Food Supply: The production and movement of food items from point of origin to use or consumption.Food: Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.Food Safety: Activities involved in ensuring the safety of FOOD including avoidance of bacterial and other contamination.Food Analysis: Measurement and evaluation of the components of substances to be taken as FOOD.Food Industry: The industry concerned with processing, preparing, preserving, distributing, and serving of foods and beverages.Food Labeling: Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a food or its container or wrapper. The concept includes ingredients, NUTRITIONAL VALUE, directions, warnings, and other relevant information.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Nutrition Policy: Guidelines and objectives pertaining to food supply and nutrition including recommendations for healthy diet.Food Preferences: The selection of one food over another.Food Inspection: Examination of foods to assure wholesome and clean products free from unsafe microbes or chemical contamination, natural or added deleterious substances, and decomposition during production, processing, packaging, etc.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Crops, Agricultural: Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Waste Products: Debris resulting from a process that is of no further use to the system producing it. The concept includes materials discharged from or stored in a system in inert form as a by-product of vital activities. (From Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Food Habits: Acquired or learned food preferences.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Food Chain: The sequence of transfers of matter and energy from organism to organism in the form of FOOD. Food chains intertwine locally into a food web because most organisms consume more than one type of animal or plant. PLANTS, which convert SOLAR ENERGY to food by PHOTOSYNTHESIS, are the primary food source. In a predator chain, a plant-eating animal is eaten by a larger animal. In a parasite chain, a smaller organism consumes part of a larger host and may itself be parasitized by smaller organisms. In a saprophytic chain, microorganisms live on dead organic matter.Economic Development: Mobilization of human, financial, capital, physical and or natural resources to generate goods and services.Food, Fortified: Any food that has been supplemented with essential nutrients either in quantities that are greater than those present normally, or which are not present in the food normally. Fortified food includes also food to which various nutrients have been added to compensate for those removed by refinement or processing. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Food Deprivation: The withholding of food in a structured experimental situation.United States Department of Agriculture: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with improving and maintaining farm income and developing and expanding markets for agricultural products. Through inspection and grading services it safeguards and insures standards of quality in food supply and production.Geography, Medical: The area of medicine concerned with the effects on health and disease due to geographic factors such as CLIMATE, environmental conditions, and geographic location.Trans Fatty Acids: UNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS that contain at least one double bond in the trans configuration, which results in a greater bond angle than the cis configuration. This results in a more extended fatty acid chain similar to SATURATED FATTY ACIDS, with closer packing and reduced fluidity. HYDROGENATION of unsaturated fatty acids increases the trans content.Pesticide Residues: Pesticides or their breakdown products remaining in the environment following their normal use or accidental contamination.Food Technology: The application of knowledge to the food industry.Nutritional Requirements: The amounts of various substances in food needed by an organism to sustain healthy life.Foodborne Diseases: Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.Security Measures: Regulations to assure protection of property and equipment.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Falconiformes: An order of diurnal BIRDS of prey, including EAGLES; HAWKS; buzzards; vultures; and falcons.Energy Intake: Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.Food Hypersensitivity: Gastrointestinal disturbances, skin eruptions, or shock due to allergic reactions to allergens in food.Cereals: Seeds from grasses (POACEAE) which are important in the diet.Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: The processes and properties of living organisms by which they take in and balance the use of nutritive materials for energy, heat production, or building material for the growth, maintenance, or repair of tissues and the nutritive properties of FOOD.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Health Food: A non-medical term defined by the lay public as a food that has little or no preservatives, which has not undergone major processing, enrichment or refinement and which may be grown without pesticides. (from Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Population Growth: Increase, over a specific period of time, in the number of individuals living in a country or region.Fast Foods: Prepared food that is ready to eat or partially prepared food that has a final preparation time of a few minutes or less.Bariatric Medicine: The discipline concerned with WEIGHT REDUCTION in patients with OBESITY.United StatesNutrition Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to the nutritional status of a human population within a given geographic area. Data from these surveys are used in preparing NUTRITION ASSESSMENTS.Sweetening Agents: Substances that sweeten food, beverages, medications, etc., such as sugar, saccharine or other low-calorie synthetic products. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Food, Genetically Modified: Food derived from genetically modified organisms (ORGANISMS, GENETICALLY MODIFIED).Food Services: Functions, equipment, and facilities concerned with the preparation and distribution of ready-to-eat food.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Climate Change: Any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). It may result from natural factors such as changes in the sun's intensity, natural processes within the climate system such as changes in ocean circulation, or human activities.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Nutritional Status: State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.Biomass: Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Dietary Fats: Fats present in food, especially in animal products such as meat, meat products, butter, ghee. They are present in lower amounts in nuts, seeds, and avocados.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Legislation, Food: Laws and regulations concerned with industrial processing and marketing of foods.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Food Additives: Substances which are of little or no nutritive value, but are used in the processing or storage of foods or animal feed, especially in the developed countries; includes ANTIOXIDANTS; FOOD PRESERVATIVES; FOOD COLORING AGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS (both plain and LOCAL); VEHICLES; EXCIPIENTS and other similarly used substances. Many of the same substances are PHARMACEUTIC AIDS when added to pharmaceuticals rather than to foods.Food, Preserved: Food that has been prepared and stored in a way to prevent spoilage.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Dietary Carbohydrates: Carbohydrates present in food comprising digestible sugars and starches and indigestible cellulose and other dietary fibers. The former are the major source of energy. The sugars are in beet and cane sugar, fruits, honey, sweet corn, corn syrup, milk and milk products, etc.; the starches are in cereal grains, legumes (FABACEAE), tubers, etc. (From Claudio & Lagua, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Dictionary, 3d ed, p32, p277)Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Infant Food: Food processed and manufactured for the nutritional health of children in their first year of life.Functional Food: Components of the usual diet that may provide health benefits beyond basic nutrients. Examples of functional foods include soy, nuts, chocolate, and cranberries (From NCCAM Backgrounder, March 2004, p3).Food, Formulated: Food and dietary formulations including elemental (chemically defined formula) diets, synthetic and semisynthetic diets, space diets, weight-reduction formulas, tube-feeding diets, complete liquid diets, and supplemental liquid and solid diets.Food Preservation: Procedures or techniques used to keep food from spoiling.Soy Foods: Foods made from SOYBEANS. Health benefits are ascribed to the high levels of DIETARY PROTEINS and ISOFLAVONES.Food Coloring Agents: Natural or synthetic dyes used as coloring agents in processed foods.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Foods, Specialized: Foods and beverages prepared for use to meet specific needs such as infant foods.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Food Assistance: Food or financial assistance for food given to those in need.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Food Preservatives: Substances capable of inhibiting, retarding or arresting the process of fermentation, acidification or other deterioration of foods.Staphylococcal Food Poisoning: Poisoning by staphylococcal toxins present in contaminated food.Hunger: The desire for FOOD generated by a sensation arising from the lack of food in the STOMACH.Nutritive Value: An indication of the contribution of a food to the nutrient content of the diet. This value depends on the quantity of a food which is digested and absorbed and the amounts of the essential nutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrate, minerals, vitamins) which it contains. This value can be affected by soil and growing conditions, handling and storage, and processing.Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Food, Organic: Food that is grown or manufactured in accordance with nationally regulated production standards that include restrictions on the use of pesticides, non-organic fertilizers, genetic engineering, growth hormones, irradiation, antibiotics, and non-organic ingredients.Salmonella Food Poisoning: Poisoning caused by ingestion of food harboring species of SALMONELLA. Conditions of raising, shipping, slaughtering, and marketing of domestic animals contribute to the spread of this bacterium in the food supply.Food Dispensers, Automatic: Mechanical food dispensing machines.Food Packaging: Containers, packaging, and packaging materials for processed and raw foods and beverages. It includes packaging intended to be used for storage and also used for preparation of foods such as microwave food containers versus COOKING AND EATING UTENSILS. Packaging materials may be intended for food contact or designated non-contact, for example, shipping containers. FOOD LABELING is also available.Diet Surveys: Systematic collections of factual data pertaining to the diet of a human population within a given geographic area.

