms and bonds within a molecule. These models can be physical or computer-generated and allow researchers to study the shape, size, and behavior of molecules, which is crucial for understanding their function and interactions with other molecules.

Physical molecular models are often made up of balls (representing atoms) connected by rods or sticks (representing bonds). These models can be constructed manually using materials such as plastic or wooden balls and rods, or they can be created using 3D printing technology.

Computer-generated molecular models, on the other hand, are created using specialized software that allows researchers to visualize and manipulate molecular structures in three dimensions. These models can be used to simulate molecular interactions, predict molecular behavior, and design new drugs or chemicals with specific properties. Overall, molecular models play a critical role in advancing our understanding of molecular structures and their functions.

A chromosome deletion is a type of genetic abnormality that occurs when a portion of a chromosome is missing or deleted. Chromosomes are thread-like structures located in the nucleus of cells that contain our genetic material, which is organized into genes.

Chromosome deletions can occur spontaneously during the formation of reproductive cells (eggs or sperm) or can be inherited from a parent. They can affect any chromosome and can vary in size, from a small segment to a large portion of the chromosome.

The severity of the symptoms associated with a chromosome deletion depends on the size and location of the deleted segment. In some cases, the deletion may be so small that it does not cause any noticeable symptoms. However, larger deletions can lead to developmental delays, intellectual disabilities, physical abnormalities, and various medical conditions.

Chromosome deletions are typically detected through a genetic test called karyotyping, which involves analyzing the number and structure of an individual's chromosomes. Other more precise tests, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) or chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA), may also be used to confirm the diagnosis and identify the specific location and size of the deletion.

p53 is a tumor suppressor gene that encodes a protein responsible for controlling cell growth and division. The p53 protein plays a crucial role in preventing the development of cancer by regulating the cell cycle and activating DNA repair processes when genetic damage is detected. If the damage is too severe to be repaired, p53 can trigger apoptosis, or programmed cell death, to prevent the propagation of potentially cancerous cells. Mutations in the TP53 gene, which encodes the p53 protein, are among the most common genetic alterations found in human cancers and are often associated with a poor prognosis.

2-Acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF) is a chemical compound that has been used in research to study the mechanisms of carcinogenesis. It is an aromatic amine and a derivative of fluorene, with the chemical formula C14H11NO.

2-AAF is not naturally occurring and is synthesized in the laboratory. It has been found to be carcinogenic in animal studies, causing tumors in various organs including the liver, lung, and bladder. The compound is metabolically activated in the body to form reactive intermediates that can bind to DNA and other cellular components, leading to mutations and cancer.

2-AAF has been used as a tool in research to investigate the mechanisms of chemical carcinogenesis and the role of metabolic activation in the process. It is not used in medical treatments or therapies.

DNA replication is the biological process by which DNA makes an identical copy of itself during cell division. It is a fundamental mechanism that allows genetic information to be passed down from one generation of cells to the next. During DNA replication, each strand of the double helix serves as a template for the synthesis of a new complementary strand. This results in the creation of two identical DNA molecules. The enzymes responsible for DNA replication include helicase, which unwinds the double helix, and polymerase, which adds nucleotides to the growing strands.

Genetic polymorphism refers to the occurrence of multiple forms (called alleles) of a particular gene within a population. These variations in the DNA sequence do not generally affect the function or survival of the organism, but they can contribute to differences in traits among individuals. Genetic polymorphisms can be caused by single nucleotide changes (SNPs), insertions or deletions of DNA segments, or other types of genetic rearrangements. They are important for understanding genetic diversity and evolution, as well as for identifying genetic factors that may contribute to disease susceptibility in humans.

Pseudogenes are defined in medical and genetics terminology as non-functional segments of DNA that resemble functional genes, such as protein-coding genes or RNA genes, but have lost their ability to be expressed or produce a functional product. They are often characterized by the presence of mutations, such as frameshifts, premature stop codons, or deletions, that prevent them from being transcribed or translated into functional proteins or RNAs.

Pseudogenes can arise through various mechanisms, including gene duplication followed by degenerative mutations, retrotransposition of processed mRNA, and the insertion of transposable elements. While they were once considered "genomic fossils" with no biological relevance, recent research has shown that pseudogenes may play important roles in regulating gene expression, modulating protein function, and contributing to disease processes.

It's worth noting that there is ongoing debate in the scientific community about the precise definition and functional significance of pseudogenes, as some may still retain residual functions or regulatory potential.

DNA-directed DNA polymerase is a type of enzyme that synthesizes new strands of DNA by adding nucleotides to an existing DNA template in a 5' to 3' direction. These enzymes are essential for DNA replication, repair, and recombination. They require a single-stranded DNA template, a primer with a free 3' hydroxyl group, and the four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) as substrates to carry out the polymerization reaction.

DNA polymerases also have proofreading activity, which allows them to correct errors that occur during DNA replication by removing mismatched nucleotides and replacing them with the correct ones. This helps ensure the fidelity of the genetic information passed from one generation to the next.

There are several different types of DNA polymerases, each with specific functions and characteristics. For example, DNA polymerase I is involved in both DNA replication and repair, while DNA polymerase III is the primary enzyme responsible for DNA replication in bacteria. In eukaryotic cells, DNA polymerase alpha, beta, gamma, delta, and epsilon have distinct roles in DNA replication, repair, and maintenance.

Tooth abnormalities refer to any variations or irregularities in the size, shape, number, structure, or development of teeth that deviate from the typical or normal anatomy. These abnormalities can occur in primary (deciduous) or permanent teeth and can be caused by genetic factors, environmental influences, systemic diseases, or localized dental conditions during tooth formation.

Some examples of tooth abnormalities include:

1. Microdontia - teeth that are smaller than normal in size.
2. Macrodontia - teeth that are larger than normal in size.
3. Peg-shaped teeth - teeth with a narrow, conical shape.
4. Talon cusps - additional cusps or points on the biting surface of a tooth.
5. Dens invaginatus - an abnormal development where the tooth crown has an extra fold or pouch that can trap bacteria and cause dental problems.
6. Taurodontism - teeth with large pulp chambers and short roots.
7. Supernumerary teeth - having more teeth than the typical number (20 primary and 32 permanent teeth).
8. Hypodontia - missing one or more teeth due to a failure of development.
9. Germination - two adjacent teeth fused together, usually occurring in the front teeth.
10. Fusion - two separate teeth that have grown together during development.

Tooth abnormalities may not always require treatment unless they cause functional, aesthetic, or dental health issues. A dentist can diagnose and manage tooth abnormalities through various treatments, such as fillings, extractions, orthodontic care, or restorative procedures.

Repetitive sequences in nucleic acid refer to repeated stretches of DNA or RNA nucleotide bases that are present in a genome. These sequences can vary in length and can be arranged in different patterns such as direct repeats, inverted repeats, or tandem repeats. In some cases, these repetitive sequences do not code for proteins and are often found in non-coding regions of the genome. They can play a role in genetic instability, regulation of gene expression, and evolutionary processes. However, certain types of repeat expansions have been associated with various neurodegenerative disorders and other human diseases.

An anticodon is a sequence of three ribonucleotides (RNA bases) in a transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule that pair with a complementary codon in a messenger RNA (mRNA) molecule during protein synthesis. This interaction occurs within the ribosome during translation, where the genetic code in the mRNA is translated into an amino acid sequence in a polypeptide. Specifically, each tRNA carries a specific amino acid that corresponds to its anticodon sequence, allowing for the accurate and systematic addition of amino acids to the growing polypeptide chain.

In summary, an anticodon is a crucial component of the translation machinery, facilitating the precise decoding of genetic information and enabling the synthesis of proteins according to the instructions encoded in mRNA molecules.

Colorectal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the colon or rectum, which can be benign or malignant. These growths can arise from the inner lining (mucosa) of the colon or rectum and can take various forms such as polyps, adenomas, or carcinomas.

Benign neoplasms, such as hyperplastic polyps and inflammatory polyps, are not cancerous but may need to be removed to prevent the development of malignant tumors. Adenomas, on the other hand, are precancerous lesions that can develop into colorectal cancer if left untreated.

Colorectal cancer is a malignant neoplasm that arises from the uncontrolled growth and division of cells in the colon or rectum. It is one of the most common types of cancer worldwide and can spread to other parts of the body through the bloodstream or lymphatic system.

Regular screening for colorectal neoplasms is recommended for individuals over the age of 50, as early detection and removal of precancerous lesions can significantly reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Aminoacridines are a group of synthetic chemical compounds that contain an acridine nucleus, which is a tricyclic aromatic structure, substituted with one or more amino groups. These compounds have been studied for their potential therapeutic properties, particularly as antiseptics and antibacterial agents. However, their use in medicine has declined due to the development of newer and safer antibiotics. Some aminoacridines also exhibit antimalarial, antifungal, and antiviral activities. They can intercalate into DNA, disrupting its structure and function, which is thought to contribute to their antimicrobial effects. However, this property also makes them potentially mutagenic and carcinogenic, limiting their clinical use.

An operon is a genetic unit in prokaryotic organisms (like bacteria) consisting of a cluster of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule, which then undergoes translation to produce multiple proteins. This genetic organization allows for the coordinated regulation of genes that are involved in the same metabolic pathway or functional process. The unit typically includes promoter and operator regions that control the transcription of the operon, as well as structural genes encoding the proteins. Operons were first discovered in bacteria, but similar genetic organizations have been found in some eukaryotic organisms, such as yeast.

A gene suppressor, also known as a tumor suppressor gene, is a type of gene that regulates cell growth and division by producing proteins to prevent uncontrolled cell proliferation. When these genes are mutated or deleted, they can lose their ability to regulate cell growth, leading to the development of cancer.

Tumor suppressor genes work to repair damaged DNA, regulate the cell cycle, and promote programmed cell death (apoptosis) when necessary. Some examples of tumor suppressor genes include TP53, BRCA1, and BRCA2. Mutations in these genes have been linked to an increased risk of developing various types of cancer, such as breast, ovarian, and colon cancer.

In contrast to oncogenes, which promote cell growth and division when mutated, tumor suppressor genes typically act to inhibit or slow down cell growth and division. Both types of genes play crucial roles in maintaining the proper functioning of cells and preventing the development of cancer.

