Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Fracture Healing: The physiological restoration of bone tissue and function after a fracture. It includes BONY CALLUS formation and normal replacement of bone tissue.Hip Fractures: Fractures of the FEMUR HEAD; the FEMUR NECK; (FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES); the trochanters; or the inter- or subtrochanteric region. Excludes fractures of the acetabulum and fractures of the femoral shaft below the subtrochanteric region (FEMORAL FRACTURES).Femoral Fractures: Fractures of the femur.Spinal Fractures: Broken bones in the vertebral column.Fracture Fixation, Internal: The use of internal devices (metal plates, nails, rods, etc.) to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment.Fracture Fixation: The use of metallic devices inserted into or through bone to hold a fracture in a set position and alignment while it heals.Fractures, Comminuted: A fracture in which the bone is splintered or crushed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Osteoporotic Fractures: Breaks in bones resulting from low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration characteristic of OSTEOPOROSIS.Radius FracturesFractures, Spontaneous: Fractures occurring as a result of disease of a bone or from some undiscoverable cause, and not due to trauma. (Dorland, 27th ed)Fractures, Stress: Fractures due to the strain caused by repetitive exercise. They are thought to arise from a combination of MUSCLE FATIGUE and bone failure, and occur in situations where BONE REMODELING predominates over repair. The most common sites of stress fractures are the METATARSUS; FIBULA; TIBIA; and FEMORAL NECK.Femoral Neck Fractures: Fractures of the short, constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters. It excludes intertrochanteric fractures which are HIP FRACTURES.Ulna Fractures: Fractures of the larger bone of the forearm.Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary: The use of nails that are inserted into bone cavities in order to keep fractured bones together.Rib FracturesSkull Fractures: Fractures of the skull which may result from penetrating or nonpenetrating head injuries or rarely BONE DISEASES (see also FRACTURES, SPONTANEOUS). Skull fractures may be classified by location (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR), radiographic appearance (e.g., linear), or based upon cranial integrity (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, DEPRESSED).Mandibular Fractures: Fractures of the lower jaw.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Tooth Fractures: Break or rupture of a tooth or tooth root.Fractures, Compression: Crumbling or smashing of cancellous BONE by forces acting parallel to the long axis of bone. It is applied particularly to vertebral body fractures (SPINAL FRACTURES). (Blauvelt and Nelson, A Manual of Orthopedic Terminology, 1994, p4)Osteoporosis: Reduction of bone mass without alteration in the composition of bone, leading to fractures. Primary osteoporosis can be of two major types: postmenopausal osteoporosis (OSTEOPOROSIS, POSTMENOPAUSAL) and age-related or senile osteoporosis.Intra-Articular Fractures: Fractures of the articular surface of a bone.Bone Plates: Implantable fracture fixation devices attached to bone fragments with screws to bridge the fracture gap and shield the fracture site from stress as bone heals. (UMDNS, 1999)Bone Nails: Rods of bone, metal, or other material used for fixation of the fragments or ends of fractured bones.Orbital Fractures: Fractures of the bones in the orbit, which include parts of the frontal, ethmoidal, lacrimal, and sphenoid bones and the maxilla and zygoma.Colles' Fracture: Fracture of the lower end of the radius in which the lower fragment is displaced posteriorly.Bony Callus: The bony deposit formed between and around the broken ends of BONE FRACTURES during normal healing.Bone Resorption: Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Periprosthetic Fractures: Fractures around joint replacement prosthetics or implants. They can occur intraoperatively or postoperatively.Wrist Injuries: Injuries to the wrist or the wrist joint.Casts, Surgical: Dressings made of fiberglass, plastic, or bandage impregnated with plaster of paris used for immobilization of various parts of the body in cases of fractures, dislocations, and infected wounds. In comparison with plaster casts, casts made of fiberglass or plastic are lightweight, radiolucent, able to withstand moisture, and less rigid.Bone Wires: Steel wires, often threaded through the skin, soft tissues, and bone, used to fix broken bones. Kirschner wires or apparatus also includes the application of traction to the healing bones through the wires.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal: Metabolic disorder associated with fractures of the femoral neck, vertebrae, and distal forearm. It occurs commonly in women within 15-20 years after menopause, and is caused by factors associated with menopause including estrogen deficiency.Bone Diseases: Diseases of BONES.External Fixators: External devices which hold wires or pins that are placed through one or both cortices of bone in order to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment. These devices allow easy access to wounds, adjustment during the course of healing, and more functional use of the limbs involved.Maxillary Fractures: Fractures of the upper jaw.Bone Development: The growth and development of bones from fetus to adult. It includes two principal mechanisms of bone growth: growth in length of long bones at the epiphyseal cartilages and growth in thickness by depositing new bone (OSTEOGENESIS) with the actions of OSTEOBLASTS and OSTEOCLASTS.Zygomatic Fractures: Fractures of the zygoma.Pelvic Bones: Bones that constitute each half of the pelvic girdle in VERTEBRATES, formed by fusion of the ILIUM; ISCHIUM; and PUBIC BONE.Accidental Falls: Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Forearm Injuries: Injuries to the part of the upper limb of the body between the wrist and elbow.Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Thoracic Vertebrae: A group of twelve VERTEBRAE connected to the ribs that support the upper trunk region.Bone Density Conservation Agents: Agents that inhibit BONE RESORPTION and/or favor BONE MINERALIZATION and BONE REGENERATION. They are used to heal BONE FRACTURES and to treat METABOLIC BONE DISEASES such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Clavicle: A bone on the ventral side of the shoulder girdle, which in humans is commonly called the collar bone.Bone Regeneration: Renewal or repair of lost bone tissue. It excludes BONY CALLUS formed after BONE FRACTURES but not yet replaced by hard bone.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Diaphyses: The shaft of long bones.Calcaneus: The largest of the TARSAL BONES which is situated at the lower and back part of the FOOT, forming the HEEL.