Validation of measures of food insecurity and hunger. (1/1030)

The most recent survey effort to determine the extent of food insecurity and hunger in the United States, the Food Security Supplement, included a series of questions to assess this complex phenomenon. The primary measure developed from this Food Security Supplement was based on measurement concepts, methods and items from two previously developed measures. This paper presents the evidence available that questionnaire-based measures, in particular the national food security measure, provide valid measurement of food insecurity and hunger for population and individual uses. The paper discusses basic ideas about measurement and criteria for establishing validity of measures and then uses these criteria to structure an examination of the research results available to establish the validity of food security measures. The results show that the construction of the national food security measure is well grounded in our understanding of food insecurity and hunger, its performance is consistent with that understanding, it is precise within usual performance standards, dependable, accurate at both group and individual levels within reasonable performance standards, and its accuracy is attributable to the well-grounded understanding. These results provide strong evidence that the Food Security Supplement provides valid measurement of food insecurity and hunger for population and individual uses. Further validation research is required for subgroups of the population, not yet studied for validation purposes, to establish validity for monitoring population changes in prevalence and to develop and validate robust and contextually sensitive measures in a variety of countries that reflect how people experience and think about food insecurity and hunger.  (+info)

Measuring food insecurity and hunger in the United States: development of a national benchmark measure and prevalence estimates. (2/1030)

Since 1992, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) has led a collaborative effort to develop a comprehensive benchmark measure of the severity and prevalence of food insecurity and hunger in the United States. Based on prior research and wide consultation, a survey instrument specifically relevant to U.S. conditions was designed and tested. Through its Current Population Survey (CPS), the U.S. Bureau of the Census has fielded this instrument each year since 1995. A measurement scale was derived from the data through fitting, testing and validating a Rasch scale. The unidimensional Rasch model corresponds to the form of the phenomenon being measured, i.e., the severity of food insufficiency due to inadequate resources as directly experienced and reported in U.S. households. A categorical measure reflecting designated ranges of severity on the scale was constructed for consistent comparison of prevalence estimates over time and across population groups. The technical basis and initial results of the new measure were reported in September 1997. For the 12 months ending April 1995, an estimated 11.9% of U.S. households (35 million persons) were food insecure. Among these, 4.1% of households (with 6.9 million adults and 4.3 million children) showed a recurring pattern of hunger due to inadequate resources for one or more of their adult and/or child members sometime during the period. The new measure has been incorporated into other federal surveys and is being used by researchers throughout the U.S. and Canada.  (+info)

Economic determinants and dietary consequences of food insecurity in the United States. (3/1030)

This paper reviews recent research on the economic determinants and dietary consequences of food insecurity and hunger in the United States. The new Current Population Study (CPS) food insecurity and hunger measure shows that hunger rates decline sharply with rising incomes. Despite this strong relationship, confirmed in other national datasets, a one-to-one correspondence between poverty-level incomes and hunger does not exist. In 1995, 13.1% of those in poverty experienced hunger and half of those experiencing hunger had incomes above the poverty level. Panel data indicate that those who are often food insufficient are much more likely than food-sufficient households to have experienced recent events that stress household budgets, such as losing a job, gaining a household member or losing food stamps. Cross-sectional work also demonstrates the importance of food stamps because benefit levels are inversely related to food insufficiency. Concern for the dietary consequences of domestic food insufficiency is well placed; recent research shows that the odds of consuming intakes <50% of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) are higher for adult women and elderly individuals from food-insufficient households. Preschoolers from food-insufficient households do not consume significantly lower amounts than those from food-sufficient households, but mean intakes for the rest of members in those very same households are significantly lower for the food insufficient. This research highlights the importance of food insecurity and hunger indicators, further validates the use of self-reported measures and points to areas of need for future research and interventions.  (+info)

