Foot Dermatoses: Skin diseases of the foot, general or unspecified.Foot: The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.Hand DermatosesFacial DermatosesSkin DiseasesSkin Diseases, Vesiculobullous: Skin diseases characterized by local or general distributions of blisters. They are classified according to the site and mode of blister formation. Lesions can appear spontaneously or be precipitated by infection, trauma, or sunlight. Etiologies include immunologic and genetic factors. (From Scientific American Medicine, 1990)Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis: Autoimmune disease characterized by subepidermal blisters and linear deposition of autoantibodies at the dermoepidermal junction. The accumulated autoantibodies are of IMMUNOGLOBULIN A and occasionally IMMUNOGLOBULIN G classes against epidermal BASEMENT MEMBRANE proteins. The dermatosis is sometimes associated with malignancies and use of certain drugs (e.g., VANCOMYCIN).Sweet Syndrome: Condition characterized by large, rapidly extending, erythematous, tender plaques on the upper body usually accompanied by fever and dermal infiltration of neutrophilic leukocytes. It occurs mostly in middle-aged women, is often preceded by an upper respiratory infection, and clinically resembles ERYTHEMA MULTIFORME. Sweet syndrome is associated with LEUKEMIA.Dermatitis, Occupational: A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.Foot Diseases: Anatomical and functional disorders affecting the foot.Diabetic Foot: Common foot problems in persons with DIABETES MELLITUS, caused by any combination of factors such as DIABETIC NEUROPATHIES; PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASES; and INFECTION. With the loss of sensation and poor circulation, injuries and infections often lead to severe foot ulceration, GANGRENE and AMPUTATION.Leg Dermatoses: A nonspecific term used to denote any cutaneous lesion or group of lesions, or eruptions of any type on the leg. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Scalp DermatosesFoot Deformities, Acquired: Distortion or disfigurement of the foot, or a part of the foot, acquired through disease or injury after birth.Foot Ulcer: Lesion on the surface of the skin of the foot, usually accompanied by inflammation. The lesion may become infected or necrotic and is frequently associated with diabetes or leprosy.Erythema: Redness of the skin produced by congestion of the capillaries. This condition may result from a variety of causes.Keratosis: Any horny growth such as a wart or callus.Pyoderma Gangrenosum: An idiopathic, rapidly evolving, and severely debilitating disease occurring most commonly in association with chronic ulcerative colitis. It is characterized by the presence of boggy, purplish ulcers with undermined borders, appearing mostly on the legs. The majority of cases are in people between 40 and 60 years old. Its etiology is unknown.Foot Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the foot.Vulvar Diseases: Pathological processes of the VULVA.Folliculitis: Inflammation of follicles, primarily hair follicles.Hyperpigmentation: Excessive pigmentation of the skin, usually as a result of increased epidermal or dermal melanin pigmentation, hypermelanosis. Hyperpigmentation can be localized or generalized. The condition may arise from exposure to light, chemicals or other substances, or from a primary metabolic imbalance.Foot Deformities: Alterations or deviations from normal shape or size which result in a disfigurement of the foot.Neurodermatitis: An extremely variable eczematous skin disease that is presumed to be a response to prolonged vigorous scratching, rubbing, or pinching to relieve intense pruritus. It varies in intensity, severity, course, and morphologic expression in different individuals. Neurodermatitis is believed by some to be psychogenic. The circumscribed or localized form is often referred to as lichen simplex chronicus.Dapsone: A sulfone active against a wide range of bacteria but mainly employed for its actions against MYCOBACTERIUM LEPRAE. Its mechanism of action is probably similar to that of the SULFONAMIDES which involves inhibition of folic acid synthesis in susceptible organisms. It is also used with PYRIMETHAMINE in the treatment of malaria. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p157-8)Dermatitis: Any inflammation of the skin.Foot Bones: The TARSAL BONES; METATARSAL BONES; and PHALANGES OF TOES. The tarsal bones consists of seven bones: CALCANEUS; TALUS; cuboid; navicular; internal; middle; and external cuneiform bones. The five metatarsal bones are numbered one through five, running medial to lateral. There are 14 phalanges in each foot, the great toe has two while the other toes have three each.Pruritus: An intense itching sensation that produces the urge to rub or scratch the skin to obtain relief.Pigmentation DisordersPurpura: Purplish or brownish red discoloration, easily visible through the epidermis, caused by hemorrhage into the tissues. When the size of the discolorization is >2-3 cm it is generally called Ecchymoses (ECCHYMOSIS).Hypopigmentation: A condition caused by a deficiency or a loss of melanin pigmentation in the epidermis, also known as hypomelanosis. Hypopigmentation can be localized or generalized, and may result from genetic defects, trauma, inflammation, or infections.Acantholysis: Separation of the prickle cells of the stratum spinosum of the epidermis, resulting in atrophy of the prickle cell layer. It is seen in diseases such as pemphigus vulgaris (see PEMPHIGUS) and DARIER DISEASE.Eczema: A pruritic papulovesicular dermatitis occurring as a reaction to many endogenous and exogenous agents (Dorland, 27th ed).Pyoderma: Any purulent skin disease (Dorland, 27th ed).Lichen Planus: An inflammatory, pruritic disease of the skin and mucous membranes, which can be either generalized or localized. It is characterized by distinctive purplish, flat-topped papules having a predilection for the trunk and flexor surfaces. The lesions may be discrete or coalesce to form plaques. Histologically, there is a "saw-tooth" pattern of epidermal hyperplasia and vacuolar alteration of the basal layer of the epidermis along with an intense upper dermal inflammatory infiltrate composed predominantly of T-cells. Etiology is unknown.Foot Joints: The articulations extending from the ANKLE distally to the TOES. These include the ANKLE JOINT; TARSAL JOINTS; METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT; and TOE JOINT.Dermatitis, Exfoliative: The widespread involvement of the skin by a scaly, erythematous dermatitis occurring either as a secondary or reactive process to an underlying cutaneous disorder (e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, etc.), or as a primary or idiopathic disease. It is often associated with the loss of hair and nails, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, and pruritus. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Skin Diseases, Viral: Skin diseases caused by viruses.Foot Deformities, Congenital: Alterations or deviations from normal shape or size which result in a disfigurement of the foot occurring at or before birth.Skin Care: Maintenance of the hygienic state of the skin under optimal conditions of cleanliness and comfort. Effective in skin care are proper washing, bathing, cleansing, and the use of soaps, detergents, oils, etc. In various disease states, therapeutic and protective solutions and ointments are useful. The care of the skin is particularly important in various occupations, in exposure to sunlight, in neonates, and in PRESSURE ULCER.Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Rare, chronic, papulo-vesicular disease characterized by an intensely pruritic eruption consisting of various combinations of symmetrical, erythematous, papular, vesicular, or bullous lesions. The disease is strongly associated with the presence of HLA-B8 and HLA-DR3 antigens. A variety of different autoantibodies has been detected in small numbers in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis.Mite Infestations: Infestations with arthropods of the subclass ACARI, superorder Acariformes.Skin Diseases, Papulosquamous: A group of dermatoses with distinct morphologic features. The primary lesion is most commonly a papule, usually erythematous, with a variable degree of scaling on the surface. Plaques form through the coalescing of primary lesions.Keratolytic Agents: Agents that soften, separate, and cause desquamation of the cornified epithelium or horny layer of skin. They are used to expose mycelia of infecting fungi or to treat corns, warts, and certain other skin diseases.Patch Tests: Skin tests in which the sensitizer is applied to a patch of cotton cloth or gauze held in place for approximately 48-72 hours. It is used for the elicitation of a contact hypersensitivity reaction.Scabies: A contagious cutaneous inflammation caused by the bite of the mite SARCOPTES SCABIEI. It is characterized by pruritic papular eruptions and burrows and affects primarily the axillae, elbows, wrists, and genitalia, although it can spread to cover the entire body.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Dermatitis, Allergic Contact: A contact dermatitis due to allergic sensitization to various substances. These substances subsequently produce inflammatory reactions in the skin of those who have acquired hypersensitivity to them as a result of prior exposure.Dermatologic Agents: Drugs used to treat or prevent skin disorders or for the routine care of skin.Paraneoplastic Syndromes: In patients with neoplastic diseases a wide variety of clinical pictures which are indirect and usually remote effects produced by tumor cell metabolites or other products.Chemexfoliation: Application of a cauterant to the skin for the purpose of causing a superficial destruction of the epidermis and upper layers of the dermis. After healing, the treated area has new epithelium.Parapsoriasis: The term applied to a group of relatively uncommon inflammatory, maculopapular, scaly eruptions of unknown etiology and resistant to conventional treatment. Eruptions are both psoriatic and lichenoid in appearance, but the diseases are distinct from psoriasis, lichen planus, or other recognized dermatoses. Proposed nomenclature divides parapsoriasis into two distinct subgroups, PITYRIASIS LICHENOIDES and parapsoriasis en plaques (small- and large-plaque parapsoriasis).Hair Preparations: Hair grooming, cleansing and modifying products meant for topical application to hair, usually human. They include sprays, bleaches, dyes, conditioners, rinses, shampoos, nutrient lotions, etc.Acitretin: An oral retinoid effective in the treatment of psoriasis. It is the major metabolite of ETRETINATE with the advantage of a much shorter half-life when compared with etretinate.Agricultural Workers' Diseases: Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease: A mild, highly infectious viral disease of children, characterized by vesicular lesions in the mouth and on the hands and feet. It is caused by coxsackieviruses A.Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Direct: A form of fluorescent antibody technique utilizing a fluorochrome conjugated to an antibody, which is added directly to a tissue or cell suspension for the detection of a specific antigen. (Bennington, Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)Dermatitis, Atopic: A chronic inflammatory genetically determined disease of the skin marked by increased ability to form reagin (IgE), with increased susceptibility to allergic rhinitis and asthma, and hereditary disposition to a lowered threshold for pruritus. It is manifested by lichenification, excoriation, and crusting, mainly on the flexural surfaces of the elbow and knee. In infants it is known as infantile eczema.Vulvitis: Inflammation of the VULVA. It is characterized by PRURITUS and painful urination.Vulvar Lichen Sclerosus: Atrophy and shriveling of the SKIN of the VULVA that is characterized by the whitish LICHEN SCLEROSUS appearance, inflammation, and PRURITUS.Ultraviolet Therapy: The use of ultraviolet electromagnetic radiation in the treatment of disease, usually of the skin. This is the part of the sun's spectrum that causes sunburn and tanning. Ultraviolet A, used in PUVA, is closer to visible light and less damaging than Ultraviolet B, which is ionizing.Skin Diseases, Genetic: Diseases of the skin with a genetic component, usually the result of various inborn errors of metabolism.Flatfoot: A condition in which one or more of the arches of the foot have flattened out.Rosacea: A cutaneous disorder primarily of convexities of the central part of the FACE, such as FOREHEAD; CHEEK; NOSE; and CHIN. It is characterized by FLUSHING; ERYTHEMA; EDEMA; RHINOPHYMA; papules; and ocular symptoms. It may occur at any age but typically after age 30. There are various subtypes of rosacea: erythematotelangiectatic, papulopustular, phymatous, and ocular (National Rosacea Society's Expert Committee on the Classification and Staging of Rosacea, J Am Acad Dermatol 2002; 46:584-7).Acrodermatitis: Inflammation involving the skin of the extremities, especially the hands and feet. Several forms are known, some idiopathic and some hereditary. The infantile form is called Gianotti-Crosti syndrome.Pemphigoid, Bullous: A chronic and relatively benign subepidermal blistering disease usually of the elderly and without histopathologic acantholysis.Blister: Visible accumulations of fluid within or beneath the epidermis.Acanthosis Nigricans: A circumscribed melanosis consisting of a brown-pigmented, velvety verrucosity or fine papillomatosis appearing in the axillae and other body folds. It occurs in association with endocrine disorders, underlying malignancy, administration of certain drugs, or as in inherited disorder.Pemphigoid Gestationis: An itching, autoimmune, bullous SKIN disease that occurs during the last two trimesters of PREGNANCY and PUERPERIUM. It also affects non-pregnant females with tissue of PLACENTA origin, such as CHORIOCARCINOMA; or HYDATIDIFORM MOLE. It exhibits antigenic and clinical similarity to bullous pemphigoid (PEMPHIGOID, BULLOUS). This disease does not involve herpes viruses (old name, herpes gestationis).Dermatitis, Contact: A type of acute or chronic skin reaction in which sensitivity is manifested by reactivity to materials or substances coming in contact with the skin. It may involve allergic or non-allergic mechanisms.Pemphigus: Group of chronic blistering diseases characterized histologically by ACANTHOLYSIS and blister formation within the EPIDERMIS.