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Ankle Injuries: Harm or hurt to the ankle or ankle joint usually inflicted by an external source.Fibula: The bone of the lower leg lateral to and smaller than the tibia. In proportion to its length, it is the most slender of the long bones.Bone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.Bone Diseases, MetabolicAbsorptiometry, Photon: A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.Multiple Trauma: Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.Diphosphonates: Organic compounds which contain P-C-P bonds, where P stands for phosphonates or phosphonic acids. These compounds affect calcium metabolism. They inhibit ectopic calcification and slow down bone resorption and bone turnover. Technetium complexes of diphosphonates have been used successfully as bone scanning agents.Traction: The pull on a limb or a part thereof. Skin traction (indirect traction) is applied by using a bandage to pull on the skin and fascia where light traction is required. Skeletal traction (direct traction), however, uses pins or wires inserted through bone and is attached to weights, pulleys, and ropes. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed)DislocationsTarsal Bones: The seven bones which form the tarsus - namely, CALCANEUS; TALUS; cuboid, navicular, and the internal, middle, and external cuneiforms.Femur Neck: The constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters.Bone Matrix: Extracellular substance of bone tissue consisting of COLLAGEN fibers, ground substance, and inorganic crystalline minerals and salts.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Internal Fixators: Internal devices used in osteosynthesis to hold the position of the fracture in proper alignment. By applying the principles of biomedical engineering, the surgeon uses metal plates, nails, rods, etc., for the correction of skeletal defects.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Carpal Bones: The eight bones of the wrist: SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; TRIQUETRUM BONE; PISIFORM BONE; TRAPEZIUM BONE; TRAPEZOID BONE; CAPITATE BONE; and HAMATE BONE.Odontoid Process: The toothlike process on the upper surface of the axis, which articulates with the CERVICAL ATLAS above.Vertebroplasty: Procedures to repair or stabilize vertebral fractures, especially compression fractures accomplished by injecting BONE CEMENTS into the fractured VERTEBRAE.Scaphoid Bone: The bone which is located most lateral in the proximal row of CARPAL BONES.Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Radius: The outer shorter of the two bones of the FOREARM, lying parallel to the ULNA and partially revolving around it.Alendronate: A nonhormonal medication for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis in women. This drug builds healthy bone, restoring some of the bone loss as a result of osteoporosis.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Pubic Bone: A bone that forms the lower and anterior part of each side of the hip bone.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Spinal Injuries: Injuries involving the vertebral column.Elbow Joint: A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.Metacarpal Bones: The five cylindrical bones of the METACARPUS, articulating with the CARPAL BONES proximally and the PHALANGES OF FINGERS distally.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Humerus: Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.Osteogenesis: The process of bone formation. Histogenesis of bone including ossification.Bone Substitutes: Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.Jaw Fractures: Fractures of the upper or lower jaw.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Skull Fracture, Basilar: Fractures which extend through the base of the SKULL, usually involving the PETROUS BONE. Battle's sign (characterized by skin discoloration due to extravasation of blood into the subcutaneous tissue behind the ear and over the mastoid process), CRANIAL NEUROPATHIES, TRAUMATIC; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; and CEREBROSPINAL FLUID OTORRHEA are relatively frequent sequelae of this condition. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p876)Spine: The spinal or vertebral column.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Polymethyl Methacrylate: Polymerized methyl methacrylate monomers which are used as sheets, moulding, extrusion powders, surface coating resins, emulsion polymers, fibers, inks, and films (From International Labor Organization, 1983). This material is also used in tooth implants, bone cements, and hard corneal contact lenses.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Foot Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the foot.Fractures, Cartilage: Breaks in CARTILAGE.Trauma Severity Indices: Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Orthopedic Fixation Devices: Devices which are used in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and diseases.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Orthopedics: A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.X-Ray Microtomography: X-RAY COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY with resolution in the micrometer range.Etidronic Acid: A diphosphonate which affects calcium metabolism. It inhibits ectopic calcification and slows down bone resorption and bone turnover.Bone Morphogenetic Proteins: Bone-growth regulatory factors that are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of proteins. They are synthesized as large precursor molecules which are cleaved by proteolytic enzymes. The active form can consist of a dimer of two identical proteins or a heterodimer of two related bone morphogenetic proteins.Kyphoplasty: Procedures to restore vertebrae to their original shape following vertebral compression fractures by inflating a balloon inserted into the vertebrae, followed by removal of the balloon and injection of BONE CEMENTS to fill the cavity.Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2: A potent osteoinductive protein that plays a critical role in the differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells into OSTEOBLASTS.Leg Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the leg.Parietal Bone: One of a pair of irregularly shaped quadrilateral bones situated between the FRONTAL BONE and OCCIPITAL BONE, which together form the sides of the CRANIUM.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Arm Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the arm.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Osteotomy: The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Splints: Rigid or flexible appliances used to maintain in position a displaced or movable part or to keep in place and protect an injured part. (Dorland, 28th ed)Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Ilium: The largest of three bones that make up each half of the pelvic girdle.Immobilization: The restriction of the MOVEMENT of whole or part of the body by physical means (RESTRAINT, PHYSICAL) or chemically by ANALGESIA, or the use of TRANQUILIZING AGENTS or NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS. It includes experimental protocols used to evaluate the physiologic effects of immobility.Talus: The second largest of the TARSAL BONES. It articulates with the TIBIA and FIBULA to form the ANKLE JOINT.Compressive Strength: The maximum compression a material can withstand without failure. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p427)Temporal Bone: Either of a pair of compound bones forming the lateral (left and right) surfaces and base of the skull which contains the organs of hearing. It is a large bone formed by the fusion of parts: the squamous (the flattened anterior-superior part), the tympanic (the curved anterior-inferior part), the mastoid (the irregular posterior portion), and the petrous (the part at the base of the skull).Femur Head: The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)Ulna: The inner and longer bone of the FOREARM.Osteoblasts: Bone-forming cells which secrete an EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. HYDROXYAPATITE crystals are then deposited into the matrix to form bone.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Soft Tissue Injuries: Injuries of tissue other than bone. The concept is usually general and does not customarily refer to internal organs or viscera. It is meaningful with reference to regions or organs where soft tissue (muscle, fat, skin) should be differentiated from bones or bone tissue, as "soft tissue injuries of the hand".Bone Cysts: Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Dental Restoration Failure: Inability or inadequacy of a dental restoration or prosthesis to perform as expected.AxisScapula: Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Dental Stress Analysis: The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.Hemiarthroplasty: A partial joint replacement in which only one surface of the joint is replaced with a PROSTHESIS.Monteggia's Fracture: Fracture in the proximal half of the shaft of the ulna, with dislocation of the head of the radius.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Finite Element Analysis: A computer based method of simulating or analyzing the behavior of structures or components.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Braces: Orthopedic appliances used to support, align, or hold parts of the body in correct position. (Dorland, 28th ed)Acetabulum: The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Teriparatide: A polypeptide that consists of the 1-34 amino-acid fragment of human PARATHYROID HORMONE, the biologically active N-terminal region. The acetate form is given by intravenous infusion in the differential diagnosis of HYPOPARATHYROIDISM and PSEUDOHYPOPARATHYROIDISM. (Reynolds JEF(Ed): Martindale: The Extra Pharmacopoeia (electronic version). Micromedex, Inc, Englewood, CO, 1995)Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Finger Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the fingers.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Arm Bones: The bones of the free part of the upper extremity including the HUMERUS; RADIUS; and ULNA.Calcification, Physiologic: Process by which organic tissue becomes hardened by the physiologic deposit of calcium salts.Kyphosis: Deformities of the SPINE characterized by an exaggerated convexity of the vertebral column. The forward bending of the thoracic region usually is more than 40 degrees. This deformity sometimes is called round back or hunchback.Pseudarthrosis: A pathologic entity characterized by deossification of a weight-bearing long bone, followed by bending and pathologic fracture, with inability to form normal BONY CALLUS leading to existence of the "false joint" that gives the condition its name. (Dorland, 27th ed)Bone Malalignment: Displacement of bones out of line in relation to joints. It may be congenital or traumatic in origin.Tooth, Nonvital: A tooth from which the dental pulp has been removed or is necrotic. (Boucher, Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Supination: Applies to movements of the forearm in turning the palm forward or upward. When referring to the foot, a combination of adduction and inversion movements of the foot.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Leg Length Inequality: A condition in which one of a pair of legs fails to grow as long as the other, which could result from injury or surgery.Finger Phalanges: Bones that make up the SKELETON of the FINGERS, consisting of two for the THUMB, and three for each of the other fingers.Osteoclasts: A large multinuclear cell associated with the BONE RESORPTION. An odontoclast, also called cementoclast, is cytomorphologically the same as an osteoclast and is involved in CEMENTUM resorption.Foot Bones: The TARSAL BONES; METATARSAL BONES; and PHALANGES OF TOES. The tarsal bones consists of seven bones: CALCANEUS; TALUS; cuboid; navicular; internal; middle; and external cuneiform bones. The five metatarsal bones are numbered one through five, running medial to lateral. There are 14 phalanges in each foot, the great toe has two while the other toes have three each.Hip: The projecting part on each side of the body, formed by the side of the pelvis and the top portion of the femur.Jaw Fixation Techniques: The stable placement of surgically induced fractures of the mandible or maxilla through the use of elastics, wire ligatures, arch bars, or other splints. It is used often in the cosmetic surgery of retrognathism and prognathism. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p636)Ceramics: Products made by baking or firing nonmetallic minerals (clay and similar materials). In making dental restorations or parts of restorations the material is fused porcelain. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Vitamin D: A vitamin that includes both CHOLECALCIFEROLS and ERGOCALCIFEROLS, which have the common effect of preventing or curing RICKETS in animals. It can also be viewed as a hormone since it can be formed in SKIN by action of ULTRAVIOLET RAYS upon the precursors, 7-dehydrocholesterol and ERGOSTEROL, and acts on VITAMIN D RECEPTORS to regulate CALCIUM in opposition to PARATHYROID HORMONE.Wrist Joint: The joint that is formed by the distal end of the RADIUS, the articular disc of the distal radioulnar joint, and the proximal row of CARPAL BONES; (SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; triquetral bone).Dental Porcelain: A type of porcelain used in dental restorations, either jacket crowns or inlays, artificial teeth, or metal-ceramic crowns. It is essentially a mixture of particles of feldspar and quartz, the feldspar melting first and providing a glass matrix for the quartz. Dental porcelain is produced by mixing ceramic powder (a mixture of quartz, kaolin, pigments, opacifiers, a suitable flux, and other substances) with distilled water. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Ossification, Heterotopic: The development of bony substance in normally soft structures.Crowns: A prosthetic restoration that reproduces the entire surface anatomy of the visible natural crown of a tooth. It may be partial (covering three or more surfaces of a tooth) or complete (covering all surfaces). It is made of gold or other metal, porcelain, or resin.Early Ambulation: Procedure to accelerate the ability of a patient to walk or move about by reducing the time to AMBULATION. It is characterized by a shorter period of hospitalization or recumbency than is normally practiced.Manipulation, Orthopedic: The planned and carefully managed manual movement of the musculoskeletal system, extremities, and spine to produce increased motion. The term is sometimes used to denote a precise sequence of movements of a joint to determine the presence of disease or to reduce a dislocation. In the case of fractures, orthopedic manipulation can produce better position and alignment of the fracture. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p264)Ilizarov Technique: A bone fixation technique using an external fixator (FIXATORS, EXTERNAL) for lengthening limbs, correcting pseudarthroses and other deformities, and assisting the healing of otherwise hopeless traumatic or pathological fractures and infections, such as chronic osteomyelitis. The method was devised by the Russian orthopedic surgeon Gavriil Abramovich Ilizarov (1921-1992). (From Bull Hosp Jt Dis 1992 Summer;52(1):1)Pronation: Applies to movements of the forearm in turning the palm backward or downward. When referring to the foot, a combination of eversion and abduction movements in the tarsal and metatarsal joints (turning the foot up and in toward the midline of the body).Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7: A bone morphogenetic protein that is widely expressed during EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT. It is both a potent osteogenic factor and a specific regulator of nephrogenesis.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Hip Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the hip.Zirconium: Zirconium. A rather rare metallic element, atomic number 40, atomic weight 91.22, symbol Zr. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Facial Bones: The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. While some consider the facial bones to comprise the hyoid (HYOID BONE), palatine (HARD PALATE), and zygomatic (ZYGOMA) bones, MANDIBLE, and MAXILLA, others include also the lacrimal and nasal bones, inferior nasal concha, and vomer but exclude the hyoid bone. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p113)Osteocalcin: Vitamin K-dependent calcium-binding protein synthesized by OSTEOBLASTS and found primarily in BONES. Serum osteocalcin measurements provide a noninvasive specific marker of bone metabolism. The protein contains three residues of the amino acid gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla), which, in the presence of CALCIUM, promotes binding to HYDROXYAPATITE and subsequent accumulation in BONE MATRIX.Dental Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.Frontal Bone: The bone that forms the frontal aspect of the skull. Its flat part forms the forehead, articulating inferiorly with the NASAL BONE and the CHEEK BONE on each side of the face.Ankle FracturesVolar Plate: A thick, fibrocartilaginous ligament at the metacarpophalageal joint.Hip Dislocation: Displacement of the femur bone from its normal position at the HIP JOINT.Titanium: A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)Technetium Tc 99m Medronate: A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used primarily in skeletal scintigraphy. Because of its absorption by a variety of tumors, it is useful for the detection of neoplasms.Alveolar Bone Loss: Resorption or wasting of the tooth-supporting bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS) in the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE.Arthroplasty: Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.Tarsal Joints: The articulations between the various TARSAL BONES. This does not include the ANKLE JOINT which consists of the articulations between the TIBIA; FIBULA; and TALUS.Facial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the soft tissue or bony portions of the face.Occipital Bone: Part of the back and base of the CRANIUM that encloses the FORAMEN MAGNUM.Postmenopause: The physiological period following the MENOPAUSE, the permanent cessation of the menstrual life.Cementation: The joining of objects by means of a cement (e.g., in fracture fixation, such as in hip arthroplasty for joining of the acetabular component to the femoral component). In dentistry, it is used for the process of attaching parts of a tooth or restorative material to a natural tooth or for the attaching of orthodontic bands to teeth by means of an adhesive.Freeze Fracturing: Preparation for electron microscopy of minute replicas of exposed surfaces of the cell which have been ruptured in the frozen state. The specimen is frozen, then cleaved under high vacuum at the same temperature. The exposed surface is shadowed with carbon and platinum and coated with carbon to obtain a carbon replica.Calcium, Dietary: Calcium compounds used as food supplements or in food to supply the body with calcium. Dietary calcium is needed during growth for bone development and for maintenance of skeletal integrity later in life to prevent osteoporosis.
These types of fractures-which occur in 11% of severe head injuries-are comminuted fractures in which broken bones displace ... two parietal bones, two temporal bones, one occipital bone, one sphenoid bone, and one ethmoid bone. The bones of the skull are ... Depressed fractures are usually comminuted, with broken portions of bone displaced inward-and may require surgical intervention ... A compound elevated skull fracture is a rare type of skull fracture where the fractured bone is elevated above the intact outer ...
Is a fracture in which bone fragments separate completely.. *Comminuted fracture: Is a fracture in which the bone has broken ... Compare healthy bone with different types of fractures: (a) closed fracture (b) open fracture (c) transverse fracture (d) ... "Broken bones" redirects here. For other uses, see Broken Bones.. A bone fracture (sometimes abbreviated FRX or Fx, Fx, or #) is ... Spinal fracture *Cervical fracture *Fracture of C1, including Jefferson fracture. *Fracture of C2, including Hangman's fracture ...
"The pins and rubbers traction system for treatment of comminuted intraarticular fractures and fracture-dislocations in the hand ... are used to generate traction between two metal Kirschner wires that are inserted into the bone on either side of a fracture. ... The Suzuki frame is a medical device, used for helping heal broken fingers, especially those with deep, complex intra-articular ... Keramidas EG, Miller G (October 2005). "The Suzuki frame for complex intraarticular fractures of the thumb". Plastic and ...
Other types of fractures generally require surgery. Patella fractures make up about a percent of all broken bones. Males are ... in case of two part fracture) to unite the fractured bones. With advancement of fixation technique comminuted fracture of the ... A patella fracture is a break of the kneecap. Symptoms include pain, swelling, and bruising to the front of the knee. A person ... Undisplaced fracture can usually be treated by casting. Even some displaced fractures can be treated with casting as long as a ...
... atrophy of the bone beneath the plate may predispose the bone to fracture. After removal of plates, fractures may occur through ... A neutralization plate is used to bridge a comminuted fracture; it also transmits bending or torsional forces from the proximal ... bending or breaking of the nail, and disengagement of the screw from the barrel and even protrusion of the screw into the ... typically after fractures. As the name implies, it is designed to exert dynamic pressure between the bone fragments to be ...