Genetic predisposition to disease refers to an increased susceptibility or vulnerability to develop a particular illness or condition due to inheriting specific genetic variations or mutations from one's parents. These genetic factors can make it more likely for an individual to develop a certain disease, but it does not guarantee that the person will definitely get the disease. Environmental factors, lifestyle choices, and interactions between genes also play crucial roles in determining if a genetically predisposed person will actually develop the disease. It is essential to understand that having a genetic predisposition only implies a higher risk, not an inevitable outcome.

DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is a cellular process that helps to correct errors that occur during DNA replication and recombination. This mechanism plays a critical role in maintaining the stability of the genome by reducing the rate of mutations.

The MMR system recognizes and repairs base-base mismatches and small insertions or deletions (indels) that can arise due to slippage of DNA polymerase during replication. The process involves several proteins, including MutSα or MutSβ, which recognize the mismatch, and MutLα, which acts as a endonuclease to cleave the DNA near the mismatch. Excision of the mismatched region is then carried out by exonucleases, followed by resynthesis of the repaired strand using the correct template.

Defects in MMR genes have been linked to various human diseases, including hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and other types of cancer. In HNPCC, mutations in MMR genes lead to an accumulation of mutations in critical genes, which can ultimately result in the development of cancer.

RNA splicing is a post-transcriptional modification process in which the non-coding sequences (introns) are removed and the coding sequences (exons) are joined together in a messenger RNA (mRNA) molecule. This results in a continuous mRNA sequence that can be translated into a single protein. Alternative splicing, where different combinations of exons are included or excluded, allows for the creation of multiple proteins from a single gene.

Mutagenicity tests are a type of laboratory assays used to identify agents that can cause genetic mutations. These tests detect changes in the DNA of organisms, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, after exposure to potential mutagens. The most commonly used mutagenicity test is the Ames test, which uses a strain of Salmonella bacteria that is sensitive to mutagens. If a chemical causes an increase in the number of revertants (reversion to the wild type) in the bacterial population, it is considered to be a mutagen. Other tests include the mouse lymphoma assay and the chromosomal aberration test. These tests are used to evaluate the potential genotoxicity of chemicals and are an important part of the safety evaluation process for new drugs, chemicals, and other substances.

Genetic variation refers to the differences in DNA sequences among individuals and populations. These variations can result from mutations, genetic recombination, or gene flow between populations. Genetic variation is essential for evolution by providing the raw material upon which natural selection acts. It can occur within a single gene, between different genes, or at larger scales, such as differences in the number of chromosomes or entire sets of chromosomes. The study of genetic variation is crucial in understanding the genetic basis of diseases and traits, as well as the evolutionary history and relationships among species.

'Escherichia coli (E. coli) proteins' refer to the various types of proteins that are produced and expressed by the bacterium Escherichia coli. These proteins play a critical role in the growth, development, and survival of the organism. They are involved in various cellular processes such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, translation, repair, and regulation.

E. coli is a gram-negative, facultative anaerobe that is commonly found in the intestines of warm-blooded organisms. It is widely used as a model organism in scientific research due to its well-studied genetics, rapid growth, and ability to be easily manipulated in the laboratory. As a result, many E. coli proteins have been identified, characterized, and studied in great detail.

Some examples of E. coli proteins include enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism such as lactase, sucrase, and maltose; proteins involved in DNA replication such as the polymerases, single-stranded binding proteins, and helicases; proteins involved in transcription such as RNA polymerase and sigma factors; proteins involved in translation such as ribosomal proteins, tRNAs, and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases; and regulatory proteins such as global regulators, two-component systems, and transcription factors.

Understanding the structure, function, and regulation of E. coli proteins is essential for understanding the basic biology of this important organism, as well as for developing new strategies for combating bacterial infections and improving industrial processes involving bacteria.

"Gag-Pol" fusion proteins are a crucial component in the life cycle of retroviruses, such as HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus). These proteins are created through the joining of two viral gene products: the "gag" gene and the "pol" gene.

The "gag" gene encodes for structural proteins that make up the viral matrix and capsid, while the "pol" gene encodes for enzymes necessary for viral replication, including reverse transcriptase, integrase, and protease.

Through a process called ribosomal frameshifting or translational readthrough, the viral RNA genome is translated into a single large polyprotein that contains both Gag and Pol domains. This Gag-Pol fusion protein is then cleaved by the viral protease into its individual functional components, allowing for the assembly of new virus particles and the replication of the viral genome in the host cell.

The formation of Gag-Pol fusion proteins is essential for retroviral replication and represents a key target for antiretroviral therapy in the treatment of HIV infection.

In the context of medical and biological sciences, a "binding site" refers to a specific location on a protein, molecule, or cell where another molecule can attach or bind. This binding interaction can lead to various functional changes in the original protein or molecule. The other molecule that binds to the binding site is often referred to as a ligand, which can be a small molecule, ion, or even another protein.

The binding between a ligand and its target binding site can be specific and selective, meaning that only certain ligands can bind to particular binding sites with high affinity. This specificity plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, enzyme catalysis, or drug action.

In the case of drug development, understanding the location and properties of binding sites on target proteins is essential for designing drugs that can selectively bind to these sites and modulate protein function. This knowledge can help create more effective and safer therapeutic options for various diseases.

Cutis laxa is a group of rare connective tissue disorders characterized by loose, sagging, and inelastic skin. The term "cutis laxa" comes from Latin, meaning "loose skin." This condition can affect both the skin and the internal organs. Inherited forms of cutis laxa are caused by mutations in various genes involved in the structure and function of connective tissue, while acquired forms can be associated with autoimmune disorders, cancer, or certain medications.

The main features of cutis laxa include:

1. Sagging, redundant skin: The skin appears loose and wrinkled, especially on the face, neck, hands, and feet. This is due to a deficiency in elastic fibers, which provide flexibility and resilience to the skin.
2. Premature aging appearance: The sagging skin can give an individual a prematurely aged appearance, with deep wrinkles and folds around the eyes, mouth, and neck.
3. Pulmonary involvement: Recurrent respiratory infections, bronchiectasis (permanent enlargement of the airways), and emphysema can occur due to weakened lung tissue.
4. Gastrointestinal issues: Weakened intestinal walls may lead to hernias, bowel obstructions, or malabsorption.
5. Cardiovascular problems: The aorta and other major blood vessels may become weakened and dilated, leading to an increased risk of aneurysms and dissections (tears in the vessel wall).
6. Ophthalmic complications: Eye abnormalities such as blue sclerae (transparent blue appearance of the whites of the eyes) and strabismus (crossed eyes) can occur.
7. Skeletal abnormalities: Individuals with cutis laxa may have joint hypermobility, scoliosis (curvature of the spine), or hip dislocations.
8. Neurological issues: Rarely, cutis laxa can be associated with developmental delays, intellectual disability, or seizures.

There is no cure for cutis laxa, and treatment focuses on managing symptoms and preventing complications. This may include skin care, physical therapy, medications to control blood pressure, and surgery to repair hernias or aneurysms. Regular follow-up with a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals is essential to monitor disease progression and address any emerging issues.

Intellectual disability (ID) is a term used when there are significant limitations in both intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior, which covers many everyday social and practical skills. This disability originates before the age of 18.

Intellectual functioning, also known as intelligence, refers to general mental capacity, such as learning, reasoning, problem-solving, and other cognitive skills. Adaptive behavior includes skills needed for day-to-day life, such as communication, self-care, social skills, safety judgement, and basic academic skills.

Intellectual disability is characterized by below-average intelligence or mental ability and a lack of skills necessary for day-to-day living. It can be mild, moderate, severe, or profound, depending on the degree of limitation in intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior.

It's important to note that people with intellectual disabilities have unique strengths and limitations, just like everyone else. With appropriate support and education, they can lead fulfilling lives and contribute to their communities in many ways.

MutS Homolog 2 (MSH2) Protein is a type of protein involved in the DNA repair process in cells. It is a member of the MutS family of proteins, which are responsible for identifying and correcting mistakes that occur during DNA replication. MSH2 forms a complex with another MutS homolog, MSH6, and this complex plays a crucial role in recognizing and binding to mismatched base pairs in the DNA. Once bound, the complex recruits other proteins to repair the damage and restore the integrity of the DNA. Defects in the MSH2 gene have been linked to an increased risk of certain types of cancer, including hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and uterine cancer.

A conserved sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to a pattern of nucleotides (in DNA or RNA) or amino acids (in proteins) that has remained relatively unchanged over evolutionary time. These sequences are often functionally important and are highly conserved across different species, indicating strong selection pressure against changes in these regions.

In the case of protein-coding genes, the corresponding amino acid sequence is deduced from the DNA sequence through the genetic code. Conserved sequences in proteins may indicate structurally or functionally important regions, such as active sites or binding sites, that are critical for the protein's activity. Similarly, conserved non-coding sequences in DNA may represent regulatory elements that control gene expression.

Identifying conserved sequences can be useful for inferring evolutionary relationships between species and for predicting the function of unknown genes or proteins.

The lac operon is a genetic regulatory system found in the bacteria Escherichia coli that controls the expression of genes responsible for the metabolism of lactose as a source of energy. It consists of three structural genes (lacZ, lacY, and lacA) that code for enzymes involved in lactose metabolism, as well as two regulatory elements: the lac promoter and the lac operator.

The lac repressor protein, produced by the lacI gene, binds to the lac operator sequence when lactose is not present, preventing RNA polymerase from transcribing the structural genes. When lactose is available, it is converted into allolactose, which acts as an inducer and binds to the lac repressor protein, causing a conformational change that prevents it from binding to the operator sequence. This allows RNA polymerase to bind to the promoter and transcribe the structural genes, leading to the production of enzymes necessary for lactose metabolism.

In summary, the lac operon is a genetic regulatory system in E. coli that controls the expression of genes involved in lactose metabolism based on the availability of lactose as a substrate.

Complementary DNA (cDNA) is a type of DNA that is synthesized from a single-stranded RNA molecule through the process of reverse transcription. In this process, the enzyme reverse transcriptase uses an RNA molecule as a template to synthesize a complementary DNA strand. The resulting cDNA is therefore complementary to the original RNA molecule and is a copy of its coding sequence, but it does not contain non-coding regions such as introns that are present in genomic DNA.