Nutrition and health outcomes associated with food insecurity and hunger. (4/1030)

This paper explores how food insecurity and hunger relate to health and nutrition outcomes in food-rich countries such as the United States. It focuses on two subgroups of the population for whom data are available: women of childbearing age and school-age children. Special consideration is given to examining how food insecurity relates to these outcomes independently of socioeconomic status and poverty. In a population-based sample of women of childbearing age, the least severe level of food insecurity (household food insecurity) was correlated with higher body mass index (BMI), controlling for other available and known influences on obesity including income level. In low income school-age children from two large urban areas of the U.S., risk of hunger and hunger were associated with compromised psychosocial functioning, controlling for maternal education and estimated household income. The nutrition and health consequences of food insecurity comprise a potentially rich area for future, socially relevant research in the field of nutritional sciences.  (+info)

Food insecurity: consequences for the household and broader social implications. (5/1030)

A conceptual framework showing the household and social implications of food insecurity was elicited from a qualitative and quantitative study of 98 households from a heterogeneous low income population of Quebec city and rural surroundings; the study was designed to increase understanding of the experience of food insecurity in order to contribute to its prevention. According to the respondents' description, the experience of food insecurity is characterized by two categories of manifestations, i.e., the core characteristics of the phenomenon and a related set of actions and reactions by the household. This second category of manifestations is considered here as a first level of consequences of food insecurity. These consequences at the household level often interact with the larger environment to which the household belongs. On a chronic basis, the resulting interactions have certain implications that are tentatively labeled "social implications" in this paper. Their examination suggests that important aspects of human development depend on food security. It also raises questions concerning the nature of socially acceptable practices of food acquisition and food management, and how such acceptability can be assessed. Guidelines to that effect are proposed. Findings underline the relevance and urgency of working toward the realization of the right to food.  (+info)

Women's dietary intakes in the context of household food insecurity. (6/1030)

A study of food insecurity and nutritional adequacy was conducted with a sample of 153 women in families receiving emergency food assistance in Toronto, Canada. Contemporaneous data on dietary intake and household food security over the past 30 d were available for 145 of the women. Analyses of these data revealed that women who reported hunger in their households during the past 30 d also reported systematically lower intakes of energy and a number of nutrients. The effect of household-level hunger on intake persisted even when other economic, socio-cultural, and behavioral influences on reported dietary intake were considered. Estimated prevalences of inadequacy in excess of 15% were noted for Vitamin A, folate, iron, and magnesium in this sample, suggesting that the low levels of intake associated with severe household food insecurity are in a range that could put women at risk of nutrient deficiencies.  (+info)

Abbreviated measures of food sufficiency validly estimate the food security level of poor households: measuring household food security. (7/1030)

This study was designed to develop an abbreviated method that captures both the qualitative and quantitative dimensions of household food security (HFS). Women in poor and very poor households (n = 238) in a peri-urban barrio in Caracas, Venezuela, provided data on food availability and their perception of food resource constraints and hunger experiences within the home. Socioeconomic data and food-related behavior that may predict HFS levels were gathered. On average, the top 12 food contributors of energy provided 81% and predicted more than 90% of the variation in households' total energy availability using stepwise regression analysis. On the other hand, a 4-point 12-item scale was shown to have face, content and construct validity with reiterative testing, factor analysis and a Chronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.92. Assessing predictors of energy availability together with a self-perceived HFS scale may provide a valid and reliable method for identifying and monitoring food security levels among poor urban households.  (+info)

Developing the effectiveness of an intersectoral food policy coalition through formative evaluation. (8/1030)

There is a difference between bringing parties together and making them work effectively. We present a case study of an intersectoral food policy Committee, part of a three-tiered coalition nested within local municipal government, which sought to promote and nutrition in a rapidly growing metropolitan region by tackling food supply issues in the first instance. This was new territory for all players. After 12 months, the group felt it was floundering and requested an evaluation. In-depth qualitative interviews with committee members (n = 21) and quantitative assessment of Committee processes revealed insufficient mechanisms for engaging new members, conflict between perceived roles for the group and a notable lack of confidence in the group's capacity to achieve its goals, or outcome efficacy. Feedback of the data and subsequent discussion led to a reform of project structure, stronger mechanisms to realize its goals and better incentive management, or ways to maximize the benefits and limit the costs for the diverse parties involved. The impact was reflected in a 4 year time series analysis of media releases, decision making and related municipal government actions. The study illustrates how theory-informed formative evaluation can help to improve health promotion practice.  (+info)