Double blind, randomised study of continuous terbinafine compared with intermittent itraconazole in treatment of toenail onychomycosis. The LION Study Group. (1/176)

OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy and safety of continuous terbinafine with intermittent itraconazole in the treatment of toenail onychomycosis. DESIGN: Prospective, randomised, double blind, double dummy, multicentre, parallel group study lasting 72 weeks. SETTING: 35 centres in six European countries. SUBJECTS: 496 patients aged 18 to 75 years with a clinical and mycological diagnosis of dermatophyte onychomycosis of the toenail. INTERVENTIONS: Study patients were randomly divided into four parallel groups to receive either terbinafine 250 mg a day for 12 or 16 weeks (groups T12 and T16) or itraconazole 400 mg a day for 1 week in every 4 weeks for 12 or 16 weeks (groups I3 and I4). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Assessment of primary efficacy at week 72 was mycological cure, defined as negative results on microscopy and culture of samples from the target toenail. RESULTS: At week 72 the mycological cure rates were 75.7% (81/107) in the T12 group and 80. 8% (80/99) in the T16 group compared with 38.3% (41/107) in the I3 group and 49.1 % (53/108) in the I4 group. All comparisons (T12 v I3, T12 v I4, T16 v I3, T16 v I4) showed significantly higher cure rates in the terbinafine groups (all P<0.0001). Also, all secondary clinical outcome measures were significantly in favour of terbinafine at week 72. There were no differences in the number or type of adverse events recorded in the terbinafine or itraconazole groups. CONCLUSION: Continuous terbinafine is significantly more effective than intermittent itraconazole in the treatment of patients with toenail onychomycosis.  (+info)

