Fresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Food: Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.Gills: Paired respiratory organs of fishes and some amphibians that are analogous to lungs. They are richly supplied with blood vessels by which oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged directly with the environment.Water Supply: Means or process of supplying water (as for a community) usually including reservoirs, tunnels, and pipelines and often the watershed from which the water is ultimately drawn. (Webster, 3d ed)Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Tilapia: A freshwater fish used as an experimental organism and for food. This genus of the family Cichlidae (CICHLIDS) inhabits Central and South America (one species extends north into Texas), West Indies, Africa, Madagascar, Syria, and coastal India.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.AnguillaFood Supply: The production and movement of food items from point of origin to use or consumption.Wetlands: Environments or habitats at the interface between truly terrestrial ecosystems and truly aquatic systems making them different from each yet highly dependent on both. Adaptations to low soil oxygen characterize many wetland species.Fishes: A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.Salinity: Degree of saltiness, which is largely the OSMOLAR CONCENTRATION of SODIUM CHLORIDE plus any other SALTS present. It is an ecological factor of considerable importance, influencing the types of organisms that live in an ENVIRONMENT.Water Quality: A rating of a body of water based on measurable physical, chemical, and biological characteristics.Salmonidae: A family of anadromous fish comprising SALMON; TROUT; whitefish; and graylings. They are the most important food and game fishes. Their habitat is the northern Atlantic and Pacific, both marine and inland, and the Great Lakes. (Nelson: Fishes of the World, 1976, p97)Water Pollutants, Chemical: Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.Water-Electrolyte Balance: The balance of fluid in the BODY FLUID COMPARTMENTS; total BODY WATER; BLOOD VOLUME; EXTRACELLULAR SPACE; INTRACELLULAR SPACE, maintained by processes in the body that regulate the intake and excretion of WATER and ELECTROLYTES, particularly SODIUM and POTASSIUM.Eels: Common name for an order (Anguilliformes) of voracious, elongate, snakelike teleost fishes.Elapidae: A family of extremely venomous snakes, comprising coral snakes, cobras, mambas, kraits, and sea snakes. They are widely distributed, being found in the southern United States, South America, Africa, southern Asia, Australia, and the Pacific Islands. The elapids include three subfamilies: Elapinae, Hydrophiinae, and Lauticaudinae. Like the viperids, they have venom fangs in the front part of the upper jaw. The mambas of Africa are the most dangerous of all snakes by virtue of their size, speed, and highly toxic venom. (Goin, Goin, and Zug, Introduction to Herpetology, 3d ed, p329-33)Body Water: Fluids composed mainly of water found within the body.Acidic Glycosphingolipids: A subclass of GLYCOSPHINGOLIPIDS containing large polar heads made up of several sugar units. One or more of their terminal sugar units are bound to a negatively charged molecule at pH 7. Members of this class include: GANGLIOSIDES, uronoglycosphingolipids, SULFOGLYCOSPHINGOLIPIDS, phosphoglycosphingolipids, and phosphonoglycosphingolipids.Food Analysis: Measurement and evaluation of the components of substances to be taken as FOOD.Food Preferences: The selection of one food over another.Food Labeling: Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a food or its container or wrapper. The concept includes ingredients, NUTRITIONAL VALUE, directions, warnings, and other relevant information.Trout: Various fish of the family SALMONIDAE, usually smaller than salmon. They are mostly restricted to cool clear freshwater. Some are anadromous. They are highly regarded for their handsome colors, rich well-flavored flesh, and gameness as an angling fish. The genera Salvelinus, Salmo, and ONCORHYNCHUS have been introduced virtually throughout the world.Rivers: Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Water Pollution: Contamination of bodies of water (such as LAKES; RIVERS; SEAS; and GROUNDWATER.)Crustacea: A large subphylum of mostly marine ARTHROPODS containing over 42,000 species. They include familiar arthropods such as lobsters (NEPHROPIDAE), crabs (BRACHYURA), shrimp (PENAEIDAE), and barnacles (THORACICA).Water Purification: Any of several processes in which undesirable impurities in water are removed or neutralized; for example, chlorination, filtration, primary treatment, ion exchange, and distillation. It includes treatment of WASTE WATER to provide potable and hygienic water in a controlled or closed environment as well as provision of public drinking water supplies.Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Trematode Infections: Infections caused by infestation with worms of the class Trematoda.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Food Habits: Acquired or learned food preferences.Food Industry: The industry concerned with processing, preparing, preserving, distributing, and serving of foods and beverages.Sodium Chloride: A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.Queensland: A state in northeastern Australia. Its capital is Brisbane. Its coast was first visited by Captain Cook in 1770 and its first settlement (penal) was located on Moreton Bay in 1824. The name Cooksland was first proposed but honor to Queen Victoria prevailed. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p996 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p441)Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Trematoda: Class of parasitic flukes consisting of three subclasses, Monogenea, Aspidogastrea, and Digenea. The digenetic trematodes are the only ones found in man. They are endoparasites and require two hosts to complete their life cycle.Food Hypersensitivity: Gastrointestinal disturbances, skin eruptions, or shock due to allergic reactions to allergens in food.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Food Safety: Activities involved in ensuring the safety of FOOD including avoidance of bacterial and other contamination.Health Food: A non-medical term defined by the lay public as a food that has little or no preservatives, which has not undergone major processing, enrichment or refinement and which may be grown without pesticides. (from Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Chlorophyta: A phylum of photosynthetic EUKARYOTA bearing double membrane-bound plastids containing chlorophyll a and b. They comprise the classical green algae, and represent over 7000 species that live in a variety of primarily aquatic habitats. Only about ten percent are marine species, most live in freshwater.Water Pollutants: Substances or organisms which pollute the water or bodies of water. Use for water pollutants in general or those for which there is no specific heading.Fast Foods: Prepared food that is ready to eat or partially prepared food that has a final preparation time of a few minutes or less.Food Deprivation: The withholding of food in a structured experimental situation.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Fish Diseases: Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Food, Fortified: Any food that has been supplemented with essential nutrients either in quantities that are greater than those present normally, or which are not present in the food normally. Fortified food includes also food to which various nutrients have been added to compensate for those removed by refinement or processing. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Food Chain: The sequence of transfers of matter and energy from organism to organism in the form of FOOD. Food chains intertwine locally into a food web because most organisms consume more than one type of animal or plant. PLANTS, which convert SOLAR ENERGY to food by PHOTOSYNTHESIS, are the primary food source. In a predator chain, a plant-eating animal is eaten by a larger animal. In a parasite chain, a smaller organism consumes part of a larger host and may itself be parasitized by smaller organisms. In a saprophytic chain, microorganisms live on dead organic matter.Chlorides: Inorganic compounds derived from hydrochloric acid that contain the Cl- ion.Food Services: Functions, equipment, and facilities concerned with the preparation and distribution of ready-to-eat food.Food, Genetically Modified: Food derived from genetically modified organisms (ORGANISMS, GENETICALLY MODIFIED).Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Base Composition: The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Fatty Acids: Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Genes, rRNA: Genes, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which are transcribed to produce the RNA which is incorporated into RIBOSOMES. Prokaryotic rRNA genes are usually found in OPERONS dispersed throughout the GENOME, whereas eukaryotic rRNA genes are clustered, multicistronic transcriptional units.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Korea: Former kingdom, located on Korea Peninsula between Sea of Japan and Yellow Sea on east coast of Asia. In 1948, the kingdom ceased and two independent countries were formed, divided by the 38th parallel.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Water Deprivation: The withholding of water in a structured experimental situation.Food, Preserved: Food that has been prepared and stored in a way to prevent spoilage.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Legislation, Food: Laws and regulations concerned with industrial processing and marketing of foods.