A history of a broken bone is usually apparent. The patient complains of persistent pain at the fracture site and may also ... Callus is formed, but the bone fractures have not joined. This can be due to inadequate fixation of the fracture, and treated ... Comminuted nonunions have one or more intermediate fragments that are necrotic. Defect nonunions has a gap in diaphysis of bone ... are used to stabilize the broken bone fragments. Bone grafting. Donor bone or autologous bone (harvested from the same person ...
A humerus fracture is a break of the humerus bone in the upper arm. Fractures of the humerus may be classified by the location ... Fracture of the greater tuberosity of the humerus Multi-fragmented, or comminuted fracture of the proximal humerus with ... Proximal fractures make up 5% of all fractures and 25% of humerus fractures, middle fractures about 60% of humerus fractures ( ... Fractures of the humerus shaft are subdivided into transverse fractures, spiral fractures, "butterfly" fractures, which are a ...
... of all fractures are calcaneal fractures, however, they make up 60% of fractures of the mid foot bones. Undisplaced fractures ... A calcaneal fracture is a break of the calcaneus (heel bone). Symptoms may include pain, bruising, trouble walking, and ... "Treatment of intra-articular comminuted os calcis fractures". Orthopedics. 29 (1): 25-9. PMID 16429931. Stoller, D. W.; Tirman ... Type IV fractures consist of fractures with more than three intra-articular fractures. Extra-articular fractures include all ...
In addition to tooth fractures, there are several types of bone fractures as well. These types being closed or simple, open or ... compound, greenstick, hairline, complicated, comminuted, avulsion, and compression.A complicated fracture is when the ... Prevention can be broken up into three broad categories of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention.[26] Primary prevention ... "Bone fractures". Retrieved 2018-11-15.. *^ a b Martínez-Silván, Daniel; Díaz-Ocejo, Jaime; Murray, Andrew (2017-04-01). " ...
... of the bone. Open reduction refers to open surgery to set bones, as is necessary for some fractures. Internal fixation refers ... Orthopedic implants to repair fractures to the radius and ulna, note the visible break in the ulna (right forearm) ... Open Reduction Internal Fixation techniques often are used in cases involving serious fractures such as comminuted or displaced ... lateral condylar fractures of the humerus in children, but if fracture displacement after closed reduction exceeds 2 mm, open ...
At the time, the plaintiff was suffering from a comminuted spiral fracture of the right tibia and fibula, which gave the ... Of the different types of fractures exhibited, an arm or leg fracture caused by a twisting force is particularly significant ... The causal chain was not broken by the fact that the subsequent injury was inflicted by the same third persons, namely the ... the bones tell a story the child is too young or too frightened to tell." (Id., at p. 18.) Finally, on the subject of ...
A sternal fracture is a fracture of the sternum (the breastbone), located in the center of the chest. The injury, which occurs in 5-8% of people who experience significant blunt chest trauma, may occur in vehicle accidents, when the still-moving chest strikes a steering wheel or dashboard or is injured by a seatbelt. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, commonly known as CPR, has also been known to cause thoracic injury, including sternum and rib fractures. Sternal fractures may also occur as a pathological fracture, in people who have weakened bone in their sternum, due to another disease process. Sternal fracture can interfere with breathing by making it more painful; however, its primary significance is that it can indicate the presence of serious associated internal injuries, especially to the heart and lungs. Vehicle collisions are the usual cause of sternal ...
The List of ICD-9 codes 800-999: injury and poisoning is one of the ranges International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems codes. (800) Fracture of vault of skull (801) Fracture of base of skull (802) Fracture of face bones (803) Other and unqualified skull fractures (804) Multiple fractures involving skull or face with other bones (805) Fracture of vertebral column without mention of spinal cord injury (806) Fracture of vertebral column with spinal cord injury (807) Fracture of rib(s), sternum, larynx, and trachea (808) Fracture of pelvis (809) Ill-defined fractures of bones of trunk (810) Fracture of clavicle (811) Fracture of scapula (812) Fracture of humerus (813) Fracture of radius and ...
A scapular fracture is a fracture of the scapula, the shoulder blade. The scapula is sturdy and located in a protected place, so it rarely breaks. When it does, it is an indication that the individual was subjected to a considerable amount of force and that severe chest trauma may be present. High-speed vehicle accidents are the most common cause. This could be anywhere from a car accident, motorcycle crash, or high speed bicycle crash but falls and blows to the area can also be responsible for the injury. Signs and symptoms are similar to those of other fractures: they include pain, tenderness, and reduced motion of the affected area although symptoms can take a couple of days to appear. Imaging techniques such as X-ray are used to diagnose scapular fracture, but the injury may not be noticed in part because it is so frequently accompanied by other, severe injuries that demand attention. The injuries that usually accompany scapular ...
A clavicle fracture, also known as a broken collarbone, is a bone fracture of the clavicle. Symptoms typically include pain at the site of the break and a decreased ability to move the affected arm. Complications can include a collection of air in the pleural space surrounding the lung (pneumothorax), injury to the nerves or blood vessels in the area, and an unpleasant appearance. It is often caused by a fall onto a shoulder, outstretched arm, or direct trauma. The fracture can also occur in a baby during childbirth. The middle section of the clavicle is most often involved. Diagnosis is typically based on symptoms and confirmed with X-rays. Clavicle fractures are typically treated by putting the arm in a sling for one or two weeks. Pain medication such as paracetamol (acetaminophen) may be useful. It can take up to five months for the strength of the bone to return to ...
