Rupture: Forcible or traumatic tear or break of an organ or other soft part of the body.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Splenic RuptureAortic Rupture: The tearing or bursting of the wall along any portion of the AORTA, such as thoracic or abdominal. It may result from the rupture of an aneurysm or it may be due to TRAUMA.Heart Rupture: Disease-related laceration or tearing of tissues of the heart, including the free-wall MYOCARDIUM; HEART SEPTUM; PAPILLARY MUSCLES; CHORDAE TENDINEAE; and any of the HEART VALVES. Pathological rupture usually results from myocardial infarction (HEART RUPTURE, POST-INFARCTION).Uterine Rupture: A complete separation or tear in the wall of the UTERUS with or without expulsion of the FETUS. It may be due to injuries, multiple pregnancies, large fetus, previous scarring, or obstruction.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Heart Rupture, Post-Infarction: Laceration or tearing of cardiac tissues appearing after MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Fetal Membranes, Premature Rupture: Spontaneous tearing of the membranes surrounding the FETUS any time before the onset of OBSTETRIC LABOR. Preterm PROM is membrane rupture before 37 weeks of GESTATION.Lung Injury: Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung: A heterogeneous aggregate of at least three distinct histological types of lung cancer, including SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA; ADENOCARCINOMA; and LARGE CELL CARCINOMA. They are dealt with collectively because of their shared treatment strategy.Lung Transplantation: The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.Aneurysm, Ruptured: The tearing or bursting of the weakened wall of the aneurysmal sac, usually heralded by sudden worsening pain. The great danger of a ruptured aneurysm is the large amount of blood spilling into the surrounding tissues and cavities, causing HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK.Acute Lung Injury: A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).Stomach Rupture: Bursting of the STOMACH.Tendon Injuries: Injuries to the fibrous cords of connective tissue which attach muscles to bones or other structures.Lung Volume Measurements: Measurement of the amount of air that the lungs may contain at various points in the respiratory cycle.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Lung Diseases, Interstitial: A diverse group of lung diseases that affect the lung parenchyma. They are characterized by an initial inflammation of PULMONARY ALVEOLI that extends to the interstitium and beyond leading to diffuse PULMONARY FIBROSIS. Interstitial lung diseases are classified by their etiology (known or unknown causes), and radiological-pathological features.Hemoperitoneum: Accumulations of blood in the PERITONEAL CAVITY due to internal HEMORRHAGE.Achilles Tendon: A fibrous cord that connects the muscles in the back of the calf to the HEEL BONE.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Intracranial Aneurysm: Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)Total Lung Capacity: The volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration. It is the equivalent to each of the following sums: VITAL CAPACITY plus RESIDUAL VOLUME; INSPIRATORY CAPACITY plus FUNCTIONAL RESIDUAL CAPACITY; TIDAL VOLUME plus INSPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus functional residual capacity; or tidal volume plus inspiratory reserve volume plus EXPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus residual volume.Extravascular Lung Water: Water content outside of the lung vasculature. About 80% of a normal lung is made up of water, including intracellular, interstitial, and blood water. Failure to maintain the normal homeostatic fluid exchange between the vascular space and the interstitium of the lungs can result in PULMONARY EDEMA and flooding of the alveolar space.Pulmonary Alveoli: Small polyhedral outpouchings along the walls of the alveolar sacs, alveolar ducts and terminal bronchioles through the walls of which gas exchange between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood takes place.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid: Washing liquid obtained from irrigation of the lung, including the BRONCHI and the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. It is generally used to assess biochemical, inflammatory, or infection status of the lung.Small Cell Lung Carcinoma: A form of highly malignant lung cancer that is composed of small ovoid cells (SMALL CELL CARCINOMA).Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Carcinoma, Small Cell: An anaplastic, highly malignant, and usually bronchogenic carcinoma composed of small ovoid cells with scanty neoplasm. It is characterized by a dominant, deeply basophilic nucleus, and absent or indistinct nucleoli. (From Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1286-7)Lung Abscess: Solitary or multiple collections of PUS within the lung parenchyma as a result of infection by bacteria, protozoa, or other agents.Pulmonary Fibrosis: A process in which normal lung tissues are progressively replaced by FIBROBLASTS and COLLAGEN causing an irreversible loss of the ability to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream via PULMONARY ALVEOLI. Patients show progressive DYSPNEA finally resulting in death.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury: Lung damage that is caused by the adverse effects of PULMONARY VENTILATOR usage. The high frequency and tidal volumes produced by a mechanical ventilator can cause alveolar disruption and PULMONARY EDEMA.Aortography: Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.Aneurysm, False: Not an aneurysm but a well-defined collection of blood and CONNECTIVE TISSUE outside the wall of a blood vessel or the heart. It is the containment of a ruptured blood vessel or heart, such as sealing a rupture of the left ventricle. False aneurysm is formed by organized THROMBUS and HEMATOMA in surrounding tissue.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Lung Diseases, Obstructive: Any disorder marked by obstruction of conducting airways of the lung. AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION may be acute, chronic, intermittent, or persistent.Heart Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the heart.Mice, Inbred C57BLRespiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Pulmonary Edema: Excessive accumulation of extravascular fluid in the lung, an indication of a serious underlying disease or disorder. Pulmonary edema prevents efficient PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE in the PULMONARY ALVEOLI, and can be life-threatening.