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Food Additives: Substances which are of little or no nutritive value, but are used in the processing or storage of foods or animal feed, especially in the developed countries; includes ANTIOXIDANTS; FOOD PRESERVATIVES; FOOD COLORING AGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS (both plain and LOCAL); VEHICLES; EXCIPIENTS and other similarly used substances. Many of the same substances are PHARMACEUTIC AIDS when added to pharmaceuticals rather than to foods.Drinking: The consumption of liquids.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Water Movements: The flow of water in enviromental bodies of water such as rivers, oceans, water supplies, aquariums, etc. It includes currents, tides, and waves.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Cyanobacteria: A phylum of oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria comprised of unicellular to multicellular bacteria possessing CHLOROPHYLL a and carrying out oxygenic PHOTOSYNTHESIS. Cyanobacteria are the only known organisms capable of fixing both CARBON DIOXIDE (in the presence of light) and NITROGEN. Cell morphology can include nitrogen-fixing heterocysts and/or resting cells called akinetes. Formerly called blue-green algae, cyanobacteria were traditionally treated as ALGAE.Osmolar Concentration: The concentration of osmotically active particles in solution expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per liter of solution. Osmolality is expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per kilogram of solvent.Water SofteningBacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.Food Preservation: Procedures or techniques used to keep food from spoiling.Infant Food: Food processed and manufactured for the nutritional health of children in their first year of life.Food Inspection: Examination of foods to assure wholesome and clean products free from unsafe microbes or chemical contamination, natural or added deleterious substances, and decomposition during production, processing, packaging, etc.Functional Food: Components of the usual diet that may provide health benefits beyond basic nutrients. Examples of functional foods include soy, nuts, chocolate, and cranberries (From NCCAM Backgrounder, March 2004, p3).Food, Formulated: Food and dietary formulations including elemental (chemically defined formula) diets, synthetic and semisynthetic diets, space diets, weight-reduction formulas, tube-feeding diets, complete liquid diets, and supplemental liquid and solid diets.Food Technology: The application of knowledge to the food industry.Soy Foods: Foods made from SOYBEANS. Health benefits are ascribed to the high levels of DIETARY PROTEINS and ISOFLAVONES.Food Coloring Agents: Natural or synthetic dyes used as coloring agents in processed foods.Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Energy Intake: Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.Cryopreservation: Preservation of cells, tissues, organs, or embryos by freezing. In histological preparations, cryopreservation or cryofixation is used to maintain the existing form, structure, and chemical composition of all the constituent elements of the specimens.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Aquaporins: A class of porins that allow the passage of WATER and other small molecules across CELL MEMBRANES.Food Preservatives: Substances capable of inhibiting, retarding or arresting the process of fermentation, acidification or other deterioration of foods.Food Packaging: Containers, packaging, and packaging materials for processed and raw foods and beverages. It includes packaging intended to be used for storage and also used for preparation of foods such as microwave food containers versus COOKING AND EATING UTENSILS. Packaging materials may be intended for food contact or designated non-contact, for example, shipping containers. FOOD LABELING is also available.Foods, Specialized: Foods and beverages prepared for use to meet specific needs such as infant foods.Food Assistance: Food or financial assistance for food given to those in need.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Hunger: The desire for FOOD generated by a sensation arising from the lack of food in the STOMACH.Staphylococcal Food Poisoning: Poisoning by staphylococcal toxins present in contaminated food.Nutritive Value: An indication of the contribution of a food to the nutrient content of the diet. This value depends on the quantity of a food which is digested and absorbed and the amounts of the essential nutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrate, minerals, vitamins) which it contains. This value can be affected by soil and growing conditions, handling and storage, and processing.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Food, Organic: Food that is grown or manufactured in accordance with nationally regulated production standards that include restrictions on the use of pesticides, non-organic fertilizers, genetic engineering, growth hormones, irradiation, antibiotics, and non-organic ingredients.