The Galeazzi fracture is a fracture of the distal third of the radius with dislocation of the distal radioulnar joint. It classically involves an isolated fracture of the junction of the distal third and middle third of the radius with associated subluxation or dislocation of the distal radio-ulnar joint; the injury disrupts the forearm axis joint. The Galeazzi fracture is named after Ricardo Galeazzi (1866-1952), an Italian surgeon at the Instituto de Rachitici in Milan, who described the fracture in 1934. However, it was first described in 1842, by Cooper, 92 years before Galeazzi reported his results. Galeazzi fractures account for 3-7% of all forearm fractures. They are seen most often in males. Although Galeazzi fracture patterns are reportedly uncommon, they are estimated to account for 7% of all forearm fractures in adults. They are associated with a ...
Treatment of scaphoid fractures is guided by the location in the bone of the fracture (proximal, waist, distal), displacement (or instability) of the fracture, and patient tolerance for cast immobilization.. Non displaced or minimally displaced waist and distal fractures have a high rate of union with closed cast management. The choice of short arm, short arm thumb spica or long arm cast is debated in the medical literature and no clear consensus or proof of the benefit of one type of casting or another has been shown; although it is generally accepted to use a short arm or short arm thumb spica for non displaced fractures.[5] Non displaced or minimally displaced fracture can also be treated with percutaneous or minimal incision surgery which if performed correctly has a high union rate, low morbidity and faster return to activity than closed cast management.[9]. Fractures ...
A calcaneal fracture is a break of the calcaneus (heel bone). Symptoms may include pain, bruising, trouble walking, and deformity of the heel. It may be associated with breaks of the hip or back. It usually occurs when a person lands on their feet following a fall from a height or during a motor vehicle collision. Diagnosis is suspected based on symptoms and confirmed by X-rays or CT scaning. If the bones remain normally aligned treatment may be by casting without weight bearing for around eights weeks. If the bones are not properly aligned surgery is generally required. Returning the bones to their normal position results in better outcomes. Surgery may be delayed a few days as long as the skin remained intact. About 2% of all fractures are calcaneal fractures, however, they make up 60% of fractures of the mid foot bones. Undisplaced ...
A femoral fracture is a bone fracture that involves the femur. They are typically sustained in high-impact trauma, such as car crashes, due to the large amount of force needed to break the bone. Fractures of the diaphysis, or middle of the femur, are managed differently from those at the head, neck, and trochanter (see hip fractures). The fracture may be classed as open, which occurs when the bone fragments protrude through the skin, or there is an overlying wound which penetrates to the bone. These types of fracture cause more damage to the surrounding tissue, are less likely to heal properly, and are at much greater risk of infection. Femoral shaft fractures can be classified with the Winquist and Hansen classification, which is based on the amount of comminution. Fractures of the inferior or distal femur ...
In medicine, the Ottawa ankle rules are a set of guidelines for clinicians to help decide if a patient with foot or ankle pain should be offered X-rays to diagnose a possible bone fracture. Before the introduction of the rules most patients with ankle injuries would have been imaged. However the vast majority of patients with unclear ankle injuries do not have bony fractures. As a result, many unnecessary X-rays were taken, which was costly, time consuming and a slight health risk due to radiation exposure. Ankle X-ray is only required if: There is any pain in the malleolar zone; and, Any one of the following: Bone tenderness along the distal 6 cm of the posterior edge of the tibia or tip of the medial malleolus, OR Bone tenderness along the distal 6 cm of the posterior edge of the fibula or tip of the lateral malleolus, OR An inability to bear weight both immediately and in the emergency department for four steps. ...
An avulsion fracture is a bone fracture which occurs when a fragment of bone tears away from the main mass of bone as a result of physical trauma. This can occur at the ligament due to the application forces external to the body (such as a fall or pull) or at the tendon due to a muscular contraction that is stronger than the forces holding the bone together. Generally muscular avulsion is prevented due to the neurological limitations placed on muscle contractions. Highly trained athletes can overcome this neurological inhibition of strength and produce a much greater force output capable of breaking or avulsing a bone. If the fracture is small, it is usually sufficient to treat with rest and support bandage, but in more severe cases, surgery may be required. Ice may be used to relieve swelling. Displaced avulsion fractures are best managed by either open ...
A patella fracture is a break of the kneecap. Symptoms include pain, swelling, and bruising to the front of the knee. A person may also be unable to walk. Complications may include injury to the tibia, femur, or knee ligaments. It typicals results from a hard blow to the front of the knee or falling on the knee. Occasionally it may occur from a strong contraction of the thigh muscles. Diagnosis is based on symptom and confirmed with X-rays. In children an MRI may be required. Treatment may be with or without surgery, depending on the type of fracture. Undisplaced fracture can usually be treated by casting. Even some displaced fractures can be treated with casting as long as a person can straighten their leg without help. Typically the leg is immobilized in a straight position for the first three weeks and then increasing degrees of bending are allowed. Other types of fractures generally require surgery. Patella ...
A trimalleolar fracture is a fracture of the ankle that involves the lateral malleolus, the medial malleolus, and the distal posterior aspect of the tibia, which can be termed the posterior malleolus. The trauma is sometimes accompanied by ligament damage and dislocation. The three aforementioned parts of bone articulate with the talus bone of the foot. Strictly speaking, there are only two malleoli (medial and lateral), but the term trimalleolar is used nevertheless and as such is a misnomer. Surgical repair using open reduction and internal fixation is generally required, and because there is no lateral restraint of the foot, the ankle cannot bear any weight while the bone knits. This typically takes six weeks in an otherwise healthy person, but can take as much as twelve weeks. Non-surgical treatment may sometimes be considered in cases where the patient has significant health problems or where the risk of surgery may be ...