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Pneumonia: Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult: A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.Vaginal Birth after Cesarean: Delivery of an infant through the vagina in a female who has had a prior cesarean section.Farmer's Lung: A form of alveolitis or pneumonitis due to an acquired hypersensitivity to inhaled antigens associated with farm environment. Antigens in the farm dust are commonly from bacteria actinomycetes (SACCHAROPOLYSPORA and THERMOACTINOMYCES), fungi, and animal proteins in the soil, straw, crops, pelts, serum, and excreta.Aneurysm: Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.Chordae Tendineae: The tendinous cords that connect each cusp of the two atrioventricular HEART VALVES to appropriate PAPILLARY MUSCLES in the HEART VENTRICLES, preventing the valves from reversing themselves when the ventricles contract.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the THORACIC AORTA. This proximal descending portion of aorta gives rise to the visceral and the parietal branches above the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Extraembryonic Membranes: The thin layers of tissue that surround the developing embryo. There are four extra-embryonic membranes commonly found in VERTEBRATES, such as REPTILES; BIRDS; and MAMMALS. They are the YOLK SAC, the ALLANTOIS, the AMNION, and the CHORION. These membranes provide protection and means to transport nutrients and wastes.Carcinoma, Lewis Lung: A carcinoma discovered by Dr. Margaret R. Lewis of the Wistar Institute in 1951. This tumor originated spontaneously as a carcinoma of the lung of a C57BL mouse. The tumor does not appear to be grossly hemorrhagic and the majority of the tumor tissue is a semifirm homogeneous mass. (From Cancer Chemother Rep 2 1972 Nov;(3)1:325) It is also called 3LL and LLC and is used as a transplantable malignancy.Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the posteromedial portion of the lateral condyle of the femur, passes anteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the depression in front of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia.Bronchi: The larger air passages of the lungs arising from the terminal bifurcation of the TRACHEA. They include the largest two primary bronchi which branch out into secondary bronchi, and tertiary bronchi which extend into BRONCHIOLES and PULMONARY ALVEOLI.Pulmonary Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.Pneumonectomy: The excision of lung tissue including partial or total lung lobectomy.Hematoma: A collection of blood outside the BLOOD VESSELS. Hematoma can be localized in an organ, space, or tissue.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Pulmonary Emphysema: Enlargement of air spaces distal to the TERMINAL BRONCHIOLES where gas-exchange normally takes place. This is usually due to destruction of the alveolar wall. Pulmonary emphysema can be classified by the location and distribution of the lesions.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Pulmonary Surfactants: Substances and drugs that lower the SURFACE TENSION of the mucoid layer lining the PULMONARY ALVEOLI.Hernia, Diaphragmatic, Traumatic: The type of DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA caused by TRAUMA or injury, usually to the ABDOMEN.Respiratory Mucosa: The mucous membrane lining the RESPIRATORY TRACT, including the NASAL CAVITY; the LARYNX; the TRACHEA; and the BRONCHI tree. The respiratory mucosa consists of various types of epithelial cells ranging from ciliated columnar to simple squamous, mucous GOBLET CELLS, and glands containing both mucous and serous cells.Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Bleeding into the intracranial or spinal SUBARACHNOID SPACE, most resulting from INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM rupture. It can occur after traumatic injuries (SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC). Clinical features include HEADACHE; NAUSEA; VOMITING, nuchal rigidity, variable neurological deficits and reduced mental status.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Plaque, Atherosclerotic: Lesions formed within the walls of ARTERIES.Aneurysm, Dissecting: Aneurysm caused by a tear in the TUNICA INTIMA of a blood vessel leading to interstitial HEMORRHAGE, and splitting (dissecting) of the vessel wall, often involving the AORTA. Dissection between the intima and media causes luminal occlusion. Dissection at the media, or between the media and the outer adventitia causes aneurismal dilation.Trial of Labor: Allowing a woman to be in LABOR, OBSTETRIC long enough to determine if vaginal birth may be anticipated.Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Cardiac Tamponade: Compression of the heart by accumulated fluid (PERICARDIAL EFFUSION) or blood (HEMOPERICARDIUM) in the PERICARDIUM surrounding the heart. The affected cardiac functions and CARDIAC OUTPUT can range from minimal to total hemodynamic collapse.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Macrophages, Alveolar: Round, granular, mononuclear phagocytes found in the alveoli of the lungs. They ingest small inhaled particles resulting in degradation and presentation of the antigen to immunocompetent cells.Splenectomy: Surgical procedure involving either partial or entire removal of the spleen.Lung Diseases, Fungal: Pulmonary diseases caused by fungal infections, usually through hematogenous spread.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Knee Injuries: Injuries to the knee or the knee joint.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Endovascular Procedures: Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.Splenic DiseasesMice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Chorioamnionitis: INFLAMMATION of the placental membranes (CHORION; AMNION) and connected tissues such as fetal BLOOD VESSELS and UMBILICAL CORD. It is often associated with intrauterine ascending infections during PREGNANCY.Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Forced Expiratory Volume: Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.Bronchoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.Vital Capacity: The volume of air that is exhaled by a maximal expiration following a maximal inspiration.Mice, Inbred BALB CCase-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Hyperoxia: An abnormal increase in the amount of oxygen in the tissues and organs.Bronchoalveolar Lavage: Washing out of the lungs with saline or mucolytic agents for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It is very useful in the diagnosis of diffuse pulmonary infiltrates in immunosuppressed patients.Esophageal Diseases: Pathological processes in the ESOPHAGUS.Hemothorax: Hemorrhage within the pleural cavity.Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Heart Aneurysm: A localized bulging or dilatation in the muscle wall of a heart (MYOCARDIUM), usually in the LEFT VENTRICLE. Blood-filled aneurysms are dangerous because they may burst. Fibrous aneurysms interfere with the heart function through the loss of contractility. True aneurysm is bound by the vessel wall or cardiac wall. False aneurysms are HEMATOMA caused by myocardial rupture.