N-terminal deletion in a desmosomal cadherin causes the autosomal dominant skin disease striate palmoplantar keratoderma. (2/176)

The N-terminal extracellular domain of the cadherins, calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules, has been shown by X-ray crystallography to be involved in two types of interaction: lateral strand dimers and adhesive dimers. Here we describe the first human mutation in a cadherin present in desmosome cell junctions that removes a portion of this highly conserved first extracellular domain. The mutation, in the DSG1 gene coding for a desmoglein (Dsg1), results in the deletion of the first and much of the second beta-strand of the first cadherin repeat and part of the first Ca2+-binding site, and would be expected to compromise strand dimer formation. It causes a dominantly inherited skin disease, striate palmoplantar keratoderma (SPPK), mapping to chromosome 18q12.1, in which affected individuals have marked hyperkeratotic bands on the palms and soles. In a three generation Dutch family with SPPK, we have found a G-->A transition in the 3" splice acceptor site of intron 2 of the DSG1 gene which segregated with the disease phenotype. This causes aberrant splicing of exon 2 to exon 4, which are in-frame, with the consequent removal of exon 3 encoding part of the prosequence, the mature protein cleavage site and part of the first extracellular domain. This mutation emphasizes the importance of this part of the molecule for cadherin function, and of the Dsg1 protein and hence desmosomes in epidermal function.  (+info)

Treatment of toenail onychomycosis with 2% butenafine and 5% Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil in cream. (3/176)

The prevalence of onychomycosis, a superficial fungal infection that destroys the entire nail unit, is rising, with no satisfactory cure. The objective of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to examine the clinical efficacy and tolerability of 2% butenafine hydrochloride and 5% Melaleuca alternifolia oil incorporated in a cream to manage toenail onychomycosis in a cohort. Sixty outpatients (39 M, 21 F) aged 18-80 years (mean 29.6) with 6-36 months duration of disease were randomized to two groups (40 and 20), active and placebo. After 16 weeks, 80% of patients using medicated cream were cured, as opposed to none in the placebo group. Four patients in the active treatment group experienced subjective mild inflammation without discontinuing treatment. During follow-up, no relapse occurred in cured patients and no improvement was seen in medication-resistant and placebo participants.  (+info)

Systematic review of topical treatments for fungal infections of the skin and nails of the feet. (4/176)