Complementary DNA is often used in molecular biology research to study gene expression, protein function, and other genetic phenomena. For example, cDNA can be used to create cDNA libraries, which are collections of cloned cDNA fragments that represent the expressed genes in a particular cell type or tissue. These libraries can then be screened for specific genes or gene products of interest. Additionally, cDNA can be used to produce recombinant proteins in heterologous expression systems, allowing researchers to study the structure and function of proteins that may be difficult to express or purify from their native sources.

Gene expression regulation in bacteria refers to the complex cellular processes that control the production of proteins from specific genes. This regulation allows bacteria to adapt to changing environmental conditions and ensure the appropriate amount of protein is produced at the right time.

Bacteria have a variety of mechanisms for regulating gene expression, including:

1. Operon structure: Many bacterial genes are organized into operons, which are clusters of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule. The expression of these genes can be coordinately regulated by controlling the transcription of the entire operon.
2. Promoter regulation: Transcription is initiated at promoter regions upstream of the gene or operon. Bacteria have regulatory proteins called sigma factors that bind to the promoter and recruit RNA polymerase, the enzyme responsible for transcribing DNA into RNA. The binding of sigma factors can be influenced by environmental signals, allowing for regulation of transcription.
3. Attenuation: Some operons have regulatory regions called attenuators that control transcription termination. These regions contain hairpin structures that can form in the mRNA and cause transcription to stop prematurely. The formation of these hairpins is influenced by the concentration of specific metabolites, allowing for regulation of gene expression based on the availability of those metabolites.
4. Riboswitches: Some bacterial mRNAs contain regulatory elements called riboswitches that bind small molecules directly. When a small molecule binds to the riboswitch, it changes conformation and affects transcription or translation of the associated gene.
5. CRISPR-Cas systems: Bacteria use CRISPR-Cas systems for adaptive immunity against viruses and plasmids. These systems incorporate short sequences from foreign DNA into their own genome, which can then be used to recognize and cleave similar sequences in invading genetic elements.

Overall, gene expression regulation in bacteria is a complex process that allows them to respond quickly and efficiently to changing environmental conditions. Understanding these regulatory mechanisms can provide insights into bacterial physiology and help inform strategies for controlling bacterial growth and behavior.

Eye abnormalities refer to any structural or functional anomalies that affect the eye or its surrounding tissues. These abnormalities can be present at birth (congenital) or acquired later in life due to various factors such as injury, disease, or aging. Some examples of eye abnormalities include:

1. Strabismus: Also known as crossed eyes, strabismus is a condition where the eyes are misaligned and point in different directions.
2. Nystagmus: This is an involuntary movement of the eyes that can be horizontal, vertical, or rotatory.
3. Cataracts: A cataract is a clouding of the lens inside the eye that can cause vision loss.
4. Glaucoma: This is a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve and can lead to vision loss.
5. Retinal disorders: These include conditions such as retinal detachment, macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy.
6. Corneal abnormalities: These include conditions such as keratoconus, corneal ulcers, and Fuchs' dystrophy.
7. Orbital abnormalities: These include conditions such as orbital tumors, thyroid eye disease, and Graves' ophthalmopathy.
8. Ptosis: This is a condition where the upper eyelid droops over the eye.
9. Color blindness: A condition where a person has difficulty distinguishing between certain colors.
10. Microphthalmia: A condition where one or both eyes are abnormally small.

These are just a few examples of eye abnormalities, and there are many others that can affect the eye and its functioning. If you suspect that you have an eye abnormality, it is important to consult with an ophthalmologist for proper diagnosis and treatment.

An oligonucleotide probe is a short, single-stranded DNA or RNA molecule that contains a specific sequence of nucleotides designed to hybridize with a complementary sequence in a target nucleic acid (DNA or RNA). These probes are typically 15-50 nucleotides long and are used in various molecular biology techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA sequencing, microarray analysis, and blotting methods.

Oligonucleotide probes can be labeled with various reporter molecules, like fluorescent dyes or radioactive isotopes, to enable the detection of hybridized targets. The high specificity of oligonucleotide probes allows for the precise identification and quantification of target nucleic acids in complex biological samples, making them valuable tools in diagnostic, research, and forensic applications.

Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a group of genetic disorders characterized by reduced or complete absence of melanin pigment in the eyes, skin, and hair. Melanin is the pigment responsible for giving color to our skin, hair, and eyes. OCA affects both the eyes (oculo-) and the skin (cutaneous), hence the name oculocutaneous albinism.

There are several types of OCA, each caused by different genetic mutations affecting melanin production. The most common forms include:

1. OCA1: This type is further divided into two subtypes - OCA1A and OCA1B. OCA1A is characterized by complete absence of melanin in the eyes, skin, and hair from birth. Individuals with this condition have white hair, very light skin, and pale blue or gray irises. OCA1B, on the other hand, presents with reduced melanin production, leading to lighter-than-average skin, hair, and eye color at birth. Over time, some melanin may be produced, resulting in milder pigmentation changes compared to OCA1A.
2. OCA2: This form of albinism is caused by mutations in the tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1) gene, which plays a role in melanin production. Individuals with OCA2 typically have light brown or yellowish skin, golden or straw-colored hair, and lighter irises compared to their family members without albinism.
3. OCA3: Also known as Rufous oculocutaneous albinism (ROCA), this type is caused by mutations in the tyrosinase gene (TYR). It primarily affects people of African descent, leading to reddish-brown hair, light brown skin, and normal or near-normal eye color.
4. OCA4: This form of albinism results from mutations in the membrane-associated transporter protein (MATP) gene, which is involved in melanin transport within cells. Individuals with OCA4 usually have light brown skin, yellowish or blond hair, and lighter irises compared to their family members without albinism.

Regardless of the type, all individuals with oculocutaneous albinism face similar challenges, including reduced vision due to abnormal eye development (nystagmus, strabismus, and farsightedness) and increased sensitivity to sunlight (photophobia). Proper management, such as wearing UV-protective sunglasses, hats, and sunscreen, can help protect their skin and eyes from damage.

APC (Adenomatous Polyposis Coli) gene is a tumor suppressor gene that provides instructions for making a protein called adenomatous polyposis coli. This protein plays a crucial role in regulating the growth and division of cells in the colon and rectum. Specifically, it helps to maintain the stability of the cell's genetic material (DNA) by controlling the process of beta-catenin degradation.

When the APC gene is mutated or altered, it can lead to an accumulation of beta-catenin in the cell, which can result in uncontrolled cell growth and division. This can ultimately lead to the development of colon polyps, which are benign growths that can become cancerous over time if left untreated.

Mutations in the APC gene are associated with several inherited cancer syndromes, including familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and attenuated FAP (AFAP). These conditions are characterized by the development of numerous colon polyps at a young age, which can increase the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) is a term used in genetics to describe the loss of one copy of a gene or a segment of a chromosome, where there was previously a pair of different genes or chromosomal segments (heterozygous). This can occur due to various genetic events such as mutation, deletion, or mitotic recombination.

LOH is often associated with the development of cancer, as it can lead to the loss of tumor suppressor genes, which normally help to regulate cell growth and division. When both copies of a tumor suppressor gene are lost or inactivated, it can result in uncontrolled cell growth and the formation of a tumor.

In medical terms, LOH is used as a biomarker for cancer susceptibility, progression, and prognosis. It can also be used to identify individuals who may be at increased risk for certain types of cancer, or to monitor patients for signs of cancer recurrence.

BRCA1 (BReast CAncer gene 1) is a tumor suppressor gene that produces a protein involved in repairing damaged DNA and maintaining genetic stability. Mutations in the BRCA1 gene are associated with an increased risk of developing hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. Inherited mutations in this gene account for about 5% of all breast cancers and about 10-15% of ovarian cancers. Women who have a mutation in the BRCA1 gene have a significantly higher risk of developing breast cancer and ovarian cancer compared to women without mutations. The protein produced by the BRCA1 gene also interacts with other proteins to regulate cell growth and division, so its disruption can lead to uncontrolled cell growth and tumor formation.

DNA transposable elements, also known as transposons or jumping genes, are mobile genetic elements that can change their position within a genome. They are composed of DNA sequences that include genes encoding the enzymes required for their own movement (transposase) and regulatory elements. When activated, the transposase recognizes specific sequences at the ends of the element and catalyzes the excision and reintegration of the transposable element into a new location in the genome. This process can lead to genetic variation, as the insertion of a transposable element can disrupt the function of nearby genes or create new combinations of gene regulatory elements. Transposable elements are widespread in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes and are thought to play a significant role in genome evolution.

Eye proteins, also known as ocular proteins, are specific proteins that are found within the eye and play crucial roles in maintaining proper eye function and health. These proteins can be found in various parts of the eye, including the cornea, iris, lens, retina, and other structures. They perform a wide range of functions, such as:

1. Structural support: Proteins like collagen and elastin provide strength and flexibility to the eye's tissues, enabling them to maintain their shape and withstand mechanical stress.
2. Light absorption and transmission: Proteins like opsins and crystallins are involved in capturing and transmitting light signals within the eye, which is essential for vision.
3. Protection against damage: Some eye proteins, such as antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins, help protect the eye from oxidative stress, UV radiation, and other environmental factors that can cause damage.
4. Regulation of eye growth and development: Various growth factors and signaling molecules, which are protein-based, contribute to the proper growth, differentiation, and maintenance of eye tissues during embryonic development and throughout adulthood.
5. Immune defense: Proteins involved in the immune response, such as complement components and immunoglobulins, help protect the eye from infection and inflammation.
6. Maintenance of transparency: Crystallin proteins in the lens maintain its transparency, allowing light to pass through unobstructed for clear vision.
7. Neuroprotection: Certain eye proteins, like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), support the survival and function of neurons within the retina, helping to preserve vision.

Dysfunction or damage to these eye proteins can contribute to various eye disorders and diseases, such as cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and others.

Haploinsufficiency is a genetic concept referring to the situation where an individual with only one functional copy of a gene, out of the two copies (one inherited from each parent) that most genes have, exhibits a phenotype or clinical features associated with the gene. This means that having just one working copy of the gene is not enough to ensure normal function, and a reduction in the dosage of the gene's product leads to a negative effect on the organism.

Haploinsufficiency can occur due to various genetic mechanisms such as point mutations, deletions, or other types of alterations that affect the expression or function of the gene. This concept is important in genetics and genomics research, particularly in the study of genetic disorders and diseases, including cancer, where haploinsufficiency of tumor suppressor genes can contribute to tumor development and progression.

