A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.
Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.
Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.
Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.
A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.
The interactions between physician and patient.
Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.
Collaborative process of research involving researchers and community representatives.
The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.
Those aspects or characteristics which identify a culture.
The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.
Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.
Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)
Interactions between health personnel and patients.
The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.
The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.
The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.
The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.
Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.
Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.
Those factors, such as language or sociocultural relationships, which interfere in the meaningful interpretation and transmission of ideas between individuals or groups.
Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.
Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.
The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).
Patient involvement in the decision-making process in matters pertaining to health.
Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.
Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.
Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.
Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.
Cultural and linguistic competence is a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, agency, or among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations. Competence implies the capacity to function effectively as an individual and an organization within the context of the cultural beliefs, behaviors, and needs presented by consumers and their communities.
The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.
The expected function of a member of a particular profession.
Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)
Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.
Recording of information on magnetic or punched paper tape.
Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.
Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.
Individuals participating in the health care system for the purpose of receiving therapeutic, diagnostic, or preventive procedures.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
Physicians whose practice is not restricted to a specific field of MEDICINE.
Confidence in or reliance on a person or thing.
The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.
Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)
A geographical area of the United States with no definite boundaries but comprising northeastern Alabama, northwestern Georgia, northwestern South Carolina, western North Carolina, eastern Kentucky, eastern Tennessee, western Virginia, West Virginia, western Maryland, southwestern Pennsylvania, southern Ohio, and southern New York.
Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.
An oversimplified perception or conception especially of persons, social groups, etc.
Persons trained to assist professional health personnel in communicating with residents in the community concerning needs and availability of health services.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.
Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.
Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.
The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Individuals licensed to practice medicine.
Organized services to provide information on any questions an individual might have using databases and other sources. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
A perceived attribute that is deeply discrediting and is considered to be a violation of social norms.
Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.
The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)
The transfer of information from experts in the medical and public health fields to patients and the public. The study and use of communication strategies to inform and influence individual and community decisions that enhance health.
Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.
The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.
Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.
Research carried out by nurses concerning techniques and methods to implement projects and to document information, including methods of interviewing patients, collecting data, and forming inferences. The concept includes exploration of methodological issues such as human subjectivity and human experience.
The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.
The expected function of a member of the medical profession.
The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.
Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.
A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.
Female parents, human or animal.
A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the African peoples. It includes treatment by medicinal plants and other materia medica as well as by the ministrations of diviners, medicine men, witch doctors, and sorcerers.
Individuals responsible for the development of policy and supervision of the execution of plans and functional operations.
A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)
The attitude and behavior associated with an individual using the computer.
A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)
A republic in eastern Africa, south of SUDAN and west of KENYA. Its capital is Kampala.
The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)
Brief accounts or narratives of an incident or event.
Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).
The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.
Great Britain is not a medical term, but a geographical name for the largest island in the British Isles, which comprises England, Scotland, and Wales, forming the major part of the United Kingdom.
The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.
The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.
A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.
The practice of assisting women in childbirth.
The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.
The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.
Organizations and individuals cooperating together toward a common goal at the local or grassroots level.
Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.
Human females as cultural, psychological, sociological, political, and economic entities.
Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.
A republic in eastern Africa, south of UGANDA and north of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Dar es Salaam. It was formed in 1964 by a merger of the countries of TANGANYIKA and ZANZIBAR.
The exertion of a strong influence or control over others in a variety of settings--administrative, social, academic, etc.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.
A republic in eastern Africa, south of ETHIOPIA, west of SOMALIA with TANZANIA to its south, and coastline on the Indian Ocean. Its capital is Nairobi.
Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the islands of the central and South Pacific, including Micronesia, Melanesia, Polynesia, and traditionally Australasia.
A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.
The procedures through which a group approaches, attacks, and solves a common problem.
Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.
Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.
A state in southeastern Australia. Its capital is Sydney. It was discovered by Captain Cook in 1770 and first settled at Botany Bay by marines and convicts in 1788. It was named by Captain Cook who thought its coastline resembled that of South Wales. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p840 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p377)
Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.
The interactions between members of a community and representatives of the institutions within that community.
A course of study offered by an educational institution.
The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.
Male-associated sex-specific social roles and behaviors unrelated to biologic function.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Kansas" is a geographical location and not a medical term or condition. It's a state located in the Midwestern United States. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I'd be happy to help!
Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.
Comparison of various psychological, sociological, or cultural factors in order to assess the similarities or diversities occurring in two or more different cultures or societies.
Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.
A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.
The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Vietnam" is not a medical term that can be defined in a medical context; it is a country located in Southeast Asia. If you have any questions related to medical conditions or terminology, I would be happy to help clarify those topics for you.
The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.
The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
A republic in western Africa, south of BURKINA FASO and west of TOGO. Its capital is Accra.
Interaction between the patient and nurse.
Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.
Design of patient care wherein institutional resources and personnel are organized around patients rather than around specialized departments. (From Hospitals 1993 Feb 5;67(3):14)
Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.
A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.
The educational process of instructing.
The circulation or wide dispersal of information.
The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.
Individual's expression of desirability or value of one course of action, outcome, or selection in contrast to others.
Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.
Human males as cultural, psychological, sociological, political, and economic entities.
A person's concept of self as being male and masculine or female and feminine, or ambivalent, based in part on physical characteristics, parental responses, and psychological and social pressures. It is the internal experience of gender role.
Any negative tradition or behavior that is generally regarded as harmful to social welfare and forbidden within a cultural or social group.
A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.
It is the study of social phenomena which characterize the learned, shared, and transmitted social activities of particular ethnic groups with focus on the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability.
A set of beliefs concerning the nature, cause, and purpose of the universe, especially when considered as the creation of a superhuman agency. It usually involves devotional and ritual observances and often a moral code for the conduct of human affairs. (Random House Collegiate Dictionary, rev. ed.)
The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.
The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.
People who leave their place of residence in one country and settle in a different country.
Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.
Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.
An evaluation procedure that focuses on how care is delivered, based on the premise that there are standards of performance for activities undertaken in delivering patient care, in which the specific actions taken, events occurring, and human interactions are compared with accepted standards.
The status of health in rural populations.
The use of community resources, individual case work, or group work to promote the adaptive capacities of individuals in relation to their social and economic environments. It includes social service agencies.
Persons having a sense of persistent identification with, and expression of, gender-coded behaviors not typically associated with one's anatomical sex at birth, and with or without a desire to undergo SEX REASSIGNMENT PROCEDURES.
Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.
Field of psychology concerned with the normal and abnormal behavior of adolescents. It includes mental processes as well as observable responses.
Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.
Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.
Instructional materials used in teaching.
(Note: 'North Carolina' is a place, not a medical term. However, I can provide a fun fact related to health and North Carolina.)
Providers of initial care for patients. These PHYSICIANS refer patients when appropriate for secondary or specialist care.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
Sexual activities of humans.
The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.
Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.
The interactions between the professional person and the family.
A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.
Printed publications usually having a format with no binding and no cover and having fewer than some set number of pages. They are often devoted to a single subject.
An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)
Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.
Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.
Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.
Education which increases the knowledge of the functional, structural, and behavioral aspects of human reproduction.
Prejudice or discrimination based on gender or behavior or attitudes that foster stereotyped social roles based on gender.
Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)

Explicit guidelines for qualitative research: a step in the right direction, a defence of the 'soft' option, or a form of sociological imperialism? (1/3481)

Within the context of health service research, qualitative research has sometimes been seen as a 'soft' approach, lacking scientific rigour. In order to promote the legitimacy of using qualitative methodology in this field, numerous social scientists have produced checklists, guidelines or manuals for researchers to follow when conducting and writing up qualitative work. However, those working in the health service should be aware that social scientists are not all in agreement about the way in which qualitative work should be conducted, and they should not be discouraged from conducting qualitative research simply because they do not possess certain technical skills or extensive training in sociology, anthropology or psychology. The proliferation of guidelines and checklists may be off-putting to people who want to undertake this sort of research, and they may also make it even more difficult for researchers to publish work in medical journals. Consequently, the very people who may be in a position to change medical practice may never read the results of important qualitative research.  (+info)

Computer analysis of qualitative data: the use of ethnograph. (2/3481)

Ethnograph, a code and retrieve software program for computer analysis of qualitative data, was utilized to assist in analyzing the content of in-depth interviews and focus group data. This program requires basic computer hardware and is fairly easy to use. The main advantage of the program is easy access to data dealing with a particular issue and easy retrieval of text for analysis and illustration. However, to get the maximum benefit from this program, documents need to be structured In the format suitable for the software. Among the difficulties encountered were the absence of on-line documents dummy coding, lack of options in printing facility and the tendency for the program to hang whenever there was a printing error.  (+info)

Indicators of the quality of general practice care of patients with chronic illness: a step towards the real involvement of patients in the assessment of the quality of care. (3/3481)

OBJECTIVE: To develop a list of indicators of the general practice care of people with chronic illnesses considered important by both patients and practitioners and to identify the indicators that are considered relevant for patient assessment of health care quality. DESIGN: Qualitative study with focus group interviews and a written consensus procedure. SETTING: General practice in the Netherlands in 1993. SUBJECTS: 34 patients with chronic illness, mostly members of patient organisations, and 19 general practitioners with expertise in either chronic disease management or experience with patient surveys. MAIN MEASURES: Aspects of general practice care considered important for the delivery of good quality care that emerged from focus group interviews; the relevance of evaluations of 41 aspects of care for patients explored through the written consensus procedure. Those aspects of general practice care agreed to be both important and relevant by patients and general practitioners were considered to be suitable indicators for patient assessment of the quality of care. RESULTS: Patients and general practitioners differed to some extent in their assessment of the aspects of care that they considered important for quality. They agreed that most indicators of care that related to the inverted question markdoctor-patient relation inverted question mark and to inverted question markinformation and support inverted question mark were relevant and therefore suitable as indicators for patient assessment of health care quality. There was less agreement about the relevance of indicators of inverted question markmedical and technical care, inverted question mark inverted question markavailability and accessibility, inverted question mark and inverted question markorganisation of services. inverted question mark CONCLUSIONS: Several indicators of the quality of general practice care of patients with chronic illness were thought to be suitable for the patient assessment of healthcare quality, but other indicators were not, mainly because of reservations by general practitioners. IMPLICATIONS: Qualitative methods can contribute to the selection of indicators for assessment of the quality of health care in areas where scientific evidence is limited or where patients' and providers' preferences are particularly important.  (+info)

Dirt and diarrhoea: formative research in hygiene promotion programmes. (4/3481)

Investment in the promotion of better hygiene for the prevention of diarrhoeal diseases and as a component of water and sanitation programmes is increasing. Before designing programmes capable of sustainably modifying hygiene behaviour in large populations, valid answers to a number of basic questions concerning the site and the intended beneficiaries have to be obtained. Such questions include 'what practices favour the transmission of enteric pathogens?', 'what advantages will be perceived by those who adopt safe practices?' and 'what channels of communication are currently employed by the target population?' A study of hygiene and diarrhoea in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso, used a mixture of methods to address such questions. This paper draws on that experience to propose a plan of preliminary research using a variety of techniques which could be implemented over a period of a few months by planners of hygiene promotion programmes. The techniques discussed include structured observation, focus group discussions and behavioural trials. Modest investment in such systematic formative research with clear and limited goals is likely to be repaid many times over in the increased effectiveness of hygiene promotion programmes.  (+info)

Understanding lay perspectives: care options for STD treatment in Lusaka, Zambia. (5/3481)

Understanding lay persons' perceptions of STD care is critical in the design and implementation of appropriate health services. Using 20 unstructured group interviews, 10 focus group discussions and 4 STD case simulations in selected sub-populations in Lusaka, we investigated lay person perspectives of STD services. The study revealed a large diversity of care options for STD in the communities, including self-care, traditional healers, medicine sold in the markets and streets, injections administered in the compounds, private clinics, health centres and hospital. The factors identified as influencing care seeking behaviour are: lay referral mechanisms, social cost, availability of care options, economics, beliefs, stigma and quality of care as perceived by the users.  (+info)

Parental perceptions of barriers to childhood immunization: results of focus groups conducted in an urban population. (6/3481)

The current US immunization rates for 2 year olds are approximately half of the goal set for the year 2000. Research studies have focused primarily on the perception of health care providers in the identification of barriers and benefits to childhood immunization. While health care providers are an important part of the immunization delivery process, the perceptions of parents are also important. In this study, qualitative methods were used to explore perceived parental barriers to childhood immunization delivery. Twelve focus groups comprising White, African-American, Hispanic, urban and non-urban people were conducted at a variety of sites, including clinics, churches, schools and work sites. The results indicated that time off from work, access to well-child care and difficulty understanding the complexity of the immunization schedule were seen as barriers to adhering to an immunization schedule. Participants emphasized problems in taking time off from work to get immunizations, sometimes without pay, and expressed fears that doing so would jeopardize promotions and raises. While some of the parental perceptions were similar to those identified in studies of health care providers in the literature, many were not. This study emphasizes the importance of gathering information from parents as well as from health care providers.  (+info)

Nurses' participation in audit: a regional study. (7/3481)

OBJECTIVES: To find out to what extent nurses were perceived to be participating in audit, to identify factors thought to impede their involvement, and to assess progress towards multidisciplinary audit. RESEARCH DESIGN: Qualitative. METHODS: Focus groups and interviews. PARTICIPANTS: Chairs of audit groups and audit support staff in hospital, community and primary health care and audit leads in health authorities in the North West Region. RESULTS: In total 99 audit leads/support staff in the region participated representing 89% of the primary health care audit groups, 80% of acute hospitals, 73% of community health services, and 59% of purchasers. Many audit groups remain medically dominated despite recent changes to their structure and organisation. The quality of interprofessional relations, the leadership style of the audit chair, and nurses' level of seniority, audit knowledge, and experience influenced whether groups reflected a multidisciplinary, rather than a doctor centred approach. Nurses were perceived to be enthusiastic supporters of audit, although their active participation in the process was considered substantially less than for doctors in acute and community health services. Practice nurses were increasingly being seen as the local audit enthusiasts in primary health care. Reported obstacles to nurses' participation in audit included hierarchical nurse and doctor relationships, lack of commitment from senior doctors and managers, poor organisational links between departments of quality and audit, work load pressures and lack of protected time, availability of practical support, and lack of knowledge and skills. Progress towards multidisciplinary audit was highly variable. The undisciplinary approach to audit was still common, particularly in acute services. Multidisciplinary audit was more successfully established in areas already predisposed towards teamworking or where nurses had high involvement in decision making. Audit support staff were viewed as having a key role in helping teams to adopt a collaborative approach to audit. CONCLUSION: Although nurses were undertaking audit, and some were leading developments in their settings, a range of structural and organisational, interprofessional and intraprofessional factors was still impeding progress. If the ultimate goal of audit is to improve patient care, the obstacles that make it difficult for nurses to contribute actively to the process must be acknowledged and considered.  (+info)

Cost recovery in Ghana: are there any changes in health care seeking behaviour? (8/3481)

The study aimed to investigate the impact on health care seeking behaviour of the cost-sharing policies introduced in Ghana between 1985 and 1992. Qualitative research techniques were used to investigate the behaviour of patients after the introduction of these policies. Focus group discussions of cohorts of the population and in-depth interviews of health workers and selected opinion leaders were used to collect data from rural and urban health care facilities in three districts of Ghana. The study findings indicate that the cost recovery policies have led to an increase in self-medication and other behaviours aimed at cost-saving. At the same time, there is a perception of an improvement in the drug supply situation and general health delivery in government facilities. The study advocated enhanced training of drug peddlers and attendants at drug stores, especially in rural areas. User fee exemption criteria need to be worked out properly and implemented so that the very needy are not precluded from seeking health care at hospitals and clinics.  (+info)

"Focus groups" is a term from the field of social science research, rather than medicine. It does not have a specific medical definition. However, focus groups are sometimes used in medical research to gather data and insights from a small group of people on a specific topic or product. This can include gathering feedback on patient experiences, testing prototypes of medical devices or treatments, or exploring attitudes and perceptions related to health issues. The goal is to gain a deeper understanding of the perspectives and needs of the target population through facilitated group discussion.

Qualitative research is a methodological approach in social sciences and healthcare research that focuses on understanding the meanings, experiences, and perspectives of individuals or groups within a specific context. It aims to gather detailed, rich data through various techniques such as interviews, focus groups, observations, and content analysis. The findings from qualitative research are typically descriptive and exploratory, providing insights into processes, perceptions, and experiences that may not be captured through quantitative methods.

In medical research, qualitative research can be used to explore patients' experiences of illness, healthcare providers' perspectives on patient care, or the cultural and social factors that influence health behaviors. It is often used in combination with quantitative methods to provide a more comprehensive understanding of complex health issues.

"Health Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices" (HKAP) is a term used in public health to refer to the knowledge, beliefs, assumptions, and behaviors that individuals possess or engage in that are related to health. Here's a brief definition of each component:

1. Health Knowledge: Refers to the factual information and understanding that individuals have about various health-related topics, such as anatomy, physiology, disease processes, and healthy behaviors.
2. Attitudes: Represent the positive or negative evaluations, feelings, or dispositions that people hold towards certain health issues, practices, or services. These attitudes can influence their willingness to adopt and maintain healthy behaviors.
3. Practices: Encompass the specific actions or habits that individuals engage in related to their health, such as dietary choices, exercise routines, hygiene practices, and use of healthcare services.

HKAP is a multidimensional concept that helps public health professionals understand and address various factors influencing individual and community health outcomes. By assessing and addressing knowledge gaps, negative attitudes, or unhealthy practices, interventions can be designed to promote positive behavior change and improve overall health status.

I'm happy to help, but it seems there might be some confusion in your question. "Interviews" is a broad topic that isn't typically a medical term or subject. However, interviews can certainly be a part of medical settings and procedures, such as job interviews for healthcare positions, patient interviews during medical consultations, or research interviews in clinical studies.

In the context of medical education, an interview might refer to the process by which medical schools evaluate applicants for admission, known as the medical school interview. This is a critical component of the application process and typically involves one-on-one conversations between the applicant and an admissions committee member or a series of multiple mini-interviews (MMIs) with various evaluators.

If you could provide more context or clarify what you mean by "Interviews as Topic" in a medical setting, I'd be happy to help further!