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Aerosols: Colloids with a gaseous dispersing phase and either liquid (fog) or solid (smoke) dispersed phase; used in fumigation or in inhalation therapy; may contain propellant agents.Administration, Inhalation: The administration of drugs by the respiratory route. It includes insufflation into the respiratory tract.Abdominal Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving organs in the abdominal cavity.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Bleomycin: A complex of related glycopeptide antibiotics from Streptomyces verticillus consisting of bleomycin A2 and B2. It inhibits DNA metabolism and is used as an antineoplastic, especially for solid tumors.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Pericardial Effusion: Fluid accumulation within the PERICARDIUM. Serous effusions are associated with pericardial diseases. Hemopericardium is associated with trauma. Lipid-containing effusion (chylopericardium) results from leakage of THORACIC DUCT. Severe cases can lead to CARDIAC TAMPONADE.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Pulmonary Gas Exchange: The exchange of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood that occurs across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.Aneurysm, Infected: Aneurysm due to growth of microorganisms in the arterial wall, or infection arising within preexisting arteriosclerotic aneurysms.Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Carcinoma, Large Cell: A tumor of undifferentiated (anaplastic) cells of large size. It is usually bronchogenic. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Carcinoma, Squamous Cell: A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Obstetric Labor, Premature: Onset of OBSTETRIC LABOR before term (TERM BIRTH) but usually after the FETUS has become viable. In humans, it occurs sometime during the 29th through 38th week of PREGNANCY. TOCOLYSIS inhibits premature labor and can prevent the BIRTH of premature infants (INFANT, PREMATURE).Fetal Organ Maturity: Functional competence of specific organs or body systems of the FETUS in utero.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Neutrophils: Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.Amnion: The innermost membranous sac that surrounds and protects the developing embryo which is bathed in the AMNIOTIC FLUID. Amnion cells are secretory EPITHELIAL CELLS and contribute to the amniotic fluid.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Posterior Capsular Rupture, Ocular: A breach in the continuity of the posterior chamber of the eyeball.Echinococcosis, Hepatic: Liver disease caused by infections with parasitic tapeworms of the genus ECHINOCOCCUS, such as Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multilocularis. Ingested Echinococcus ova burrow into the intestinal mucosa. The larval migration to the liver via the PORTAL VEIN leads to watery vesicles (HYDATID CYST).Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Labor, Induced: Artificially induced UTERINE CONTRACTION. Generally, LABOR, OBSTETRIC is induced with the intent to cause delivery of the fetus and termination of pregnancy.Abdomen, Acute: A clinical syndrome with acute abdominal pain that is severe, localized, and rapid in onset. Acute abdomen may be caused by a variety of disorders, injuries, or diseases.Amniotic Fluid: A clear, yellowish liquid that envelopes the FETUS inside the sac of AMNION. In the first trimester, it is likely a transudate of maternal or fetal plasma. In the second trimester, amniotic fluid derives primarily from fetal lung and kidney. Cells or substances in this fluid can be removed for prenatal diagnostic tests (AMNIOCENTESIS).Tidal Volume: The volume of air inspired or expired during each normal, quiet respiratory cycle. Common abbreviations are TV or V with subscript T.Hernia, Diaphragmatic: Protrusion of abdominal structures into the THORAX as a result of congenital or traumatic defects in the respiratory DIAPHRAGM.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Urinary Bladder Diseases: Pathological processes of the URINARY BLADDER.National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts and supports research program related to diseases of the heart, blood vessels, lung, and blood; blood resources; and SLEEP WAKE DISORDERS. From 1948 until October 10, 1969, it was known as the National Heart Institute. From June 25, 1976, it was the National Heart and Lung Institute. Since October 1997, the NHLBI has also had administrative responsibility for the NIH Woman's Health Initiative.ElastinUterine Myomectomy: Surgical removal of a LEIOMYOMA of the UTERUS.Abdominal Pain: Sensation of discomfort, distress, or agony in the abdominal region.Cystic Fibrosis: An autosomal recessive genetic disease of the EXOCRINE GLANDS. It is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CYSTIC FIBROSIS TRANSMEMBRANE CONDUCTANCE REGULATOR expressed in several organs including the LUNG, the PANCREAS, the BILIARY SYSTEM, and the SWEAT GLANDS. Cystic fibrosis is characterized by epithelial secretory dysfunction associated with ductal obstruction resulting in AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION; chronic RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS; PANCREATIC INSUFFICIENCY; maldigestion; salt depletion; and HEAT PROSTRATION.Bronchiolitis Obliterans: Inflammation of the BRONCHIOLES leading to an obstructive lung disease. Bronchioles are characterized by fibrous granulation tissue with bronchial exudates in the lumens. Clinical features include a nonproductive cough and DYSPNEA.Matrix Metalloproteinase 9: An endopeptidase that is structurally similar to MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE 2. It degrades GELATIN types I and V; COLLAGEN TYPE IV; and COLLAGEN TYPE V.Macrophages: The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive: A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.Hemoptysis: Expectoration or spitting of blood originating from any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT, usually from hemorrhage in the lung parenchyma (PULMONARY ALVEOLI) and the BRONCHIAL ARTERIES.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Pulmonary Atelectasis: Absence of air in the entire or part of a lung, such as an incompletely inflated neonate lung or a collapsed adult lung. Pulmonary atelectasis can be caused by airway obstruction, lung compression, fibrotic contraction, or other factors.Adenocarcinoma, Bronchiolo-Alveolar: A carcinoma thought to be derived from epithelium of terminal bronchioles, in which the neoplastic tissue extends along the alveolar walls and grows in small masses within the alveoli. Involvement may be uniformly diffuse and massive, or nodular, or lobular. The neoplastic cells are cuboidal or columnar and form papillary structures. Mucin may be demonstrated in some of the cells and in the material in the alveoli, which also includes denuded cells. Metastases in regional lymph nodes, and in even more distant sites, are known to occur, but are infrequent. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Tendons: Fibrous bands or cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE at the ends of SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS that serve to attach the MUSCLES to bones and other structures.