Viral DNA refers to the genetic material present in viruses that consist of DNA as their core component. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is one of the two types of nucleic acids that are responsible for storing and transmitting genetic information in living organisms. Viruses are infectious agents much smaller than bacteria that can only replicate inside the cells of other organisms, called hosts.

Viral DNA can be double-stranded (dsDNA) or single-stranded (ssDNA), depending on the type of virus. Double-stranded DNA viruses have a genome made up of two complementary strands of DNA, while single-stranded DNA viruses contain only one strand of DNA.

Examples of dsDNA viruses include Adenoviruses, Herpesviruses, and Poxviruses, while ssDNA viruses include Parvoviruses and Circoviruses. Viral DNA plays a crucial role in the replication cycle of the virus, encoding for various proteins necessary for its multiplication and survival within the host cell.

Keratoderma, palmoplantar is a medical term that refers to a group of skin conditions characterized by thickening and hardening (hyperkeratosis) of the skin on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. This condition can affect people of all ages, but it's most commonly seen in children.

The thickening of the skin is caused by an overproduction of keratin, a protein that helps to form the tough, outer layer of the skin. In palmoplantar keratoderma, this excess keratin accumulates in the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the epidermis, leading to the formation of rough, scaly, and thickened patches on the palms and soles.

There are several different types of palmoplantar keratoderma, each with its own specific symptoms and causes. Some forms of the condition are inherited and present at birth or develop in early childhood, while others may be acquired later in life as a result of an underlying medical condition, such as atopic dermatitis, lichen planus, or psoriasis.

Treatment for palmoplantar keratoderma typically involves the use of emollients and keratolytic agents to help soften and remove the thickened skin. In some cases, oral retinoids or other systemic medications may be necessary to manage more severe symptoms. It's important to consult with a healthcare provider for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan.

Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) receptors are a group of cell surface receptors that bind to TGF-β ligands and transduce signals into the cell. These receptors play crucial roles in regulating various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and extracellular matrix production.

There are two types of TGF-β receptors: type I and type II. Type I receptors, also known as activin receptor-like kinases (ALKs), have serine/threonine kinase activity and include ALK1, ALK2, ALK3, ALK4, ALK5, and ALK6. Type II receptors are constitutively active serine/threonine kinases and include TGF-β RII, ActRII, and ActRIIB.

When a TGF-β ligand binds to a type II receptor, it recruits and phosphorylates a type I receptor, which in turn phosphorylates downstream signaling molecules called Smads. Phosphorylated Smads form complexes with co-Smad proteins and translocate to the nucleus, where they regulate gene expression.

Abnormalities in TGF-β signaling have been implicated in various human diseases, including fibrosis, cancer, and autoimmune disorders. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of TGF-β receptor function is essential for developing therapeutic strategies to target these conditions.

Promoter regions in genetics refer to specific DNA sequences located near the transcription start site of a gene. They serve as binding sites for RNA polymerase and various transcription factors that regulate the initiation of gene transcription. These regulatory elements help control the rate of transcription and, therefore, the level of gene expression. Promoter regions can be composed of different types of sequences, such as the TATA box and CAAT box, and their organization and composition can vary between different genes and species.

Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to amplify and detect specific DNA sequences. This technique is particularly useful for the detection and quantification of RNA viruses, as well as for the analysis of gene expression.

The process involves two main steps: reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the first step, reverse transcriptase enzyme is used to convert RNA into complementary DNA (cDNA) by reading the template provided by the RNA molecule. This cDNA then serves as a template for the PCR amplification step.

In the second step, the PCR reaction uses two primers that flank the target DNA sequence and a thermostable polymerase enzyme to repeatedly copy the targeted cDNA sequence. The reaction mixture is heated and cooled in cycles, allowing the primers to anneal to the template, and the polymerase to extend the new strand. This results in exponential amplification of the target DNA sequence, making it possible to detect even small amounts of RNA or cDNA.

RT-PCR is a sensitive and specific technique that has many applications in medical research and diagnostics, including the detection of viruses such as HIV, hepatitis C virus, and SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). It can also be used to study gene expression, identify genetic mutations, and diagnose genetic disorders.

Genetic association studies are a type of epidemiological research that aims to identify statistical associations between genetic variations and particular traits or diseases. These studies typically compare the frequency of specific genetic markers, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in individuals with a given trait or disease to those without it.

The goal of genetic association studies is to identify genetic factors that contribute to the risk of developing common complex diseases, such as diabetes, heart disease, or cancer. By identifying these genetic associations, researchers hope to gain insights into the underlying biological mechanisms of these diseases and develop new strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

It's important to note that while genetic association studies can identify statistical associations between genetic markers and traits or diseases, they cannot prove causality. Further research is needed to confirm and validate these findings and to understand the functional consequences of the identified genetic variants.

Viral genes refer to the genetic material present in viruses that contains the information necessary for their replication and the production of viral proteins. In DNA viruses, the genetic material is composed of double-stranded or single-stranded DNA, while in RNA viruses, it is composed of single-stranded or double-stranded RNA.

Viral genes can be classified into three categories: early, late, and structural. Early genes encode proteins involved in the replication of the viral genome, modulation of host cell processes, and regulation of viral gene expression. Late genes encode structural proteins that make up the viral capsid or envelope. Some viruses also have structural genes that are expressed throughout their replication cycle.

Understanding the genetic makeup of viruses is crucial for developing antiviral therapies and vaccines. By targeting specific viral genes, researchers can develop drugs that inhibit viral replication and reduce the severity of viral infections. Additionally, knowledge of viral gene sequences can inform the development of vaccines that stimulate an immune response to specific viral proteins.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

The genetic code is the set of rules that dictates how DNA and RNA sequences are translated into proteins. It consists of a 64-unit "alphabet" formed by all possible combinations of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) in DNA or uracil (U) in RNA. These triplets, also known as codons, specify the addition of specific amino acids during protein synthesis or signal the start or stop of translation. This code is universal across all known organisms, with only a few exceptions.

Fungal genes refer to the genetic material present in fungi, which are eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as larger organisms like mushrooms. The genetic material of fungi is composed of DNA, just like in other eukaryotes, and is organized into chromosomes located in the nucleus of the cell.

Fungal genes are segments of DNA that contain the information necessary to produce proteins and RNA molecules required for various cellular functions. These genes are transcribed into messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules, which are then translated into proteins by ribosomes in the cytoplasm.

Fungal genomes have been sequenced for many species, revealing a diverse range of genes that encode proteins involved in various cellular processes such as metabolism, signaling, and regulation. Comparative genomic analyses have also provided insights into the evolutionary relationships among different fungal lineages and have helped to identify unique genetic features that distinguish fungi from other eukaryotes.

Understanding fungal genes and their functions is essential for advancing our knowledge of fungal biology, as well as for developing new strategies to control fungal pathogens that can cause diseases in humans, animals, and plants.

Proteins are complex, large molecules that play critical roles in the body's functions. They are made up of amino acids, which are organic compounds that are the building blocks of proteins. Proteins are required for the structure, function, and regulation of the body's tissues and organs. They are essential for the growth, repair, and maintenance of body tissues, and they play a crucial role in many biological processes, including metabolism, immune response, and cellular signaling. Proteins can be classified into different types based on their structure and function, such as enzymes, hormones, antibodies, and structural proteins. They are found in various foods, especially animal-derived products like meat, dairy, and eggs, as well as plant-based sources like beans, nuts, and grains.

A nucleic acid heteroduplex is a double-stranded structure formed by the pairing of two complementary single strands of nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) that are derived from different sources. The term "hetero" refers to the fact that the two strands are not identical and come from different parents, genes, or organisms.

Heteroduplexes can form spontaneously during processes like genetic recombination, where DNA repair mechanisms may mistakenly pair complementary regions between two different double-stranded DNA molecules. They can also be generated intentionally in laboratory settings for various purposes, such as analyzing the similarity of DNA sequences or detecting mutations.

Heteroduplexes are often used in molecular biology techniques like polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing, where they can help identify mismatches, insertions, deletions, or other sequence variations between the two parental strands. These variations can provide valuable information about genetic diversity, evolutionary relationships, and disease-causing mutations.

Proto-oncogene proteins are normal cellular proteins that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, such as signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). They are involved in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and survival under physiological conditions.

When proto-oncogene proteins undergo mutations or aberrations in their expression levels, they can transform into oncogenic forms, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and division. These altered proteins are then referred to as oncogene products or oncoproteins. Oncogenic mutations can occur due to various factors, including genetic predisposition, environmental exposures, and aging.

Examples of proto-oncogene proteins include:

1. Ras proteins: Involved in signal transduction pathways that regulate cell growth and differentiation. Activating mutations in Ras genes are found in various human cancers.
2. Myc proteins: Regulate gene expression related to cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and metabolism. Overexpression of Myc proteins is associated with several types of cancer.
3. EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor): A transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that regulates cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Mutations or overexpression of EGFR are linked to various malignancies, such as lung cancer and glioblastoma.
4. Src family kinases: Intracellular tyrosine kinases that regulate signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation, survival, and migration. Dysregulation of Src family kinases is implicated in several types of cancer.
5. Abl kinases: Cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases that regulate various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and stress responses. Aberrant activation of Abl kinases, as seen in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), leads to uncontrolled cell proliferation.

Understanding the roles of proto-oncogene proteins and their dysregulation in cancer development is essential for developing targeted cancer therapies that aim to inhibit or modulate these aberrant signaling pathways.

Molecular evolution is the process of change in the DNA sequence or protein structure over time, driven by mechanisms such as mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and natural selection. It refers to the evolutionary study of changes in DNA, RNA, and proteins, and how these changes accumulate and lead to new species and diversity of life. Molecular evolution can be used to understand the history and relationships among different organisms, as well as the functional consequences of genetic changes.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

COS cells are a type of cell line that are commonly used in molecular biology and genetic research. The name "COS" is an acronym for "CV-1 in Origin," as these cells were originally derived from the African green monkey kidney cell line CV-1. COS cells have been modified through genetic engineering to express high levels of a protein called SV40 large T antigen, which allows them to efficiently take up and replicate exogenous DNA.

There are several different types of COS cells that are commonly used in research, including COS-1, COS-3, and COS-7 cells. These cells are widely used for the production of recombinant proteins, as well as for studies of gene expression, protein localization, and signal transduction.