  • ACANA Freshwater Fish features an unmatched variety of local ingredients that are raised or fished by people we know and trust sourced from federally inspected facilities, and then delivered to our Kentucky DogStar Kitchens fresh or raw! (acana.com)
  • That's why we loaded ACANA Freshwater Fish with Rainbow trout from Idaho, whole Blue catfish from Kentucky, and wild Yellow perch from the Great Lakes - all delivered in nourishing WholePrey ™ ratios. (acana.com)
  • Entirely free of plant protein concentrates, ACANA Freshwater Fish is loaded with 60% fish - up to twice as much as most pet specialty dog foods. (acana.com)
  • Based on this biological fact, and to produce a nutritional analysis that mirrors the diet Mother Nature would provide for your dog, ACANA Freshwater Fish is rich in nourishing fish proteins and oils, while limiting unwanted carbohydrates and synthetic additives. (acana.com)
  • Larvae (transparent leptocephali shaped somewhat like a willow leaf) hatch and develop at sea to metamorphose into elvers in nearshore waters and estuaries. (calvertmarinemuseum.com)
  • When we domesticated the guinea pig, we also adjusted their diet to include nutrient-rich foods, such as yogurt drops, dried nuts and fruits, commercial guinea pig pellets and sweet and sugary treats. (petmd.com)
  • Wash the bowl daily in hot, soapy water to remove the slick bacterial film that can build up on it. (vetstreet.com)
  • Wash your utensils, cutting boards, and countertops with hot, soapy water after using them. (cdc.gov)
  • Instead, the CA findings contend that the world's food needs over the next few decades could be met by bringing the production levels of the world's low-yield farmers up to 80 per cent of what high-yield farmers get from comparable land. (indiatogether.org)
  • Challenges to food safety will continue to arise in unpredictable ways, largely due to changes in the world's food production, supply, and more imported foods. (cdc.gov)
  • Tarpon can thrive in waters as warm as 85 degrees F, while salmon and cod must have cooler 50s, 40s, and even 30s. (discoverboating.com)
  • Our foods provide a concentrated and natural source of virtually every nutrient your dog needs to thrive, which is why virtually all of the nutrients in ACANA are naturally present and are not synthetic. (acana.com)
  • Add this to the fact that some guinea pig foods favor taste appeal over good nutrition, which makes it difficult for pet parents to know if their pets are getting the nutrition they need to thrive. (petmd.com)
  • Our goal was to build freshwater resilience globally-that is, the ability of freshwater ecosystems and dependent communities and industries to thrive in the face of change, such as extended droughts, land use change, and excessive withdrawals. (rockefellerfoundation.org)
  • Consumers also may ask which foods, ingredients, and practices pose the greatest risk for foodborne disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Fresh fruit and vegetables and cigarettes are made available to soldiers serving in Jordan. (britishpathe.com)
  • Notice I'm not saying fresh fruit, which is high in sugar, and we already know that most pigs have a sweet tooth. (petmd.com)
  • Fruits function both as a protector of seeds as they develop and a dispersing aid - depending on the fruit, seeds get dispersed by animals (fleshy fruits), water (coconuts) or wind (rhubarb). (mnn.com)
  • But Nifong and Silliman found that freshwater American alligators can and do visit marine areas, and that they play an important role in coastal ecosystems like salt marshes," said Alber. (nsf.gov)
  • Coastal waters of muddy and sandy bottoms. (calvertmarinemuseum.com)
  • Only a fraction of nitrogen applied as a fertilizer is typically used by plants, the rest ends up in inland waters and coastal systems, creating eutrophication and dead zones. (wri.org)
  • For the purposes of issuing a permit, the internal waters that are marine in nature and landward of the internal boundary of the territorial sea of Canada (as described by the Oceans Act of Canada) are part of the declaration of the coastal provinces. (gc.ca)
  • Most, if not all, of the finfish and mollusc culture activities in marine waters are captured in the declarations of the coastal provinces, not the territorial sea and contiguous zone of Canada. (gc.ca)
  • The soil's food web is very dynamic and the living part of soil and it is very complex and interchanging depending on it's ecosystem. (kenyon.edu)
  • The interactions found in the food web are soil organisms living all or part of their lives in the soil while producing energy and working together with plants to survive. (kenyon.edu)
  • Diagram demonstrating the soil food web cycle. (kenyon.edu)
  • The start of all biological interactions within any soil food web would start with organic matter. (kenyon.edu)
  • Soil food webs are found in both terrestrial and freshwater/marine sediment soils. (kenyon.edu)
  • Various chemical factors like pH, CEC, and mineral composition affect how the soil food web responds to certain environments as well. (kenyon.edu)