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Pleural DiseasesElasticity: Resistance and recovery from distortion of shape.Emphysema: A pathological accumulation of air in tissues or organs.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Spirometry: Measurement of volume of air inhaled or exhaled by the lung.Iatrogenic Disease: Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.Blood-Air Barrier: The barrier between capillary blood and alveolar air comprising the alveolar EPITHELIUM and capillary ENDOTHELIUM with their adherent BASEMENT MEMBRANE and EPITHELIAL CELL cytoplasm. PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE occurs across this membrane.Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity: The amount of a gas taken up, by the pulmonary capillary blood from the alveolar gas, per minute per unit of average pressure of the gradient of the gas across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.Tendon Transfer: Surgical procedure by which a tendon is incised at its insertion and placed at an anatomical site distant from the original insertion. The tendon remains attached at the point of origin and takes over the function of a muscle inactivated by trauma or disease.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Oligohydramnios: A condition of abnormally low AMNIOTIC FLUID volume. Principal causes include malformations of fetal URINARY TRACT; FETAL GROWTH RETARDATION; GESTATIONAL HYPERTENSION; nicotine poisoning; and PROLONGED PREGNANCY.Patellar Ligament: A band of fibrous tissue that attaches the apex of the PATELLA to the lower part of the tubercle of the TIBIA. The ligament is actually the caudal continuation of the common tendon of the QUADRICEPS FEMORIS. The patella is embedded in that tendon. As such, the patellar ligament can be thought of as connecting the quadriceps femoris tendon to the tibia, and therefore it is sometimes called the patellar tendon.Pneumothorax: An accumulation of air or gas in the PLEURAL CAVITY, which may occur spontaneously or as a result of trauma or a pathological process. The gas may also be introduced deliberately during PNEUMOTHORAX, ARTIFICIAL.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Casts, Surgical: Dressings made of fiberglass, plastic, or bandage impregnated with plaster of paris used for immobilization of various parts of the body in cases of fractures, dislocations, and infected wounds. In comparison with plaster casts, casts made of fiberglass or plastic are lightweight, radiolucent, able to withstand moisture, and less rigid.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Tendinopathy: Clinical syndrome describing overuse tendon injuries characterized by a combination of PAIN, diffuse or localized swelling, and impaired performance. Distinguishing tendinosis from tendinitis is clinically difficult and can be made only after histopathological examination.Tissue Adhesives: Substances used to cause adherence of tissue to tissue or tissue to non-tissue surfaces, as for prostheses.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Capillary Permeability: The property of blood capillary ENDOTHELIUM that allows for the selective exchange of substances between the blood and surrounding tissues and through membranous barriers such as the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER; BLOOD-AQUEOUS BARRIER; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; BLOOD-NERVE BARRIER; BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER; and BLOOD-TESTIS BARRIER. Small lipid-soluble molecules such as carbon dioxide and oxygen move freely by diffusion. Water and water-soluble molecules cannot pass through the endothelial walls and are dependent on microscopic pores. These pores show narrow areas (TIGHT JUNCTIONS) which may limit large molecule movement.Brachiocephalic Trunk: The first and largest artery branching from the aortic arch. It distributes blood to the right side of the head and neck and to the right arm.Labor, Obstetric: The repetitive uterine contraction during childbirth which is associated with the progressive dilation of the uterine cervix (CERVIX UTERI). Successful labor results in the expulsion of the FETUS and PLACENTA. Obstetric labor can be spontaneous or induced (LABOR, INDUCED).Atherosclerosis: A thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES that occurs with formation of ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES within the ARTERIAL INTIMA.Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: A heterogeneous group of autosomally inherited COLLAGEN DISEASES caused by defects in the synthesis or structure of FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. There are numerous subtypes: classical, hypermobility, vascular, and others. Common clinical features include hyperextensible skin and joints, skin fragility and reduced wound healing capability.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
... the first traits of the lung appear. Hepatic plate, the first traits of the liver appear. Buccopharyngeal membrane ruptures. ... Lungs begin to form. The brain continues to develop. Arms and legs have lengthened with foot and hand areas distinguishable. ... Alveoli (air sacs) are forming in lungs. Gestational age: 24 weeks old. Embryonic age: Week nr 25. 24 weeks old. The fetus ... Rhythmic breathing movements occur, but lungs are not fully mature. Thalamic brain connections, which mediate sensory input, ...
Arteries and certain organs such as the intestines and uterus are also fragile and prone to rupture. People with this type ... collapse of a lung); recession of the gums; and a decreased amount of fat under the skin. Kyphoscoliosis EDS - associated with ... Affected people may also have easy bruising; fragile arteries that are prone to rupture; unusually small corneas; and ... bladder rupture, or poor wound healing. Inheritance patterns in this group include X-linked recessive, autosomal dominant, and ...
This places great pressure on the lung tissue which can rupture. U. Joseph Schoepf; "6.4.9.5 Expiratory Hyperinflation - Air ... In the classic presentation, the lung will appear normal at inspiration, but on exhalation, the diseased portions of the lung ... On diving the lung volume collapses and pushes air into the poorly aerated regions. On arising from a deep depth, these air- ... Air trapping represents poorly aerated lung, but on its own is clinically benign. It is a common problem for smokers who dive. ...
A pneumatocele results when a lung laceration, a cut or tear in the lung tissue, fills with air. A rupture of a small airway ... A pneumatocele is a cavity in the lung parenchyma filled with air that may result from pulmonary trauma during mechanical ... In some cases, both pneumatoceles and hematomas exist in the same injured lung. A pneumatocele can become enlarged, for example ... Differential diagnoses, other conditions that could cause similar symptoms as pneumatocele, include lung cancer, tuberculosis, ...