It is important to note that while COS cells have been a valuable tool in scientific research, they are not without their limitations. For example, because they are derived from monkey kidney cells, there may be differences in the way that human genes are expressed or regulated in these cells compared to human cells. Additionally, because COS cells express SV40 large T antigen, they may have altered cell cycle regulation and other phenotypic changes that could affect experimental results. Therefore, it is important to carefully consider the choice of cell line when designing experiments and interpreting results.

The "age of onset" is a medical term that refers to the age at which an individual first develops or displays symptoms of a particular disease, disorder, or condition. It can be used to describe various medical conditions, including both physical and mental health disorders. The age of onset can have implications for prognosis, treatment approaches, and potential causes of the condition. In some cases, early onset may indicate a more severe or progressive course of the disease, while late-onset symptoms might be associated with different underlying factors or etiologies. It is essential to provide accurate and precise information regarding the age of onset when discussing a patient's medical history and treatment plan.

Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is the genetic material present in the mitochondria, which are specialized structures within cells that generate energy. Unlike nuclear DNA, which is present in the cell nucleus and inherited from both parents, mtDNA is inherited solely from the mother.

MtDNA is a circular molecule that contains 37 genes, including 13 genes that encode for proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, a process that generates energy in the form of ATP. The remaining genes encode for rRNAs and tRNAs, which are necessary for protein synthesis within the mitochondria.

Mutations in mtDNA can lead to a variety of genetic disorders, including mitochondrial diseases, which can affect any organ system in the body. These mutations can also be used in forensic science to identify individuals and establish biological relationships.

Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Neoplasms (HNPCC), also known as Lynch Syndrome, is a genetic disorder that significantly increases the risk of developing colorectal cancer and other types of cancer. It is characterized by the mutation in genes responsible for repairing mistakes in the DNA replication process, specifically the mismatch repair genes (MMR).

HNPCC is typically inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, meaning that a person has a 50% chance of inheriting the mutated gene from an affected parent. The syndrome is associated with the development of colorectal cancer at a younger age, usually before 50 years old, and often in the proximal colon. Individuals with HNPCC also have an increased risk for other cancers, including endometrial, stomach, small intestine, ovary, kidney, brain, and skin (sebaceous gland tumors).

Regular surveillance and screening are crucial for early detection and management of colorectal neoplasms in individuals with HNPCC. This typically includes colonoscopies starting at a younger age and performed more frequently than in the general population. Genetic counseling and testing may also be recommended for family members who may have inherited the mutated gene.

Ectodermal dysplasia (ED) is a group of genetic disorders that affect the development and formation of ectodermal tissues, which include the skin, hair, nails, teeth, and sweat glands. The condition is usually present at birth or appears in early infancy.

The symptoms of ED can vary widely depending on the specific type and severity of the disorder. Common features may include:

* Sparse or absent hair
* Thin, wrinkled, or rough skin
* Abnormal or missing teeth
* Nail abnormalities
* Absent or reduced sweat glands, leading to heat intolerance and problems regulating body temperature
* Ear abnormalities, which can result in hearing loss
* Eye abnormalities

ED is caused by mutations in genes that are involved in the development of ectodermal tissues. Most cases of ED are inherited in an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive pattern, meaning that a child can inherit the disorder even if only one parent (dominant) or both parents (recessive) carry the mutated gene.

There is no cure for ED, but treatment is focused on managing the symptoms and improving quality of life. This may include measures to maintain body temperature, such as cooling vests or frequent cool baths; dental treatments to replace missing teeth; hearing aids for hearing loss; and skin care regimens to prevent dryness and irritation.

A viral RNA (ribonucleic acid) is the genetic material found in certain types of viruses, as opposed to viruses that contain DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid). These viruses are known as RNA viruses. The RNA can be single-stranded or double-stranded and can exist as several different forms, such as positive-sense, negative-sense, or ambisense RNA. Upon infecting a host cell, the viral RNA uses the host's cellular machinery to translate the genetic information into proteins, leading to the production of new virus particles and the continuation of the viral life cycle. Examples of human diseases caused by RNA viruses include influenza, COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2), hepatitis C, and polio.

Nitrogen mustard compounds are a group of chemical agents that have been used historically as chemotherapy drugs and also have potential as military chemical warfare agents. They are alkylating agents, which means they work by modifying DNA in such a way that it can no longer replicate properly, leading to cell death.

In the medical context, nitrogen mustard compounds are used to treat certain types of cancer, including Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. They may also be used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia, multiple myeloma, and other cancers.

The most common nitrogen mustard compounds used in medicine are mechlorethamine, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and melphalan. These drugs are typically administered intravenously or orally, and their use is carefully monitored to minimize side effects such as nausea, vomiting, hair loss, and suppression of the immune system.

It's worth noting that nitrogen mustard compounds can also be highly toxic and dangerous if used as chemical warfare agents. They can cause severe respiratory, skin, and eye damage, as well as potentially fatal systemic effects.

Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a cellular surveillance mechanism that degrades abnormal messenger RNAs (mRNAs) containing premature termination codons (PTCs) to prevent the production of potentially harmful truncated proteins. This process helps maintain the fidelity and integrity of gene expression.

In eukaryotic cells, NMD is initiated when the ribosome encounters a PTC during translation, which is typically located more than 50-55 nucleotides upstream of an exon-exon junction. This distinctive arrangement triggers the recruitment of specific protein factors that mark the mRNA for degradation in the cytoplasm.

NMD plays a crucial role in maintaining the normal function of cells and has been implicated in various physiological processes, including development, differentiation, and stress response. Moreover, defects in NMD have been associated with several human diseases, such as cancer, neurodevelopmental disorders, and genetic disorders caused by PTC-containing mRNAs.

Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) is a term used in molecular biology and genetics. It refers to the presence of variations in DNA sequences among individuals, which can be detected by restriction enzymes. These enzymes cut DNA at specific sites, creating fragments of different lengths.

In RFLP analysis, DNA is isolated from an individual and treated with a specific restriction enzyme that cuts the DNA at particular recognition sites. The resulting fragments are then separated by size using gel electrophoresis, creating a pattern unique to that individual's DNA. If there are variations in the DNA sequence between individuals, the restriction enzyme may cut the DNA at different sites, leading to differences in the length of the fragments and thus, a different pattern on the gel.

These variations can be used for various purposes, such as identifying individuals, diagnosing genetic diseases, or studying evolutionary relationships between species. However, RFLP analysis has largely been replaced by more modern techniques like polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods and DNA sequencing, which offer higher resolution and throughput.

Pregnenes is not a term that is commonly used in medical terminology. However, in biochemistry, pregnenes are steroid compounds containing a carbon skeleton with nine or more rings. They are precursors to various steroid hormones such as progesterone and cortisol.

Pregnenes are derived from cholesterol through a series of enzymatic reactions that involve the removal of several carbons from the cholesterol molecule. The resulting pregnenolone is then further metabolized to produce other steroid hormones, including progesterone, cortisol, androgens, and estrogens.

Therefore, while not a medical term per se, pregnenes are an essential class of compounds in the endocrine system that play a crucial role in various physiological processes, such as sexual development, stress response, and immune function.

A neoplasm is a tumor or growth that is formed by an abnormal and excessive proliferation of cells, which can be benign or malignant. Neoplasm proteins are therefore any proteins that are expressed or produced in these neoplastic cells. These proteins can play various roles in the development, progression, and maintenance of neoplasms.

Some neoplasm proteins may contribute to the uncontrolled cell growth and division seen in cancer, such as oncogenic proteins that promote cell cycle progression or inhibit apoptosis (programmed cell death). Others may help the neoplastic cells evade the immune system, allowing them to proliferate undetected. Still others may be involved in angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels that supply the tumor with nutrients and oxygen.

Neoplasm proteins can also serve as biomarkers for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, or treatment response. For example, the presence or level of certain neoplasm proteins in biological samples such as blood or tissue may indicate the presence of a specific type of cancer, help predict the likelihood of cancer recurrence, or suggest whether a particular therapy will be effective.

Overall, understanding the roles and behaviors of neoplasm proteins can provide valuable insights into the biology of cancer and inform the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins are the proteins that are produced by the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This organism is a single-celled eukaryote that has been widely used as a model organism in scientific research for many years due to its relatively simple genetic makeup and its similarity to higher eukaryotic cells.

The genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been fully sequenced, and it is estimated to contain approximately 6,000 genes that encode proteins. These proteins play a wide variety of roles in the cell, including catalyzing metabolic reactions, regulating gene expression, maintaining the structure of the cell, and responding to environmental stimuli.

Many Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins have human homologs and are involved in similar biological processes, making this organism a valuable tool for studying human disease. For example, many of the proteins involved in DNA replication, repair, and recombination in yeast have human counterparts that are associated with cancer and other diseases. By studying these proteins in yeast, researchers can gain insights into their function and regulation in humans, which may lead to new treatments for disease.

Gene frequency, also known as allele frequency, is a measure in population genetics that reflects the proportion of a particular gene or allele (variant of a gene) in a given population. It is calculated as the number of copies of a specific allele divided by the total number of all alleles at that genetic locus in the population.

For example, if we consider a gene with two possible alleles, A and a, the gene frequency of allele A (denoted as p) can be calculated as follows:

p = (number of copies of allele A) / (total number of all alleles at that locus)

Similarly, the gene frequency of allele a (denoted as q) would be:

q = (number of copies of allele a) / (total number of all alleles at that locus)

Since there are only two possible alleles for this gene in this example, p + q = 1. These frequencies can help researchers understand genetic diversity and evolutionary processes within populations.