  • Providing food and nutrition security for the rapidly expanding populations in the world's cities is a pressing challenge in this changing world. (wur.nl)
  • Against the background of these developments, achieving urban food and nutrition security calls for integrated and innovative solutions. (wur.nl)
  • The objective is to highlight the urgency for integrated research and policy for urban food and nutrition security. (wur.nl)
  • This seminar is an integral part of CDI's short course Market Access for Food Security . (wur.nl)
  • Here we ask questions such as: what are the opportunities for supply in urban contexts, how can innovative business models be designed and smart linkages made between producers and retailers of food? (wur.nl)
  • Current insights will be presented on the challenges faced by urban citizens to get physical, social and economic access at all times to food, which is safe and consumed in sufficient quantity and quality to meet their dietary needs and food preferences, supported by a safe living environment allowing for a healthy and active life. (wur.nl)
  • But the FDA oversees 80 percent of the nation's food supply, so keeping it safe represents a more pressing need for the country's residents, and anything that may compromise that task raises red flags. (usatoday.com)
  • Some experts say the latest population drop poses a threat to our nation's food supply. (cbsnews.com)
  • On Friday, the agency released two proposed rules designed to boost the safety of the nation's food supply, encompassing hundreds of pages. (npr.org)
  • Some of the advocates working to reform our nation's food system and save our environmental resources have a habit of painting farmers as corporate polluters, guilty unless they can prove otherwise. (latimes.com)
  • We need to ensure the safety of our workers, and we also need these pork producers and plants functioning - not only for the sake of their families, but for our nation's food supply as a whole. (thegazette.com)
  • SFSCs were originally identified as examples of "resistance" of farmers to modernization of the food system, characterized by the development of supply chains based on long-distance trade. (wikipedia.org)
  • Given these characteristics, short food supply chains are increasingly taken into consideration by rural and food policies as a driver of change in the food system and a policy tool for rural development. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the proximate short food supply chains producers are not necessarily managing product distribution (as in the case of consumers' cooperatives). (wikipedia.org)
  • In the extended short food supply chains, although geographical distances between producers and consumers may be long, consumers are aware of the identity of the producers and of the products (such as in the case of fair trade and protected denominations of origin). (wikipedia.org)
  • An action plan developed in 2009 at the Ministry of Agriculture, Agrifood, and Forestry of France was aimed at supporting the development of short food chains. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tightening of customs controls at Japan, South Korea, Thailand, and Taiwan borders is beginning to cause delivery delays in Asia's highly integrated production supply chains. (americanthinker.com)
  • In the food supply, farmworkers are the first responders who keep the supply chains going. (rand.org)
  • Special consideration is also given to supermarket supply networks, third party logistics, temperature controlled supply chains, organic foods and the U.S. food supply chain. (worldcat.org)
  • 12. Temperature Controlled Supply Chains: D. Smith and L. Sparks. (worldcat.org)
  • In this context, and amid rising anti-immigration-rhetoric, food companies need to acknowledge the large numbers of migrant workers in their supply chains - both on farms and in food-processing - and the specific vulnerabilities they face. (triplepundit.com)
  • A new benchmark by KnowTheChain of the world's 20 largest food companies has found that while they are aware of the risks of forced labor through their supply chains, only a handful are taking action to address it. (triplepundit.com)
  • Three areas in which food companies need to step up their game are recruitment, tracing their supply chains to the level of commodities, and worker voice. (triplepundit.com)
  • Food companies have complex and fragmented supply chains, which creates challenges for oversight. (triplepundit.com)
  • The benchmark found that while several companies have begun to trace their supply chains - an important step in identifying the risks of forced labor - this so far tends to be limited in scope to high-profile commodities such as palm oil and sugar. (triplepundit.com)
  • This report looks at the feasibility of blockchain in commercial food supply chains and the considerations to undertake blockchain exploration. (accenture.com)
  • In general, companies do not know enough about the products that they buy and sell to navigate the many complex challenges facing today's global supply chains (e.g., safe, sustainable and ethical). (accenture.com)
  • More can be done to equip companies with real-time traceability of products within global food supply chains. (accenture.com)
  • Blockchain, a type of distributed ledger technology (DLT), has been increasingly gaining market traction in supply chains-for example, in proofing product provenance and implementing track-and-trace of products through the supply chain. (accenture.com)
  • As global supply chains share data across multiple nodes, risk exposure is compounded by an emerging cyber security threat for which very few are set manage. (foodlogistics.com)
  • So, how can you mitigate supply chain risk, while integrating people, assets and technology to build the foundations for data-driven, cognitively intelligent supply chains with end-to-end visibility? (foodlogistics.com)
  • Governments all over the world have made attempts to ensure availability of staple foods and these supply chains have generally held up well, even in countries with strict social distancing requirements. (eurekalert.org)
  • But food supply chains differ across countries and crops, as do the impacts of COVID-19 on supplies. (eurekalert.org)
  • Capital-intensive food value chains that are highly mechanized (predominant in rich countries for staple crops such as wheat, maize and soybeans) have continued functioning with few disruptions. (eurekalert.org)
  • These food value chains have shown more supply disruptions owing to the risk of disease transmission, labor shortages, and disruptions in transportation and logistics. (eurekalert.org)
  • FoodLogiQ Connect is an online supplier community used by food companies to manage quality, safety, compliance and traceability across their supply chains. (newsday.com)
  • The company, a leading distributor of food and supplies to more than 800 fast food and casual dining chains, has secured a 100,000-square-foot distribution building in Southwest Michigan. (prweb.com)
  • Inventories are still ample, and major bottlenecks have not yet developed in the supply chains, which tend to react quickly to changing situations. (mybroadband.co.za)
  • Pangestu added G20 nations accounted for a large share of food trade so its actions would have significant global impact at a time when supply chains have broken down and the poorest and most vulnerable countries were being threatened by food insecurity. (cips.org)
  • She said it was necessary to ensure that the supply chains for food continue to flow and function safely, including considering food, agriculture inputs and food-related logistics as essential so they are prioritised. (cips.org)