The brain and nervous system are not affected pathologically, but lung and, rarely, kidney impairment may occur. Patients in ... While painless, enlargement of spleen increases the risk of splenic rupture. Hypersplenism and pancytopenia, the rapid and ... Enlarged liver and grossly enlarged spleen (together hepatosplenomegaly) are common; the spleen can rupture and cause ... lungs, brain, and bone marrow. Manifestations may include enlarged spleen and liver, liver malfunction, skeletal disorders or ...
Once ruptured, the exposed pigments cause a foreign body reaction and inflammation. This pigment deposition also invokes ... Stiffening of the ribs with decreased lung function has also been reported. The intravertebral cartilage is also more prone to ... Connective tissue: Hardening of tendons and ligaments can predispose them to rupture. Color changes in the joints can be ...
Nodules can form in lungs surrounding these spherules. When they rupture, they release their contents into bronchi, forming ... Chest x-rays rarely demonstrate nodules or cavities in the lungs, but these images commonly demonstrate lung opacification, ... Rupture of spherules release these endospores, which in turn repeat the cycle and spread the infection to adjacent tissues ... Severe lung disease may develop in HIV-infected persons. After Coccidioides infection, coccidioidomycosis begins with Valley ...
Ruptured schizonts may induce granulomatous reactions in the surrounding tissues. Clinically the majority of birds affected ... Megaloschizonts appear as grey-white nodules found in the heart, liver, lung or spleen. Microscopically there is ischemic ... elongate forms Megaloschizont in lung[permanent dead link] Gametocyte images Gametocyte images Bennett, GF (1993). " ...
Spread of the disease to distant lymph nodes, large blood vessels, and the lungs may occur. An aneurysm of a great vessel can ... rupture and cause sudden death. Grooters A (2003). "Pythiosis, lagenidiosis, and zygomycosis in small animals". Vet Clin North ...
The compressed gas in the lungs expands as the ambient pressure decreases causing the lungs to over-expand and rupture unless ... which are commonly called burst lung or lung overpressure injury by divers. To equalise the lungs, all that is necessary is not ... Ventilator induced lung injury (VILI) is a condition caused by over-expansion of the lungs by mechanical ventilation used when ... Some people have pathologies of the lung which prevent rapid flow of excess air through the passages, which can lead to lung ...
... is created when air bursts or ruptures through tissue from the alveoli and bronchioles into the perivascular tissue of the lung ... Pulmonary interstitial emphysema is more frequent in premature infants who require mechanical ventilation for severe lung ... This collection of air develops as a result of alveolar and terminal bronchiolar rupture. ...
A deposit of tuberculosis was found at the base of his left lung. Odlum's first, third and fifth ribs were broken. The cause of ... The autopsy revealed that Odlum's spleen, liver and kidneys were ruptured. ...
Five days later, DeRudder, a resident of Westville, Illinois would die from a ruptured lung. Ethiopia's Emperor Haile Selassie ...
... the blood going to the lungs has to be diverted from the pulmonary vasculature and lung function taken care of by a machine. ... If the surgeon dissects too deeply into the vessel wall the pulmonary vessels may rupture. If the surgeon does not dissect deep ... The right lung is typically done first. At the end an almost beautiful negative of the pulmonary arteries exists-as the emboli ... The challenge for the ICU physician thus is getting the extra water out of the lungs, (for which they make use of the strong ...
He ruptured his achilles which caused blood clots to go to his heart and lungs. She carries a scarf printed with a ...
If the person tries to hold their breath during decompression, the lungs may rupture internally. International Space Station ... The lungs also collapse in this process, but will continue to release water vapour leading to cooling and ice formation in the ...
He suffered a fractured wrist, bruised lung and liver, whiplash, ruptured spleen and a concussion. Ricky Carmichael won the ...
The ruptured lungs were a sure indicator that the air cabin depressurised because the sudden decrease in pressure would cause ... These injuries consisted of fractured skulls and ruptured and otherwise damaged lungs. Fornari found no evidence of an ... the lungs to expand until they rupture. To support the theory and also to confirm the cause of the skull fractures, the crash ... To simulate the crash, the investigators deliberately ruptured the model by increasing the air pressure within it until it ...
The cause of death of both passengers was ruptures to their lungs. A verdict of Accidental death was given in both cases. The ...
Pulmonary barotrauma is lung injury that results from the hyperinflation of alveoli past the rupture point. The effects of PEEP ... is sometimes used to improve hypoxemia or reduce ventilator-associated lung injury in patients with acute lung injury, acute ... Smith, TC; Marini, JJ (1988). "Impact of PEEP on lung mechanics and work of breathing in severe airflow obstruction". J Appl ... 2004). "Pattern of lung emptying and expiratory resistance in mechanically ventilated patients with chronic obstructive ...
They spend between 14 and 17 days migrating through the liver and lungs. At this point, they are coughed up and re-swallowed, ... Severe infestations of adult P. equorum can also cause colic, intestinal blockage and potential intestinal rupture. Feed ... Horses may develop a cough and a nasal discharge during the lung migration stage. Scarring of internal organs, particularly the ... From there, they migrate to the lungs, where they emerge from blood vessels into the alveoli. ...
... which may lead to alveolar rupture and hemodynamic compromise. Airflow obstruction during expiration slows lung emptying and ... The phenomenon that occurs when a new breath begins before the lung has reached the static equilibrium volume is called dynamic ... Dynamic hyperinflation is a phenomenon that occurs when a new breath begins before the lung has reached the static equilibrium ... It is a physiologic response to airflow obstruction and exists, to an extent, because increasing lung volume tends to increase ...