The "attitude of health personnel" refers to the overall disposition, behavior, and approach that healthcare professionals exhibit towards their patients or clients. This encompasses various aspects such as:

1. Interpersonal skills: The ability to communicate effectively, listen actively, and build rapport with patients.
2. Professionalism: Adherence to ethical principles, confidentiality, and maintaining a non-judgmental attitude.
3. Compassion and empathy: Showing genuine concern for the patient's well-being and understanding their feelings and experiences.
4. Cultural sensitivity: Respecting and acknowledging the cultural backgrounds, beliefs, and values of patients.
5. Competence: Demonstrating knowledge, skills, and expertise in providing healthcare services.
6. Collaboration: Working together with other healthcare professionals to ensure comprehensive care for the patient.
7. Patient-centeredness: Focusing on the individual needs, preferences, and goals of the patient in the decision-making process.
8. Commitment to continuous learning and improvement: Staying updated with the latest developments in the field and seeking opportunities to enhance one's skills and knowledge.

A positive attitude of health personnel contributes significantly to patient satisfaction, adherence to treatment plans, and overall healthcare outcomes.

An "attitude to health" is a set of beliefs, values, and behaviors that an individual holds regarding their own health and well-being. It encompasses their overall approach to maintaining good health, preventing illness, seeking medical care, and managing any existing health conditions.

A positive attitude to health typically includes:

1. A belief in the importance of self-care and taking responsibility for one's own health.
2. Engaging in regular exercise, eating a balanced diet, getting enough sleep, and avoiding harmful behaviors such as smoking and excessive alcohol consumption.
3. Regular check-ups and screenings to detect potential health issues early on.
4. Seeking medical care when necessary and following recommended treatment plans.
5. A willingness to learn about and implement new healthy habits and lifestyle changes.
6. Developing a strong support network of family, friends, and healthcare professionals.

On the other hand, a negative attitude to health may involve:

1. Neglecting self-care and failing to take responsibility for one's own health.
2. Engaging in unhealthy behaviors such as sedentary lifestyle, poor diet, lack of sleep, smoking, and excessive alcohol consumption.
3. Avoidance of regular check-ups and screenings, leading to delayed detection and treatment of potential health issues.
4. Resistance to seeking medical care or following recommended treatment plans.
5. Closed-mindedness towards new healthy habits and lifestyle changes.
6. Lack of a support network or reluctance to seek help from others.

Overall, an individual's attitude to health can significantly impact their physical and mental well-being, as well as their ability to manage and overcome any health challenges that may arise.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

In the medical context, communication refers to the process of exchanging information, ideas, or feelings between two or more individuals in order to facilitate understanding, cooperation, and decision-making. Effective communication is critical in healthcare settings to ensure that patients receive accurate diagnoses, treatment plans, and follow-up care. It involves not only verbal and written communication but also nonverbal cues such as body language and facial expressions.

Healthcare providers must communicate clearly and empathetically with their patients to build trust, address concerns, and ensure that they understand their medical condition and treatment options. Similarly, healthcare teams must communicate effectively with each other to coordinate care, avoid errors, and provide the best possible outcomes for their patients. Communication skills are essential for all healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, therapists, and social workers.

In the context of medical science, culture refers to the growth of microorganisms, such as bacteria or fungi, under controlled conditions in a laboratory setting. This process is used to identify and study the characteristics of these microorganisms, including their growth patterns, metabolic activities, and sensitivity to various antibiotics or other treatments.

The culture medium, which provides nutrients for the microorganisms to grow, can be modified to mimic the environment in which the organism is typically found. This helps researchers to better understand how the organism behaves in its natural habitat.

In addition to its use in diagnosis and research, culture is also an important tool in monitoring the effectiveness of treatments and tracking the spread of infectious diseases.

Physician-patient relations, also known as doctor-patient relationships, refer to the interaction and communication between healthcare professionals and their patients. This relationship is founded on trust, respect, and understanding, with the physician providing medical care and treatment based on the patient's needs and best interests. Effective physician-patient relations involve clear communication, informed consent, shared decision-making, and confidentiality. A positive and collaborative relationship can lead to better health outcomes, improved patient satisfaction, and increased adherence to treatment plans.

Health promotion is the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and its determinants, and to improve their health. It moves beyond a focus on individual behavior change to include social and environmental interventions that can positively influence the health of individuals, communities, and populations. Health promotion involves engaging in a wide range of activities, such as advocacy, policy development, community organization, and education that aim to create supportive environments and personal skills that foster good health. It is based on principles of empowerment, participation, and social justice.

Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) is a collaborative research approach that involves community members, organizational representatives, and researchers in all aspects of the research process. It is a partnership between researchers and communities that equitably involves all parties in the research to address and respond to community-identified issues. CBPR aims to combine knowledge and action for social change to improve community health and wellbeing. This approach recognizes the strengths and expertise of both community members and researchers, and it integrates scientific research methods with community knowledge and experiential wisdom. CBPR is guided by specific principles, including co-learning, capacity building, and reciprocal sharing of power and resources, to ensure that the research is relevant, accessible, and beneficial to the community.

Patient acceptance of health care refers to the willingness and ability of a patient to follow and engage in a recommended treatment plan or healthcare regimen. This involves understanding the proposed medical interventions, considering their potential benefits and risks, and making an informed decision to proceed with the recommended course of action.

The factors that influence patient acceptance can include:

1. Patient's understanding of their condition and treatment options
2. Trust in their healthcare provider
3. Personal beliefs and values related to health and illness
4. Cultural, linguistic, or socioeconomic barriers
5. Emotional responses to the diagnosis or proposed treatment
6. Practical considerations, such as cost, time commitment, or potential side effects

Healthcare providers play a crucial role in facilitating patient acceptance by clearly communicating information, addressing concerns and questions, and providing support throughout the decision-making process. Encouraging shared decision-making and tailoring care plans to individual patient needs and preferences can also enhance patient acceptance of health care.

Cultural characteristics refer to the beliefs, customs, values, and behaviors that are shared by a group of people and are passed down from one generation to the next. These characteristics help define and distinguish one cultural group from another. In healthcare, understanding a patient's cultural characteristics is important for providing culturally competent care, which takes into account the patient's cultural background, beliefs, and values in the delivery of care. This can help improve communication, build trust, and ensure that the patient receives care that is respectful and responsive to their needs and preferences.

In the context of medicine and psychology, perception refers to the neurophysiological processes, cognitive abilities, and psychological experiences that enable an individual to interpret and make sense of sensory information from their environment. It involves the integration of various stimuli such as sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell to form a coherent understanding of one's surroundings, objects, events, or ideas.

Perception is a complex and active process that includes attention, pattern recognition, interpretation, and organization of sensory information. It can be influenced by various factors, including prior experiences, expectations, cultural background, emotional states, and cognitive biases. Alterations in perception may occur due to neurological disorders, psychiatric conditions, sensory deprivation or overload, drugs, or other external factors.

In a clinical setting, healthcare professionals often assess patients' perceptions of their symptoms, illnesses, or treatments to develop individualized care plans and improve communication and adherence to treatment recommendations.

Health education is the process of providing information and strategies to individuals and communities about how to improve their health and prevent disease. It involves teaching and learning activities that aim to empower people to make informed decisions and take responsible actions regarding their health. Health education covers a wide range of topics, including nutrition, physical activity, sexual and reproductive health, mental health, substance abuse prevention, and environmental health. The ultimate goal of health education is to promote healthy behaviors and lifestyles that can lead to improved health outcomes and quality of life.

"Health personnel" is a broad term that refers to individuals who are involved in maintaining, promoting, and restoring the health of populations or individuals. This can include a wide range of professionals such as:

1. Healthcare providers: These are medical doctors, nurses, midwives, dentists, pharmacists, allied health professionals (like physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, dietitians, etc.), and other healthcare workers who provide direct patient care.

2. Public health professionals: These are individuals who work in public health agencies, non-governmental organizations, or academia to promote health, prevent diseases, and protect populations from health hazards. They include epidemiologists, biostatisticians, health educators, environmental health specialists, and health services researchers.

3. Health managers and administrators: These are professionals who oversee the operations, finances, and strategic planning of healthcare organizations, such as hospitals, clinics, or public health departments. They may include hospital CEOs, medical directors, practice managers, and healthcare consultants.

4. Health support staff: This group includes various personnel who provide essential services to healthcare organizations, such as medical records technicians, billing specialists, receptionists, and maintenance workers.

5. Health researchers and academics: These are professionals involved in conducting research, teaching, and disseminating knowledge related to health sciences, medicine, public health, or healthcare management in universities, research institutions, or think tanks.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines "health worker" as "a person who contributes to the promotion, protection, or improvement of health through prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, palliation, health promotion, and health education." This definition encompasses a wide range of professionals working in various capacities to improve health outcomes.

Professional-patient relations, also known as physician-patient relationships or doctor-patient relationships, refer to the interactions and communications between healthcare professionals and their patients. It is a critical aspect of healthcare delivery that involves trust, respect, understanding, and collaboration. The American Medical Association (AMA) defines it as "a ethical relationship in which a physician, by virtue of knowledge and skills, provides medical services to a patient in need."

Professional-patient relations encompass various elements, including:

1. Informed Consent: Healthcare professionals must provide patients with adequate information about their medical condition, treatment options, benefits, risks, and alternatives to enable them to make informed decisions about their healthcare.
2. Confidentiality: Healthcare professionals must respect patients' privacy and maintain the confidentiality of their medical information, except in specific circumstances where disclosure is required by law or necessary for patient safety.
3. Communication: Healthcare professionals must communicate effectively with patients, listening to their concerns, answering their questions, and providing clear and concise explanations about their medical condition and treatment plan.
4. Empathy and Compassion: Healthcare professionals must demonstrate empathy and compassion towards their patients, recognizing their emotional and psychological needs and providing support and comfort when necessary.
5. Cultural Competence: Healthcare professionals must be aware of and respect cultural differences among their patients, adapting their communication style and treatment approach to meet the unique needs of each patient.
6. Shared Decision-Making: Healthcare professionals and patients should work together to make medical decisions based on the best available evidence, the patient's values and preferences, and the healthcare professional's expertise.
7. Continuity of Care: Healthcare professionals must ensure continuity of care for their patients, coordinating with other healthcare providers and ensuring that patients receive appropriate follow-up care.

Professional-patient relations are essential to achieving positive health outcomes, improving patient satisfaction, and reducing medical errors and adverse events. Healthcare professionals must maintain ethical and professional standards in their interactions with patients, recognizing the power imbalance in the relationship and striving to promote trust, respect, and collaboration.

Patient satisfaction is a concept in healthcare quality measurement that reflects the patient's perspective and evaluates their experience with the healthcare services they have received. It is a multidimensional construct that includes various aspects such as interpersonal mannerisms of healthcare providers, technical competence, accessibility, timeliness, comfort, and communication.

Patient satisfaction is typically measured through standardized surveys or questionnaires that ask patients to rate their experiences on various aspects of care. The results are often used to assess the quality of care provided by healthcare organizations, identify areas for improvement, and inform policy decisions. However, it's important to note that patient satisfaction is just one aspect of healthcare quality and should be considered alongside other measures such as clinical outcomes and patient safety.

A rural population refers to people who live in areas that are outside of urban areas, typically defined as having fewer than 2,000 residents and lacking certain infrastructure and services such as running water, sewage systems, and paved roads. Rural populations often have less access to healthcare services, education, and economic opportunities compared to their urban counterparts. This population group can face unique health challenges, including higher rates of poverty, limited access to specialized medical care, and a greater exposure to environmental hazards such as agricultural chemicals and industrial pollutants.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "public opinion" is not a term that has a medical definition. Public opinion refers to the collective views, attitudes, and beliefs held by a group or society about a particular issue or topic. It is typically formed through interaction, discussion, and various forms of communication within a community or population. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medicine, I'd be happy to help with those!

Health services accessibility refers to the degree to which individuals and populations are able to obtain needed health services in a timely manner. It includes factors such as physical access (e.g., distance, transportation), affordability (e.g., cost of services, insurance coverage), availability (e.g., supply of providers, hours of operation), and acceptability (e.g., cultural competence, language concordance).

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), accessibility is one of the key components of health system performance, along with responsiveness and fair financing. Improving accessibility to health services is essential for achieving universal health coverage and ensuring that everyone has access to quality healthcare without facing financial hardship. Factors that affect health services accessibility can vary widely between and within countries, and addressing these disparities requires a multifaceted approach that includes policy interventions, infrastructure development, and community engagement.

In the context of medical terminology, "attitude" generally refers to the position or posture of a patient's body or a part of it. It can also refer to the mental set or disposition that a person has towards their health, illness, or healthcare providers. However, it is not a term that has a specific medical definition like other medical terminologies do.

For example, in orthopedics, "attitude" may be used to describe the position of a limb or joint during an examination or surgical procedure. In psychology, "attitude" may refer to a person's feelings, beliefs, and behaviors towards a particular object, issue, or idea related to their health.

Therefore, the meaning of "attitude" in medical terminology can vary depending on the context in which it is used.

Decision-making is the cognitive process of selecting a course of action from among multiple alternatives. In a medical context, decision-making refers to the process by which healthcare professionals and patients make choices about medical tests, treatments, or management options based on a thorough evaluation of available information, including the patient's preferences, values, and circumstances.

The decision-making process in medicine typically involves several steps:

1. Identifying the problem or issue that requires a decision.
2. Gathering relevant information about the patient's medical history, current condition, diagnostic test results, treatment options, and potential outcomes.
3. Considering the benefits, risks, and uncertainties associated with each option.
4. Evaluating the patient's preferences, values, and goals.
5. Selecting the most appropriate course of action based on a careful weighing of the available evidence and the patient's individual needs and circumstances.
6. Communicating the decision to the patient and ensuring that they understand the rationale behind it, as well as any potential risks or benefits.
7. Monitoring the outcomes of the decision and adjusting the course of action as needed based on ongoing evaluation and feedback.

Effective decision-making in medicine requires a thorough understanding of medical evidence, clinical expertise, and patient preferences. It also involves careful consideration of ethical principles, such as respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. Ultimately, the goal of decision-making in healthcare is to promote the best possible outcomes for patients while minimizing harm and respecting their individual needs and values.

"Family Physicians" are medical doctors who provide comprehensive primary care to individuals and families of all ages. They are trained to diagnose and treat a wide range of medical conditions, from minor illnesses to complex diseases. In addition to providing acute care, family physicians also focus on preventive medicine, helping their patients maintain their overall health and well-being through regular checkups, screenings, and immunizations. They often serve as the patient's main point of contact within the healthcare system, coordinating care with specialists and other healthcare professionals as needed. Family physicians may work in private practices, community health centers, hospitals, or other healthcare settings.

A needs assessment in a medical context is the process of identifying and evaluating the health needs of an individual, population, or community. It is used to determine the resources, services, and interventions required to address specific health issues and improve overall health outcomes. This process often involves collecting and analyzing data on various factors such as demographics, prevalence of diseases, access to healthcare, and social determinants of health. The goal of a needs assessment is to ensure that resources are allocated effectively and efficiently to meet the most pressing health needs and priorities.

Communication barriers in a medical context refer to any factors that prevent or hinder the effective exchange of information between healthcare providers and patients, or among healthcare professionals themselves. These barriers can lead to misunderstandings, errors, and poor patient outcomes. Common communication barriers include:

1. Language differences: When patients and healthcare providers do not speak the same language, it can lead to miscommunication and errors in diagnosis and treatment.
2. Cultural differences: Cultural beliefs and values can affect how patients perceive and communicate their symptoms and concerns, as well as how healthcare providers deliver care.
3. Literacy levels: Low health literacy can make it difficult for patients to understand medical information, follow treatment plans, and make informed decisions about their care.
4. Disability: Patients with hearing or vision impairments, speech disorders, or cognitive impairments may face unique communication challenges that require accommodations and specialized communication strategies.
5. Emotional factors: Patients who are anxious, stressed, or in pain may have difficulty communicating effectively, and healthcare providers may be less likely to listen actively or ask open-ended questions.
6. Power dynamics: Hierarchical relationships between healthcare providers and patients can create power imbalances that discourage patients from speaking up or asking questions.
7. Noise and distractions: Environmental factors such as noise, interruptions, and distractions can make it difficult for patients and healthcare providers to hear, focus, and communicate effectively.

Effective communication is critical in healthcare settings, and addressing communication barriers requires a multifaceted approach that includes training for healthcare providers, language services for limited English proficient patients, and accommodations for patients with disabilities.

Program Evaluation is a systematic and objective assessment of a healthcare program's design, implementation, and outcomes. It is a medical term used to describe the process of determining the relevance, effectiveness, and efficiency of a program in achieving its goals and objectives. Program evaluation involves collecting and analyzing data related to various aspects of the program, such as its reach, impact, cost-effectiveness, and quality. The results of program evaluation can be used to improve the design and implementation of existing programs or to inform the development of new ones. It is a critical tool for ensuring that healthcare programs are meeting the needs of their intended audiences and delivering high-quality care in an efficient and effective manner.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "pilot projects" is not a medical term per se. Instead, it is a general term used in various fields, including healthcare and medicine, to describe a small-scale initiative that is implemented on a temporary basis to evaluate its feasibility, effectiveness, or impact before deciding whether to expand or continue it.

In the context of healthcare, pilot projects might involve testing new treatment protocols, implementing innovative care models, or introducing technology solutions in a limited setting to assess their potential benefits and drawbacks. The results of these projects can help inform decisions about broader implementation and provide valuable insights for improving the quality and efficiency of healthcare services.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Program Development" is not a medical term. It is a general term that refers to the process of creating, planning, and implementing a new program or project, typically in a business, education, or community setting. In a healthcare context, it might refer to the development of a new healthcare service, treatment program, or educational initiative.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to try and help!

Patient participation refers to the active involvement of patients in their own healthcare process. This includes:

1. Making informed decisions about their health and treatment options in partnership with healthcare professionals.
2. Communicating effectively with healthcare providers to ensure their needs, preferences, and values are taken into account.
3. Monitoring their own health status and seeking appropriate care when needed.
4. Providing feedback on the quality of care they receive to help improve healthcare services.

Patient participation is considered a key component of patient-centered care, which aims to treat patients as whole persons with unique needs, values, and preferences, rather than simply treating their medical conditions. It is also an essential element of shared decision-making, where patients and healthcare providers work together to make informed decisions based on the best available evidence and the patient's individual circumstances.

Social support in a medical context refers to the resources and assistance provided by an individual's social network, including family, friends, peers, and community groups. These resources can include emotional, informational, and instrumental support, which help individuals cope with stress, manage health conditions, and maintain their overall well-being.

Emotional support involves providing empathy, care, and encouragement to help an individual feel valued, understood, and cared for. Informational support refers to the provision of advice, guidance, and knowledge that can help an individual make informed decisions about their health or other aspects of their life. Instrumental support includes practical assistance such as help with daily tasks, financial aid, or access to resources.