A frameshift mutation (also called a framing error or a reading frame shift) is a genetic mutation caused by indels (insertions ... Frameshift mutations can occur randomly or be caused by an external stimulus. The detection of frameshift mutations can occur ... The flanking DNA can also contribute to frameshift mutations. In prostate cancer a frameshift mutation changes the open reading ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Frameshift mutation. Frameshift+Mutation at the U.S. National Library of Medicine ...
The above mutations cause a frameshift in the gene. A frameshift mutation refers to a condition in which the reading frame of ... "Frameshift Mutation". Genome.gov. Retrieved 2022-03-30. Karakaya, Taner; Bilgic, Ali Evren; Eris, Deniz; Baser, Burak; Mermer, ... Multiple mutations at the CKAP2L gene can cause Filippi Syndrome. Some of these mutations include a 1-base pair duplication in ... This frameshift mutation ultimately results in a premature termination codon (the formation of a termination codon at a ...
Patient 1 harbors a frameshift mutation (p. Lys335fs) and displays heterotaxy (dextrocardia, total anomalous pulmonary venous ... Two damaging de novo NAA15 mutations were reported by exome sequencing in parent-offspring trios with congenital heart disease ... "De novo mutations in histone-modifying genes in congenital heart disease". Nature. 498 (7453): 220-3. Bibcode:2013Natur.498.. ... the second patient harbors a nonsense mutation (p.S761X) and displays conotruncal defects (tetralogy of Fallot, single left ...
Unless noted as a deletion (del), frame shift (fs), or homozygous mutation, all mutations are heterozygous, missense mutations ... frameshift mutation, insert mutation, or splice site mutation in one of these genes. The most frequent sites for these ... A deletion mutation causing a frameshift viz., c.1622delT: Thr525Leu, is also a cause of the disorder. The fibrinogen bearing ... Two particular missense mutations represent the majority (74% in one study of 101 individuals) of all mutations associated with ...
forward mutation frameshift mutation A type of mutation in a nucleic acid sequence caused by the insertion or deletion of a ... back mutation A mutation that reverses the effect of a previous mutation which had inactivated a gene, thus restoring wild-type ... lethal mutation Any mutation that results in the premature death of the organism carrying it. Recessive lethal mutations are ... 2. (of a mutation) Not causing a frameshift. ionophore Any chemical compound or macromolecule that facilitates the movement of ...
Cairns, J.; Foster, P. L. (August 1991). "Adaptive Reversion of a Frameshift Mutation in Escherichia Coli". Genetics. 128 (4): ... Substitution bias further increases the likelihood of haplotype convergence, as this increases the probability of mutations ...
All ROGDI mutations which include frameshift, nonsense, and splice site mutations cause premature mRNA degradation or protein ... One family had a frameshift mutation called c.366dupA. This duplication that caused the frameshift resulted in a premature stop ... A mutation called c.507delC which is the deletion of a cytosine at position 507 resulted in a nonsense mutation. A nonsense ... mutation is a point mutation that results in a premature stop codon. Five affected families contained the nonsense mutation ...
However, not all indels are frameshift mutations. If indels occur in trinucleotides, the result is an extension of the protein ... or a frameshift mutation that may render the protein inactive. The biological consequences of indels are often deleterious and ... Considering multiple gaps in a sequence as a larger single gap will reduce the assignment of a high cost to the mutations. For ... Genetic sequence alignment - In bioinformatics, gaps are used to account for genetic mutations occurring from insertions or ...
experiment of 1961, which discovered frameshift mutations; this insight provided early elucidation of the nature of the genetic ... "Distribution of proflavin-induced mutations in the genetic fine structure", Nature 182: 983-5. Brenner, S. and Barnett, L. 1959 ...
experiment of 1961, which discovered frameshift mutations. Brenner collaborating with Sarabhai, Stretton and Bolle in 1964, ... Hodgkin, JA; Brenner, S (1977). "Mutations causing transformation of sexual phenotype in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans". ...
Multiple mutations are known: the current (2007) total is 79. These include both nonsense and frameshift mutations. Most of the ... Mutations in the ALMS1 gene have been found to be causative for Alström syndrome with a total of 81 disease-causing mutations. ... Mutations associated with disease are usually found in exons 8, 10 and 16. The gene is expressed in fetal tissues including the ... "Mutation of ALMS1, a large gene with a tandem repeat encoding 47 amino acids, causes Alström syndrome". Nature Genetics. 31 (1 ...
1996). "Endothelin-3 frameshift mutation in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome". Nat. Genet. 13 (4): 395-6. doi: ... Hofstra RM, Osinga J, Buys CH (1998). "Mutations in Hirschsprung disease: when does a mutation contribute to the phenotype". ... Mutations in this gene and EDNRB have been associated with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) and Waardenburg syndrome (WS), which are ... 1996). "A homozygous mutation in the endothelin-3 gene associated with a combined Waardenburg type 2 and Hirschsprung phenotype ...
A premature stop codon results from this frame-shift mutation. This variant is found worldwide, and likely predates human ... ABO at BGMUT Blood Group Antigen Gene Mutation Database at NCBI, NIH Encyclopædia Britannica, ABO blood group system National ... Some evolutionary biologists theorize that there are four main lineages of the ABO gene and that mutations creating type O have ...
Frame shifts include insertions, deletions, and mutations. The presence of one of these features, or the presence of multiple ... This relationship is affected by certain sequence features such as frame shifts, direct repeats, and inverted repeats. ...
In molecular biology, 2-AF is able to induce frameshift mutations, by deleting 2 bases in the DNA. DNA is able to undergo a ... doi:10.1016/0165-1110(94)90025-6. Hoffmann, George R.; Fuchs, Robert P. P. (1 April 1997). "Mechanisms of Frameshift Mutations ... Mutations ultimately affect the production of proteins and at times, it can be quite fatal. 2-AF is not common in industrial ... If DNA mutations occur during DNA replication, this will ultimately affect the central dogma and every protein that gets ...
May 2001). "A frameshift mutation in NOD2 associated with susceptibility to Crohn's disease". Nature. 411 (6837): 603-6. ... April 2002). "The contribution of NOD2 gene mutations to the risk and site of disease in inflammatory bowel disease". ...
"Cone-rod dystrophy and a frameshift mutation in the PROM1 gene". Molecular Vision. 15: 1709-16. PMC 2732717. PMID 19718270. ...
Kang, S.; Graham, J. M.; Olney, A. H.; Biesecker, L. G. (March 1997). "GLI3 frameshift mutations cause autosomal dominant ... Some cases can still result from new mutations in the gene and occur in people with no history of the disorder in their family ... Pallister-Hall Syndrome occurs due to a mutation in the GLI3 gene that overrides normal genetic development. Before birth the ... robust phenotype prediction from the type and position of GLI3 mutations". American Journal of Human Genetics. 76 (4): 609-622 ...
Charest, N. J.; Zhou, Z. X.; Lubahn, D. B.; Olsen, K. L.; Wilson, E. M.; French, F. S. (1991). "A frameshift mutation ... "A single base mutation in the androgen receptor gene causes androgen insensitivity in the testicular feminized rat". The ...
"A frameshift mutation in LRSAM1 is responsible for a dominant hereditary polyneuropathy". Hum. Mol. Genet. 21 (2): 358-70. doi: ... Mutations in LRSAM1 have been reported in the peripheral neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2P (OMIM 614436), while disruption ... "A novel LRSAM1 mutation is associated with autosomal dominant axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease". Eur. J. Hum. Genet. 21 (2): ... "Mutation in the gene encoding ubiquitin ligase LRSAM1 in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease". PLOS Genet. 6 (8): ...
... frameshift mutations have also been described in colorectal cancers. In accordance to its role in facilitating p53 ... Yoo NJ, Park SW, Lee SH (December 2011). "Frameshift mutations of ubiquitination-related genes HERC2, HERC3, TRIP12, UBE2Q1 and ... This genotype is present in almost all people with blue eyes and is hypothesised as being the founder mutation of blue eyes in ... In Old Order Amish families, a homozygous proline to leucine missense mutation within the first RLD domain has been implicated ...
1961: Francis Crick and Sydney Brenner discovered frame shift mutations. In the experiment, proflavin-induced mutations of the ... These mutations were used to demonstrate that three sequential bases of the rIIB gene's DNA specify each successive amino acid ... Proflavin causes mutations by inserting itself between DNA bases, typically resulting in insertion or deletion of a single base ... Genetics, "The hisB463 Mutation and Expression of a Eukaryotic Protein in Escherichia coli", Vol. 180, 709-714, October 2008 [4 ...
Thiselton DL, Zito I, Plant C, Jay M, Hodgson SV, Bird AC, Bhattacharya SS, Hardcastle AJ (2000). "Novel frameshift mutations ... RPGR mutations in most families with definite X linkage and clustering of mutations in a short sequence stretch of exon ORF15 ... Wada Y, Nakazawa M, Abe T, Tamai M (2000). "A new Leu253Arg mutation in the RP2 gene in a Japanese family with X-linked ... Hardcastle AJ, Thiselton DL, Van Maldergem L, Saha BK, Jay M, Plant C, Taylor R, Bird AC, Bhattacharya S (2000). "Mutations in ...
"Novel frameshift mutations in CRX associated with Leber congenital amaurosis". Human Mutation. 18 (6): 550-1. doi:10.1002/humu. ... Chen S, Wang QL, Xu S, Liu I, Li LY, Wang Y, Zack DJ (Apr 2002). "Functional analysis of cone-rod homeobox (CRX) mutations ... Mutations in this gene are associated with photoreceptor degeneration, Leber's congenital amaurosis type III and the autosomal ... Nakamura M, Ito S, Miyake Y (Sep 2002). "Novel de novo mutation in CRX gene in a Japanese patient with leber congenital ...
"Frameshift mutation in the PTCH2 gene can cause nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome". Familial Cancer. 12 (4): 611-4. doi: ... "A susceptibility locus on 1p32-1p34 for congenital macrostomia in a Chinese family and identification of a novel PTCH2 mutation ...
"Selective translational repression of truncated proteins from frameshift mutation-derived mRNAs in tumors". PLOS Biol. 5 (5): ...
That deletion causes a frameshift mutation which results in a "premature" stop codon. The resulting human BASE protein is much ...
... in POU3F4 Frameshift truncation and extension mutations at the POU3F4 C-terminus Physical anomalies caused by POU3F4 mutations ... "Destabilization and mislocalization of POU3F4 by C-terminal frameshift truncation and extension mutation". Human Mutation. 34 ( ... These known mutations include: Missense mutation causing the substitution of amino acid glycine for glutamic acid at position ... identification of a somatic mosaicism for a POU3F4 missense mutation". Human Mutation. 10 (3): 207-11. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1098- ...