From here, the air tracks to the hilum of the lung and then to the mediastinum. In case of a pericardial tear, this air enters ... Increased pressure leads to alveolar rupture, resulting in air getting through to the pericapillary interstitial pulmonary ... This condition has been recognized in preterm neonates, in which it is associated with severe lung pathology, after vigorous ...
Rupture of the ventricular dividing wall or left ventricular wall may occur within the initial weeks. Dressler's syndrome, a ... Causes of sudden-onset breathlessness generally involve the lungs or heart - including pulmonary edema, pneumonia, allergic ... Play media The most common cause of a myocardial infarction is the rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque on an artery supplying ... Plaques can become unstable, rupture, and additionally promote the formation of a blood clot that blocks the artery; this can ...
This in turn allowed his ruptured lung to re-expand, effectively saving his life. He subsequently had surgery to permanently ... Stevens, Mark (12 July 2007). "Lung surgery for Petterd". Herald Sun. News Ltd. Retrieved 9 April 2014. Paton, Al (4 May 2010 ... repair the lung. Petterd suffered another season-ending injury with Melbourne in May 2010, when he suffered a dislocated right ...
The documented adverse effects of filgrastim include splenic rupture (indicated by left upper abdominal or shoulder pain, risk ... The most common severe adverse reactions were pulmonary edema/deep vein thrombosis, splenic rupture, and myocardial infarction ...
We report a case of an adult patient who presented with delayed splenic rupture necessitating splenectomy, 2 months following ... Delayed splenic rupture following conservative management of splenic injury is an extremely rare complication. ... Contusions; Hernia, Inguinal; Humans; Lacerations; Lung Injury; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Trauma; Skiing; Spleen; Splenectomy ... Delayed splenic rupture following conservative management of splenic injury is an extremely rare complication. We report a case ...
Rupture of Lung without External Signs of Trauma Br Med J 1933; 1 :938 ... Rupture of Lung without External Signs of Trauma. Br Med J 1933; 1 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.1.3777.938-a (Published 27 ...
Emergent Completion Pneumonectomy for Postoperative Hemorrhage from Rupture of the Infected Pulmonary Artery in Lung Cancer ... "Emergent Completion Pneumonectomy for Postoperative Hemorrhage from Rupture of the Infected Pulmonary Artery in Lung Cancer ...
low birth weight lung problems placental abruption pregnancy premature delievery rupture of membrane preterm reduces the ... Search rupture delievery preterm weight premature infant lung matching in title, tags, annotations and url of group items » ... Health and Fitness Club/ Group items tagged rupture delievery preterm weight premature infant lung. #main{background:#fff; ...
Lung MDA and MPO. Lung tissue MDA level was significantly increased to nmol/g in the S/C group from nmol/g in the sham groups ( ... Likewise, lung MPO level increased to ng/mL in the S/C group from ng/mL in the sham group and decreased to ng/mL in the S/C + ... Lung Injury. Histopathological examination of the lung tissues revealed normal lung tissue in the sham groups but diffused ... as well as lung MPO and MDA values decreased significantly (. ). In the lung tissues, histological injury scores and lung ...
Empyema necessitans and a persistent air leak associated with rupture of an anaerobic lung abscess due to bacteroides ... Correction: Empyema necessitans and a persistent air leak associated with rupture of an anaerobic lung abscess due to ... Empyema necessitans and a persistent air leak associated with rupture of an anaerobic lung abscess due to bacteroides ...
Lungs and Breathing. 09/12/2019 Lungs and Breathing Statins could protect older patients from severe pneumonia, study finds ... The cardiologist Aitor Jiménez has managed to gather and characterise in detail 110 cases of cardiac rupture (CR), after ... Correlación clínica y patológica (Cardiac rupture in acute myocardial infarction. Clinical and pathological correlation). ...
Treating stage III non-small cell lung cancer. Take Quiz. Lung function post-radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung ... Pathology & clinical presentation of small cell lung cancer. Take Quiz. Staging & imaging of small cell lung cancer. Take Quiz ... Understanding lung cancer Take Quiz. Advanced & previously treated NSCLC: The OAK & POPLAR trials by Bobby Daly, MD, MBA. Take ... Lung cancer: The role of imaging studies & chest CT. Take Quiz. ... Trends in lung cancer mortality. Take Quiz. Lung cancer ...
Rupture of Tuberculous Aortic Aneurysm Into Lung. deProphetis, Nino; Armitage, Harry V.; Triboletti, Eleanor D. ...
... the major airways leading to the lungs. A tear can also occur in the tissue lining the windpipe. ... A tracheal or bronchial rupture is a tear or break in the windpipe (trachea) or bronchial tubes, ... A collapsed lung is treated with a chest tube connected to suction, which re-expands the lung. ... A tracheal or bronchial rupture is a tear or break in the windpipe (trachea) or bronchial tubes, the major airways leading to ...
What Causes Water Build-up in the Lungs?. * Q: How Do You Heal a Ruptured Disc?. ...
A ruptured spleen can cause death. * Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). ARDS is a serious lung problem. ... Spleen rupture. Your spleen may become enlarged and can rupture. ...
Is Upper Right Back Pain a Symptom of Lung Cancer? How Can You Fix Bone Spurs in the Shoulder Without Surgery? ... What Are the Symptoms of a Ruptured Ovarian Cyst? What Is a Denver Steak? ...
H. Primary Lung Disease (COPD, Asthma, ILD).*I. Gastrointestinal or Nutrition Issues.*J. Hematologic or Coagulation Issues.*K. ... Thus, diagnosis and recognition of esophageal rupture is difficult and often missed. Esophageal rupture is a life threatening ... severity of rupture, subsequent comorbitidies from the rupture, patients clinical condition and presence of underlying ... If esophageal rupture occurs at or near the site of an esophageal malignancy, the patient will likely need esophageal resection ...