Social support has been shown to have a positive impact on physical and mental health outcomes, including reduced stress levels, improved immune function, better coping skills, and increased resilience. It can also play a critical role in promoting healthy behaviors, such as adherence to medical treatments and lifestyle changes.

African Americans are defined as individuals who have ancestry from any of the black racial groups of Africa. This term is often used to describe people living in the United States who have total or partial descent from enslaved African peoples. The term does not refer to a single ethnicity but is a broad term that includes various ethnic groups with diverse cultures, languages, and traditions. It's important to note that some individuals may prefer to identify as Black or of African descent rather than African American, depending on their personal identity and background.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "parents" is not a term that has a medical definition. In general usage, parents are the two people (typically) who bring up and care for a child, or who have given birth to or adopted a child. They are responsible for the child's housing, food, clothing, education, and medical care. Is there a specific medical or healthcare-related context you had in mind? I would be happy to help further if I can.

Consumer participation in the context of healthcare refers to the active involvement and engagement of patients, families, caregivers, and communities in their own healthcare decision-making processes and in the development, implementation, and evaluation of health policies, programs, and services. It emphasizes the importance of patient-centered care, where the unique needs, preferences, values, and experiences of individuals are respected and integrated into their healthcare.

Consumer participation can take many forms, including:

1. Patient-provider communication: Consumers engage in open and honest communication with their healthcare providers to make informed decisions about their health.
2. Shared decision-making: Consumers work together with their healthcare providers to weigh the benefits and risks of different treatment options and make evidence-based decisions that align with their values, preferences, and goals.
3. Patient education: Consumers receive accurate, timely, and understandable information about their health conditions, treatments, and self-management strategies.
4. Patient advocacy: Consumers advocate for their own health needs and rights, as well as those of other patients and communities.
5. Community engagement: Consumers participate in the development, implementation, and evaluation of health policies, programs, and services that affect their communities.
6. Research partnerships: Consumers collaborate with researchers to design, conduct, and disseminate research that is relevant and meaningful to their lives.

Consumer participation aims to improve healthcare quality, safety, and outcomes by empowering individuals to take an active role in their own health and well-being, and by ensuring that healthcare systems are responsive to the needs and preferences of diverse populations.

Cultural competency is a term used in the medical and healthcare fields to describe the ability of healthcare providers and systems to understand, respect, and effectively communicate with patients from diverse cultural backgrounds. It involves an awareness of and appreciation for the differences in customs, values, beliefs, languages, and practices that exist among various cultural groups.

A culturally competent healthcare provider is one who:

* Has knowledge of the patient's culture and how it may impact their health beliefs, behaviors, and communication styles
* Is sensitive to and respectful of the patient's cultural values and traditions
* Uses this understanding to inform their clinical decision-making and provide care that is tailored to the individual needs and preferences of the patient

Cultural competency also involves an awareness of one's own cultural background and biases, as well as a commitment to ongoing learning and self-reflection in order to continually improve cultural humility and sensitivity.

A culturally competent healthcare system is one that:

* Has policies and procedures in place to ensure equitable access to care for all patients, regardless of their cultural background
* Provides interpreter services and other language accommodations as needed
* Engages in ongoing training and education to promote cultural awareness and sensitivity among staff members
* Collects and analyzes data on patient outcomes and satisfaction to identify and address disparities in care.

Patient education, as defined by the US National Library of Medicine's Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), is "the teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs. It includes the patient's understanding of his or her condition and the necessary procedures for self, assisted, or professional care." This encompasses a wide range of activities and interventions aimed at helping patients and their families understand their medical conditions, treatment options, self-care skills, and overall health management. Effective patient education can lead to improved health outcomes, increased patient satisfaction, and better use of healthcare resources.

A "Professional Role" in the context of medicine typically refers to the specific duties, responsibilities, and expectations associated with a particular healthcare position. It encompasses the legal, ethical, and clinical aspects of the job, and is shaped by education, training, and professional standards. Examples include roles such as a physician, nurse, pharmacist, or therapist, each with their own distinct set of professional responsibilities and obligations to patients, colleagues, and society.

Primary health care is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as:

"Essential health care that is based on practical, scientifically sound and socially acceptable methods and technology made universally accessible to individuals and families in the community through their full participation and at a cost that the community and country can afford. It forms an integral part both of the country's health system, of which it is the central function and main focus, and of the overall social and economic development of the community. It is the first level of contact of individuals, the family and community with the national health system bringing health care as close as possible to where people live and work, and constitutes the first element of a continuing health care process."

Primary health care includes a range of services such as preventive care, health promotion, curative care, rehabilitation, and palliative care. It is typically provided by a team of health professionals including doctors, nurses, midwives, pharmacists, and other community health workers. The goal of primary health care is to provide comprehensive, continuous, and coordinated care to individuals and families in a way that is accessible, affordable, and culturally sensitive.

In the context of healthcare and medical psychology, motivation refers to the driving force behind an individual's goal-oriented behavior. It is the internal or external stimuli that initiate, direct, and sustain a person's actions towards achieving their desired outcomes. Motivation can be influenced by various factors such as biological needs, personal values, emotional states, and social contexts.

In clinical settings, healthcare professionals often assess patients' motivation to engage in treatment plans, adhere to medical recommendations, or make lifestyle changes necessary for improving their health status. Enhancing a patient's motivation can significantly impact their ability to manage chronic conditions, recover from illnesses, and maintain overall well-being. Various motivational interviewing techniques and interventions are employed by healthcare providers to foster intrinsic motivation and support patients in achieving their health goals.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "tape recording" is not a medical term. It refers to the process of recording sound or video onto magnetic tape using a device called a tape recorder. This technology was widely used in the past for audio and video recordings, but it has been largely replaced by digital recording methods in recent years. If you have any questions about medical terminology, I'd be happy to help!

Consumer satisfaction in a medical context refers to the degree to which a patient or their family is content with the healthcare services, products, or experiences they have received. It is a measure of how well the healthcare delivery aligns with the patient's expectations, needs, and preferences. Factors that contribute to consumer satisfaction may include the quality of care, communication and interpersonal skills of healthcare providers, accessibility and convenience, affordability, and outcomes. High consumer satisfaction is associated with better adherence to treatment plans, improved health outcomes, and higher patient loyalty.

Rural health services refer to the healthcare delivery systems and facilities that are located in rural areas and are designed to meet the unique health needs of rural populations. These services can include hospitals, clinics, community health centers, mental health centers, and home health agencies, as well as various programs and initiatives aimed at improving access to care, addressing health disparities, and promoting health and wellness in rural communities.

Rural health services are often characterized by longer travel distances to healthcare facilities, a greater reliance on primary care and preventive services, and a higher prevalence of certain health conditions such as chronic diseases, injuries, and mental health disorders. As a result, rural health services must be tailored to address these challenges and provide high-quality, affordable, and accessible care to rural residents.

In many countries, rural health services are supported by government policies and programs aimed at improving healthcare infrastructure, workforce development, and telehealth technologies in rural areas. These efforts are critical for ensuring that all individuals, regardless of where they live, have access to the healthcare services they need to maintain their health and well-being.

In medical terms, a patient is an individual who receives medical attention, treatment, or care from a healthcare professional or provider. This could be in the context of seeking help for a specific health concern, receiving ongoing management for a chronic condition, or being under observation as part of preventative healthcare. The term "patient" implies a level of trust and vulnerability, where the individual places their health and well-being in the hands of a medical expert. It's important to note that patients have rights and responsibilities too, including informed consent, confidentiality, and active participation in their own care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

A General Practitioner (GP) is a medical doctor who provides primary care and treats a wide range of health conditions in patients of all ages. They serve as the first point of contact for individuals seeking healthcare services and provide ongoing, person-centered care, including prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and management of acute and chronic illnesses. GPs often collaborate with specialists, hospitals, and other healthcare professionals to ensure their patients receive comprehensive and coordinated care. They are trained to recognize a wide variety of diseases and conditions, and to handle a majority of health problems that present in their patients. General practitioners may also provide health education, lifestyle advice, and counseling to promote overall well-being and disease prevention.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "trust" is a general concept and not a medical term with a specific definition. It can be used in various contexts, including healthcare relationships between patients and healthcare providers. In this context, trust refers to the confidence and reliance that patients have on the competence, professionalism, honesty, and integrity of their healthcare providers.

However, if you're looking for a medical term related to "trust," there is a psychological concept called "interpersonal trust" which can be assessed using the "Trust Scale." Interpersonal trust refers to an individual's general willingness to rely on and be vulnerable to others across various situations. This concept might be relevant in some medical or healthcare research contexts, particularly those involving patient-provider communication, adherence to treatment plans, and therapeutic relationships.

Interprofessional relations, in the context of healthcare, refers to the interactions and collaborative practices between different healthcare professionals (such as physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists, social workers, etc.) when providing care for patients. It involves developing and maintaining positive and effective communication, respect, trust, and collaboration among various healthcare disciplines to ensure coordinated, safe, and high-quality patient care. The goal of interprofessional relations is to enhance collaborative practice, improve patient outcomes, and promote a supportive work environment.

Cultural diversity, in the context of healthcare and medicine, refers to the existence, recognition, and respect of the different cultural backgrounds, beliefs, values, traditions, languages, and practices of individuals or groups. This concept is important in providing culturally competent care, which aims to improve health outcomes by addressing the unique needs and preferences of patients from diverse backgrounds. Cultural diversity in healthcare recognizes that there are variations in how people perceive and experience health and illness, communicate about symptoms and treatments, seek help, and follow medical advice. By understanding and incorporating cultural diversity into healthcare practices, providers can build trust, reduce disparities, and enhance patient satisfaction and adherence to treatment plans.

The Appalachian Region is a geographic and cultural region in the eastern United States that stretches from southern New York to northern Mississippi. It is defined by the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) as including 420 counties across 13 states: Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. The ARC defines the region based on its unique economic and social challenges, as well as its distinct cultural heritage.

The Appalachian Region is characterized by a diverse landscape that includes the Appalachian Mountains, valleys, plateaus, and coastal plains. It has a rich history of coal mining, agriculture, and manufacturing, but has also faced significant economic challenges in recent decades due to declines in these industries. The region has higher poverty rates, lower educational attainment levels, and poorer health outcomes compared to the national average.

The medical definition of the Appalachian Region may refer to the unique health challenges that are prevalent in this area. These can include higher rates of chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and respiratory illnesses due to factors such as poverty, lack of access to healthcare, and environmental exposures related to coal mining and other industries. The region also has a higher rate of opioid addiction and overdose deaths compared to the national average. Public health initiatives and interventions in the Appalachian Region often focus on addressing these specific health disparities and improving overall health outcomes for the population.

Community health services refer to a type of healthcare delivery that is organized around the needs of a specific population or community, rather than individual patients. These services are typically focused on preventive care, health promotion, and improving access to care for underserved populations. They can include a wide range of services, such as:

* Primary care, including routine check-ups, immunizations, and screenings
* Dental care
* Mental health and substance abuse treatment
* Public health initiatives, such as disease prevention and health education programs
* Home health care and other supportive services for people with chronic illnesses or disabilities
* Health services for special populations, such as children, the elderly, or those living in rural areas

The goal of community health services is to improve the overall health of a population by addressing the social, economic, and environmental factors that can impact health. This approach recognizes that healthcare is just one factor in determining a person's health outcomes, and that other factors such as housing, education, and income also play important roles. By working to address these underlying determinants of health, community health services aim to improve the health and well-being of entire communities.

In the context of medicine and psychology, stereotyping refers to the process of forming oversimplified generalizations about individuals or groups based on limited information or preconceived ideas. These generalizations may not accurately represent the characteristics, behaviors, or intentions of the individual or group being stereotyped. Stereotypes can lead to prejudice, discrimination, and social stigma, which can negatively impact mental and physical health outcomes in affected individuals and communities.

It is important to note that stereotyping is different from diagnostic criteria used in medicine. In medical diagnoses, patterns of symptoms or signs are identified and categorized based on established criteria to help healthcare professionals make accurate assessments and provide appropriate treatment. However, stereotypes can still influence medical decision-making and contribute to health disparities if they lead to biased assumptions about patients' conditions or needs.

Community health workers (CHWs) are individuals who are trained to work within and promote the health of their own communities. They serve as a bridge between healthcare professionals and the communities they serve, often working in underserved or hard-to-reach areas. CHWs may provide a range of services, including health education, outreach, advocacy, and case management.

CHWs come from diverse backgrounds and may have different levels of training and education. They are typically trusted members of their communities and share similar language, culture, and life experiences with the people they serve. This helps to build rapport and trust with community members, making it easier for CHWs to provide culturally sensitive care and support.

The role of CHWs can vary depending on the needs of the community and the healthcare system in which they work. In some settings, CHWs may focus on specific health issues, such as maternal and child health, infectious diseases, or chronic conditions like diabetes. In other cases, they may provide more general support to help individuals navigate the healthcare system and access needed services.

Overall, community health workers play an important role in promoting health equity and improving health outcomes for vulnerable populations. By working closely with communities and connecting them to appropriate care and resources, CHWs can help to reduce disparities and improve the overall health of their communities.

Data collection in the medical context refers to the systematic gathering of information relevant to a specific research question or clinical situation. This process involves identifying and recording data elements, such as demographic characteristics, medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory results, and imaging studies, from various sources including patient interviews, medical records, and diagnostic tests. The data collected is used to support clinical decision-making, inform research hypotheses, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. It is essential that data collection is performed in a standardized and unbiased manner to ensure the validity and reliability of the results.

Family practice, also known as family medicine, is a medical specialty that provides comprehensive and continuous care to patients of all ages, genders, and stages of life. Family physicians are trained to provide a wide range of services, including preventive care, diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illnesses, management of complex medical conditions, and providing health education and counseling.

Family practice emphasizes the importance of building long-term relationships with patients and their families, and takes into account the physical, emotional, social, and psychological factors that influence a person's health. Family physicians often serve as the primary point of contact for patients within the healthcare system, coordinating care with other specialists and healthcare providers as needed.

Family practice is a broad and diverse field, encompassing various areas such as pediatrics, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, geriatrics, and behavioral health. The goal of family practice is to provide high-quality, patient-centered care that meets the unique needs and preferences of each individual patient and their family.

Health services needs refer to the population's requirement for healthcare services based on their health status, disease prevalence, and clinical guidelines. These needs can be categorized into normative needs (based on expert opinions or clinical guidelines) and expressed needs (based on individuals' perceptions of their own healthcare needs).

On the other hand, health services demand refers to the quantity of healthcare services that consumers are willing and able to pay for, given their preferences, values, and financial resources. Demand is influenced by various factors such as price, income, education level, and cultural beliefs.

It's important to note that while needs represent a population's requirement for healthcare services, demand reflects the actual utilization of these services. Understanding both health services needs and demand is crucial in planning and delivering effective healthcare services that meet the population's requirements while ensuring efficient resource allocation.

Health behavior can be defined as a series of actions and decisions that individuals take to protect, maintain or promote their health and well-being. These behaviors can include activities such as engaging in regular exercise, eating a healthy diet, getting sufficient sleep, practicing safe sex, avoiding tobacco and excessive alcohol consumption, and managing stress.

Health behaviors are influenced by various factors, including knowledge and attitudes towards health, beliefs and values, cultural norms, social support networks, environmental factors, and individual genetic predispositions. Understanding health behaviors is essential for developing effective public health interventions and promoting healthy lifestyles to prevent chronic diseases and improve overall quality of life.

Health services research (HSR) is a multidisciplinary field of scientific investigation that studies how social factors, financing systems, organizational structures and processes, health technologies, and personal behaviors affect access to healthcare, the quality and cost of care, and ultimately, our health and well-being. The goal of HSR is to inform policy and practice, improve system performance, and enhance the health and well-being of individuals and communities. It involves the use of various research methods, including epidemiology, biostatistics, economics, sociology, management science, political science, and psychology, to answer questions about the healthcare system and how it can be improved.

Examples of HSR topics include:

* Evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different healthcare interventions and technologies
* Studying patient-centered care and patient experiences with the healthcare system
* Examining healthcare workforce issues, such as shortages of primary care providers or the impact of nurse-to-patient ratios on patient outcomes
* Investigating the impact of health insurance design and financing systems on access to care and health disparities
* Analyzing the organization and delivery of healthcare services in different settings, such as hospitals, clinics, and long-term care facilities
* Identifying best practices for improving healthcare quality and safety, reducing medical errors, and eliminating wasteful or unnecessary care.

A physician is a healthcare professional who practices medicine, providing medical care and treatment to patients. Physicians may specialize in various fields of medicine, such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, psychiatry, or radiology, among others. They are responsible for diagnosing and treating illnesses, injuries, and disorders; prescribing medications; ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests; providing counseling and education to patients; and collaborating with other healthcare professionals to provide comprehensive care. Physicians may work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, private practices, and academic medical centers. To become a physician, one must complete a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree program and pass licensing exams to practice medicine in their state.

In the context of healthcare, "Information Services" typically refers to the department or system within a healthcare organization that is responsible for managing and providing various forms of information to support clinical, administrative, and research functions. This can include:

1. Clinical Information Systems: These are electronic systems that help clinicians manage and access patient health information, such as electronic health records (EHRs), computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems, and clinical decision support systems.

2. Administrative Information Systems: These are electronic systems used to manage administrative tasks, such as scheduling appointments, billing, and maintaining patient registries.

3. Research Information Services: These provide support for research activities, including data management, analysis, and reporting. They may also include bioinformatics services that deal with the collection, storage, analysis, and dissemination of genomic and proteomic data.

4. Health Information Exchange (HIE): This is a system or service that enables the sharing of clinical information between different healthcare organizations and providers.

5. Telemedicine Services: These allow remote diagnosis and treatment of patients using telecommunications technology.

6. Patient Portals: Secure online websites that give patients convenient, 24-hour access to their personal health information.

7. Data Analytics: The process of examining data sets to draw conclusions about the information they contain, often with the intention of predicting future trends or behaviors.

8. Knowledge Management: The process of identifying, capturing, organizing, storing, and sharing information and expertise within an organization.

The primary goal of healthcare Information Services is to improve the quality, safety, efficiency, and effectiveness of patient care by providing timely, accurate, and relevant information to the right people in the right format.

A social stigma is a socially constructed phenomenon where certain individuals or groups are labeled, discriminated against, and excluded because of their perceived differences, which may be based on characteristics such as race, ethnicity, nationality, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age, mental or physical abilities, or health status. These negative attitudes and behaviors can lead to unequal treatment, prejudice, and discrimination, resulting in significant harm to the stigmatized individuals' social, emotional, and psychological well-being.