OBJECTIVE: To identify and synthesise the evidence for efficacy and cost effectiveness of topical treatments for superficial fungal infections of the skin and nails of the feet. DESIGN: Systematic review. INTERVENTIONS: Topical treatments for superficial fungal infections. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cure confirmed by culture and microscopy for skin and by culture for nails in patients with clinically diagnosed fungal infections. RESULTS: Of 126 trials identified in 121 papers, 72 (57.1%) met the inclusion criteria. Placebo controlled trials yielded pooled relative risks of failure to cure skin infections: allylamines (0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.24 to 0.38); azoles (0.54, 0.42 to 0.68); undecenoic acid (0.28, 0. 11 to 0.74); and tolnaftate (0.46, 0.17 to 1.22). Although meta-analysis of 11 trials comparing allylamines and azoles showed a relative risk of failure to cure of 0.88 (0.78 to 0.99) in favour of allylamines, there was evidence of language bias. Seven reports in English favoured allylamines (0.79, 0.69 to 0.91), but four reports in foreign languages showed no difference between the two drugs (1. 01, 0.90 to 1.13). Neither trial of nail infections showed significant differences between alternative topical treatments. CONCLUSIONS: Allylamines, azoles, and undecenoic acid were efficacious in placebo controlled trials. There are sufficient comparative trials to judge relative efficacy only between allylamines and azoles. Allylamines cure slightly more infections than azoles but are much more expensive than azoles. The most cost effective strategy is first to treat with azoles or undecenoic acid and to use allylamines only if that fails.  (+info)

Onychomycosis caused by Scytalidium dimidiatum. Report of two cases. Review of the taxonomy of the synanamorph and anamorph forms of this coelomycete. (5/176)

The authors report two cases of onychomycosis in the dystrophic form, one of them involving an HIV-positive patient, provoked by Scytalidium dimidiatum, previously called Scytalidium lignicola. The subject is reviewed from the taxonomic viewpoint, considering the anamorph Hendersonula toruloidea as a synonym of Nattrassia mangiferae, and having Scytalidium dimidiatum as the major synanamorph. According to many mycologists, Scytalidium hyalinum may be a separate species or a hyaline mutant of Scytalidium dimidiatum. Scytalidium lignicola Pesante 1957 was considered to be the type-species of the genus by ELLIS (1971)13 and later to be a "conidial state" of Hendersonula toruloidea by the same author, today known as Nattrassia mangiferae. The microorganism lives only on the roots of certain plants (mainly Platanus and Pinus). It produces pycnidia and is not considered to be a pathogen, although it is considered as a possible emerging agent capable of provoking opportunistic fungal lesions. The importance of this topic as one of the most outstanding in fungal taxonomy, so likely to be modified over time, as well as its interest in the field of dermatologic mycology, are emphasized.  (+info)

Synthesis of viral DNA and late capsid protein L1 in parabasal spinous cell layers of naturally occurring benign warts infected with human papillomavirus type 1. (6/176)

We investigated human papillomavirus type 1 (HPV1)-specific transcription, viral DNA replication, and viral protein expression in naturally occurring benign tumors by in situ hybridization, 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, and immunohistochemistry and obtained results different from other HPV-infected benign tumors characterized so far. Moderate amounts of transcripts with a putative coding potential for E6/E7, E1, and E2 were demonstrated from the first subrabasal cell layer throughout the stratum spinosum and granulosum. In addition very large amounts of E4 and L1 transcripts were present in the same epithelial layers. This finding was substantiated by the demonstration of L1 and E4 protein already in the bottom-most spinous cell layer. Furthermore massive amplification of the viral DNA as measured by BrdU incorporation and different methods of in situ hybridization took place in the lowest 5 to 10 suprabasal cell layers. These findings are in contrast to the assumption that late gene expression and viral DNA synthesis are restricted to the more differentiated cell layers of the epithelium and point to differences in the regulation of the vegetative life cycle between different papillomavirus types.  (+info)

Mycobacterium thermoresistible recovered from a cutaneous lesion in an otherwise healthy individual. (7/176)

This is the first report of coinfection by Mycobacterium thermoresistible and Mycobacterium fortuitum and only the fifth case of human infection by M. thermoresistible reported in the world literature.  (+info)

White grain mycetoma caused by a Cylindrocarpon sp. in India. (8/176)

We describe a case of white grain eumycetoma of the foot of an Indian male caused by a slow-growing, poorly sporulating fungus that does not match any known agent of this infection. Histologic examination of a biopsy tissue specimen showed oval, lobular, white granules composed of hyaline, septate hyphae, and thick-walled chlamydospores. Culture of granules from a draining sinus yielded compact, very-slow-growing, poorly sporulating colonies producing a strong reddish brown pigment that diffused into the medium. The fungus was identified as a Cylindrocarpon sp. based on the development of rare cylindrical conidia borne from solitary phialides lacking collarettes, in addition to chlamydospores formed singly or in short chains.  (+info)