  • We are working with governments and international partners to closely monitor domestic food and agricultural supply chains and how the loss of employment and income is impacting people's ability to buy food," she said. (cips.org)
  • We are building on existing projects and deploying short and long-term financing to help countries provide social safety nets, preserve the functioning of supply chains and ensure that farmers can meet the demand of local consumers during the pandemic. (cips.org)
  • Our award-winning design makes this detailed information clear, easy-to-work-with, and actionable: IBM Food Trust won the 2019 Spark Galleries Platinum Award for Digital Design . (ibm.com)
  • IBM Food Trust™ makes food traceability possible, tracking products through all points of the food supply chain for safety and authenticity. (ibm.com)
  • Recent blockchain trials in food traceability are promising but it is still early. (accenture.com)
  • A blockchain empowered food chain will have high level of transparency, traceability, trust and lower level of fraud. (wur.nl)
  • 1WorldSync, the leading multi-enterprise product information network, and FoodLogiQ, the leading food safety, traceability and sustainability software as a service company, announced today that they have partnered to provide the entire spectrum of the food supply industry with a supply chain traceability solution that delivers transparency while tackling food safety and compliance issues. (newsday.com)
  • FoodLogiQ Connect, the leading software as a service food traceability software, will leverage 1WorldSync's suite of tools that provide data validity, quality, and intelligence while enabling customers to maintain a seamless connection with trading partners to make sure accurate, complete product information is flowing through the supply chain at all times. (newsday.com)
  • From the customer demand for transparency to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's mandate for better processes, traceability is no longer just a nice-to-have asset. (newsday.com)
  • 1WorldSync's product information and fresh industry solutions coupled with FoodLogiQ's track/traceability and supply chain management capabilities allows the fresh industry an opportunity to be fully engaged in global product information sharing. (newsday.com)
  • FoodLogiQ® provides traceability, food safety compliance and supply chain transparency software solutions. (newsday.com)
  • We help restaurant operators, food retailers, consumer packaged goods companies and other food companies achieve end-to-end traceability while supporting safe and high quality food products across the supply chain. (newsday.com)
  • To meet mounting regulatory requirements and consumer demands for transparency, food companies are leveraging FoodLogiQ Connect to achieve end-to-end traceability for their supply chain, validate supplier compliance with food safety and sustainability standards, and act with confidence in the event of a food safety or quality issue. (newsday.com)
  • The food industry faces increasing environmental and social responsibility demands, tougher stakeholder and government requirements and rising food safety and traceability scrutiny as well as challenges in managing brand reputation and addressing profitability concerns. (lr.org)
  • Localized food shortages are also reported in the Sahelian countries of Chad, Mauritania and the Niger. (fao.org)
  • Despite temporary shortages of some food items in supermarkets caused by an unexpected surge in demand, Australia does not have a food security problem," it stated. (cips.org)
  • Many emergency food providers, including Wisconsin's largest, say they're trying to balance rising needs and shortages due to a cut in federally funded supplies and the stalled farm bill. (twincities.com)
  • Rival Impossible Foods has been struggling with shortages as demand for plant-based meat alternatives soars. (cnbc.com)
  • As rival Impossible Foods deals with supply shortages of its plant-based burgers, Beyond Meat said Thursday that it has the capacity to take on any restaurant chain. (cnbc.com)
  • That left 20 million people with dire food shortages in East Africa. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • Blockchain is a very promising technology that can raise supply chain digitalization in the agri-food sector to a higher level. (wur.nl)
  • For this reason, Blockchain technology is now on the radar of all mayor players in the agri-food chain. (wur.nl)
  • The main objective of this research, which may comprise multiple thesis projects, is to investigate what is needed to scale-up the application of Blockchain in the agri-food domain. (wur.nl)
  • A review on blockchain applications in the agri‐food sector. (wur.nl)
  • The participants of the course (mid-career professionals in agri-food sectors in Africa and Asia) will also be participating in the event. (wur.nl)
  • Keep up to date with the latest agri-food and biosciences news, events, funding opportunities and more. (innovateuk.org)
  • The transactions could be of any type: financial such as for Bitcoin as well as for, say, transfers of products in a supply chain, sustainability certifications, food safety inspections, or quality audits. (wur.nl)
  • With articles written by leading journalists including Sean Rickard (former NFU Chief Economist), Mike Scott (The Financial Times, The Guardian) and Jeremy Hazlehurst (Management Today, FT Wealth), the publication elevates the food sustainability discussion from the niche press, into the UK's most widely-read business newspaper. (innovateuk.org)
  • helping you manage food safety and sustainability risks. (lr.org)
  • Genetically modified (GM) foods support the food production system by increasing yields, supporting conservation and building sustainability through social, environmental and economic opportunities . (foodinsight.org)
  • The truly frightening thing is that this bird flu pandemic is coming at a time when the U.S. food supply is already under an unprecedented assault. (theeconomiccollapseblog.com)
  • Access to food could be critical to getting through the COVID-19 pandemic. (rand.org)
  • While the pandemic could disrupt supplies of these foods, it would be unlikely to have any impact on Australia's food security, the report said. (cips.org)
  • Links of the food supply chain are regaining strength after periods of uncertainty during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, instilling consumer confidence, according to Texas A&M AgriLife experts. (enn.com)
  • It appears capital spending in food manufacturing - at least among large firms - was only temporarily set back by pandemic impacts. (foodmanufacturing.com)
  • The most important impact of the pandemic on food security is through income declines that put food access at risk", said article co-author and IFPRI Director-General Johan Swinnen. (eurekalert.org)
  • Export restrictions on staple foods including rice and wheat, imposed by 21 countries in the early months of the pandemic, created volatility and upward pressure on world prices for food staples. (eurekalert.org)
  • Trade associations from the UK food and drink supply chain have called on the government to ensure they could continue to provide essential supplies during the coronavirus pandemic. (cips.org)
  • Now more than ever, it's important we make sure they have the resources they need to get through this global pandemic, so that Iowans, and all Americans, can continue to have food on the grocery store shelves, in our food pantries and banks, and on our kitchen tables. (thegazette.com)
  • To establish a sustainable settlement on Earth's solar system neighbor, space travelers will have to learn how to grow food on Mars - a job that could turn out to be one of the most vital, challenging and labor-intensive tasks at hand, experts say. (yahoo.com)