Left diaphragm rupture (blunt) with stomach & spleen herniation.. trauma.org. Lung hernia, chest wall defect - 01. Lung hernia ... Lung hernia, chest wall defect - 02. Lung hernia and chest wall defect ...
Pneumonia with lung abscess 9. Catamenial 10. Asthma, secondary to mucous plugging 11. Lung cancer 12. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis ... Subpleural bleb rupture 2. Secondary 1. Bullous disease, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease 2. Cystic fibrosis 3. ... Spontaneous rupture of the esophagus 4. Marfans syndrome 5. Eosinophilic granuloma 6. Pneumocystis carinii, especially in ... Transbronchial lung biopsy 4. Thoracocentesis 5. Chest tube malfunction 6. After laparoscopic surgery 2. Barotrauma 3. ...
Potential serious side effects include spleen rupture and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). More common side effects ... Spleen rupture While taking Neulasta, your spleen may enlarge and can rupture. You can die from a ruptured spleen. ... ARDS is a serious lung problem. If you experience shortness of breath, trouble breathing, or a fast rate of breathing, call ... you should be aware of some of the potential side effects such as spleen rupture and ARDS. ...
Tracheal rupture. 51. Double lumen tube for a single lung ventilation. 52. Airway management in lung transplantation. 53. ... Whole lung lavage. Part VII. When the Airway Goes Bad:. 57. Unexpected regurgitation and aspiration. 58. Airway fire. 59. ... Pulmonary artery rupture. 54. Regional anesthesia in the difficult airway patient. 55. Channel-blade videolaryngoscopy for ... The consequences of failure to adequately oxygenate a patient and ventilate their lungs during surgery can be catastrophic. ...
... the first traits of the lung appear. Hepatic plate, the first traits of the liver appear. Buccopharyngeal membrane ruptures. ... Lungs begin to form. The brain continues to develop. Arms and legs have lengthened with foot and hand areas distinguishable. ... Alveoli (air sacs) are forming in lungs. Gestational age: 24 weeks old. Embryonic age: Week nr 25. 24 weeks old. The fetus ... Rhythmic breathing movements occur, but lungs are not fully mature. Thalamic brain connections, which mediate sensory input, ...
... surgery is rarely needed if albendazole is continued following rupture . Kurkcuoglu [6] reports the rupture of hydatid lung in ... Few reports of a rupture following treatment with albendazole are available [4,5]. Deepak Talwar reported cyst rupture while ... There has been no report of major anaphylaxis following rupture of pulmonary cyst. Galankis E et al [5 ] reports that rupture ... The rupture may be curative in some but the patients need to be followed for regrowth or development of spillage induced ...
Fatal splenic rupture: Evaluate patients who report left upper abdominal or shoulder pain for an enlarged spleen or splenic ... rupture.. *Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): Evaluate patients who develop fever, lung infiltrates, or respiratory ...
Myocardial rupture: the heart attack damages the wall of the heart, meaning an increased risk of a heart wall rupture. ... Pulmonary edema: fluid accumulates in and around the lungs.. * DVT or deep vein thrombosis: the deep veins of the legs and ...
... space between the chest wall and the lung) if there is lung collapse ... Rupture or tear in the airway. *Rupture or tear in the esophagus or gastrointestinal tract ...
  • However, highly curved surfactant-covered interfaces are ubiquitous in physiology and technology in emulsions ( 13 ), foams ( 14 ), aerosols ( 15 ), and at the air-liquid interface of lung alveoli ( 16 ). (pnas.org)
  • Instead, the pus forms into sacs that line the pleura , eventually scarring the cavity and severely impairing lung function. (petmd.com)
  • Cats generally get these types of infections from bite wounds, but they can also get them from inhaling foreign bodies, or from the spread of a lung infection, such as pneumonia, into the chest cavity. (petmd.com)
  • These images will show fluid in the chest cavity, possible lung hardening (consolidation), lung collapse, and/or masses. (petmd.com)
  • FDA warns about increased risk of ruptures or tears in the aorta blood vessel with fluoroquinolone antibiotics in certain patients. (medscape.com)
  • [12-20-A U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) review found that fluoroquinolone antibiotics can increase the occurrence of rare but serious events of ruptures or tears in the main artery of the body, called the aorta. (fda.gov)
  • A collapsed lung is treated with a chest tube connected to suction, which re-expands the lung. (medlineplus.gov)
  • CT Chest - may show full thickness tear of the esophagus with leakage of contrast into the mediastinum, pneumomediastinum, as well as the same lung pathology that can be seen on CXR. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • The rupture resulted is sudden cough (n= 6), breathlessness (n=3), chest pain ( n= 2) and wheezing (n= 2) accompanied by expectoration of a salty fluid containing whitish membrane like structures. (ispub.com)
  • The pleural space plays an important role in respiration by coupling the movement of the chest wall with that of the lungs in two ways. (medscape.com)
  • We communicated safety information associated with fluoroquinolones in July 2018 (significant decreases in blood sugar and certain mental health side effects), July 2016 (disabling side effects of the tendons, muscles, joints, nerves, and central nervous system), May 2016 (restricting use for certain uncomplicated infections), August 2013 (peripheral neuropathy), and July 2008 (tendinitis and tendon rupture). (fda.gov)
  • I had spontaneous tendon ruptures. (sott.net)
  • I had multiple tendon ruptures in my ankle where I was just sitting there and they ruptured. (sott.net)
  • Our study provides a mechanic rationale for clinical testing of whether currently available aldosterone antagonist drugs administered immediately after the diagnosis of MI can reduce acute mortality, by minimizing the likelihood of myocardial rupture. (ahajournals.org)