A Jones fracture is a break between the base and middle part of the fifth metatarsal of the foot. It result in pain near the midportion of the foot on the outside. There may also be bruising and difficulty walking. Onset is generally sudden. The fracture typically occurs when the toes are pointed and the foot bends inwards. This movement may occur when changing direction while the heel is off the ground such in dancing, tennis, or basketball. Diagnosis is generally suspected based on symptoms and confirmed with X-rays. Initial treatment is typically in a cast, without any walking on it, for at least six weeks. If after this period of time healing has not occurred a further six weeks of casting may be recommended. Due to poor blood supply in this area, the break sometimes does not heal and surgery is required. In athletes or if the pieces of bone are separated surgery may be considered sooner. The fracture was first described in 1902 by ...
The bone where the tendon has pulled away is broken into tiny pieces (called a comminuted fracture). Type V injuries are ... Intertrochanteric Hip Fractures Middletown RI Diagnose Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Middletown RI Complex Shoulder Fractures ... A piece of the bone may come with the tendon (still attached). This is called an avulsion injury. There can be a bone fracture ... Type II injury means the tendon has pulled away from the tip of the finger taking a tiny bit of bone with it but without ...
A challenging break to treat, a comminuted fracture... ... A comminuted fracture is one in which the bone is broken into ... comminuted fractures are often caused by road accidents. However, these severe breaks are frequently caused by brittle bone ... A comminuted fracture is a fracture in which the bone involved in the fracture is broken into several pieces. At least three ... Bad breaks like a comminuted fracture are frequently open fractures. This makes significantly more dangerous than other types ...
Closed fracture: a fracture that doesnt break the skin.. Comminuted fracture: when the bone is broken in more than two pieces ... Stress fractures: tiny cracks in the bones surface often caused by repetitive overloading (such as in the feet of a basketball ... Greenstick fracture: a partial break in which one side of the bone is broken and the other side bends (this fracture resembles ... Segmental break or fracture: when the same bone is broken in two or more places. ...
A comminuted fracture is one in which the broken ends of the bone are shattered into many pieces. Fractures can also be ... comminuted fracture (pathology). ...the bone does break into separate pieces, the condition is called a complete fracture. An ... impacted fracture occurs when the broken ends of the bone are jammed together by the force of the injury. ...
Unstable displaced fractures may require surgery.. * Displaced, comminuted: A fracture where the bones are broken in several ... Treatment of Open Fractures of the Tibia. An open fracture occurs when the bone or parts of the bone break through the skin. ... There are three types of tibial shaft fractures:. * Nondisplaced: A fracture where the broken bones remain aligned. This type ... These fractures are usually transverse (across) or oblique (slanted) breaks in the bone. Distal tibial metaphyseal fractures ...
... is one of most commonly fractured bones in the body. Learn about the key symptoms of a tibia fracture, treatment options, and ... comminuted fracture. The bone breaks into three or more separate pieces. This is the most unstable and severe type of tibia ... Tibia fractures can also be closed or open. With closed fractures, the bone doesnt break through the skin. Internal soft ... displaced fracture. The tibia is moved out of place when it breaks. The broken ends of the bone are separated and dont align. ...
Overview of Comminuted Fractures in Dogs. A comminuted fracture is a splintered or fragmented break in the continuity of bone ... To repair a comminuted fracture, the ends of the bone must be opposed and the continuity of the bone restored as close to ... Fracture of the Sacrum in Dogs. Share Overview of Fracture of the Sacrum in Dogs Isolated fractures of the sac.... Dr. David ... Comminuted fractures can be difficult to repair and heal, given the damage to the blood supply to the bone and the possibility ...
... multidisciplinary fracture team is comprised of orthopedic specialists who provide advanced care in one convenient location. ... Comminuted fracture: The bone breaks into several pieces, often requiring surgery.. What are the signs and symptoms of ... Non-displaced fracture: The broken bone segments line up easily.. *Displaced fracture: The broken bone pieces are out of ... Complete fractures. As bones mature, complete bone fractures - where the bone breaks into two or more pieces - are more likely ...
Create healthcare diagrams like this example called Distal Radius Fracture in minutes with SmartDraw. SmartDraw includes 1000s ... A fracture that does not extend into the joint. When a fractured bone breaks the skin. When a bone is broken into more than two ... Classifying the type of fractures. Intra-articular Fracture. Extra-articular Fracture. Open fracture. Comminuted Fracture. A ... Fracture. Smiths fractures:. when the hand is flexed forward under the wrist.. Distal radius fracture is a break across the ...
Comminuted fracture A fracture where the bone is broken in several places ... Pelvic fracture. -Two or more proximal long bone fractures. -Crushed/mangled extremity. -Uncontrollable external hemorrhage. - ... Hip fracture is a fracture of the proximal femur, pelvic fracture is a fracture of the pelvis ... Skin is not broken in closed extremity injury, skin is broken in open extremity injury (by injured bone or penetrating object) ...
As with any facial fracture, consideration must be given for the need of emergency treatment to secure the airway or to obtain ... Mandible fractures are a frequent injury because of the mandibles prominence and relative lack of support. ... hemostasis if necessary before initiating definitive treatment of the fracture. ... Comminuted mandibular fracture. View Media Gallery * Greenstick - Fracture in which one cortex of the bone is broken and the ...
Read our guide to fractures, what they may mean for you and what you can expect from your recovery. Get in touch for free to ... This is because a comminuted fracture (or multiple fracture) is where the bone has been shattered or broken into multiple ... Spiral fractures - spiral fractures mean that your bone has a spiral break running around the surface. Spiral fractures can ... A simple fracture is a broken bone that occurs without damaging anything else around the bone. This means the broken bone ...
... comminuted fracture - fracture in which the bone is splintered or crushed fracture, break... ... comminuted fracture synonyms, comminuted fracture pronunciation, comminuted fracture translation, English dictionary definition ... of comminuted fracture. n a fracture in which the bone is splintered or fragmented Noun 1. ... The fractures in his left foot included a second-metatarsal (MT) neck fracture, proximal third-MT fracture, and a comminuted ...