  • In other words: For canned corn, the coronavirus was something of a perfect storm, as suppliers didn't have enough supply, distributors didn't have a full force, and canning season-when stocks could be replenished-fell at the end of summer. (yahoo.com)
  • The Australian government has released a report showing it will not run out of food during the coronavirus outbreak despite fears of empty shelves. (cips.org)
  • Following the coronavirus outbreak, staple products such as flour and rice became in short supply in some supermarkets. (cips.org)
  • In this April 10, 2020, file photo, residents desperate for a planned distribution of food for those suffering under Kenya's coronavirus-related movement restrictions push through a gate in Nairobi, Kenya. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • In a pre-dawn raid in food-starved Zimbabwe, police enforcing a coronavirus lockdown confiscated and destroyed 3 tons of fresh fruit and vegetables by setting fire to it. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • It was an extreme example of how lockdowns to slow the spread of the coronavirus may be choking Africa's already-vulnerable food supply. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • The Birmingham group says they are currently in talks with governments in the Fertile Crescent region to implement conservation efforts and are also partnering with the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization to plan and implement such efforts. (commondreams.org)
  • About one in every five people in Africa, nearly 250 million, already didn't have enough food before the virus outbreak, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • According to the 2006 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) report Livestock's Long Shadow, animal agriculture contributes on a "massive scale" to global warming, air pollution, land degradation, energy use, deforestation, and biodiversity decline. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a typical week, the FDA runs 160 inspections of domestic food facilities, looking for bacterial contamination, insect infestations and unhygienic conditions. (usatoday.com)
  • The more concerning type of contamination occurs when dangerous radioactive materials become ingested through the food chain in a process called food uptake. (foxnews.com)
  • But even if radiation is ingested in the Japanese food chain, Atcher believes the United States does not need to panic about contamination because of today's highly sensitive radiation-detection equipment. (foxnews.com)
  • FSANZ and other Australian and New Zealand government agencies continuously monitor the food supply to ensure it is safe, and that foods comply with standards for microbiological contaminants, pesticide residue limits and chemical contamination. (foodstandards.gov.au)
  • The other proposed rule would require food processors to develop and follow detailed plans for preventing contamination of their products. (npr.org)
  • Few documented incidents of malicious food contamination exist, though, which raises the question: Is food terrorism fact or fiction? (kqed.org)
  • Competition within the global food industry means many rely on cheap labor on farms and in food-processing factories. (triplepundit.com)
  • Like every seed company, we've had a huge uptick in sales," said Nate Kleinman, who lives and farms in southern New Jersey (where nurseries and farming supply stores have been classed as essential businesses ). (nytimes.com)
  • One rule covers operations at fruit and vegetable farms, focusing on those foods that we eat raw and have been the subject of several recent recalls, like leafy greens, tomatoes, melons, herbs, green onions and berries. (npr.org)
  • Experts suspect that the bigger reason the U.S. has avoided a large-scale attack on food and farms is that an attack like that doesn't carry the same weight as a suicide bombing or mass shooting. (kqed.org)
  • Research institutions, in close dialog with stakeholders and end users, will develop innovative climate services for energy, water, and food supply to support people in East Africa in coping with the challenges associated with climate change. (enn.com)
  • For nearly two decades, scientists had predicted that climate change would be relatively manageable for agriculture, suggesting that even under worst-case assumptions, it would probably take until 2080 for food prices to double. (nytimes.com)
  • For a look at what climate change could do to the world's food supply, consider what the weather did to the American Corn Belt last year. (sej.org)
  • Delivering nutritious food to cities is a complex problem that is also challenged by natural resource scarcity, climate change, and population growth, adding pressure to food systems globally. (wur.nl)
  • The report explores issues of food security, depleting natural resources and climate change - in so doing highlighting the role of agriculture at the heart of this trilemma. (innovateuk.org)
  • Nepal Earthquake Relief Samaritan's Purse launched an emergency response to the catastrophic earthquake in Nepal by supplying over 50,000 families with relief items such as food, tarps, blankets, and kitchen kits. (samaritanspurse.org)
  • Global grain reserves may be replenished for the time being, but global food security remains a goal, not a reality. (reuters.com)
  • An in-depth discussion of what Food Trust is, how it uses blockchain, its module-based flexibility, governance, network and data security, onboarding and support, and how to build your team. (ibm.com)
  • In the last 50 years, what's on dinner plates has grown more similar the world over - with major consequences for human nutrition and global food security, researchers said Monday. (latimes.com)
  • Will Urban Sprawl Affect China's Food Security? (chinadigitaltimes.net)
  • Most people are familiar with the terms "national security" or "home security," but relatively few are familiar with the term "food security. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Food security has similar connotations in relation to food. (encyclopedia.com)
  • According to the 1996 World Food Summit, food security exists "when every person has physical and economic access at all times to healthy and nutritious food in sufficient quantity to cover the needs of their daily ration and food preferences, in order to live a healthy and active life. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In its simplest form, food security means that all people have enough to eat at all times to be healthy and active, and do not have to fear that the situation will change in the future. (encyclopedia.com)
  • There are three fundamental pillars in achieving food security. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The next pillar of food security is access to food - economic and physical. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The third pillar of food security is food utilization, important at the household level and critical at the individual level, which brings together both the quality of the food and other complementary factors such as safe water that underpin good nutritional outcomes. (encyclopedia.com)
  • International concerns with regard to food security have shifted in the last three decades. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The plantation workers and their families often live on palm plantations with little food security as plantations displace community gardens. (ran.org)
  • Providing food and nutrition security for the rapidly expanding populations in the world's cities is a pressing challenge in this changing world. (wur.nl)