  • Terrestrial soil food webs can consist of but are not limited to many soil microbe/plant interactions. (kenyon.edu)
  • Terrestrial soil food webs are more adaptive to having many plant exudates and very rich organic matter coming from mainly alive primary producers. (kenyon.edu)
  • Like any typical food system, bone soup (or broth), a traditional nourishing food in many cultures, contains a colloid dispersion of self-assembled micro/nano-particles. (nature.com)
  • Since the bioactive compounds in astragalus are soluble in water, they are extracted into the broth while the soup is cooking. (motherearthnews.com)
  • Ninety-two percent water (hence the name), watermelon is a good source of vitamin C and, when it's red (some are orange or yellow), also has lycopene, an antioxidant that may help protect against heart disease and some types of cancer. (eatingwell.com)
  • Enjoy fresh wedges (go ahead and see how far you can spit the seeds) or, better yet, get creative with watermelon recipes . (eatingwell.com)
  • veterinarian tested and recommended design keeps pets from eating their food too quickly. (petedge.com)
  • Just make sure to discuss the introduction of new foods and portions sizes with your veterinarian beforehand. (petmd.com)
  • You should speak to your veterinarian about this concern, and she will most likely recommend bloodwork, as well as measuring the amount of water you are giving your cat on a daily basis. (vetstreet.com)
  • The water is mostly coming from melting permafrost and rising rainfall, which is increasing flows in Siberian rivers that drain into the Arctic, such as the Ob and Yenisei. (treehugger.com)
  • With as much as 2700 cubic kilometers of green water (from rivers and subsurface), an estimated 70 per cent of the total, already withdrawn for irrigation, the focus must shift towards productive use of blue water (rainfall). (indiatogether.org)
  • People throughout Texas pinned down by icy roads and lacking power and water have ventured out to stores only to find long lines snaking around the building or shelves bereft of basic items, like milk, bread and bottled water. (gosanangelo.com)
  • Why does a refrigerator sometimes freeze milk and water in the fresh food compartment? (fixitnow.com)
  • I've notice that on the top shelf of my somewhat older model fridge, the water and milk every now and then freeze a bit. (fixitnow.com)
  • Foods to avoid during an episode of diarrhea include fatty foods, milk and other dairy products, alcohol, caffeine and artificial sweeteners. (reference.com)
  • Lactose occurs naturally in dairy products such as milk, cheese, yogurt and ice cream, but it can also be present in many different prepared foods. (reference.com)
  • SENSITIVITY + SHINE recipes are great for all cats, but especially formulated for those with food sensitivities or specific dietary needs. (entirelypets.com)
  • Bacteria were isolated from fermented soy foods and the grass carp intestine, and strains selected for high protease, cellulase and amylase activities. (springer.com)
  • Our results suggest these two B. amyloliquefaciens bacteria can efficiently solid state ferment soybean meal and ultimately produce a more utilizable food source for growing healthy piglets. (springer.com)
  • Bacteria can multiply rapidly if food is kept in the "danger zone" between 40°F and 140°F for more than two hours. (cdc.gov)
  • The Water-Energy-Food Security Nexus Approach, an increasingly influential concept pioneered by ICIMOD and applied in 2015 to climate change adaptation and sustainable development, is a tool to highlight precisely those questions and linkages. (icimod.org)
  • As The Rockefeller Foundation now looks at designing multi-year and bold new programs in health and agriculture, what we have learned-and will continue to learn-about water will be an important part of how we approach our other work going forward. (rockefellerfoundation.org)
  • Workers and volunteers at the San Antonio Food Bank are used to delivering groceries and prepared meals to evacuees from other disasters, including 2005's Hurricane Katrina in southern Louisiana and evacuees from Hurricane Harvey in Texas. (gosanangelo.com)
  • Home-delivered groceries, subscription meal kits, and mail-order food can be convenient. (cdc.gov)
  • Abstract / Summary Waters is a leader in developing food and water quality testing systems that incorporate analytical standards and reagents, sample preparation products, chromatographic columns, instrumentation, and data management software. (environmental-expert.com)
  • In Harris County, the largest in Texas with nearly 5 million residents, more than 33,000 homes remained without power Thursday and thousands of people didn't have access to clean water, said Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo, the county's top executive. (gosanangelo.com)
  • Known as the Beluga Point Fresh Water Spring, out of this pipe spurts cool, clean water from an underground spring. (atlasobscura.com)