  • Subjects must have clinical evidence of interdigital tinea pedis of one or both feet characterized by: (i) moderate erythema, (ii) scaling and (iii) mild pruritis. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • There is also erythema and edema of the coronary bands and subsequent deformities of the foot. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Patients with tinea pedis typically present with itching, erythema and small blisters on one or both feet. (bpac.org.nz)
  • Moccasin (chronic hyperkeratotic) tinea pedis is also predominantly caused by T. rubrum and is associated with scaling plaques and mild erythema on the heels, soles and lateral aspects of one foot, or less often, both feet ( Figure 3 ). (bpac.org.nz)
  • As dermatoses pelagra, eczema numular, púrpura pigmentosa crônica e psoríase foram mais frequentes no grupo dos alcoolistas e aparentemente surgiram paralelamente ao alcoolismo, que parece interferir na evolução destas dermatoses. (scielo.br)
  • Dyshidrotic eczema typically starts as tiny itchy blisters along the sides of the fingers or feet and then turns into red, scaling areas. (skinsight.com)
  • skin diseases of the foot , general or unspecified. (lookfordiagnosis.com)
  • Macerated skin of immersion foot, common among troops in Viet Nam, is also seen among workers wearing water soaked boots for extended periods of time. (cdc.gov)
  • Cracked heels refers to a condition produced by the occurrence of fissures in abnormally hard, dry skin over the heels of the feet. (news-medical.net)
  • This disease is characterized by dry scaly and flaking skin, and can develop in different places on the body, including the feet. (news-medical.net)
  • This disease causes thickening of the skin on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet and predisposes to fissure formation. (news-medical.net)
  • Children with this condition experience high levels of moisture on the skin over their feet, followed by quick drying. (news-medical.net)
  • Diabetes patients have to be mindful of the risk of foot ulcers developing from the cracks in the skin. (news-medical.net)
  • According to the National Foot Health Assessment 2012, 20 percent of adults in the United States have experienced cracked skin on their feet. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Soaking and moisturizing your feet can help when the skin at your heels dries out. (harcourthealth.com)
  • The dermatoses of pregnancy include skin conditions occurring almost exclusively during the gravid or puerperal state. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP), though not a dermatosis in the strict sense of the word because there are no primary lesions, is an important cause of itch and secondary skin lesions in pregnancy. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • The condition occurs when fungus infects the superficial skin layers of your feet and toes. (livestrong.com)
  • This contagious infection typically causes dry, scaly, itchy skin on the soles and/or sides of the feet, and between the toes. (livestrong.com)
  • An alternating cycle of foot wetness and drying damages the superficial skin the soles causes this noninfectious condition characterized by a red, scaly rash. (livestrong.com)
  • Keeping the feet dry and use of an emollient to prevent skin drying are the cornerstones of treatment for sweaty sock syndrome, which usually clears up permanently around the age of puberty. (livestrong.com)
  • What Causes Skin to Peel From the Bottom of Feet? (livestrong.com)
  • While dry skin can seem rather innocuous, cracked soles of the feet can often itch, burn and even bleed, making you vulnerable to infection. (livestrong.com)
  • Simply wearing open-heeled shoes, exercising frequently, walking barefoot or placing excess pressure on your feet can result in developing corns and calluses that ultimately create cracked foot skin. (livestrong.com)
  • The recommendations of the American Academy of Foot and Ankle Surgeons assert that you should lubricate dry skin before deep problems develop. (livestrong.com)
  • CNN Health's guide to dry skin includes several lifestyle modifications and home remedies for treating skin conditions such as cracked soles of the feet. (livestrong.com)
  • If the dry skin on your feet itches, apply a cold compress. (livestrong.com)
  • Look for key ingredients in your moisturizer that can help treat dry, cracked skin on the soles of your feet. (livestrong.com)
  • Consult your doctor or a specialist regarding cracked or dry skin on the soles of your feet that does not respond to self-treatment, or that causes you pain. (livestrong.com)
  • Why Does the Skin on My Dog's Nose and Feet Feel so Tough? (pethealthnetwork.com)
  • Normally, the specialized skin that makes up the surface of a dog's nose (the planum nasale) and feet (the digital, carpal and tarsal pads) is quite smooth and soft. (pethealthnetwork.com)
  • Plantar hyperkeratosis or keratoderma (thickening of the skin on the soles of the feet). (dermnetnz.org)
  • Cracked heels generally occur as a result of dry skin on the feet. (bpac.org.nz)
  • Microcyn has proven itself successful in both clinical studies and in daily clinical use in the resolution of skin dermatoses, the management of scars, and perhaps most telling, the reduction of pain and itch, which is the most common complaint dermatologists hear from their patients. (cnbc.com)