  • Against the background of these developments, achieving urban food and nutrition security calls for integrated and innovative solutions. (wur.nl)
  • The objective is to highlight the urgency for integrated research and policy for urban food and nutrition security. (wur.nl)
  • This seminar is an integral part of CDI's short course Market Access for Food Security . (wur.nl)
  • The global population is now 7 billion and by 2050 it will be 9 billion so it is now even more crucial that we conserve crop wild relatives as part of the wider need to address global food security issues," Maxted added. (commondreams.org)
  • Washington, DC: COVID-19 has led to a global economic slowdown that is affecting all four pillars of food security - availability, access, utilization, and stability - according to a new article from researchers at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), published in the journal Science . (eurekalert.org)
  • On top of these problems, the World Bank said the virus could create "a severe food security crisis in Africa. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • Food security refers to the availability of food and one's access to it. (phys.org)
  • Worldwide around 852 million people are chronically hungry due to extreme poverty, while up to 2 billion people lack food security intermittently due to varying degrees of poverty (source: FAO, 2003). (phys.org)
  • It is becoming increasingly difficult to maintain food security in a world beset by a confluence of "peak" phenomena, namely peak oil, peak water, peak grain and peak fish. (phys.org)
  • Food security is a complex topic, standing at the intersection of many disciplines. (phys.org)
  • Christopher Elliot is professor of food security at Queen's University Belfast and director of the Institute for Global Food Safety. (wikipedia.org)
  • A Wall Street journal exposé of conditions on palm-oil plantations in Malaysia supplying international companies, for example, included the story of Mr. Rubel, a young Bangladeshi man who was promised work opportunities in Malaysia. (triplepundit.com)
  • It's time to Occupy Our Food Supply and reclaim food sovereignty from the corporate food regime. (ran.org)
  • The number of countries in sub-Saharan Africa facing exceptional food emergencies has climbed to 17 - up four from the 13 reported at the end of 1996 - according to a special FAO report released in early May. (fao.org)
  • But the food supply outlook for the region as a whole has generally improved, as a result of good harvests in western Africa and favourable prospects in southern Africa. (fao.org)
  • The planned large-scale repatriation of the estimated 80 000 refugees by relief agencies has run into serious difficulties due to cholera outbreaks, delays in securing necessary clearances and the looting of relief food supplies by the local populations,' according to the quarterly report Food Supply Situation and Crop Prospects in Sub-Saharan Africa. (fao.org)
  • In eastern Africa, poor harvests caused by drought, particularly in Eritrea and parts of Kenya, Somalia, Tanzania and Uganda, have led to serious food supply difficulties. (fao.org)
  • And in western Africa, despite a satisfactory food supply situation in most countries, thanks to average and above-average harvests gathered in late 1996, Liberia and Sierra Leone continue to rely mostly on food assistance to meet their needs. (fao.org)
  • Estimated 1997 food aid needs of sub-Saharan Africa - still high at nearly 2 million tonnes - are lower than last year, reflecting the favourable harvests in western Africa and southern Africa's optimistic outlook. (fao.org)
  • Adesina said the variety of foods being produced in Africa, often on the same farm -- with maize, groundnuts, rice, cowpea and sweet potato all grown in a cycle -- served as an important insurance that must be maintained however possible. (reuters.com)
  • Africa, for the most part, has not yet had a green revolution and so it plays a small role in the overall world food supply, although certainly an important one for Africans. (eurekalert.org)
  • Developing more precise seasonal forecasts to improve food supply for a total of 365 million people in eleven countries in East Africa, this is the goal of the new CONFER project funded by the EU. (enn.com)
  • Lockdowns without provisions to help the poor "may affect us very, very much," said Lola Castro, regional director in southern Africa for the UN World Food Program. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • The World Food Program was already feeding millions in Africa, mainly rural people, due to a myriad of disasters: Floods, drought. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • There are always places in the world where food has become scarce for at time, and people starve or move. (scienceblogs.com)
  • As the article above points out, most people would say the acceptable level or mammalian feces or fly eggs in your food is zero. (mercola.com)
  • Wheat, rice and maize prices have fallen sharply from their 2008 highs, when protests broke out across the developing world over unaffordable staple foods and countries imposed export bans to ensure their people had enough to eat. (reuters.com)
  • If the world gets two or three bad grain crop years in a row, they say, the poorest people, who already spend much of their income on food, will get hurt the most. (eurekalert.org)
  • People seem to be preparing for some serious disruptions in the food supply. (nytimes.com)
  • These days, more weight is being placed on conscious consumerism and people are beginning to really care about where they're getting their food. (ibm.com)
  • as Pollan points out, Americans spend less than nine percent of their income on food - less than any other people in history. (npr.org)
  • And if people want to pay those costs for cheap food, that's great, but let's tell them about the costs first. (npr.org)
  • Essential industries-such as growing, harvesting and delivering food-are allowed to operate under the lockdown but the people who move the essentials from farm to fork aren't showing up for work. (wsj.com)
  • Thank goodness everyday people are reclaiming our food supply from the insanely unsustainable hands of the corporate few. (ran.org)
  • As the cargo jet was in the air en route from India on Friday, Samaritan's Purse distributed 18 tons of food to 2,800 people in the village of Lele, where almost every house was leveled in the earthquake. (samaritanspurse.org)
  • The food will meet the immediate needs of 2,800 people. (samaritanspurse.org)
  • The St. John's-based association serves as a central hub for donations from the area, and in turn distributes material to 54 food banks all over the province, providing food to some 27,000 people. (cbc.ca)
  • Food sovereignty is a prerequisite for health and justice for all people, food, agriculture, and Mother Earth. (truthout.org)
  • For these reasons, many people who wouldn't expect to find themselves in line at a food pantry are the very ones waiting for a bag of food," she said. (twincities.com)
  • Since then, the American food system has grappled more with unintentional outbreaks, like the listeria-laden cantaloupe that killed 33 people in 2011. (kqed.org)
  • Last week, thousands of desperate people scrambled for food aid at a distribution point, causing a stampede. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • Somalia, one of the world's most fragile countries, is struggling to get food to people living in extremist-controlled areas. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • U.S. authorities have said that strain is genetically distinct from the H7N9 in Tennessee and that the risk of the disease spreading to people from poultry or making food unsafe is low. (reuters.com)