... the radius is the most commonly broken bone in the arm. Treatment depends on many factors, such as the nature of the fracture, ... Distal radius fractures are very common. In fact, ... Comminuted fracture. When a bone is broken into more than two ... Intra-articular fractures, open fractures, comminuted fractures, and displaced fractures (when the broken pieces of bone do not ... Open fracture. When a fractured bone breaks the skin, it is called an open fracture. These types of fractures require immediate ...
Ver Foto de stock de Xray Of A Comminuted Fracture Showing The Femur Tibia And Fibula Bones. Encuentra fotos de alta resolución ... X-ray of a comminuted fracture, showing the femur, tibia, and fibula bones.. These fractures occur when bones are broken, ... Comminuted fractures are closed fractures unlike a compound fracture which is an open fracture. ...
The kneecap is susceptible to many fractures and accounts for 1 percent of all broken bones. Rehabilitation for a broken ... kneecap can only begin after establishing the type of fracture and treatment options used. ... is the bone that protects your knee joint. ... the patella has comminuted fractures. These fractures are more ... Fractures. A kneecap fracture can be displaced or nondisplaced. With displaced fractures, the bone is no longer aligned ...
When there is a break anywhere along this length of bone, it is called a femoral shaft fracture. The femur is the longest and ... strongest bone in the body, and it takes a great deal of force to break it. ... Comminuted fracture. In this type of fracture, the bone has broken into three or more pieces. In most cases, the number of bone ... If a bone breaks in such a way that bone fragments stick out through the skin or a wound penetrates down to the broken bone, ...
Comminuted fractures This where the bone breaks or splinters into two or more fragments. This type of fracture often results ... Spiral Fracture A spiral fracture is a fracture which occurs when a bone is broken by a twisting force where the break spirals ... Greenstick Fractures A greenstick fracture is a break to the bone of a child when their bones are soft, generally in children ... Common Risks with Bone Fractures include:. Infection: In bone fractures where the skin has broken, there is a particular risk ...
Types of fractures. A bone can break in many ways. Here are some fracture types you may hear about:. * Displaced fracture. The ... Comminuted fracture. The bone is broken into more than 2 pieces.. What are the signs and symptoms of a femur fracture?. * Pain ... Your child has a break (fracture) in his or her thighbone (femur). The femur is a strong bone and is very hard to break. So a ... Because it takes great force to break the femur, more X-rays may be done to rule out fractures in nearby bones or to bones in ...
206-727-4000 Lawyer helping accident victims with broken bones. Seattle attorney Chris Davis and Davis Law Group have been ... Comminuted Fracture. A comminuted fracture is a break or splinter of the bone into more than two fragments. ... Oblique Fracture. An oblique fracture is a relatively common fracture in which the bone breaks diagonally. Oblique fractures ... Transverse Fracture. A fracture of a bone is the same as a break in the bone. A fracture of a transverse process is a break of ...
WebMD shows you how bones heal and what you can expect during recovery. ... Within hours of breaking a bone, your bodys already started to repair itself. ... Comminuted: bone breaks into three or more pieces. Other types include compression fractures, which often happen in the spine, ... Osteoporosis Canada: "After the Fracture: Information About Pain and Practical Tips for Movement." ...
These types of fractures-which occur in 11% of severe head injuries-are comminuted fractures in which broken bones displace ... two parietal bones, two temporal bones, one occipital bone, one sphenoid bone, and one ethmoid bone. The bones of the skull are ... Depressed fractures are usually comminuted, with broken portions of bone displaced inward-and may require surgical intervention ... A compound elevated skull fracture is a rare type of skull fracture where the fractured bone is elevated above the intact outer ...
Comminuted-the bone is broken into several pieces. Fractures may either be:. *Closed-the fracture does not break the skin ... Childrens bones are still growing at an area of the bone called the growth plate. If the fracture affected the growth plate, a ... Childrens bones are still growing at an area of the bone called the growth plate. If the fracture affected the growth plate, a ... Boxers fracture is a common name for a fracture of the long bone that connects the little finger to the wrist. ...
Comminuted fracture - The bone has broken into three or more pieces.. *Open fracture - If a bone breaks in such a way that bone ... Femur (thigh bone) Fractures Your thigh bone (femur) is the longest and strongest bone in your body. Because the femur is so ... Oblique fracture - The fracture has an angled line across the shaft.. *Spiral fracture - The fracture line encircles the shaft ... Femur fractures vary greatly, depending on the force that causes the break. The pieces of bone may line up correctly or be out ...
The third bone in the forearm, the radius, acts like a golf tee (the disk-like proximal end is called the radial head) for part ... the upper arm bone) acting like the ball that fits into the socket of the forearms proximal ulna (the olecranon). ... I broke my elbow and they say I will need surgery to fix it. Why cant I just have a cast for a couple of months?A: The elbow ... Non-surgical treatment may be all that is required for fractures where the bones are not displaced or comminuted and there are ...
  • Often a fracture is easy to detect because there is obvious deformity. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Signs include loss of the power of movement, pain with acute tenderness over the site of fracture, swelling and bruising, deformity and possible shortening, unnatural mobility, and crepitus or grating heard when the ends of the bone rub together. (tabers.com)
  • A broken toe heals pretty much on its own, but we need to make sure that the toe is well aligned so that it heals without deformity and that the. (healthtap.com)
  • A fracture in conjunction with an overlying laceration that tears the epidermis and the meninges, or runs through the paranasal sinuses and the middle ear structures, bringing the outside environment into contact with the cranial cavity is called a compound fracture. (wikipedia.org)
  • If you have a personal injury case involving multiple fractures or broken bones you may be facing serious pain, surgical procedures, physical therapy, and months or even years of recovery time. (injurytriallawyer.com)
  • Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro, who suffered multiple fractures soon after the start of the Preakness Stakes (gr. (thehorse.com)