Type XII - OI caused by a frameshift mutation in SP7 on chromosome 12q13.13. This mutation causes bone deformities, fractures, ... The presence of frameshift mutations caused by duplications and deletions is generally the cause of increased severity of ... This mutation causes recurrent fractures, high bone mass, and hypermobile joints. Type XIV - OI caused by mutations in the ... The mutations cause a decrease in secretion of trimeric procollagen molecules. Other mutations in this gene can cause autosomal ...
However, there has been a recent case of a patient with recessive OI with a documented frameshift mutation in Sp7/Osx as the ... July 2010). "Identification of a frameshift mutation in Osterix in a patient with recessive osteogenesis imperfecta". American ... Generally this disease is caused by mutations in Col1a1 or Col1a2 which are regulators of collagen growth. OI-causing mutations ... A mutation in the zebrafish homologue of Sp7 caused severe craniofacial irregularities in maturing organisms while leaving the ...
A frameshift mutation (also called a framing error or a reading frame shift) is a genetic mutation caused by indels (insertions ... Frameshift mutations can occur randomly or be caused by an external stimulus. The detection of frameshift mutations can occur ... The flanking DNA can also contribute to frameshift mutations. In prostate cancer a frameshift mutation changes the open reading ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Frameshift mutation. Frameshift+Mutation at the U.S. National Library of Medicine ...
Prediction of individual patient response to immune therapy by assessing genetic mutations, like frame-shift mutations, in lung ... zogenaamde frame-shifts, in de toekomst gebruikt kunnen worden om een geheel op maat gemaakte immunotherapie behandeling te ...
It is well known that misalignments at homopolymeric runs can cause frameshift mutations and base substitutions [94]. Sequence ... the mutation frequency after one cell infection cycle will equal the mutation rate except if mutations occur during the first ... Mutation rate variation across viruses. a Range of variation of mutation rates for the seven Baltimore classes of viruses (ss ... 1a). Higher mutation rates lead to higher genetic diversity but, except in special cases, it is not possible to infer mutation ...
Background The GM2 gangliosidoses are a group of lysosomal lipid storage disorders caused by mutations in at least 1 of 3 ... Del76A frameshift mutation, exon 1. 84% of subtype, Greek-Cypriot Maronite. Infantile ... in which one allele has a G269S mutation and the other allele a mutation for infantile TSD. Patients who have a G269S mutation ... Of the mutations, 42% were missense or nonsense mutations.. † Hex A plus/Hex B minus was originally called Hexosaminidase Paris ...
31) and included 2 frameshift mutations. The STEC O55:H7 outbreak strain 122262 had a β-glucuronidase-positive phenotype, and ... In STEC O157:H7, the sorbitol-negative phenotype was thought to have resulted from frameshifts in srlA and srlE, as observed in ... Genetic and evolutionary analysis of mutations in the gusA gene that cause the absence of beta-glucuronidase activity in ... followed by loss of the ability to ferment sorbitol because of a non-sense mutation in srlA. The parallel, convergent ...
GLI3 frameshift mutations cause autosomal dominant Pallister-Hall syndrome. Nat Genet. 1997 Mar;15(3):266-8. doi: 10.1038/ ... At least two mutations in the GLI3 gene have been reported in people with features of acrocallosal syndrome, a rare condition ... More than 40 mutations in the GLI3 gene have been found to cause Pallister-Hall syndrome, a rare condition whose major features ... Most of the mutations that cause Pallister-Hall syndrome occur near the middle of the gene, creating a premature stop signal in ...
However, the panel did identify a frameshift mutation in the BRCA2 gene. The womans tumor was re-analyzed and she was given ... which identified 33 tier 1 somatic point mutations and four indel mutations. The initial analysis pointed to no obvious drugs ... "In the majority of those [unsolved] cases, the mutation is in the data, but were not able to identify it." Additionally, one ... A commercial gene panel found no mutations in the KRAS gene, which would have been very unusual had it truly been pancreatic ...
Adenoma/genetics, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11, Female, Frameshift Mutation, Gene Deletion, Humans, ... and 6 of them demonstrated previously unrecognized somatic missense and frameshift deletion mutations of the MEN1 gene. Many of ... and 6 of them demonstrated previously unrecognized somatic missense and frameshift deletion mutations of the MEN1 gene. Many of ... Frameshift Mutation; Gene Deletion; Humans; Hyperparathyroidism/genetics; Loss of Heterozygosity; Male; Microsatellite Repeats ...
frameshift mutation had partial remission following CoQ10 treatment. These data indicate that individuals with SRNS with ... Mutations in ADCK4. resulted in reduced CoQ10 levels and reduced mitochondrial respiratory enzyme activity in cells isolated ... ADCK4 mutations promote steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome through CoQ10 biosynthesis disruption ... ADCK4 mutations promote steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome through CoQ10 biosynthesis disruption ...
... the bacterial population can accumulate pathoadaptive mutations that reduce bacterial toxicity whilst allowing persistence ... The crossbar represents mean and standard deviation (p , 0.0001). (C) Predicted impact of K2308 frameshift mutation (K2308fs) ... D) Number of mutations detected for each of the 20 genes, coloured by S. aureus ST. (E) Location of convergent mutations in ... A) Number of mutations detected for each of the 20 most convergent genes, coloured by S. aureus ST (B) Mutation maps. ...
Some mutations are harmful. ● Some of them are ● , Point mutations → Silent, misense and nonsense ● , Frame Shift mutations. ... MUTATIONS AND GENETIC CODE ● FRAME SHIFT MUTATION → these occur with one or more base pair is inserted in or deleted from DNA ... MIS SENSE MUTATION → The changed base may code for a different amino acid MUTATIONS AND GENETIC CODE NONSENSE MUTATION→ The ... MUTATIONS AND GENETIC CODE ● POINT MUTATION →The replacement of one base pair by another results in point mutations ● SILENT ...
A frameshift mutation in NOD2 associated with susceptibility to Crohns disease. Nature 2001;411:603-6.doi:10.1038/35079114 ... Brooks et al identified different clusters of patients with UC using network footprints created by combining mutation data, ... 115-118 Adding to the complexity is the recently discovered fact that mutations occur in a cell type-specific manner.119 Most ...
... splice acceptor site mutation leading to a frame shift after K15 and then a stop codon, LNQHGKYQSEKSSSEFASRPYK STOP); zw17 (W21 ... Mutation in bkip-1 suppressed the lethargic phenotype caused by SLO-1(gf). To perform a forward genetic screen for molecules ... Effects of bkip-1 mutation on neurotransmitter release. A, At 5 mm [Ca2+]o, the amplitude of ePSCs at the neuromuscular ... 2A). bkip-1(zw10), which is a putative null resulting from a mutation in the splice acceptor site of the first intron, was used ...
... complete copies and inactive formats due to premature stop codons and frameshift mutations. Presence of inactive and intact ... Sequencing of JM109-Thyr defined multiple mutations including a stop mutation in the acrR gene resulting in a truncation of the ... Simulations indicated that mutations at amino acids E198A and F200Y alter binding of BZ, whereas there was no obvious effect of ... Three mutations in the β-tubulin protein family are associated with BZ resistance. Seven shared β-tubulin isotypes were ...
CRISPR/Cas9 was used to generate mutants harboring new alleles of Fign, Fignl1, and Fignl2 that contain frame-shift mutations. ... fign mutation resulted in mice "fidget" behavior (Yang et al., 2005); human FIGN suppressed microtubule growth via minus-end ... fignl2 sgRNA1 was found to be active with a somatic mutation rate of 30-40% in the founders at 24 hpf. One mutated allele was ... Embryos with fignl2 mutations were found to have pericardial edema and smaller eyes, and the phenotypes were dependent on gene ...
They warned that duplications could lead to dangerous frameshift mutations, resulting in misshapen proteins.. GMWatch comment: ... In addition, and surprisingly, the range of on-target mutations (unintended mutations at the intended editing site) varied, ... While the study found that the CRISPR tools in themselves did not introduce many off-target mutations in the plants, many off- ... Thus the study found that the CRISPR process, taken as a whole, causes large numbers of off-target mutations. GMWatch comment: ...
Various mutations have been discovered, including missense and frameshift types. Patients of Ashkenazi Jewish descent have been ... Raben N, Sherman J, Miller F, Mena H, Plotz P. A 5 splice junction mutation leading to exon deletion in an Ashkenazic Jewish ... Raben et al reported that the disease appears to be prevalent among people of Ashkenazi Jewish descent with mutations of the ... Mutations in muscle phosphofructokinase gene. Hum Mutat. 1995. 6 (1):1-6. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ...
An AP4B1 frameshift mutation in siblings with intellectual disability and spastic tetraplegia further delineates the AP-4 ... Mutations in KCNH1 and ATP6V1B2 cause Zimmermann-Laband syndrome. Kortüm F, Caputo V, Bauer C, Stella L, Ciolfi A, Alawi M, ... Coinheritance of biallelic SLURP1 and SLC39A4 mutations cause a severe genodermatosis with skin peeling and hair loss all over ... The novel RAF1 mutation p.(Gly361Ala) located outside the kinase domain of the CR3 region in two patients with Noonan syndrome ...
Ames tests have confirmed that TDI caused frameshift and base pair mutations through its active metabolite 2,4-toluenediamine ( ...
However, the association between EPH gene mutation and ICI response is lacking. Clinical data and whole-exome sequencing (WES) ... published studies were collected and consolidated as a discovery cohort to analyze the association between EPH gene mutation ... splice site mutations, and frameshift insertion and deletion; "Non-truncating mutations" included missense mutations and ... Association between EPH7A mutation and clinical outcomes in the discovery cohort. a Associations between EPH gene mutation and ...
RME and RAE reduced the frameshift mutation induced by NPD in TA98 and sodium azide induced mutation in TA100 strains of S. ... frameshift mutation test) and TA100 (base pair substitution test). The fresh cultures of tester strains TA98 and TA100 of S. ... The Salmonella histidine point mutation assay proposed by Maron and Ames (1983) was followed using S. typhimurium strains TA98 ... A. racemosus extract RME and RAE have been found to have effective in the inhibition of mutation induced by NPD and sodium ...
Under the test conditions, the test item did not induce gene mutations by base pair changes or frameshifts in the genome of the ... MAMMALIAN CELL GENE MUTATION ASSAY In vitro gene mutation assay in mammalina cells was evaluated taken into account the already ... BACTERIA GENE MUTATION ASSAY Direct Blue 199 Na was assessed for its potential to induce gene mutations according to the plate ... The test substance did not induce gene mutation by base-pair changes or frameshifts, in the Salmonella typhimurium and ...