  • Let's not repeat what happened in 2008 when trade restrictions amplified world food price spikes and caused 130-155m more people to fall below the poverty line, especially in the most vulnerable countries," she said. (cips.org)
  • People buy the same foods, so if there is a mass rush and everyone is buying the same foods, there will not be enough for everyone. (shtfplan.com)
  • Be prepared for life's storms with our Deluxe Food Supply for four people. (beprepared.com)
  • The global food aid availability, which in recent years has been on a downward trend, is unlikely to improve in the coming years,' warned Abdur Rashid, chief of FAO's Global Information and Early Warning System, which published the report. (fao.org)
  • The global food supply remains far from secure," Adesina told the U.N. Conference and Trade and Development (UNCTAD). (reuters.com)
  • Coulomb D (2008) Refrigeration and cold chain serving the global food industry and creating a better future: two key IIR challenges for improved health and environment. (springer.com)
  • However, in terms of providing food of the right quality which is nutritious and free from environmental contaminants, the task ahead is challenging, particularly in highly populated parts of the world. (fao.org)
  • The Nosaki (野埼) was a food supply ship (reefer ship) of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) serving during World War II, the only ship of her class. (wikipedia.org)
  • But, they said, the world of food has become homogeneous, to the point of suggesting a global standard food supply. (latimes.com)
  • The victory garden movement began during World War I and called on Americans to grow food in whatever spaces they could - rooftops, fire escapes, empty lots, backyards. (nytimes.com)
  • The food system began its dramatic decline the second the world turned away from the farming practices of our ancestors, and began to attempt to outdo nature with technology. (mercola.com)
  • Today the world is food secure from the perspective of food availability, and global grain prices are less costly in real terms than at any time in recent decades. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In the developing world many poor mothers face excessive time burdens given the absence of electricity, or running water, or labor-saving food preparation devices. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In some areas of the world, notably south Asia , girls and women in poor households often receive less food than they need even though the household has sufficient amounts. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In the 1960s and early 1970s, with rising world grain prices, fears arose that the world would run out of food in the future as its population grew ever larger. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Bourne M (1977) Post harvest food losses-the neglected dimension in increasing the world food supply. (springer.com)
  • Magnesium content of the food supply in the modern-day world. (nih.gov)
  • Food riots have recently taken place in many countries across the world. (phys.org)
  • It now appears that the penis did evolve as a spare food supply, and in future it could again help to solve world hunger problems. (thespoof.com)
  • The government shutdown has significantly reduced the number of inspections the FDA conducts, raising concerns about the safety of the food supply. (usatoday.com)
  • Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said he's making efforts to get inspections of high-risk facilities restarted. (usatoday.com)
  • Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said on Twitter the agency has cut back significantly on safety inspections of domestic food because of the ongoing partial government shutdown. (usatoday.com)
  • Though Gottlieb said foreign food inspections would continue, he acknowledged routine inspections of domestic facilities have halted. (usatoday.com)
  • Food inspections are not the only vital function performed by the FDA's 17,000 employees that has been curtailed by the shutdown. (usatoday.com)
  • The Haitian government was ousted in 2008 amid food riots, and anger over high prices has played a role in the recent Arab uprisings. (nytimes.com)
  • Disruptions in food systems both contribute to increases in poverty, by affecting a critical source of income for many of the world's poor, and also exacerbate the impacts of poverty by reducing access to food, particularly nutritious foods," said Swinnen. (eurekalert.org)
  • Parts of food processing sectors in rich countries have also been susceptible to such disruptions, as evident in the case of United States and Europe, where 30,000 workers in meat processing tested positive for COVID-19, causing many plant closures. (eurekalert.org)
  • Tyson said it worked with Tennessee and federal officials to quickly euthanize birds in the infected flock and did not expect disruptions to its chicken supply. (reuters.com)
  • Sorghum, one of the world's most important sources of food, animal feed, and biofuel, is considered a model crop for research because it has a high tolerance to drought, heat, and high-salt conditions. (innovations-report.com)
  • China's food supply is being imperiled as new reports warn that up to 50 percent of China's 440 million pigs are now at risk from African Swine Fever infection. (americanthinker.com)
  • For those of you left unaware of what exactly the BPA scare is all about, bisphenol A (also affectionately known as BPA) is a synthetic estrogen, as well as dangerous chemical, and most commonly used to strengthen plastic and line various types of food packaging (mainly, but not exclusively, cans). (care2.com)
  • The report also found modern weed control methods, which result in large fields with a single crop, has hurt bees by limiting the range of nutrients in their diet, compared with past decades when bees had access to a wider array of plant foods in a smaller range. (thestar.com.my)
  • The world's supply of basic foods has roughly doubled over the last half century, but it is fluctuating more from year to year, two Stanford researchers warn. (eurekalert.org)
  • The ongoing conflicts raging across the Middle East are putting the Earth's essential food stocks at dire risk, a group of researchers from England's University of Birmingham announced Monday. (commondreams.org)
  • The researchers recommend governments avoid further use of disruptive policies like export restrictions on food, keep policies consistent with rules agreed at the WTO and maintain open trade channels. (eurekalert.org)
  • The department spearheaded a multi-agency GAPS task force that consisted of the Kentucky Food Safety Branch, the Kentucky Department of Agriculture, the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service and other stakeholders. (emaxhealth.com)
  • For the fiscal year ending in August, the agency received 1.5 million pounds of food from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. (twincities.com)
  • While the single market has brought benefits to operators in the supply chain through more market opportunities and a larger customer base, it has also brought challenges. (europa.eu)
  • Yet growing food on Mars presents several significant challenges. (yahoo.com)
  • Current insights will be presented on the challenges faced by urban citizens to get physical, social and economic access at all times to food, which is safe and consumed in sufficient quantity and quality to meet their dietary needs and food preferences, supported by a safe living environment allowing for a healthy and active life. (wur.nl)
  • As the food supply chain becomes more complex the challenges surrounding your brand, reputation and shareholder value inevitably increase. (lr.org)