In medical terms, a social stigma may be associated with certain health conditions, illnesses, or disabilities that are perceived as shameful, undesirable, or deviant by society. For example, people with mental illness, HIV/AIDS, substance use disorders, or sexually transmitted infections may experience social stigma, which can negatively impact their access to healthcare services, treatment outcomes, and overall quality of life.

The negative consequences of social stigma can be reduced through education, awareness, and advocacy efforts that challenge stereotypes, promote understanding and empathy, and foster inclusive and supportive communities.

A caregiver is an individual who provides assistance and support to another person who is unable to meet their own needs for activities of daily living due to illness, disability, frailty, or other reasons. Caregiving can take many forms, including providing physical care, emotional support, managing medications, assisting with mobility, and helping with household tasks and errands. Caregivers may be family members, friends, or professional providers, and the level of care they provide can range from a few hours a week to round-the-clock assistance. In medical contexts, caregivers are often referred to as informal or family caregivers when they are unpaid relatives or friends, and professional or paid caregivers when they are hired to provide care.

In the context of healthcare, privacy is often referred to as the state of being free from unauthorized intrusion or observation in regards to one's personal health information. This includes maintaining confidentiality, restricting access to only those who have a legitimate need for the information, and protecting the information from being shared, disclosed, or used inappropriately. It is a fundamental right of individuals and is essential for maintaining trust in the healthcare system.

Health communication is the scientific field that uses communication strategies and methods to inform and influence individual health behaviors and organizational, community, and public policies. It combines disciplines such as psychology, sociology, anthropology, and public health to develop and disseminate messages that will improve health literacy, engage individuals in self-care, and promote positive changes in healthcare systems and policy. Health communication can be used to increase awareness of health issues, prevent the spread of diseases, reduce risky behaviors, and promote healthy lifestyles. It encompasses a wide range of activities including interpersonal communication between patients and healthcare providers, mass media campaigns, social marketing, patient education materials, and community-based participatory research.

Self care is a health practice that involves individuals taking responsibility for their own health and well-being by actively seeking out and participating in activities and behaviors that promote healthy living, prevent illness and disease, and manage existing medical conditions. Self care includes a wide range of activities such as:

* Following a healthy diet and exercise routine
* Getting adequate sleep and rest
* Managing stress through relaxation techniques or mindfulness practices
* Practicing good hygiene and grooming habits
* Seeking preventive care through regular check-ups and screenings
* Taking prescribed medications as directed by a healthcare provider
* Monitoring symptoms and seeking medical attention when necessary

Self care is an important part of overall health and wellness, and can help individuals maintain their physical, emotional, and mental health. It is also an essential component of chronic disease management, helping people with ongoing medical conditions to manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

Clinical competence is the ability of a healthcare professional to provide safe and effective patient care, demonstrating the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for the job. It involves the integration of theoretical knowledge with practical skills, judgment, and decision-making abilities in real-world clinical situations. Clinical competence is typically evaluated through various methods such as direct observation, case studies, simulations, and feedback from peers and supervisors.

A clinically competent healthcare professional should be able to:

1. Demonstrate a solid understanding of the relevant medical knowledge and its application in clinical practice.
2. Perform essential clinical skills proficiently and safely.
3. Communicate effectively with patients, families, and other healthcare professionals.
4. Make informed decisions based on critical thinking and problem-solving abilities.
5. Exhibit professionalism, ethical behavior, and cultural sensitivity in patient care.
6. Continuously evaluate and improve their performance through self-reflection and ongoing learning.

Maintaining clinical competence is essential for healthcare professionals to ensure the best possible outcomes for their patients and stay current with advances in medical science and technology.

Hispanic Americans, also known as Latino Americans, are individuals in the United States who are of Spanish-speaking origin or whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, Cuba, the Caribbean, Central and South America. This group includes various cultures, races, and nationalities. It is important to note that "Hispanic" refers to a cultural and linguistic affiliation rather than a racial category. Therefore, Hispanic Americans can be of any race, including White, Black, Asian, Native American, or mixed races.

Nursing methodology research is a type of scientific inquiry that focuses on the development, evaluation, and refinement of nursing interventions used in clinical practice. This research aims to determine the most effective and efficient methods for promoting health, preventing illness, and managing symptoms or conditions in patients receiving nursing care. Nursing methodology research can involve various study designs, including experimental, quasi-experimental, correlational, and qualitative approaches. The ultimate goal of this research is to contribute to evidence-based practice in nursing, which involves making clinical decisions based on the best available research evidence, patient preferences, and clinical expertise.

Interpersonal relations, in the context of medicine and healthcare, refer to the interactions and relationships between patients and healthcare professionals, as well as among healthcare professionals themselves. These relationships are crucial in the delivery of care and can significantly impact patient outcomes. Positive interpersonal relations can lead to improved communication, increased trust, greater patient satisfaction, and better adherence to treatment plans. On the other hand, negative or strained interpersonal relations can result in poor communication, mistrust, dissatisfaction, and non-adherence.

Healthcare professionals are trained to develop effective interpersonal skills, including active listening, empathy, respect, and cultural sensitivity, to build positive relationships with their patients. Effective interpersonal relations also involve clear and concise communication, setting appropriate boundaries, and managing conflicts in a constructive manner. In addition, positive interpersonal relations among healthcare professionals can promote collaboration, teamwork, and knowledge sharing, leading to improved patient care and safety.

A physician's role is defined as a licensed healthcare professional who practices medicine, diagnoses and treats injuries or illnesses, and promotes health and wellness. Physicians may specialize in various fields such as cardiology, dermatology, psychiatry, surgery, etc., requiring additional training and certification beyond medical school. They are responsible for providing comprehensive medical care to patients, including:

1. Obtaining a patient's medical history and performing physical examinations
2. Ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests
3. Developing treatment plans based on their diagnosis
4. Prescribing medications or performing procedures as necessary
5. Coordinating with other healthcare professionals for multidisciplinary care
6. Providing counseling and education to patients about their health, disease prevention, and wellness promotion
7. Advocating for their patients' rights and ensuring quality of care
8. Maintaining accurate medical records and staying updated on the latest medical research and advancements in their field.

Confidentiality is a legal and ethical principle in medicine that refers to the obligation of healthcare professionals to protect the personal and sensitive information of their patients. This information, which can include medical history, diagnosis, treatment plans, and other private details, is shared between the patient and the healthcare provider with the expectation that it will be kept confidential and not disclosed to third parties without the patient's consent.

Confidentiality is a fundamental component of the trust relationship between patients and healthcare providers, as it helps to ensure that patients feel safe and comfortable sharing sensitive information with their doctors, nurses, and other members of their healthcare team. It also helps to protect patients' privacy rights and uphold their autonomy in making informed decisions about their healthcare.

There are some limited circumstances in which confidentiality may be breached, such as when there is a legal obligation to report certain types of information (e.g., suspected child abuse or neglect), or when the disclosure is necessary to protect the health and safety of the patient or others. However, these exceptions are typically narrowly defined and subject to strict guidelines and safeguards to ensure that confidentiality is protected as much as possible.

Psychometrics is a branch of psychology that deals with the theory and technique of psychological measurement, such as the development and standardization of tests used to measure intelligence, aptitude, personality, attitudes, and other mental abilities or traits. It involves the construction and validation of measurement instruments, including the determination of their reliability and validity, and the application of statistical methods to analyze test data and interpret results. The ultimate goal of psychometrics is to provide accurate, objective, and meaningful measurements that can be used to understand individual differences and make informed decisions in educational, clinical, and organizational settings.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Internet" is a term that pertains to the global network of interconnected computers and servers that enable the transmission and reception of data via the internet protocol (IP). It is not a medical term and does not have a specific medical definition. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I'd be happy to try to help answer them for you!

I believe there may be a misunderstanding in your question. "Mothers" is a term that refers to individuals who have given birth to and raised children. It is not a medical term with a specific definition. If you are referring to a different word or term, please clarify so I can provide a more accurate response.

African traditional medicine (ATM) refers to the practices and beliefs regarding both physical and spiritual health and well-being that are indigenous to Africa. It includes various forms of healing, such as herbalism, spiritualism, and ancestral veneration, which may be practiced by traditional healers, including herbalists, diviners, and traditional birth attendants. These practices are often closely intertwined with the cultural, religious, and social beliefs of the community. It's important to note that the specific practices and beliefs can vary widely among different African cultures and communities.

Administrative personnel in a medical context typically refer to individuals who work in healthcare facilities or organizations, but do not provide direct patient care. Their roles involve supporting the management and operations of the healthcare system through various administrative tasks. These responsibilities may include managing schedules, coordinating appointments, handling billing and insurance matters, maintaining medical records, communicating with patients and other staff members, and performing various clerical duties.

Examples of administrative personnel in a medical setting might include medical office assistants, medical receptionists, medical billers, medical coders, medical transcriptionists, and healthcare administrators. While they do not provide direct patient care, their work is essential to ensuring the smooth functioning of healthcare services and the overall quality of patient care.

Psychological adaptation refers to the process by which individuals adjust and cope with stressors, challenges, or changes in their environment or circumstances. It involves modifying thoughts, feelings, behaviors, and copabilities to reduce the negative impact of these stressors and promote well-being. Psychological adaptation can occur at different levels, including intrapersonal (within the individual), interpersonal (between individuals), and cultural (within a group or society).

Examples of psychological adaptation include:

* Cognitive restructuring: changing negative thoughts and beliefs to more positive or adaptive ones
* Emotion regulation: managing and reducing intense or distressing emotions
* Problem-solving: finding solutions to practical challenges or obstacles
* Seeking social support: reaching out to others for help, advice, or comfort
* Developing coping strategies: using effective ways to deal with stressors or difficulties
* Cultivating resilience: bouncing back from adversity and learning from negative experiences.

Psychological adaptation is an important aspect of mental health and well-being, as it helps individuals adapt to new situations, overcome challenges, and maintain a sense of control and optimism in the face of stressors or changes.

"Attitude to Computers" is not a medical term or concept, but rather a social science or psychological one. It refers to an individual's feelings, beliefs, and behaviors towards computers and technology in general. This can include things like their comfort level using computers, their perception of the benefits and drawbacks of computer use, and their willingness to learn new technologies.

In some cases, a person's attitude towards computers may be influenced by factors such as their age, education level, work experience, and access to technology. For example, someone who grew up using computers and has had positive experiences with them is likely to have a more favorable attitude than someone who is not familiar with computers or has had negative experiences with them.

It's worth noting that attitudes towards computers can vary widely from person to person, and may change over time as technology evolves and becomes more integrated into daily life. Additionally, while an individual's attitude towards computers may not be a direct medical concern, it can have implications for their overall health and well-being, particularly in terms of their ability to access information, communicate with others, and participate in modern society.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Ontario" is not a medical term. It is the name of a province in Canada, similar to how "California" is the name of a state in the United States. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health conditions, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Uganda" is not a medical term or concept. It is the name of a country located in East Africa, known officially as the Republic of Uganda. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

Cooperative behavior, in a medical or healthcare context, refers to the actions and attitudes displayed by individuals or groups working together to achieve a common goal related to health and well-being. This may involve patients following their healthcare providers' advice, healthcare professionals collaborating to diagnose and treat medical conditions, or communities coming together to promote healthy behaviors and environments. Cooperative behavior is essential for positive health outcomes, as it fosters trust, communication, and shared decision-making between patients and healthcare providers, and helps to ensure that everyone involved in the care process is working towards the same goal.

An anecdote, in the context of medicine and healthcare, is a short narrative or description of a particular event or experience regarding a patient or a medical treatment. Anecdotes are often used in clinical settings to illustrate a point or to share a personal observation about a patient's response to a therapy.

However, anecdotes are generally considered to be a lower level of evidence than rigorous scientific studies because they are based on individual experiences and may not be representative of the broader population. Anecdotes can be subject to bias, including recall bias and confirmation bias, and may not account for other factors that could have influenced the outcome.

Therefore, while anecdotes can provide interesting insights and generate hypotheses for further investigation, they should not be used as the sole basis for making clinical decisions or recommendations. Instead, anecdotal evidence should be considered in conjunction with more rigorous scientific research to inform medical practice.

HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection is a viral illness that progressively attacks and weakens the immune system, making individuals more susceptible to other infections and diseases. The virus primarily infects CD4+ T cells, a type of white blood cell essential for fighting off infections. Over time, as the number of these immune cells declines, the body becomes increasingly vulnerable to opportunistic infections and cancers.

HIV infection has three stages:

1. Acute HIV infection: This is the initial stage that occurs within 2-4 weeks after exposure to the virus. During this period, individuals may experience flu-like symptoms such as fever, fatigue, rash, swollen glands, and muscle aches. The virus replicates rapidly, and the viral load in the body is very high.
2. Chronic HIV infection (Clinical latency): This stage follows the acute infection and can last several years if left untreated. Although individuals may not show any symptoms during this phase, the virus continues to replicate at low levels, and the immune system gradually weakens. The viral load remains relatively stable, but the number of CD4+ T cells declines over time.
3. AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome): This is the most advanced stage of HIV infection, characterized by a severely damaged immune system and numerous opportunistic infections or cancers. At this stage, the CD4+ T cell count drops below 200 cells/mm3 of blood.

It's important to note that with proper antiretroviral therapy (ART), individuals with HIV infection can effectively manage the virus, maintain a healthy immune system, and significantly reduce the risk of transmission to others. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for improving long-term health outcomes and reducing the spread of HIV.

Quality of health care is a term that refers to the degree to which health services for individuals and populations increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge. It encompasses various aspects such as:

1. Clinical effectiveness: The use of best available evidence to make decisions about prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and care. This includes considering the benefits and harms of different options and making sure that the most effective interventions are used.
2. Safety: Preventing harm to patients and minimizing risks associated with healthcare. This involves identifying potential hazards, implementing measures to reduce errors, and learning from adverse events to improve systems and processes.
3. Patient-centeredness: Providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values. This includes ensuring that patients are fully informed about their condition and treatment options, involving them in decision-making, and providing emotional support throughout the care process.
4. Timeliness: Ensuring that healthcare services are delivered promptly and efficiently, without unnecessary delays. This includes coordinating care across different providers and settings to ensure continuity and avoid gaps in service.
5. Efficiency: Using resources wisely and avoiding waste, while still providing high-quality care. This involves considering the costs and benefits of different interventions, as well as ensuring that healthcare services are equitably distributed.
6. Equitability: Ensuring that all individuals have access to quality healthcare services, regardless of their socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, gender, age, or other factors. This includes addressing disparities in health outcomes and promoting fairness and justice in healthcare.

Overall, the quality of health care is a multidimensional concept that requires ongoing evaluation and improvement to ensure that patients receive the best possible care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Great Britain" is not a medical concept or condition. It is a geographical and political term referring to the largest island in the British Isles, on which the majority of England, Scotland, and Wales are located. It's also used to refer to the political union of these three countries, which is called the United Kingdom. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Urban Population" is not a medical term. It is a demographic term used to describe the portion of a country's population that lives in areas classified as urban. The United Nations defines an urban area as a city, town, or other agglomeration with a population of 20,000 or more. However, the specific definition can vary by country and organization.

In contrast, medical terms typically refer to conditions, diseases, symptoms, treatments, or healthcare-related concepts. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to help if I can!

In a medical context, "faculty" most commonly refers to the inherent abilities or powers of a normal functioning part of the body or mind. For example, one might speak of the "faculties of perception" to describe the senses of sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell. It can also refer to the teaching staff or body of instructors at a medical school or other educational institution. Additionally, it can be used more generally to mean a capability or skill, as in "the faculty of quick thinking."

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "prejudice" is not a term that has a medical definition in the same way that a term like "myocardial infarction" (heart attack) does. Prejudice is a psychological or sociological concept that refers to preconceived opinions or attitudes about a person or group that are not based on reason or actual experience. It often involves stereotypes and can lead to discrimination or unfair treatment. While prejudice itself is not a medical condition, it can certainly have impacts on mental and physical health, both for those who experience it and for those who hold such biases.

Midwifery is the health profession that involves providing care to childbearing individuals and their newborns during pregnancy, labor, birth, and postpartum period. Midwives offer a range of services including: conducting physical examinations, monitoring the health of the fetus and mother, providing education and counseling on pregnancy-related topics, managing common complaints and complications, and collaborating with other healthcare professionals when necessary. They promote normal childbirth and work to minimize technological interventions, while ensuring the safety and well-being of both the mother and baby. Midwifery is based on the principles of informed choice, continuity of care, and evidence-based practice.

Social perception, in the context of psychology and social sciences, refers to the ability to interpret and understand other people's behavior, emotions, and intentions. It is the process by which we make sense of the social world around us, by observing and interpreting cues such as facial expressions, body language, tone of voice, and situational context.

In medical terminology, social perception is not a specific diagnosis or condition, but rather a cognitive skill that can be affected in various mental and neurological disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, and dementia. For example, individuals with autism may have difficulty interpreting social cues and understanding other people's emotions and intentions, while those with schizophrenia may have distorted perceptions of social situations and interactions.

Healthcare professionals who work with patients with cognitive or neurological disorders may assess their social perception skills as part of a comprehensive evaluation, in order to develop appropriate interventions and support strategies.

The "delivery of health care" refers to the process of providing medical services, treatments, and interventions to individuals in order to maintain, restore, or improve their health. This encompasses a wide range of activities, including:

1. Preventive care: Routine check-ups, screenings, immunizations, and counseling aimed at preventing illnesses or identifying them at an early stage.
2. Diagnostic services: Tests and procedures used to identify and understand medical conditions, such as laboratory tests, imaging studies, and biopsies.
3. Treatment interventions: Medical, surgical, or therapeutic treatments provided to manage acute or chronic health issues, including medications, surgeries, physical therapy, and psychotherapy.
4. Acute care services: Short-term medical interventions focused on addressing immediate health concerns, such as hospitalizations for infections, injuries, or complications from medical conditions.
5. Chronic care management: Long-term care and support provided to individuals with ongoing medical needs, such as those living with chronic diseases like diabetes, heart disease, or cancer.
6. Rehabilitation services: Programs designed to help patients recover from illnesses, injuries, or surgeries, focusing on restoring physical, cognitive, and emotional function.
7. End-of-life care: Palliative and hospice care provided to individuals facing terminal illnesses, with an emphasis on comfort, dignity, and quality of life.
8. Public health initiatives: Population-level interventions aimed at improving community health, such as disease prevention programs, health education campaigns, and environmental modifications.

The delivery of health care involves a complex network of healthcare professionals, institutions, and systems working together to ensure that patients receive the best possible care. This includes primary care physicians, specialists, nurses, allied health professionals, hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and public health organizations. Effective communication, coordination, and collaboration among these stakeholders are essential for high-quality, patient-centered care.