  • Here, we show that, as the radius of a clinical lung surfactant monolayer-covered bubble decreases to ∼100 µm, the monolayer morphology changes from dispersed circular liquid-condensed (LC) domains in a continuous liquid-expanded (LE) matrix to a continuous LC linear mesh separating discontinuous LE domains. (pnas.org)
  • It is likely due to the anisotropic bending energy of the LC phase of the saturated phospholipids that are common to all natural and clinical lung surfactants. (pnas.org)
  • Therefore, we reviewed the clinical course and outcomes of pregnancies following membrane rupture occurring before 24 weeks' gestation and with a membrane rupture to delivery interval (latent period) of 14 days or more. (bmj.com)
  • Uterine rupture is a full-thickness separation of the uterine wall and the overlying serosa. (terrybryant.com)
  • Though rare, during childbirth uterine rupture is often deadly to the infant and mother. (terrybryant.com)
  • If you suffered from a uterine rupture, contact the Houston birth injury lawyers at Terry Bryant Accident & Injury Law. (terrybryant.com)
  • Patients older than 50 years with sudden onset of abdominal pain should be presumed to have a ruptured AAA and should receive attentive airway management and vigorous fluid resuscitation, as indicated. (medscape.com)
  • We report a unique case in which a retropharyngeal hematoma occurred secondary to a ruptured ITA resulting in airway compromise that required endotracheal intubation. (hindawi.com)
  • Though the incidence of ruptured HCC has reduced in the recent past, owing to better early diagnosis , it is still remains a significant health problem in the east [ 4 , 5 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • Ruptured HCC is common in males between 44 and 68 years reflecting the general incidence of HCC [ 3 , 6 ] and is more common involving the left lobe due to the lesser anatomical span of the left lobe and the greater propensity to protrude and thereby chance of injury when compared to the relative safety under the ribcage on the right [ 7 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • the heart attack damages the wall of the heart, meaning an increased risk of a heart wall rupture. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • This toxic chemical can cause lung disease and contribute to heart disease. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Internationally acclaimed heart surgeon Stuart W. Jamieson will join the staff at UC San Diego Medical Center, a move that promises to vault the Hillcrest hospital to the forefront of heart and lung transplant research and procedures. (latimes.com)
  • Jamieson has performed about 500 heart transplants and more than 50 heart-lung transplants--a relatively new procedure first attempted only eight years ago. (latimes.com)
  • In addition, two agencies closely connected to the developing body of research in heart-lung transplants will relocate to San Diego to follow the accomplishments of Jamieson and his team. (latimes.com)
  • The International Registry for Heart Transplantation, which keeps records on heart and heart-lung transplants throughout the world, and the editorial offices of the bimonthly Journal of Heart Transplantation will move their offices here, according to officials at UCSD Medical Center. (latimes.com)
  • Jamieson, born in Rhodesia and educated in London, took a fellowship at Stanford University in 1978 and helped develop the fledgling field of heart-lung transplantation along with pre-eminent heart surgeon Norman Shumway. (latimes.com)
  • Crackling sounds can be heard in the lungs, and a galloping rythm of the heart. (medhelp.org)
  • His heart rate had a controlled ventricular response and his lungs were clear to auscultation. (hindawi.com)
  • Ethyl pyruvate may reduce systemic inflammatory response and lung injury which resulted from shock and ischemia/reperfusion in an experimental model of RAAA. (hindawi.com)
  • created an experimental model and demonstrated that supramesenteric aortic clamping and hemorrhagic shock, each of which is unable to cause lung damage individually, caused distant organ damage when they are together, as in the surgical treatment of RAAA, and they used this model in numerous experimental studies [ 2 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • However, the consequences would be small even if a one-stop referral pattern could be generally accomplished, due to the huge over-all mortality related to rAAA, hence an argument to find and treat AAA before rupture, e.g. by screening. (diva-portal.org)
  • We find enhanced MMP9 expression in cardiomyocytes isolated from the MI region in MI+Aldo wildtype mice, suggesting that myocardial MMP9 may be essential for enhancing rupture in the MI+Aldo model. (ahajournals.org)
  • Myocardial CaMKII inhibition, over-expression of methionine sulfoxide reductase A, an enzyme that reduces oxidized CaMKII, or NADPH oxidase knockout gave protection from aldosterone-enhanced post-MI cardiac rupture. (ahajournals.org)
  • The cardiologist Aitor Jiménez has managed to gather and characterise in detail 110 cases of cardiac rupture (CR), after spending 22 years (1978-2000) gathering data at the Hospital de Cruces, near Bilbao. (healthcanal.com)
  • We find that aldosterone exerts direct toxic actions on myocardium by oxidative activation of CaMKII, causing cardiac rupture and increased mortality in mice after MI (65.5% for aldosterone versus 31.0% for vehicle, P=0.007, n≥19 mice per treatment). (ahajournals.org)
  • We also identified increased MMP9 from myocardium in the MI region of patients who died of MI-related cardiac rupture, but not in patients who died of MI without rupture, suggesting that our findings in mice were relevant to patients. (ahajournals.org)
  • Her medical history was notable for hypothyroidism, anxiety, and a ruptured breast implant for which incomplete surgical resection and evacuation had been performed 10 years previously. (elsevier.com)
  • Parikh D, Samuel M. Congenital cystic lung lesions: is surgical resection essential? (medscape.com)
  • The consequences of failure to adequately oxygenate a patient and ventilate their lungs during surgery can be catastrophic. (cambridge.org)
  • The resected lung parenchyma was continuously sutured with 4-0 Prolene® (Ethicon endo-surgery) and covered with a polyglycolic acid sheet (Fig. 3 b). (springer.com)