When targeted to specific coding regions of genes, Cas9 is capable of causing various types of mutations, including a frame ... Though somatic mutations are more challenging, Platt et al bypassed these challenges by creating a Cre-dependent Cas9-knockin ... The ability to efficiently screen for new therapeutic targets and create somatic mutations to develop tumor models has ... they were able to develop multigenic cancer mutations and create macroscopic tumors.. Undoubtedly, the CRISPR-Cas9 technology ...
Cheung, Peter Kwai Fat (1981) A suppressor in Escherichia Coli N4316 which suppresses T4 nonsense and frameshift mutations. ...
The Mx2 gene in BALB/cJ and CBA/J is interrupted by an open reading frame mutation. Mutagenesis correcting the frameshift ... Blue squares indicate phenotypes directly attributed to mutations/alleles of this gene. ...
Frame-shift mutation made tuberculosis bacteria resistant to antibi… By newseditor Posted February 4th 2020, 5:12 AM ...
  • Allelic loss at 11q13 was detected in 13 tumors, and 6 of them demonstrated previously unrecognized somatic missense and frameshift deletion mutations of the MEN1 gene. (lu.se)
  • The first one was a deletion causing frameshift,c.299delT p. (ac.ir)
  • Results: A homozygous 28-nucleotide frameshift deletion introducing a premature stop codon in the PTRHD1 exon 1 was identified in the four affected members. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy in Rhodesian Ridgeback Dogs (JME) is caused by a 4-bp deletion in the exon 2 of the DIRAS1 gene, causing a frameshift and a loss of the stop signal. (maanhaar.com)
  • Dogs homozygous for the mutation will display the symptoms of the JME. (maanhaar.com)
  • We noticed a strong relationship between mutations in DNA fix genes (either somatic or constitutional) and TMB (Fig. 2d). (ipa2014.org)
  • Mutation in the DNA of a body cell of a multicellular organism (somatic mutation) may be transmitted to descendant cells by DNA replication and hence result in a sector or patch of cells having abnormal function, an example being cancer. (mathisfunforum.com)
  • These signs and symptoms overlap significantly with those of Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (described below), so acrocallosal syndrome resulting from GLI3 gene mutations is sometimes considered a severe form of that condition. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The GLI3 gene mutations that cause acrocallosal syndrome change single protein building blocks (amino acids) in a particular region of the GLI3 protein, which disrupts the protein's function. (medlineplus.gov)
  • GLI3 gene mutations can cause several forms of isolated polydactyly. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Clinical and biochemical characteristics of HPT were apparently unrelated to the presence or absence of LOH and the MEN1 gene mutations. (lu.se)
  • However, the demonstration of LOH at 11q13 and MEN1 gene mutations in small parathyroid adenomas of patients with slight hypercalcemia and normal serum PTH levels suggest that altered MEN1 gene function may also be important for the development of mild sporadic pHPT. (lu.se)
  • Mutations in egg or sperm cells (germinal mutations) may result in an individual offspring all of whose cells carry the mutation, which often confers some serious malfunction, as in the case of a human genetic disease such as cystic fibrosis. (mathisfunforum.com)
  • The role of the GLI3 protein in brain and limb patterning may help explain why mutations lead to brain abnormalities, polydactyly, and the other features of acrocallosal syndrome. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Most of the mutations that cause Pallister-Hall syndrome occur near the middle of the gene, creating a premature stop signal in the instructions for making the GLI3 protein. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Many of the detected mutations would most likely result in a nonfunctional menin protein, consistent with a tumor suppressor mechanism. (lu.se)
  • Three kinds of mutations that alter protein coding sequences are reported: non-synonymous variants that change a single amino acid, and frame-shift and stop-gain mutations that alter all downstream amino acids. (skyline.ms)
  • Exon 6 skipping introduces a frameshift and the translation of a protein lacking the intracellular, the transmembrane and part of the extracellular domain. (pentaconhq.org)
  • Less than 0.1% of the general population carries 2 pseudocholinesterase gene allele mutations that will produce clinically significant effects from succinylcholine lasting longer than 1 hour. (medscape.com)
  • The Population Variation plug-in for Skyline presents the variant data from dbSNP and the 1000 Genome project for mutations with a calculated minor allele frequency. (skyline.ms)
  • G M2 gangliosidosis, also known as adult chronic-type TSD is characterized by a pseudodeficiency mutation in one or both HEXA alleles. (medscape.com)
  • We conducted phenotypic examination, segregation, linkage analysis, and CFTR gene sequencing to define causative mutations. (ac.ir)
  • These similarities made the canine equivalent of this disorder important study model and contributed to the identification of causative mutation. (maanhaar.com)
  • Reverse mutations occur which change the mutated sequence back to the original wild type sequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • The genome is composed of one to several long molecules of DNA, and mutation can occur potentially anywhere on these molecules at any time. (mathisfunforum.com)
  • A frameshift mutation (also called a framing error or a reading frame shift) is a genetic mutation caused by indels (insertions or deletions) of a number of nucleotides in a DNA sequence that is not divisible by three. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mutation, an alteration in the genetic material (the genome) of a cell of a living organism or of a virus that is more or less permanent and that can be transmitted to the cell's or the virus's descendants. (mathisfunforum.com)
  • In general, mutation is the main source of genetic variation, which is the raw material for evolution by natural selection. (mathisfunforum.com)
  • Initiation codon mutation of α2-globin Gene (HBA2:c.1delA), donor splice site mutation of α1-globin gene (IVSI-1, HBA1:c.95 + 1G>A), hemoglobin Queens Park/Chao Pra Ya (HBA1:c.98T>A) and hemoglobin Westmead (HBA2:c.369C>G). (bvsalud.org)
  • 8q24 clear cell renal cell carcinoma germline variant is associated with VHL mutation status and clinical aggressiveness. (cdc.gov)
  • Mutations in the recently identified MEN1 gene at chromosome 11q13 have been found in parathyroid tumors of nonfamilial pHPT. (lu.se)
  • A recent article in the Journal of Clinical Oncology attempted to correlate specific mutation types with clinical presentation. (sarcomastrong.com)
  • Among the 5 primary malignancies, TP53 mutations had been the most widespread: 52.9% of patients in colorectal cancer, 49.2% of sufferers in pancreatic tumor, 48.6% of sufferers with ovarian cancer, 35.9% of patients with breast cancer, and 33.3% of sufferers with NSCLC. (ipa2014.org)
  • The tumor type with higher TMB was NSCLC, a median of 6 mutations per Mb. (ipa2014.org)
  • More directly stated the syndrome is caused by a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, p53, that predisposes those affected to multiple malignancies. (sarcomastrong.com)
  • Howard Jacob, director of the Medical College of Wisconsin's Human and Molecular Genetics Center, remains a proponent of whole-genome sequencing to ensure that relevant mutations are not missed. (genomeweb.com)
  • A core-genome phylogeny of the evolutionary history of the STEC O55:H7 outbreak strain revealed that the most parsimonious model was a progenitor enteropathogenic O55:H7 sorbitol-fermenting strain, lysogenized by a Shiga toxin (Stx) 2a-encoding phage, followed by loss of the ability to ferment sorbitol because of a non-sense mutation in srlA . (cdc.gov)
  • A frameshift mutation will in general cause the reading of the codons after the mutation to code for different amino acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • This offsets the effect of the original mutation by creating a secondary mutation, shifting the sequence to allow for the correct amino acids to be read. (wikipedia.org)
  • A frameshift mutation is not the same as a single-nucleotide polymorphism in which a nucleotide is replaced, rather than inserted or deleted. (wikipedia.org)
  • Haplotype segregation data supported our new mutation findings. (ac.ir)
  • in 1997, a frameshift mutation was linked to resistance to infection by the HIV retrovirus. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1995). The cosmonaut mutational spectrum differed from that of unexposed healthy subjects (p = 0.042), and showed a higher incidence of splicing errors, frameshifts, and complex mutations. (uvic.ca)
  • A study by Negoro et al (2006) found that a frameshift mutation was unlikely to have been the cause and that rather a two amino acid substitution in the active site of an ancestral esterase resulted in nylonase. (wikipedia.org)
  • More than 40 mutations in the GLI3 gene have been found to cause Pallister-Hall syndrome, a rare condition whose major features include polydactyly, an abnormal growth in the brain called a hypothalamic hamartoma, and a malformation of the airway called a bifid epiglottis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Mutations in the GLI3 gene have been found in people who have polydactyly without the other features of acrocallosal syndrome, Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome, or Pallister-Hall syndrome (described above). (medlineplus.gov)
  • At least two mutations in the GLI3 gene have been reported in people with features of acrocallosal syndrome, a rare condition characterized by certain brain abnormalities, extra fingers and toes (polydactyly), and distinctive facial features, including widely spaced eyes (hypertelorism) and a prominent forehead. (medlineplus.gov)
  • At least 120 mutations in the GLI3 gene have been identified in people with Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome, which is a rare condition characterized by polydactyly, hypertelorism, a broad forehead, and an unusually large head (macrocephaly). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Ames tests have confirmed that TDI caused frameshift and base pair mutations through its active metabolite 2,4-toluenediamine (95807). (cdc.gov)
  • The frameshift mutation will also alter the first stop codon ("UAA", "UGA" or "UAG") encountered in the sequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • Documented variation includes point mutations, deletions, insertions, and recombination among closely or distantly related coronaviruses. (bvsalud.org)
  • The 3rd most widespread mutations had been PIK3CA mutations, present for 24.3% of sufferers with breast cancer and 13.5% for patients with ovarian cancer (Fig. 2b). (ipa2014.org)
  • In the majority of those [unsolved] cases, the mutation is in the data, but we're not able to identify it. (genomeweb.com)
  • Conclusions: We provide further evidence that PTRHD1 mutations are associated with autosomal-recessive childhood-onset intellectual disability associated with spasticity and parkinsonism. (elsevierpure.com)
  • In prokaryotes the error rate inducing frameshift mutations is only somewhere in the range of .0001 and .00001. (wikipedia.org)
  • The median TMB was 5.1 mutations per Mb (range 0.6C54). (ipa2014.org)
  • A healing proposal was completed if there is an open scientific trial tests a medication which goals the mutation, or if there is an approved medication designed for the relevant disease or for another disease recognized to focus on the mutated gene or the related turned on pathway. (ipa2014.org)