Community networks, in the context of public health and medical care, typically refer to local or regional networks of healthcare providers, organizations, and resources that work together to provide integrated and coordinated care to a defined population. These networks can include hospitals, clinics, primary care providers, specialists, mental health services, home health agencies, and other community-based organizations.

The goal of community networks is to improve the overall health outcomes of the population they serve by ensuring that individuals have access to high-quality, coordinated care that meets their unique needs. Community networks can also help to reduce healthcare costs by preventing unnecessary hospitalizations and emergency department visits through better management of chronic conditions and prevention efforts.

Effective community networks require strong partnerships, clear communication, and a shared commitment to improving the health of the community. They may be organized around geographic boundaries, such as a city or county, or around specific populations, such as individuals with chronic illnesses or low-income communities.

Traditional medicine (TM) refers to health practices, approaches, knowledge and beliefs incorporating plant, animal and mineral-based medicines, spiritual therapies, manual techniques and exercises, applied singularly or in combination to treat, diagnose and prevent illnesses or maintain well-being. Although traditional medicine has been practiced since prehistoric times, it is still widely used today and may include:

1. Traditional Asian medicines such as acupuncture, herbal remedies, and qigong from China; Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani and Siddha from India; and Jamu from Indonesia.
2. Traditional European herbal medicines, also known as phytotherapy.
3. North American traditional indigenous medicines, including Native American and Inuit practices.
4. African traditional medicines, such as herbal, spiritual, and manual techniques practiced in various African cultures.
5. South American traditional medicines, like Mapuche, Curanderismo, and Santo Daime practices from different countries.

It is essential to note that traditional medicine may not follow the scientific principles, evidence-based standards, or quality control measures inherent to conventional (also known as allopathic or Western) medicine. However, some traditional medicines have been integrated into modern healthcare systems and are considered complementary or alternative medicines (CAM). The World Health Organization encourages member states to develop policies and regulations for integrating TM/CAM practices into their healthcare systems, ensuring safety, efficacy, and quality while respecting cultural diversity.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Women" is not a medical term that can be defined in a straightforward way. In medical contexts, "women" is often used to refer to adult human females, based on their biological sex characteristics. However, it's important to note that there are individuals who may be biologically male but identify as women, and they are also considered part of the female population in many medical and societal contexts.

In general, gender identity is a personal sense of being male, female, or something else. It's separate from biological sex, which refers to physical characteristics like chromosomes, hormone levels, and reproductive organs. Some people identify with the gender that matches their biological sex, while others may identify as the opposite gender, or as neither male nor female.

Therefore, it's important to consider both the biological and personal aspects of an individual's identity when discussing medical issues related to women.

Health care surveys are research tools used to systematically collect information from a population or sample regarding their experiences, perceptions, and knowledge of health services, health outcomes, and various other health-related topics. These surveys typically consist of standardized questionnaires that cover specific aspects of healthcare, such as access to care, quality of care, patient satisfaction, health disparities, and healthcare costs. The data gathered from health care surveys are used to inform policy decisions, improve healthcare delivery, identify best practices, allocate resources, and monitor the health status of populations. Health care surveys can be conducted through various modes, including in-person interviews, telephone interviews, mail-in questionnaires, or online platforms.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Tanzania" is not a medical term. It is the name of a country located in East Africa. If you have any questions about medical terms or conditions, I would be happy to help clarify those for you.

Socioeconomic factors are a range of interconnected conditions and influences that affect the opportunities and resources a person or group has to maintain and improve their health and well-being. These factors include:

1. Economic stability: This includes employment status, job security, income level, and poverty status. Lower income and lack of employment are associated with poorer health outcomes.
2. Education: Higher levels of education are generally associated with better health outcomes. Education can affect a person's ability to access and understand health information, as well as their ability to navigate the healthcare system.
3. Social and community context: This includes factors such as social support networks, discrimination, and community safety. Strong social supports and positive community connections are associated with better health outcomes, while discrimination and lack of safety can negatively impact health.
4. Healthcare access and quality: Access to affordable, high-quality healthcare is an important socioeconomic factor that can significantly impact a person's health. Factors such as insurance status, availability of providers, and cultural competency of healthcare systems can all affect healthcare access and quality.
5. Neighborhood and built environment: The physical conditions in which people live, work, and play can also impact their health. Factors such as housing quality, transportation options, availability of healthy foods, and exposure to environmental hazards can all influence health outcomes.

Socioeconomic factors are often interrelated and can have a cumulative effect on health outcomes. For example, someone who lives in a low-income neighborhood with limited access to healthy foods and safe parks may also face challenges related to employment, education, and healthcare access that further impact their health. Addressing socioeconomic factors is an important part of promoting health equity and reducing health disparities.

I'm happy to help, but it seems there might be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Nurses" is not a medical term per se, but rather a job title or professional role within the healthcare field. Here's a brief description of what nurses do:

Nurses are healthcare professionals who work closely with patients to provide and coordinate care, education, and support. They play a critical role in promoting health, preventing illness, and helping patients cope with various medical conditions. Nurses can be found in various settings such as hospitals, clinics, private practices, long-term care facilities, community health centers, and patient homes.

There are different nursing specialties and levels of education, including:

1. Registered Nurse (RN): Typically holds an associate's or bachelor's degree in nursing and has passed a licensing exam. RNs provide direct patient care, administer medications, and coordinate treatment plans.
2. Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN): Has completed additional education and training beyond the RN level, often earning a master's or doctoral degree. APRNs can specialize in areas such as nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, certified registered nurse anesthetist, or certified nurse-midwife.
3. Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) or Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN): Holds a diploma or certificate from a practical nursing program and has passed a licensing exam. LPNs/LVNs provide basic patient care under the supervision of RNs and physicians.

These definitions are not exhaustive, but they should give you an idea of what nurses do and their roles within the healthcare system.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Kenya" is not a medical term. It is the name of a country located in East Africa, known for its diverse wildlife and geography, including savannas, lakelands, the dramatic Great Rift Valley, and mountain highlands. It is also where you can find the Maasai Mara Reserve, known for its annual wildebeest migrations, and vast Nairobi National Park. The capital city of Kenya is Nairobi. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Oceanic Ancestry Group" is not a standard medical term or classification. It seems to be a general term that refers to people who have ancestral origins in the Oceanic region, which includes countries like Australia, New Zealand, and various islands in the Pacific Ocean.

In genetic or genealogical contexts, it might refer to a group of populations sharing certain genetic characteristics due to their geographical and historical connections. However, it's important to note that such classifications can be oversimplified and may not accurately reflect the complex genetic histories and cultural identities of individuals.

If you're looking for a medical term related to ancestry or genetics, you might be thinking of "racial" or "ethnic" categories, which are sometimes used in medical research or clinical settings to describe patterns of disease risk or treatment response. However, these categories are also flawed and can oversimplify the genetic and cultural diversity within and between populations. It's generally more useful and accurate to consider each individual's unique genetic and environmental factors when considering their health and medical needs.

Quality of Life (QOL) is a broad, multidimensional concept that usually includes an individual's physical health, psychological state, level of independence, social relationships, personal beliefs, and their relationship to salient features of their environment. It reflects the impact of disease and treatment on a patient's overall well-being and ability to function in daily life.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines QOL as "an individual's perception of their position in life in the context of the culture and value systems in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standards and concerns." It is a subjective concept, meaning it can vary greatly from person to person.

In healthcare, QOL is often used as an outcome measure in clinical trials and other research studies to assess the impact of interventions or treatments on overall patient well-being.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Group Processes" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a term that is commonly used in the fields of psychology, social work, and group therapy to refer to the interactions and dynamics that occur within a group of people. This can include things like communication patterns, decision-making processes, power dynamics, and conflict resolution strategies.

In a medical or healthcare context, the term "group process" might be used to describe the way that a team of healthcare providers works together to make decisions about a patient's care, for example. However, it is not a term with a specific clinical diagnosis or medical definition.

Continuity of patient care is a concept in healthcare that refers to the consistent and seamless delivery of medical services to a patient over time, regardless of changes in their location or healthcare providers. It emphasizes the importance of maintaining clear communication, coordination, and information sharing among all members of a patient's healthcare team, including physicians, nurses, specialists, and other caregivers.

The goal of continuity of patient care is to ensure that patients receive high-quality, safe, and effective medical treatment that is tailored to their individual needs and preferences. This can help to reduce the risk of medical errors, improve patient outcomes, enhance patient satisfaction, and decrease healthcare costs.

There are several types of continuity that are important in patient care, including:

1. Relational continuity: This refers to the ongoing relationship between a patient and their primary care provider or team, who knows the patient's medical history, values, and preferences.
2. Management continuity: This involves the coordination and management of a patient's care across different settings, such as hospitals, clinics, and long-term care facilities.
3. Informational continuity: This refers to the sharing of accurate and up-to-date information among all members of a patient's healthcare team, including test results, medication lists, and treatment plans.

Continuity of patient care is particularly important for patients with chronic medical conditions, who require ongoing monitoring and management over an extended period. It can also help to reduce the risk of fragmented care, which can occur when patients receive care from multiple providers who do not communicate effectively with each other. By promoting continuity of care, healthcare systems can improve patient safety, quality of care, and overall health outcomes.

Physician's practice patterns refer to the individual habits and preferences of healthcare providers when it comes to making clinical decisions and managing patient care. These patterns can encompass various aspects, such as:

1. Diagnostic testing: The types and frequency of diagnostic tests ordered for patients with similar conditions.
2. Treatment modalities: The choice of treatment options, including medications, procedures, or referrals to specialists.
3. Patient communication: The way physicians communicate with their patients, including the amount and type of information shared, as well as the level of patient involvement in decision-making.
4. Follow-up care: The frequency and duration of follow-up appointments, as well as the monitoring of treatment effectiveness and potential side effects.
5. Resource utilization: The use of healthcare resources, such as hospitalizations, imaging studies, or specialist consultations, and the associated costs.

Physician practice patterns can be influenced by various factors, including medical training, clinical experience, personal beliefs, guidelines, and local availability of resources. Understanding these patterns is essential for evaluating the quality of care, identifying potential variations in care, and implementing strategies to improve patient outcomes and reduce healthcare costs.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "New South Wales" is not a medical term. It's actually the name of the largest state in Australia, known for its diverse landscapes and wildlife. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those!

In the context of public health and medical research, a peer group is a social group whose members have similar interests, concerns, or social positions. Peer groups can play an important role in shaping individual behaviors, attitudes, and beliefs, particularly during adolescence and young adulthood. In research, studying peer groups can help researchers understand how social norms and influences affect health-related behaviors, such as substance use, sexual behavior, and mental health. It's worth noting that the term "peer group" doesn't have a specific medical definition, but it is widely used in public health and medical research to refer to these types of social groups.

Community-institutional relations in a medical context generally refers to the interactions and relationships between healthcare institutions, such as hospitals or clinics, and the communities they serve. This can include initiatives and programs aimed at promoting community health, addressing social determinants of health, and building trust and engagement with community members. It may also involve collaborations and partnerships with other organizations, such as community-based organizations, public health agencies, and local government entities, to address shared health concerns and improve overall community wellbeing. Effective community-institutional relations can help to ensure that healthcare institutions are responsive to the needs of their communities and contribute to positive health outcomes.

In the context of medical education, a curriculum refers to the planned and organized sequence of experiences and learning opportunities designed to achieve specific educational goals and objectives. It outlines the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that medical students or trainees are expected to acquire during their training program. The curriculum may include various components such as lectures, small group discussions, clinical rotations, simulations, and other experiential learning activities. It is typically developed and implemented by medical education experts and faculty members in consultation with stakeholders, including learners, practitioners, and patients.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Australia" is not a medical term or concept. It is the world's largest island and smallest continent, located in the Southern Hemisphere, surrounded by the Pacific and Indian Oceans. It is composed of many diverse ecosystems, including deserts, rainforests, and coastal areas, and is home to a wide variety of unique plant and animal species.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer them for you!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "masculinity" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is a social and cultural concept related to the attitudes, behaviors, and roles generally associated with boys and men. Masculinity can vary greatly across different cultures and societies, and may include traits such as strength, courage, independence, and assertiveness. However, it's important to note that these traits are not exclusive to males, and people of any gender can embody them. It's also worth mentioning that toxic forms of masculinity, which emphasize stoicism, emotional repression, and aggression, can have negative impacts on mental and physical health.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Kansas" is not a medical term. It is a geographical location, being the name of a state in the central United States. If you have any questions about medical terms or conditions, I would be happy to help answer those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "social values" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, in a broader social context, "social values" refer to the beliefs, principles, and standards that a group or society holds in regard to what is considered important, desirable, or acceptable. These values can influence attitudes, behaviors, and decisions related to health and healthcare. They may also impact medical research, policy-making, and patient care.

Cross-cultural comparison is a research method used in various fields such as anthropology, sociology, psychology, and medical sciences to compare and contrast cultural practices, beliefs, values, and behaviors across different cultural groups. In the context of medicine, cross-cultural comparison involves examining health outcomes, illness experiences, healthcare systems, and medical practices across diverse populations to identify similarities and differences.

The goal of cross-cultural comparison in medicine is to enhance our understanding of how culture shapes health and illness, improve the cultural competence of healthcare providers, reduce health disparities, and develop culturally appropriate interventions and treatments. Cross-cultural comparison can help identify best practices and effective strategies that can be adapted and applied in different cultural contexts to promote health and wellbeing.

Examples of cross-cultural comparisons in medicine include comparing the prevalence and risk factors of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer across different populations, examining cultural differences in pain management and communication styles between patients and healthcare providers, and exploring the impact of traditional healing practices on mental health outcomes.

A feasibility study is a preliminary investigation or analysis conducted to determine the viability of a proposed project, program, or product. In the medical field, feasibility studies are often conducted before implementing new treatments, procedures, equipment, or facilities. These studies help to assess the practicality and effectiveness of the proposed intervention, as well as its potential benefits and risks.

Feasibility studies in healthcare typically involve several steps:

1. Problem identification: Clearly define the problem that the proposed project, program, or product aims to address.
2. Objectives setting: Establish specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound (SMART) objectives for the study.
3. Literature review: Conduct a thorough review of existing research and best practices related to the proposed intervention.
4. Methodology development: Design a methodology for data collection and analysis that will help answer the research questions and achieve the study's objectives.
5. Resource assessment: Evaluate the availability and adequacy of resources, including personnel, time, and finances, required to carry out the proposed intervention.
6. Risk assessment: Identify potential risks and challenges associated with the implementation of the proposed intervention and develop strategies to mitigate them.
7. Cost-benefit analysis: Estimate the costs and benefits of the proposed intervention, including direct and indirect costs, as well as short-term and long-term benefits.
8. Stakeholder engagement: Engage relevant stakeholders, such as patients, healthcare providers, administrators, and policymakers, to gather their input and support for the proposed intervention.
9. Decision-making: Based on the findings of the feasibility study, make an informed decision about whether or not to proceed with the proposed project, program, or product.

Feasibility studies are essential in healthcare as they help ensure that resources are allocated efficiently and effectively, and that interventions are evidence-based, safe, and beneficial for patients.

The term "family" in a medical context often refers to a group of individuals who are related by blood, marriage, or adoption and who consider themselves to be a single household. This can include spouses, parents, children, siblings, grandparents, and other extended family members. In some cases, the term may also be used more broadly to refer to any close-knit group of people who provide emotional and social support for one another, regardless of their biological or legal relationship.

In healthcare settings, understanding a patient's family dynamics can be important for providing effective care. Family members may be involved in decision-making about medical treatments, providing care and support at home, and communicating with healthcare providers. Additionally, cultural beliefs and values within families can influence health behaviors and attitudes towards medical care, making it essential for healthcare professionals to take a culturally sensitive approach when working with patients and their families.

A "social environment" is not a term that has a specific medical definition, but it is often used in the context of public health and social sciences to refer to the physical and social conditions, relationships, and organized institutions that influence the health and well-being of individuals and communities.

The social environment includes factors such as:

* Social support networks (family, friends, community)
* Cultural norms and values
* Socioeconomic status (income, education, occupation)
* Housing and neighborhood conditions
* Access to resources (food, healthcare, transportation)
* Exposure to discrimination, violence, and other stressors

These factors can have a significant impact on health outcomes, as they can influence behaviors related to health (such as diet, exercise, and substance use), as well as exposure to disease and access to healthcare. Understanding the social environment is essential for developing effective public health interventions and policies that promote health equity and reduce health disparities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Vietnam" is not a medical term. It is the name of a country located in Southeast Asia. If you have any questions about medical conditions or terminology, I would be happy to help clarify those for you.

Counseling is a therapeutic intervention that involves a trained professional working with an individual, family, or group to help them understand and address their problems, concerns, or challenges. The goal of counseling is to help the person develop skills, insights, and resources that will allow them to make positive changes in their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and improve their overall mental health and well-being.

Counseling can take many forms, depending on the needs and preferences of the individual seeking help. Some common approaches include cognitive-behavioral therapy, psychodynamic therapy, humanistic therapy, and solution-focused brief therapy. These approaches may be used alone or in combination with other interventions, such as medication or group therapy.

The specific goals and techniques of counseling will vary depending on the individual's needs and circumstances. However, some common objectives of counseling include:

* Identifying and understanding the underlying causes of emotional or behavioral problems
* Developing coping skills and strategies to manage stress, anxiety, depression, or other mental health concerns
* Improving communication and relationship skills
* Enhancing self-esteem and self-awareness
* Addressing substance abuse or addiction issues
* Resolving conflicts and making difficult decisions
* Grieving losses and coping with life transitions

Counseling is typically provided by licensed mental health professionals, such as psychologists, social workers, marriage and family therapists, and professional counselors. These professionals have completed advanced education and training in counseling techniques and theories, and are qualified to provide a range of therapeutic interventions to help individuals, families, and groups achieve their goals and improve their mental health.

Professional ethics in the medical field are a set of principles that guide physicians and other healthcare professionals in their interactions with patients, colleagues, and society. These ethical standards are based on values such as respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. They help to ensure that medical professionals provide high-quality care that is safe, effective, and respectful of patients' rights and dignity.