  • A skin condition that is limited to the hands and/or feet can have several possible causes. (skinsight.com)
  • Other skin disorders occur primarily on the feet rather than on the hands or on both the hands and feet. (skinsight.com)
  • Click any of pictures below to learn more about what skin changes are common in hands and feet. (skinsight.com)
  • His 27-year-old daughter has a similar picture with her skin lesions started at age of 17 in the region below the breast, back, trunk, feet and hands. (scirp.org)
  • A skin problem on the feet of children. (totalhealth.co.uk)
  • Skin disease of the face and feet, stunting, splayed digits, eating difficulties, increased susceptibility to microbial infections due to skin lesions and severe immune deficiency. (antagene.com)
  • Most published papers concerning this symptom during pregnancy focused mainly on itch occurring in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) and other pregnancy-specific dermatoses, leaving the problem of idiopathic itch in pregnant women without proper investigation. (hindawi.com)
  • Many of these conditions on the hands or feet are itchy, but, in some people, they may not itch at all. (skinsight.com)
  • A confirmed clinical diagnosis of tinea pedis with lesions localized to the interdigital spaces or predominantly interdigital, but may extend to other areas of the foot. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • During the clinical examination, I noted symmetric plantar lesions/pits on both feet, including the heels, metatarsal areas and the plantar aspect of the hallux. (podiatrytoday.com)
  • Occasionally, lesions are found on the feet and around the coronet, where secondary bacterial infection with Dermatophilus congolensis commonly causes "strawberry footrot. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Extensive lesions on the feet cause lameness. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Creams are suitable for most dermatoses, b but ointments may also provide some occlusion and are usually used for the treatment of dry, scaly lesions. (drugs.com)
  • DOI: 10.1099/ dermatosis caused by the penetration 2 elevated, ulcerative lesions on the vir.0.82858-0 of larvae, mostly of a dog or cat hook- lateral side of the right foot, and from 3. (cdc.gov)
  • Repeated wet-dry cycles lead to cracks developing on the soles of the feet. (news-medical.net)
  • Hand foot and mouth disease gets its name from a rash which develops on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Fortunately, medical experts have several recommendations for treating dry and cracked soles of the feet, particularly the areas most prone to cracking, the heels and the areas between the toes. (livestrong.com)
  • Cracked soles of the feet can be symptomatic of various conditions, some mild and others more serious, according to the New Zealand Dermatological Society. (livestrong.com)
  • The remedy wouldn't have seemed so strange to doctors a hundred years ago, who often prescribed liniments and poultices containing mild irritants such as mustard, garlic, or camphor to the chest and to the soles of the feet to relieve symptoms of colds and whooping cough. (thoughtco.com)
  • Clinical history is often significant for occlusive footwear (e.g. rubber boots, winter boots), extended periods of exposure to moist socks or shoes, and possibly hyperhidrosis of the feet. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Clinical exam demonstrates shiny glazed erythematous patches containing fissures and desquamation on weight-bearing regions of the foot, specifically the plantar forefoot, great toe, and occasionally the heel ( Figure 1 ). (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • These related dermatoses share several clinical features and importantly do not portend a poor prognosis for the fetus. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Clinical characterstic of an outbreak of hand foot and mouth disease in Singapore. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Foot-and-mouth disease (see Foot-and-Mouth Disease ) and bluetongue (see Bluetongue ) infection should be considered if morbidity is high and clinical signs include salivation, lameness, and fever. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Eosinophilic dermatosis of hematologic malignancy is a rare condition with a wide variety of clinical presentations, ranging from papules, erythematous nodules, or blisters that simulate arthropod bites, to the formation of true plaques of differing sizes. (actasdermo.org)
  • Clinical Characteristics of the Patients with Eosinophilic Dermatosis. (actasdermo.org)
  • The importance of this case report is to alert health professionals that the diagnosis of DD should be considered in family members of patients, especially those in the first degree, and also in patients with follicular keratolytic dermatoses, being an important differential diagnosis of this group of patients diseases. (scirp.org)
  • Cold can bring on Raynaud's disease, trench foot and frostbite. (cdc.gov)