  • It's not uncommon for some cats to be chronically dehydrated, but with a regular source of fresh, clean water , your cat should drink more frequently and more willingly, and she'll be healthier for it. (vetstreet.com)
  • Part of the reason that 2 cups of salad greens has fewer than 15 calories is that greens are more than 90 percent water. (eatingwell.com)
  • Smoked freshwater whitefish is sold in delicatessens and eaten as part of Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine, either filleted or made into whitefish salad. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rick in pastures the islands will have the problems this summer of how to water the livestock annually sent over from the mainland for fattening. (britishpathe.com)
  • It is estimated that agriculture is currently responsible for 70% of global water withdrawals [ 5 ], and nearly a third of that is attributed to livestock production and, in turn, a third of this is related to beef cattle [ 6 ]. (mdpi.com)
  • To locate wild turkeys, try to find their food source. (motherearthnews.com)
  • Like PulseNet-USA, TraNet will allow Chinese scientists to detect clusters of disease that may be caused by a common source, such as a mass-distributed food. (cdc.gov)
  • In this paper, we have explored the possibility of substituting traditional meat products with an alternative source of protein (insects) in order to reduce human pressure on water. (mdpi.com)
  • Growing crops for biofuels might promise more abundant, cleaner energy, but what happens to food security when cultivable land is diverted? (icimod.org)
  • What foods make diarrhea worse? (reference.com)
  • Foods such as dairy products, fatty foods, sugar-free foods and gas-producing foods usually make diarrhea worse. (reference.com)
  • While such substitution works well in purely market terms, it does imply that water-scarce countries will inevitably yield some of their food sovereignty in the process - a decision not all governments would be willing to make. (indiatogether.org)
  • Make checking and filling your cat's water bowl a simple task. (vetstreet.com)
  • Find out how CDC and global partners are providing countries with tools and training to make food safer to eat. (cdc.gov)
  • Acting globally means sharing solutions and resources throughout the world to make food safer for everyone. (cdc.gov)
  • Strengthening laboratory skills is an essential step to make food safer-whether consumed in China, exported to the United States, or shipped worldwide. (cdc.gov)
  • To lower your chances of food poisoning, consider how germs found in contaminated food can make you sick . (cdc.gov)
  • Make sure food safety is part of the package, too. (cdc.gov)
  • The only way to know the food is safe to eat is to use a food thermometer to make sure the food is 40°F or below. (cdc.gov)
  • While food imports can help overcome some water shortages, this does imply that water-scarce countries will inevitably yield some of their food sovereignty in the process. (indiatogether.org)
  • The perspective in the world population growth rate [ 4 ] states that the higher food demand will imply a direct effect on agricultural water usage in the future. (mdpi.com)
  • What brand sell high quality food? (fishlore.com)
  • Diets with high fat and sugar content and foods and drinks hot. (reference.com)
  • In autumn, the dominance of aged and more degraded SOM (low nutritional value) was evident, whereas in spring fresh and more labile SOM (high nutritional value) prevailed. (publish.csiro.au)
  • In Arizona, our water is very hard, and pH is always high or at least above 8.0 out of the tap. (azgardens.com)
  • After research and testing the water with my new API Master Kit, I figured it would be best to move them a new tank because the ammonia was just sky high (we were also overfeeding them). (fishlore.com)
  • I am now going to test the water every day and do water changes if the ammonia is too high. (fishlore.com)
  • Feed at least some canned food , which contains a high percentage of water - some 70 to 75 percent. (vetstreet.com)
  • This startling revelation comes courtesy the Comprehensive Assessment of Water Management in Agriculture (CA), an ambitious program co-sponsored by the Consultative Group on International Agriculture Research (CGIAR) that pulled together the work of 700 experts over a five year period. (indiatogether.org)
  • This research reveals the relationship between freshwater alligators and salt marsh ecosystems. (nsf.gov)
  • A recent study from The Brookings Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based research institute, names Milwaukee's regional water technology industry, championed by The Water Council, as one of the best industry clusters in the nation. (uwm.edu)
  • Research companies and call customer service to ask about food safety standards. (cdc.gov)
  • This rudimentary but annoying chore led them to do some research on how to get clean, drinking water without boiling. (howwemadeitinafrica.com)