Some key principles of professional ethics in medicine include:

1. Respect for autonomy: Healthcare professionals should respect patients' right to make their own decisions about their healthcare, including the right to refuse treatment.
2. Non-maleficence: Medical professionals have a duty to avoid causing harm to their patients. This includes avoiding unnecessary tests or treatments that may cause harm or waste resources.
3. Beneficence: Healthcare professionals have a duty to act in the best interests of their patients and to promote their well-being.
4. Justice: Medical professionals should treat all patients fairly and without discrimination, and should work to ensure that healthcare resources are distributed equitably.
5. Confidentiality: Medical professionals have a duty to keep patient information confidential, unless the patient gives permission to share it or there is a legal or ethical obligation to disclose it.
6. Professional competence: Medical professionals have a duty to maintain their knowledge and skills, and to provide care that meets accepted standards of practice.
7. Honesty and integrity: Medical professionals should be honest and truthful in their interactions with patients, colleagues, and other stakeholders. They should avoid conflicts of interest and should disclose any potential conflicts to patients and others.
8. Responsibility to society: Medical professionals have a responsibility to contribute to the health and well-being of society as a whole, including advocating for policies that promote public health and addressing health disparities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Ghana" is not a medical term. It is the name of a country located in West Africa, known officially as the Republic of Ghana. If you have any questions about medical terms or conditions, I would be happy to help with those!

Nurse-patient relations refer to the interactions and relationships between registered nurses (RNs) or licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and their patients. This relationship is based on trust, respect, and collaboration, with the goal of providing safe, effective, and compassionate care that promotes the physical, emotional, and psychological well-being of the patient.

The nurse-patient relationship involves several key elements, including:

1. Communication: Effective communication is essential in the nurse-patient relationship. Nurses must listen actively to their patients, understand their needs and concerns, and provide clear and concise information about their care.
2. Empathy: Nurses should demonstrate empathy and compassion towards their patients, recognizing their feelings and emotions and providing emotional support when needed.
3. Autonomy: Nurses should respect their patients' autonomy and self-determination, involving them in decision-making about their care and promoting their independence whenever possible.
4. Confidentiality: Nurses must maintain confidentiality and protect their patients' privacy, ensuring that sensitive information is shared only with those who have a legitimate need to know.
5. Advocacy: Nurses should advocate for their patients, ensuring that they receive the care and resources they need to achieve optimal health outcomes.

Overall, nurse-patient relations are critical to the delivery of high-quality healthcare and can significantly impact patient satisfaction, adherence to treatment plans, and clinical outcomes.

Adolescent health services refer to medical and related services that are specifically designed to meet the unique physical, mental, emotional, and social needs of young people between the ages of 10-24 years. These services encompass a broad range of interventions, including preventive care, acute and chronic disease management, reproductive health care, mental health services, substance use treatment, and health promotion and education. The goal of adolescent health services is to support young people in achieving optimal health and well-being as they navigate the complex transitions of adolescence and early adulthood. Such services may be provided in a variety of settings, including primary care clinics, schools, community health centers, and specialized youth clinics.

Patient-centered care is a healthcare approach that places the patient at the center of the care experience and considers their preferences, values, and needs in making clinical decisions. It is based on partnership between the patient and healthcare provider, with open communication, mutual respect, and shared decision-making. Patient-centered care aims to improve the quality of care, increase patient satisfaction, and lead to better health outcomes by addressing not only the medical needs but also the emotional, social, and cultural factors that affect a patient's health.

A Patient Care Team is a group of healthcare professionals from various disciplines who work together to provide comprehensive, coordinated care to a patient. The team may include doctors, nurses, pharmacists, social workers, physical therapists, dietitians, and other specialists as needed, depending on the patient's medical condition and healthcare needs.

The Patient Care Team works collaboratively to develop an individualized care plan for the patient, taking into account their medical history, current health status, treatment options, and personal preferences. The team members communicate regularly to share information, coordinate care, and make any necessary adjustments to the care plan.

The goal of a Patient Care Team is to ensure that the patient receives high-quality, safe, and effective care that is tailored to their unique needs and preferences. By working together, the team can provide more comprehensive and coordinated care, which can lead to better outcomes for the patient.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "poverty" is not a medical condition or term. It is a social condition defined by the World Bank as "pronounced deprivation in well-being," and measured through indicators such as income, consumption, and access to basic services. Poverty can have significant impacts on health outcomes and healthcare access, but it is not considered a medical diagnosis. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try my best to help answer them!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "teaching" is a general term that refers to the act of imparting knowledge or skills to others and is not a medical term. However, in the context of medical education, teaching refers to the instruction and training of medical students, residents, fellows, and other healthcare professionals to develop their knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for providing high-quality patient care. This can take place in various settings such as classrooms, clinical wards, simulation centers, or online platforms, and can involve a range of teaching methods including lectures, small group discussions, bedside teaching, case-based learning, and hands-on training.

I'm happy to help! However, I must clarify that "information dissemination" is not a medical term per se, but rather a general term used in various fields, including healthcare and medicine. It refers to the process of spreading or distributing information to a specific audience or the public.

In the context of medicine and healthcare, information dissemination often relates to sharing clinical guidelines, research findings, public health messages, or patient education materials with healthcare professionals, patients, or the general public. This can occur through various channels, such as scientific conferences, peer-reviewed journals, newsletters, websites, social media platforms, and other communication methods.

The goal of information dissemination in medicine is to ensure that accurate, evidence-based, and up-to-date information reaches the intended audience, ultimately improving healthcare quality, patient outcomes, and decision-making processes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "leadership" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Leadership is a concept that relates to the ability of an individual or an organization's management to set and achieve challenging goals, take swift and decisive action, outperform the competition, and inspire others to perform at their best.

In healthcare settings, leadership refers to the skills, behaviors, and attitudes of those in positions of authority within a healthcare organization. Effective healthcare leaders are able to create a positive organizational culture, communicate a clear vision, motivate and engage staff, manage resources effectively, and ensure high-quality patient care. They must also be able to adapt to changing circumstances, make informed decisions based on data and evidence, and work collaboratively with other healthcare professionals and stakeholders.

Patient preference, in the context of medical decision-making, refers to the individual desires, values, and concerns that a patient considers when choosing between different treatment options. It is based on the patient's own experiences, beliefs, and needs, and may take into account factors such as potential benefits, risks, side effects, costs, and convenience. Patient preferences should be respected and integrated into clinical decision-making processes whenever possible, in order to promote patient-centered care and improve outcomes.

Medical mass screening, also known as population screening, is a public health service that aims to identify and detect asymptomatic individuals in a given population who have or are at risk of a specific disease. The goal is to provide early treatment, reduce morbidity and mortality, and prevent the spread of diseases within the community.

A mass screening program typically involves offering a simple, quick, and non-invasive test to a large number of people in a defined population, regardless of their risk factors or symptoms. Those who test positive are then referred for further diagnostic tests and appropriate medical interventions. Examples of mass screening programs include mammography for breast cancer detection, PSA (prostate-specific antigen) testing for prostate cancer, and fecal occult blood testing for colorectal cancer.

It is important to note that mass screening programs should be evidence-based, cost-effective, and ethically sound, with clear benefits outweighing potential harms. They should also consider factors such as the prevalence of the disease in the population, the accuracy and reliability of the screening test, and the availability and effectiveness of treatment options.

"Men" is not a medical term that can be defined in a medical context. It generally refers to adult male human beings. If you are looking for a medical definition related to males, there are several terms that could potentially fit based on the context. Here are some examples:

* Male: A person who is biologically determined to be male, typically having XY chromosomes, testes, and certain physical characteristics such as greater muscle mass and body hair compared to females.
* Men's health: Refers to the branch of medicine that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of medical conditions that are more common or specific to males, such as prostate cancer, testicular cancer, and erectile dysfunction.
* Menopause: A natural biological process that occurs in women, typically in their 40s or 50s, when their ovaries stop producing hormones and menstrual periods cease. Although not directly related to males, it is worth noting that some men may experience symptoms similar to those of menopause due to a decline in testosterone levels as they age (a condition known as andropause).

I hope this helps clarify! Let me know if you have any further questions or need more information.

Gender Identity is a deeply-held sense of being male, female, or something else and may not necessarily correspond to an individual's biological sex. It is a personal experience of gender that may include a person's sense of the role they should play in society, their self-image, expectations of how they should be treated by others, and their feelings about their bodies. This concept is a fundamental aspect of a person's self-concept and psychological well-being. It is separate from a person's sexual orientation.

The American Psychiatric Association states that "gender identity refers to a person’s internal sense of gender, or the feeling of being male, female, or something else." According to the World Health Organization (WHO), "gender identity refers to a person’s deeply-felt sense of being male, female or something else and may not necessarily correspond to an individual’s biological sex."

It's important to note that gender identity is a complex and nuanced concept, and it can change over time for some individuals. It's also distinct from sexual orientation, which refers to a person's emotional, romantic, or sexual attraction to other people.

In medical terminology, 'taboo' does not have a specific definition as it is more commonly used in anthropological or sociological contexts. However, generally speaking, a taboo refers to a social or religious custom that prohibits something considered sacred, holy, or forbidden. It often involves behaviors, words, or subjects that are considered offensive, shocking, or dangerous, and are avoided or punished in certain cultures or societies. In a medical setting, healthcare professionals may encounter taboos related to cultural practices, patient beliefs, or sensitive topics that require cultural competence and sensitivity to address appropriately.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "South Africa" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located at the southernmost tip of the African continent. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to help answer them!

Cultural anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that focuses on the study of human culture, society, and behavior. It seeks to understand the ways in which different cultural groups organize and structure their social lives, as well as the meanings and symbols that shape their beliefs, practices, and institutions. Cultural anthropologists conduct ethnographic research, which involves immersing themselves in a particular cultural setting and observing and participating in the daily lives of its members. They generate detailed descriptions and analyses of cultural phenomena, with the aim of providing insights into both the specificity of individual cultures and the broader patterns of human social and cultural life. Cultural anthropology has important applications in fields such as international development, public health, education, and business, where an understanding of cultural differences is essential for effective communication, collaboration, and problem-solving.

I am not a doctor, but I can tell you that religion is not a concept that has a medical definition. Religion generally refers to the belief in and worship of a superhuman controlling power, especially a personal God or gods. It involves specific practices and rituals, codes of conduct, sacred texts, and an organized community of believers.

However, in some contexts, religion may be discussed in a medical setting as it relates to a patient's beliefs, values, and cultural background, which can all impact their health and healthcare decisions. In such cases, healthcare providers might use terms like "spirituality" or "religious coping" to describe how a patient's religious practices or beliefs affect their health and well-being. But there is no specific medical definition for religion itself.

I apologize, but "Canada" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in North America, known for its vast wilderness, multicultural cities, and significant natural resources. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terms, I would be happy to help answer those!

I'm assuming you are asking for a definition of "medical students." Here it is:

Medical students are individuals who are enrolled in a program of study to become medical doctors. They typically complete four years of undergraduate education before entering a medical school, where they spend another four years studying basic sciences and clinical medicine. After completing medical school, they become physicians (M.D.) and continue their training through residency programs in their chosen specialties. Some medical students may choose to pursue a research career and complete a Ph.D. during or after medical school.

Professional competence, in the context of medicine, refers to the possession of the necessary skills, knowledge, and behaviors required for the provision of high-quality healthcare services. It involves the ability to apply medical knowledge and clinical skills effectively in practice, make informed and evidence-based decisions, communicate clearly and effectively with patients and colleagues, demonstrate professionalism and ethical behavior, and engage in continuous learning and improvement.

Professional competence is evaluated through various means, including assessments of clinical skills, knowledge tests, patient feedback, and peer reviews. It is an ongoing process that requires healthcare professionals to continually update their knowledge and skills, adapt to changes in medical practice, and strive for excellence in patient care. Maintaining professional competence is essential for ensuring the safety and quality of healthcare services and is a key component of medical regulation and licensure.

An emigrant is a person who leaves their native country to live permanently in another country. The process of leaving one's country to settle in another is called emigration.

On the other hand, an immigrant is a person who comes to live permanently in a foreign country. The process of coming to live permanently in a new country is called immigration.

So, the main difference between emigrants and immigrants lies in the perspective: emigrants are people leaving their own country, while immigrants are people entering a new country.

Biomedical research is a branch of scientific research that involves the study of biological processes and diseases in order to develop new treatments and therapies. This type of research often involves the use of laboratory techniques, such as cell culture and genetic engineering, as well as clinical trials in humans. The goal of biomedical research is to advance our understanding of how living organisms function and to find ways to prevent and treat various medical conditions. It encompasses a wide range of disciplines, including molecular biology, genetics, immunology, pharmacology, and neuroscience, among others. Ultimately, the aim of biomedical research is to improve human health and well-being.

Urban health services refer to the provision of healthcare and public health programs in urban areas, designed to meet the unique needs and challenges of urban populations. These services encompass a wide range of facilities, professionals, and interventions that aim to improve the health and well-being of people living in urban environments. They often address issues such as infectious diseases, chronic conditions, mental health, environmental hazards, and social determinants of health that are prevalent or amplified in urban settings. Examples of urban health services include hospital systems, community health centers, outreach programs, and policy initiatives focused on improving the health of urban populations.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

Health plan implementation is not a medical term per se, but rather a term used in the context of healthcare management and administration. It refers to the process of putting into action the plans, strategies, and policies of a health insurance or healthcare benefit program. This includes activities such as:

1. Designing and structuring health benefits and coverage options
2. Developing provider networks and reimbursement rates
3. Establishing procedures for claims processing and utilization management
4. Implementing care management programs to improve health outcomes and reduce costs
5. Communicating the plan details to members and providers
6. Ensuring compliance with relevant laws, regulations, and accreditation standards

The goal of health plan implementation is to create a well-functioning healthcare benefit program that meets the needs of its members while managing costs and ensuring quality care.

Rural health is a branch of healthcare that focuses on the unique health challenges and needs of people living in rural areas. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines rural health as "the state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, in the rural population."

Rural populations often face disparities in healthcare access and quality compared to their urban counterparts. Factors such as geographic isolation, poverty, lack of transportation, and a shortage of healthcare providers can contribute to these disparities. Rural health encompasses a broad range of services, including primary care, prevention, chronic disease management, mental health, oral health, and emergency medical services.

The goal of rural health is to improve the health outcomes of rural populations by addressing these unique challenges and providing high-quality, accessible healthcare services that meet their needs. This may involve innovative approaches such as telemedicine, mobile health clinics, and community-based programs to reach people in remote areas.

Social work is a professional field of practice that promotes social change, problem-solving in human relationships, and the empowerment and liberation of people to enhance well-being. According to the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW), social work involves "the application of social sciences, theory, knowledge, and skills to effect positive changes in individuals, groups, communities, and societies."

Social workers are trained to work with individuals, families, groups, and communities to address a wide range of social, emotional, and practical needs. They help people navigate complex systems, access resources, and advocate for their rights. Social workers may be employed in various settings, including hospitals, mental health clinics, schools, community centers, and government agencies.

In medical settings, social work is often focused on helping patients and their families cope with illness, disability, or injury. Medical social workers provide counseling, support, and advocacy to help patients and families navigate the healthcare system, access needed resources, and make informed decisions about treatment options. They may also assist with discharge planning, coordinating care transitions, and connecting patients with community-based services.

Medical social work is a specialized area of practice that requires knowledge and skills in areas such as psychosocial assessment, crisis intervention, case management, and advocacy. Medical social workers must be able to communicate effectively with healthcare professionals, patients, and families, and have a deep understanding of the social determinants of health and the impact of illness on individuals and communities.

Transgender is a term used to describe people whose gender identity differs from the sex they were assigned at birth. It's important to note that being transgender is not a mental illness; it's a part of human diversity.

According to the American Psychiatric Association, a transgender person may be diagnosed with gender dysphoria if they experience significant distress or impairment in their daily life due to this incongruence between their experienced/expressed gender and their assigned sex. However, many transgender people do not experience such distress and therefore do not have a mental disorder.

It's also crucial to respect each individual's self-identified gender and use the appropriate pronouns they prefer. Discrimination and stigma against transgender individuals can lead to serious health disparities, including higher rates of mental health issues, substance abuse, and suicide.

Informed consent is a process in medical care where patients are provided with all relevant information about their health status, proposed treatments, potential risks and benefits, and alternative options. This allows patients to make informed decisions regarding their healthcare and understand the consequences of their choices. The process includes ensuring that the patient has adequate mental capacity to make such decisions, is fully aware of the implications, and gives their voluntary agreement for the proposed treatment or procedure. It's a fundamental principle in medical ethics and is required by law in many jurisdictions to protect patients' rights.

Adolescent psychology is a branch of psychology that focuses on the study of adolescents, their behavior, thoughts, and emotions. This field examines the cognitive, social, and emotional development of adolescents, as well as any challenges or mental health issues they may face during this stage of life. It also involves the application of psychological theories and principles to promote positive adolescent development and address adolescent mental health concerns. Adolescent psychologists work in various settings, including schools, clinics, hospitals, and private practices, providing assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and counseling services to adolescents and their families.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Netherlands" is not a medical term. It is a country located in Western Europe, known for its artistic heritage, elaborate canal system, and legalized marijuana and prostitution. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

Maternal health services refer to the preventative, diagnostic, and treatment-based healthcare services provided during pregnancy, childbirth, and postnatal period. These services aim to ensure the best possible health outcomes for mothers throughout their reproductive years, including family planning, preconception care, antenatal care, delivery, postpartum care, and management of chronic conditions or complications that may arise during pregnancy and childbirth.

The World Health Organization (WHO) outlines several critical components of maternal health services:

1. Antenatal care: Regular check-ups to monitor the mother's and fetus's health, identify potential risks, provide essential interventions, and offer counseling on nutrition, breastfeeding, and birth preparedness.
2. Delivery care: Skilled attendance during childbirth, including normal vaginal delivery and assisted deliveries (forceps or vacuum extraction), and access to emergency obstetric care for complications such as hemorrhage, eclampsia, obstructed labor, and sepsis.
3. Postnatal care: Continuum of care for mothers and newborns during the first six weeks after childbirth, focusing on recovery, early detection and management of complications, immunization, family planning, and psychosocial support.
4. Family planning: Access to modern contraceptive methods, counseling on fertility awareness, and safe abortion services where legal, to enable women to plan their pregnancies and space their children according to their reproductive intentions.
5. Management of chronic conditions: Comprehensive care for pregnant women with pre-existing or pregnancy-induced medical conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, and mental health disorders.
6. Preconception care: Identification and management of risk factors before conception to optimize maternal and fetal health outcomes.
7. Prevention and management of gender-based violence: Screening, counseling, and referral services for women experiencing intimate partner violence or sexual violence during pregnancy and childbirth.
8. Health promotion and education: Community-based interventions to raise awareness about the importance of maternal health, promote positive health behaviors, and reduce barriers to accessing healthcare services.