  • Emergence of Coxsackie A6 hand-foot-and-mouth disease and comparative severity of Coxsackie B vs. echovirus infections, 2014-2016, UK. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Enterovirus (EV) infections (n=102) in paediatric and adult patients, presenting with hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD), suspected sepsis or viral meningitis during Jan 2014 to Dec 2016 were characte. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Recombinant human enterovirus 71 in hand foot and mouth disease patients. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Since its discovery in 1969, EV71 has caused major outbreaks of hand foot and mouth disease around the world, affecting mostly children. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The US has issued a warning for travellers intending to travel to Vietnam, with regard to a hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD) outbreak that is seemingly spreading and affecting more people. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A trio of nursery children at John Shelton Primary School have been diagnosed with hand foot and mouth disease in the last fortnight. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • She said: "We are aware of three nursery children having being diagnosed with hand foot and mouth disease over the last two weeks. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Hand foot and mouth disease mainly affects children and symptoms include feeling generally unwell with a sore mouth for a day or two before a rashappears. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • If the condition starts suddenly for the first time and is associated with painful sores on the hands, feet, and mouth, consider hand, foot, and mouth disease. (skinsight.com)
  • Dermatosis characterized by tissue eosinophilia arising in the context of hematologic disease is known as eosinophilic dermatosis of hematologic malignancy. (actasdermo.org)
  • It is important to recognize this dermatosis as it can indicate progression of the underlying disease, as was the case in 3 of our patients. (actasdermo.org)
  • Macrophage stimulating agent soluble yeast beta-1,3/1,6-glucan as a topical treatment of diabetic foot and leg ulcers: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled phase II study. (springer.com)
  • and Alevicyn™ Dermal Spray, which is intended to be used by health care professionals in the management via debridement of wounds such as stage I-IV pressure ulcers, partial- and full-thickness wounds, diabetic foot ulcers, post-surgical wounds, first- and second-degree burns, grafted and donor sites. (cnbc.com)
  • Among the complications, one of the most common chronic complications is diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). (dovepress.com)
  • Areas of foot ulcers for all patients ranged from 5 to 100 cm 2 . (dovepress.com)
  • Among the complications, one of the most common chronic complications is diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), which are disabling and affect about 15% of people with diabetes. (dovepress.com)
  • Chronic foot or leg swelling in the affected limb, varicose veins , no healing leg ulcers, affected limb may experience pain pressure, itching, dull ache, or heaviness in the affected limb. (lymphedemapeople.com)
  • Entrapment of the distal branches of the posterior TIBIAL NERVE (which divides into the medial plantar, lateral plantar, and calcanial nerves) in the tarsal tunnel, which lies posterior to the internal malleolus and beneath the retinaculum of the flexor muscles of the foot. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Plantar" here refers to the sole of the foot. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tinea pedis is a fungal infection that primarily affects the interdigital spaces and the plantar surface of the foot. (bpac.org.nz)
  • to verify the prevalence of dermatoses in alcoholics, analize the dermatological changes found in these patients and their evolution during alcoholic abstinence. (scielo.br)
  • a breed-related form occurs in Siberian huskies and several other Artic breeds, and a dermatosis can occur in puppies of any breed if their diet is deficient in zinc or absorption is impaired by excessive supplementation of calcium. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Fissures generally occur on the back of the heel and usually affect both feet. (bpac.org.nz)
  • Tinea pedis is a common fungal foot infection that is often associated with high rates of treatment failure or recurrence. (bpac.org.nz)
  • More commonly it could be tinea pedis or athletes foot. (healthtap.com)
  • RATIONALE: Pyridoxine may help prevent hand-foot syndrome caused by capecitabine in patients with cancer. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Comparative analysis of the severity of Hand-Foot-Syndrome (HFS) of palms treated with brimonidine tartrate gel or with standard care Urea 10% containing lotion in cancer patients receivin. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Elderly patients present with a unique spectrum of dermatoses that pose particular management opportunities and challenges, which will be increasingly encountered in dermatological practice. (nih.gov)
  • The remaining 31 elderly patients received 739 individual phototherapy treatments: 88% narrowband (NB)-UVB and 12% systemic, bath and hand/foot psoralen UVA (PUVA). (nih.gov)
  • All 4 patients were diagnosed with eosinophilic dermatosis (ED) of hematologic malignancy. (actasdermo.org)
  • Likewise, for virtually all cancer patients, targeted therapies, chemotherapy and radiotherapy result in uncomfortable and painful drug-induced dermatosis. (galderma.com)