Maternal health services should be accessible, affordable, acceptable, and equitable for all women, regardless of their age, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, or geographical location. Adequate investment in maternal health infrastructure, human resources, and service delivery models is essential to achieve universal health coverage and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Teaching Materials" is not a medical term or concept. It generally refers to resources and tools used by educators to facilitate learning, which can include textbooks, multimedia presentations, handouts, and other materials used in educational settings. If you have a specific term related to medicine or healthcare in mind, please let me know so I can provide a more accurate definition.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "North Carolina" is a geographical location and not a medical term or condition. It is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States. If you have any questions about medical terms or conditions, I'd be happy to help with those!

Primary care physicians are medical professionals who provide first-contact and continuous care for patients with acute and chronic physical, mental, and social health problems. They serve as the patient's main point of entry into the healthcare system and act as the patient's advocate in coordinating access to and delivery of appropriate healthcare services. Primary care physicians may include general practitioners, family medicine specialists, internists, pediatricians, and geriatricians.

Primary care involves the widest scope of healthcare, including all ages of patients, patients of all socioeconomic and geographic origins, and patients seeking to maintain optimal health, as well as those with all types of acute and chronic physical, mental and social health issues. Primary care includes disease prevention, health promotion, patient education, and diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illnesses.

Primary care physicians are trained to recognize a wide range of health problems and to provide initial treatment or make referrals to medical subspecialists or other healthcare professionals as needed. They may also provide ongoing, person-centered care, including chronic disease management, and they play an important role in coordinating the care provided by other healthcare professionals and specialists.

Primary care physicians are often based in community settings such as private practices, community health centers, or hospital outpatient departments, and they may work in teams with nurses, social workers, mental health professionals, and other healthcare providers to provide comprehensive, patient-centered care.

Reproducibility of results in a medical context refers to the ability to obtain consistent and comparable findings when a particular experiment or study is repeated, either by the same researcher or by different researchers, following the same experimental protocol. It is an essential principle in scientific research that helps to ensure the validity and reliability of research findings.

In medical research, reproducibility of results is crucial for establishing the effectiveness and safety of new treatments, interventions, or diagnostic tools. It involves conducting well-designed studies with adequate sample sizes, appropriate statistical analyses, and transparent reporting of methods and findings to allow other researchers to replicate the study and confirm or refute the results.

The lack of reproducibility in medical research has become a significant concern in recent years, as several high-profile studies have failed to produce consistent findings when replicated by other researchers. This has led to increased scrutiny of research practices and a call for greater transparency, rigor, and standardization in the conduct and reporting of medical research.

Sexual behavior refers to any physical or emotional interaction that has the potential to lead to sexual arousal and/or satisfaction. This can include a wide range of activities, such as kissing, touching, fondling, oral sex, vaginal sex, anal sex, and masturbation. It can also involve the use of sexual aids, such as vibrators or pornography.

Sexual behavior is influenced by a variety of factors, including biological, psychological, social, and cultural influences. It is an important aspect of human development and relationships, and it is essential to healthy sexual functioning and satisfaction. However, sexual behavior can also be associated with risks, such as sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unintended pregnancies, and it is important for individuals to engage in safe and responsible sexual practices.

It's important to note that sexual behavior can vary widely among individuals and cultures, and what may be considered normal or acceptable in one culture or context may not be in another. It's also important to recognize that all individuals have the right to make informed decisions about their own sexual behavior and to have their sexual rights and autonomy respected.

Women's health is a branch of healthcare that focuses on the unique health needs, conditions, and concerns of women throughout their lifespan. It covers a broad range of topics including menstruation, fertility, pregnancy, menopause, breast health, sexual health, mental health, and chronic diseases that are more common in women such as osteoporosis and autoimmune disorders. Women's health also addresses issues related to gender-based violence, socioeconomic factors, and environmental impacts on women's health. It is aimed at promoting and maintaining the physical, emotional, and reproductive well-being of women, and preventing and treating diseases and conditions that disproportionately affect them.

In the context of healthcare, "safety" refers to the freedom from harm or injury that is intentionally designed into a process, system, or environment. It involves the prevention of adverse events or injuries, as well as the reduction of risk and the mitigation of harm when accidents do occur. Safety in healthcare aims to protect patients, healthcare workers, and other stakeholders from potential harm associated with medical care, treatments, or procedures. This is achieved through evidence-based practices, guidelines, protocols, training, and continuous quality improvement efforts.

I couldn't find a medical definition specifically for "professional-family relations," as it is more commonly referred to as "professional-patient relationship" in the medical field. However, I can provide you with the definition of professional-patient relationship:

A professional-patient relationship is a formal relationship between a healthcare provider and a patient, characterized by trust, honesty, and mutual respect. The healthcare provider has a duty to act in the best interest of the patient, providing competent and ethical care, while maintaining appropriate boundaries and confidentiality. Effective communication, shared decision-making, and informed consent are essential components of this relationship.

Family members may also be involved in the professional-patient relationship, particularly when the patient is unable to make decisions for themselves or when family involvement is necessary for the patient's care. In these cases, healthcare providers must communicate clearly and respectfully with family members while still maintaining the primary focus on the patient's needs and autonomy.

A research design in medical or healthcare research is a systematic plan that guides the execution and reporting of research to address a specific research question or objective. It outlines the overall strategy for collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data to draw valid conclusions. The design includes details about the type of study (e.g., experimental, observational), sampling methods, data collection techniques, data analysis approaches, and any potential sources of bias or confounding that need to be controlled for. A well-defined research design helps ensure that the results are reliable, generalizable, and relevant to the research question, ultimately contributing to evidence-based practice in medicine and healthcare.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "pamphlets" is not a medical term. It refers to a small paper booklet or leaflet that can be used to provide information on various topics, including non-medical subjects. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those!

Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is a medical approach that combines the best available scientific evidence with clinical expertise and patient values to make informed decisions about diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. It emphasizes the use of systematic research, including randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses, to guide clinical decision making. EBM aims to provide the most effective and efficient care while minimizing variations in practice, reducing errors, and improving patient outcomes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Organizational Case Studies" is not a medical term. It is a term that is used in various fields including business, management, and social sciences to describe the analysis of a specific organization or a particular aspect of its functioning. An organizational case study typically involves an in-depth examination of an organization, including its structure, culture, processes, and outcomes, with the aim of understanding its performance, challenges, and opportunities for improvement.

In healthcare, case studies are often used to examine specific clinical scenarios or patient cases. However, "Organizational Case Studies" in a medical context might refer to the study of healthcare organizations, such as hospitals or clinics, to analyze their management practices, quality of care, financial performance, and other factors that can impact patient outcomes and overall organizational success.

Allied health personnel refers to a group of healthcare professionals who are licensed or regulated to provide specific services within the healthcare system. They work in collaboration with physicians and other healthcare providers to deliver comprehensive medical care. Allied health personnel include various disciplines such as:

1. Occupational therapists
2. Physical therapists
3. Speech-language pathologists
4. Audiologists
5. Respiratory therapists
6. Dietitians and nutritionists
7. Social workers
8. Diagnostic medical sonographers
9. Radiologic technologists
10. Clinical laboratory scientists
11. Genetic counselors
12. Rehabilitation counselors
13. Therapeutic recreation specialists

These professionals play a crucial role in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of various medical conditions and are essential members of the healthcare team.

Guideline adherence, in the context of medicine, refers to the extent to which healthcare professionals follow established clinical practice guidelines or recommendations in their daily practice. These guidelines are systematically developed statements designed to assist practitioners and patient decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. Adherence to evidence-based guidelines can help improve the quality of care, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote optimal patient outcomes. Factors that may influence guideline adherence include clinician awareness, familiarity, agreement, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and the complexity of the recommendation.

Sex education is a systematic instruction or information regarding human sexuality, including human reproduction, sexual anatomy and physiology, sexually transmitted infections, sexual activity, sexual orientation, emotional relations, reproductive health, and safe sex, among other topics. It is usually taught in schools but can also be provided by healthcare professionals, parents, or community organizations. The aim of sex education is to equip individuals with the knowledge and skills necessary to make informed decisions about their sexual health and relationships while promoting responsible and respectful attitudes towards sexuality.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but 'sexism' is not a term that has a medical definition. It is a social or cultural term that refers to prejudice, stereotypes, or discrimination, typically against women, on the basis of sex. If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

Self-efficacy is not a medical term per se, but it is widely used in medical and health-related contexts. It is a concept from social cognitive theory that refers to an individual's belief in their ability to successfully perform specific tasks or achieve certain goals, particularly in the face of challenges or adversity.

In medical settings, self-efficacy can refer to a patient's confidence in their ability to manage their health condition, adhere to treatment plans, and engage in healthy behaviors. For example, a person with diabetes who has high self-efficacy may feel confident in their ability to monitor their blood sugar levels, follow a healthy diet, and exercise regularly, even if they encounter obstacles or setbacks.

Research has shown that self-efficacy is an important predictor of health outcomes, as individuals with higher self-efficacy are more likely to engage in positive health behaviors and experience better health outcomes than those with lower self-efficacy. Healthcare providers may seek to enhance patients' self-efficacy through education, counseling, and support to help them manage their health condition more effectively.

Variants of focus groups include: Two-way focus group - one focus group watches another focus group and discusses the observed ... focus groups can be used for learning about group attitudes and patterns of interaction. An advantage of focus groups is their ... web focus groups - live group conducted over the phone and online with 6 to 8 participants. When conducting a focus-group ... He later established focus groups for the Bureau of Applied Social Research. The use of focus groups by sociologists gained ...
"The Focus Group" (Frasier episode), an episode of season 3 of American sitcom Frasier Online focus group, a type of focus group ... a 1930s organisation operated by a group known as Focus in Defence of Freedom and Peace or the Focus Group Focus Group Holdings ... A focus group is a group interview involving a small number of demographically similar people or participants who have other ... Focus (disambiguation) This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Focus Group. If an internal link led ...
An online focus group is one type of focus group, and is a sub-set of online research methods. They are typically an ... Like in-person focus groups, online groups are usually limited to 8-10 participants. 'Whiteboard' exercises and the ability to ... In addition to the savings on travel, online focus groups often can be accomplished faster than traditional groups because ... While at a conference in Scottsdale, Arizona in June, 1995 they led an online focus group on the Perdiem laxative brand which ...
... is a project of experimental electronic musician and graphic designer Julian House. The Focus Group's sound is ... The Focus Group have released five studio albums on House's own label, Ghost Box: Sketches and Spells (2004), Hey Let Loose ... "The Focus Group - Ghost Box". Ghostbox.co.uk. Retrieved 4 March 2020. "The Wire magazine best of 2005". Thewire.co.uk. ... Broadcast and the Focus Group Investigate Witch Cults of the Radio Age with Broadcast (2009, Warp) The Elektrik Karousel (2013 ...
The Focus Group was founded in 1976 and has become one of the leading companies in the UK for the design, sourcing and ... In May 2007, Manchester City Football Club agreed a deal with the group that saw the club kitted out by French manufacturers Le ...
... ("Focus Group"; Chinese: 映藝集團控股有限公司), is a company formed by Andy Lau Tak-wah, a popular Hong Kong ... Lau List of record labels Focus Group Official Site Focus Films Limited Infinitus Entertainment Personnel Revamp at focus group ... In December 2006, executives Daniel Yu and Lorna Tee left their positions at Focus Films. Focus Group acts as a holding company ... The major companies under the control and ownership of Focus Group are: Focus Films Limited - It deals with the production and ...
Administratively, FG-AI4H was created by ITU-T Study Group 16. Under ITU-T's framework, participation in Focus Groups is open ... The ITU-WHO Focus Group on Artificial Intelligence for Health (AI for Health) is an inter-agency collaboration between the ... "Focus Group on "Artificial Intelligence for Health"". www.itu.int. Archived from the original on 2020-07-26. Retrieved 2021-01- ... The Deliverables (outputs) of the Focus Group AI for Health are structured in the AI for Health Framework, which roughly ...
Bliss, Abi (26 October 2009). "Album Review: Broadcast and the Focus Group - Broadcast and the Focus Group Investigate Witch ... Pattison, Louis (2009). "BBC - Music - Review of Broadcast and the Focus Group - Broadcast and the Focus Group Investigate ... Broadcast and the Focus Group Investigate Witch Cults of the Radio Age is a collaboration album by Broadcast and the Focus ... artist behind the Focus Group) had collaborated previously on artwork and packaging by British indie electronic group Broadcast ...
"Focus Groups". ATHE. Archived from the original on 12 August 2012. Retrieved 7 November 2012. "Job bank". ATHE. Archived from ... has 23 special interest focus groups, runs a job bank service for its members, and organises an annual conference attended by ...
The nominal group technique is similar to focus groups with a few important differences. The group often consists of experts in ... Focus groups are a qualitative research method often used in market research. They constitute a form of group interview ... Vander Laenen, Freya (4 March 2015). "Not just another focus group: making the case for the nominal group technique in ... Common methods found in the social sciences are surveys, interviews, focus groups, and the nominal group technique. They differ ...
Focus groups. Vol. 20. Sage, 2014. Dawn Iacobucci, Department of Marketing, Owen Graduate School of Management Archived 2015-01 ...
"Focus Groups". Association for Theatre in Higher Education. "Dorothy Mennen Research/Development Grant". Voice and Speech ... Founded in 1986, VASTA is both an independent, multidisciplinary organization and a focus group of the Association for Theatre ...
"an exploratory study of childrens [sic] views of censorship , Focus Group , Censorship". Scribd. Retrieved 2018-12-16. "ALA , ... a random focus group found many adults saying that there was nothing explicitly inappropriate with Roy and Silo's relationship ... According to Julia Mickenberg and Philip Nel, professors and scholars of children's literature, the focus of the book is on the ... a psychiatrist focused on the sexual development of children, decided they wanted to tell the story in the form of a children's ...
No focus groups. No marketing surveys. If the president of Loblaw International Merchants, the product-development arm of ... But he cautioned, "We accept the fact that ... not all environmental groups will agree with all our President's Choice G.R.E.E. ... He explained how his team had met with executives of Canada's leading environmental groups to ask them what products they would ... Commenting on his role as brand spokesman, Weston said he intended to focus on the environment and healthier food products. ...
"Sections/Focus Groups". American Geophysical Union. Archived from the original on April 17, 2019. Retrieved October 10, 2016. " ... Small, highly focused meetings are offered through the Chapman Conferences. The large numbers and international participation ... exceptional scientific contributions to Earth and space sciences as valued by their peers and vetted by section and focus group ... or group. To educators who have had a major impact on geophysical education at any level (kindergarten through postgraduate), ...
No focus groups. No marketing surveys. If the president of Loblaw International Merchants, the product-development arm of ...
Focus Group Frenzy; School Trip Secrets; Run Away with Me; Vote For Me!; Swimsuit Show-Offs; Paper Thin Walls; My School ... "Casey Calvert's Op-Ed on Porn Published by 'The Economist' - 'Can Porn Be Good for Us?' is the focus of porn star Calvert's ... Pornography and legal case law related to the film industry were a focus of the media class. She also studied the First ...
"Gabon: Lambert Noël Matha annonce la fermeture des frontières terrestres et maritimes". Focus Group Media. 25 August 2023. ...
Focus Online News - Health (in German). FOCUS Online Group. Retrieved 2017-02-09. Loerzer, Sven (2017-08-24). "Emergency ... In 2001 Schoeneich was awarded the Charity Bambi of the Hubert Burda Media Group for his many years of medical aid in ... Focus: Humanitarian Missions Abroad. Association of German Surgeons E.V. (in German). Retrieved 2018-11-24. Koophamel, Anne ... 1996 Plastic surgery - victim of the killer bacillus, Focus Magazin. 2017 Emergency medicine - When EU foreigners have no place ...
Vrentas, Jenny (January 25, 2015). "Football's Focus Group". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 2017-04-03. Best, Neil (October 10, ... 2015). "Cris Collinsworth liked using Pro Football Focus, so he bought it". Newsday. Retrieved 2016-09-12. "Pro Football Focus ... Pro Football Focus (also written as ProFootballFocus, and often referred to by its initials, PFF) is a sports analytics company ... Allen, Bruce (June 4, 2014). "Can Pro Football Focus Stats Be Blindly Trusted?". Boston Sports Media Watch. Retrieved May 5, ...
Hussey, Peter (2018). "Some thoughts on the cultural differences between England and Wales" (PDF). MFW Focus Group. Retrieved ... The term was coined by special advisor (and now First Minister) Mark Drakeford, as part of a group on the left-wing of the ... group wanted to "bring clear, red water between the party in Wales and the Keir Starmer-led British party ... [by] supporting ... having made a speech at the 2007 Welsh Labour party conference calling for the party to abandon it and focus instead on ...
A focus group participant pointed out that dividing the process into these two phases allowed stakeholders sufficient time to ... This fact was known by all participants in the focus groups and interviews. Malcolm, 2008:419. paragraph 72 of the WSIS' Tunis ... Focus group, Kee, 2016. IGF BPF Gender, 2015:60. e.g. Maciel & Affonso Pereira de Souza, 2011:7; de la Chapelle, 2011. " ... Focus group, 2016. Rossini, Brito Cruz & Doneda, 2015:5. Harding, 2014. Câmara, 2013. Declaring the Bill as constitutionally ...
"GoCompare.com 'Big Bad Wof'". Prime Focus Group. Archived from the original on 31 January 2013. Retrieved 13 June 2012. "Browse ... Through Argosy Film Group Bazley directed the Lost Treasure Hunt, an animated half-hour pilot for a proposed TV series. Lost ...
Focus Information group. ISBN 0-941051-38-2. J. P. Mallory (1989). In Search of the Indo Europeans. Thames and Hudson. ISBN 0- ...
Potter, Jonathan; Puchta, Claudia (2004). Focus group practice. London Thousand Oaks, California: SAGE. ISBN 9780761966913. ... New work is focused on studying video records of mealtime interaction in families with young children. This has looked at ... A joint grant led by Margaret Wetherell resulted in the volume Mapping the Language of Racism in 1992 that focused on the way ... His collection Conversation and Cognition, co-edited with Hedwig te Molder, brought together a group of conversation analysts, ...
Adams Publishing Group. Retrieved October 18, 2018. "Tim Utz declares as candidate for District 41-B". Sun Focus. Adams ... "Kunesh-Podein, Wagner to face off in DFL primary". Sun Focus. Adams Publishing Group. August 4, 2018. Retrieved August 5, 2018 ... "Moller challenges incumbent Jessup in 42A House race". Sun Focus. Adams Publishing Group. October 12, 2018. Retrieved October ... Lenhart, Sam (October 12, 2018). "House District 41A voters guide". Sun Focus. Adams Publishing Group. Retrieved October 18, ...
"IAS: Current Focus Groups". Technical University of Munich Institute for Advanced Study. Archived from the original on 17 ...
"Area Focus Groups" (PDF). Cotton Belt Corridor Regional Rail Project. Dallas Area Rapid Transit. December 2011. Retrieved 28 ...
"IAS - Alumni Focus Groups". 29 January 2016. Archived from the original on 10 October 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2016. "Akademie ... After his retirement in 2012 he moved to the TUM Institute for Advanced Study where he is leading the focus group 'Fundamental ... After a fellowship in the CERN theory group from 1975-1977 he was first a visitor and then a staff member in the Fermilab ... theory group from 1977 till 1982. He then became staff member of the Max Planck Institute for Physics in Munich (1982-1988). In ...
"AGUs Cryosphere Focus Group". 2011. Archived from the original on 16 November 2011. Retrieved 30 September 2011. Bozorgnia, ... Understanding their mechanisms, which depend on the type of earthquake (e.g., intraplate or deep focus), can lead to better ...
Variants of focus groups include: Two-way focus group - one focus group watches another focus group and discusses the observed ... focus groups can be used for learning about group attitudes and patterns of interaction. An advantage of focus groups is their ... web focus groups - live group conducted over the phone and online with 6 to 8 participants. When conducting a focus-group ... He later established focus groups for the Bureau of Applied Social Research. The use of focus groups by sociologists gained ...
The group awards "Best Student Paper" $500 prizes at the March Meeting, open to both undergraduate and graduate students. In ... In just a few short years, the APS Topical Group on Quantum Information (GQI) has burgeoned into an important focal point for ... "It is a very robust corner of the group right now, it probably constitutes a third of all research activity, as measured by ... At the 2007 March Meeting in Denver, GQI held a total of 13 sessions that the group has either sponsored or co-sponsored, while ...
It should be noted that the community consultation event is not a part of the current focus groups and that it is rather a ... You will be given a $20 honorarium for your time and work during the focus group discussion.. Confidentiality. Your names will ... You will be expected to attend ONE focus group discussion (1.5-2 hours approx.) with 4 other individuals online via Zoom. You ... we will host a community consultation session where we will invite the participants from our focus group discussions, as well ...
Conducting a focus group study. SAMPLING AND GROUP COMPOSITION. Focus group studies can consist of anything between half a ... Rationale and uses of focus groups. Focus groups are a form of group interview that capitalises on communication between ... Morgan D. Focus groups as qualitative research. London: Sage, 1988.. Kreuger R. Focus groups: a practical guide for applied ... Improving survey questionnaires through focus groups. In Morgan D, ed. Successful focus groups: advancing the state of the art ...
This focus group will inform the ARPA & Equity Advisory Committees development of a set of priorities and strategies for ... Thank you for your interest in attending this focus group for the business community at Thursday, December 15 from 6pm-7:30pm ... We are collecting some information to register an appropriate number of attendees for the focus groups. Attendees will be ...
Logitech webcams to provide reliable high-definition video and sound for its research clients in order to conduct online focus ... and focus groups easier.The Logitech HD Webcams enable market research clients to conduct remote and online focus groups with ... FocusVision Uses Logitech® HD Webcams to Conduct Online Focus Groups. #id798aa5901d91a9522c37f3175ee1051.component-hero-banner ... FocusVision enables clients to conduct online focus groups around the world with Logitech® HD webcams.. ...
Physics of X- ray and Neutron Multilayer Structures Conference 2020 ...
Please join our group ASAP!. Jeanne Vaseleck, MBA. CEO, Advisory CFO Services. As an Advisory CFO service, I help you prevent ...
Short Story: "Focus Group". By Philip Zack (Page 1 of 4 pages) 1 comment ... "Focus Group". by P. Orin Zack. [3/4/2011]. Lonnie strode through the encampment of pro-union protesters outside the capitol ... About the only thing I knew for sure was that each of the groups out here has their own agenda, so I told him it would be ... focus of its strategy of destroying the American middle class by driving a stake through the labor movement at its heart to the ...
Pink Out Focus Group Pink Out Focus Group. Tuscaloosa VAMC would like to learn about your health care. October 5, 2023- Pink ... The Pink Out Focus Group will briefly address Breast Cancer and related issues and then open the floor to your comments/ ...
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In a Pew Research Center analysis based on dozens of focus groups, Asian American participants described navigating their own ... In the fall of 2021, Pew Research Center undertook the largest focus group study it had ever conducted - 66 focus groups with ... Read sortable quotes from our focus groups. Browse excerpts in the interactive quote sorter from focus group participants in ... The focus groups were organized into 18 distinct Asian ethnic origin groups, fielded in 18 languages and moderated by members ...
What kind of educational opportunities would you like to see in your neighborhood? Join us for a 2-hour focus group discussion ...
... time-limited group analytic psychotherapy, built on new and existing research, and integrating clinical expe ... This practical text lays out a new form of focused, ... Lorentzen is an expert on group analysis. Focused Group ... 2. Focused Group Analytic Psychotherapy 3. Who Can Benefit from Focused Group Analytic Psychotherapy? 4. Evaluation of Patients ... Introducing the Demonstration Group 6. The Group Process 7. The Therapist in Focused Group Analytical Psychotherapy Part III. 8 ...
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Any group of MSA members who wishes to organize a new Focused Interest Group may contact the FIG Chair for more information. ... MSA FIGs are groups of MSA members who have organized, with the approval of MSA Council, to promote a specific discipline ... Focused Ion Beam (FIB) Assel Aitkaliyeva University of Florida Gainesville, FL Email ...
The Focus on Technology course is an introductory level course that aims to improve your knowledge on accessible technologies ... This phone group is open to all residents of the UK.. Time and day. Monday and Tuesday from 2nd October to 3rd October 2023, ... Focus on Technology courses are for adults of all ages, including friends, family members or anyone close to you. ... The Focus on Technology course is an introductory level course that aims to improve your knowledge on accessible technologies ...
... free market advocacy group urges Congress and the... ... Citizen Group: Tax Day a Time for Congress to Stay Focused on ... free market advocacy group urges Congress and the Obama Administration to remain vigilant on spending issues, especially ...
... il Focus Group,/em, - The article deals with the focus group as a psycho-social action-research technique which is primarily ... the present paper offers some cues of reflection on the focus group and an example for its use. ... il Focus Group - ,em,Linterazione come tecnica dindagine psicosociale: ... Linterazione come tecnica dindagine psicosociale: il Focus Group - The article deals with the focus group as a psycho-social ...
Symbols refer to GTs office structure, which is detailed on the Disclosures page.. ...
Download a PDF of our prospectus or order a printed copy to be delivered to your door.. Download a prospectus ...
1. In-Person Focus Groups. If the phrase "focus group" brings to mind a sterile room in which a small group of strangers ... Mini Groups. Mini groups (also known as dyads) are like small focus groups, usually with two or three participants and a ... Depending on the subject and length of the focus group, the exchange may be broken into different formats, such as small group ... Its conducive to in-person focus groups and online panels, where variably sized groups of participants can consume content (e. ...
Focused on Solving Next Generation of Cybersecurity Threats Facing Companies ... SonicWall Announces Spin Out from Dell Software Group - ... SonicWall Announces Spin Out from Dell Software Group - Focused ... SonicWall Announces Spin Out from Dell Software Group - Focused on Solving Next Generation of Cybersecurity Threats Facing ... "SonicWall is a trusted partner to its customers and channel partners in 40 countries worldwide and is laser focused on ...
Observers at an October focus group meeting. [Photo: Erica C. Barnett]. The medium-density focus group meeting I attended in ... were chosen to serve on the four HALA focus groups that have been meeting monthly since last April. The focus groups are ... Thaler denounced the whole focus group process, suggested that the city chose people for the focus groups based on "some other ... and engage in small-group discussions. The goal is to use feedback from the focus groups to help shape the zoning legislation ...
CPM Focus Group and Working Group Reports * Task Force on Topics * CPM Focus Group on Strengthening Pest Outbreak Alert and ... CPM Focus Group on Communications The CPM Focus Group on Communications reviews and updates the IPPC Communications Strategy ( ... Functions: The focus group is tasked to: * Provide guidance on and lead the development of the IPPC Communications Strategy ( ... CPM Focus Group on Safe Provision of Food and Other Humanitarian Aid ...
  • A focus group is a group interview involving a small number (sometimes up to ten) of demographically similar people or participants who have other traits/experiences in common depending on the research objective of the study. (wikipedia.org)
  • Focus groups are used in market research to understand better people's reactions to products or services or participants' perceptions of shared experiences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Instead of a researcher/evaluator asking group members questions individually, focus groups use group interaction to explore and clarify participants' beliefs, opinions, and views. (wikipedia.org)
  • The interactivity of focus groups allows researchers to obtain qualitative data from multiple participants, often making focus groups a relatively expedient, convenient, and efficacious research method. (wikipedia.org)
  • From there, Merton created an interviewing procedure to gain further insight into the subjective reactions of focus-group participants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another advantage is that a focus group can allow participants to learn from one another as they exchange views and to understand research as an enriching experience. (wikipedia.org)
  • Before releasing the curriculum, we will host a community consultation session where we will invite the participants from our focus group discussions, as well as any interested community members to approve/review the curriculum resource (unpaid contribution). (google.com)
  • Focus groups are a form of group interview that capitalises on communication between research participants in order to generate data. (bmj.com)
  • Group discussion is particularly appropriate when the interviewer has a series of open ended questions and wishes to encourage research participants to explore the issues of importance to them, in their own vocabulary, generating their own questions and pursuing their own priorities. (bmj.com)
  • When group dynamics work well the participants work alongside the researcher, taking the research in new and often unexpected directions. (bmj.com)
  • In a new Pew Research Center analysis based on dozens of focus groups, Asian American participants described the challenges of navigating their own identity in a nation where the label "Asian" brings expectations about their origins, behavior and physical self. (pewresearch.org)
  • In the fall of 2021, Pew Research Center undertook the largest focus group study it had ever conducted - 66 focus groups with 264 total participants - to hear Asian Americans talk about their lived experiences in America. (pewresearch.org)
  • Because of the pandemic, the focus groups were conducted virtually, allowing us to recruit participants from all parts of the United States. (pewresearch.org)
  • It's conducive to in-person focus groups and online panels, where variably sized groups of participants can consume content (e.g., watch a video ad or examine a prototype label) and provide feedback. (moneycrashers.com)
  • Focus Group Session participants will receive complimentary lunch (to be provided during the session) as well as a $75 Visa gift card as a Thank You for your time. (prweb.com)
  • Focus groups are taking place across Victoria with participants from metropolitan and regional areas between March and April. (cancervic.org.au)
  • Using findings from the study, the Center for Devices and Radiological Health developed for further testing two prototype, composite tables with the characteristics the focus group participants favored for uniform contraceptive labeling. (cdc.gov)
  • It provides detailed guidance on the practical and theoretical considerations in conducting focus group discussions including: designing the discussion guide, recruiting participants, training a field team, moderating techniques and ethical considerations. (lu.se)
  • Focus groups were led by a nonphysician moderator, consisted of 5 to 12 participants, and were conducted separately for patients with CLTI and claudication. (bvsalud.org)
  • The CPM Focus Group on Communications reviews and updates the IPPC Communications Strategy (2022-2030) to align with the IPPC Strategic Framework 2020-2030 and continue raising awareness of the importance of plant health and the role of the IPPC and provide related advocacy. (ippc.int)
  • This paper introduces focus group methodology, gives advice on group composition, running the groups, and analysing the results. (bmj.com)
  • In order to achieve the objectives of the research, an exercise was carried out aimed at understanding the content of focus groups through active learning methodology based on the experience and binomial action-reflection. (bvsalud.org)
  • Focus Group Methodology is an introductory text which leads readers through the entire process of designing a focus group study, from conducting interviews and analyzing data to presenting the findings. (lu.se)
  • Thus, focus groups constitute a research or evaluation method that researchers organize to collect qualitative data through interactive and directed discussions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Used in qualitative research, the interviews involve a group of people who are asked about their perceptions, attitudes, opinions, beliefs, and views regarding many different topics (e.g., abortion, political candidates or issues, a shared event, needs assessment). (wikipedia.org)
  • Compare all Tamil speaking focus group moderators (qualitative consultants). (quirks.com)
  • The qualitative interview strategy in the mode of the focus group showed to be adequate to the purpose of the activity. (bvsalud.org)
  • Kjellberg, S, Wiklund, G & Voog, H 2014, ' It´s all about keeping quiet - using focus group interviews to understand the everyday life of researchers in order to support their research ', Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Libraries, Qqml , nr. 1, s. 253-261. (lu.se)
  • While the program for the upcoming 2009 meeting in Pittsburgh is still in the works, the group will continue to have a significant number of invited sessions. (aps.org)
  • Search above or browse by research topic, market focus and content type below. (quirks.com)
  • In the 2019-2023 ELIXIR Scientific Programme , there is an increased focus on communities of researchers and the nurturing of smaller-scale grass-roots sources of curated data to support specialist or emerging ares of interest. (elixir-europe.org)
  • The Biocuration Focus Group is establised to provide the supporting mechanism driving this scientific theme in the 2019-2023 Scientific Programme, and widen the applicability of ELIXIR activities to data resource developers/operators across the Nodes and their constituent institutions. (elixir-europe.org)
  • Section II highlights findings of focus groups that met in Kansas City, Chicago, Detroit and Denver to continue this work. (kansascityfed.org)
  • Employee perceptions of safety, health , and well-being: focus group findings from one veterans affairs medical center. (cdc.gov)
  • Application of the Total Worker Health (TM) hierarchy of controls provided a novel framework for discussion of focus group findings. (cdc.gov)
  • Logitech webcams feature Logitech Fluid Crystal Technology for smoother, sharper, clearer video that makes viewing and reviewing interviews and focus groups easier.The Logitech HD Webcams enable market research clients to conduct remote and online focus groups with high-quality video and audio for efficient transmission, analysis, and archiving of content. (logitech.com)
  • To utilize focus groups to garner reactions (perceptions, opinions, beliefs, and attitudes) and preferences from women about the format and content of the two different model contraceptive efficacy tables. (cdc.gov)
  • Focus groups were audio recorded, transcribed, and content analysis was performed. (cdc.gov)
  • 13 14 For similar reasons focus groups are useful for studying dominant cultural values (for example, exposing dominant narratives about sexuality 15 ) and for examining work place cultures-the ways in which, for example, staff cope with working with terminally ill patients or deal with the stresses of an accident and emergency department. (bmj.com)
  • Presented in three parts, Focused Group Analytic Psychotherapy clearly introduces the therapeutic approach, fully explores all the elements involved, from considering suitable patients to composing the group and the role of the therapist, and provides an in-depth examination of clinical quality assurance, research and the integration of supervision. (routledge.com)
  • Peppered with examples and vignettes from carefully designed research by the author and others, the chapters demonstrate how this approach can be used in group therapy with patients facing specific psychological problems, symptomatic distress and/or a problematic relationship to self or others. (routledge.com)
  • 4. Evaluation of Patients for Focused Group Analytic Psychotherapy (FGAP) 5. (routledge.com)
  • Additionally, A.I.R. Consulting conducts annual focus groups with patients and providers to find out why patients may not get screened for cancer as recommended. (cdc.gov)
  • Focus group study of factors relevant to treatment decisions and experiences among patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease. (bvsalud.org)
  • We conducted a focus group study of patients with symptomatic PAD to identify factors important and relevant to treatment choices, and to characterize aspects of the health care process that contribute to positive vs negative experiences apart from the specific treatment (s) received. (bvsalud.org)
  • A total of 51 patients (26 with CLTI and 25 with claudication) were enrolled and participated in focus groups . (bvsalud.org)
  • An advantage of focus groups is their fairly low cost compared to surveys because focus groups allow a researcher to obtain results relatively quickly and increase the sample size by including several people at once. (wikipedia.org)
  • Through analysing the operation of humour, consensus, and dissent and examining different types of narrative used within the group, the researcher can identify shared and common knowledge. (bmj.com)
  • The focus groups will be run by Vicki White, lead researcher, Deakin University who is experienced in conducting research with people affected by cancer. (cancervic.org.au)
  • The focus groups librarians organize are helpful in identifying patrons' needs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Any group of MSA members who wishes to organize a new Focused Interest Group may contact the FIG Chair for more information. (microscopy.org)
  • In combination with participant observation, focus groups can be used for learning about group attitudes and patterns of interaction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although group interviews are often used simply as a quick and convenient way to collect data from several people simultaneously, focus groups explicitly use group interaction as part of the method. (bmj.com)
  • Group work also helps researchers tap into the many different forms of communication that people use in day to day interaction, including jokes, anecdotes, teasing, and arguing. (bmj.com)
  • In market research, focus groups can explore a group's response to a new product or service. (wikipedia.org)
  • Focus groups first started in the 1940s as a research method in the context of market research concerning radio soap operas. (wikipedia.org)
  • He later established focus groups for the Bureau of Applied Social Research. (wikipedia.org)
  • In just a few short years, the APS Topical Group on Quantum Information (GQI) has burgeoned into an important focal point for researchers across a wide range of fields, while maintaining its dedication to continued discussion and vitality of research on the foundations of quantum theory. (aps.org)
  • It is a very robust corner of the group right now, it probably constitutes a third of all research activity, as measured by contributed papers at the March Meeting," said DiVincenzo. (aps.org)
  • It should be noted that the community consultation event is not a part of the current focus groups and that it is rather a public (non-research) event anyone can attend. (google.com)
  • 12 This makes focus groups a data collection technique particularly sensitive to cultural variables-which is why it is so often used in cross cultural research and work with ethnic minorities. (bmj.com)
  • This practical text lays out a new form of focused, time-limited group analytic psychotherapy, built on new and existing research, and integrating clinical experience from across the field. (routledge.com)
  • Empirical Research on Group Psychotherapy 10. (routledge.com)
  • Focused Group Analytic Psychotherapy (FGAP) combines decades of clinical wisdom with rigorous research to inform beginning and advanced clinicians. (routledge.com)
  • This extends beyond clinical work into the large, often untilled, fields of data accumulation and research, especially into the discipline that he has developed, that of Focused Group-Analytic Psychotherapy (FGAP). (routledge.com)
  • There's no clear definition of domestic terrorism, but a May 2012 report by the Congressional Research Service suggests that law enforcement uses the term to describe extremists in the U.S. who are motivated by ideology but without strong ties to an overseas group. (wgbh.org)
  • The case study and focus group research addressed our questions about how healthcare system restructuring has affected work health and safety. (cdc.gov)
  • This Focus Group will act as a connection point for all of the ELIXIR members and their close collaborators who have biocuration as their main area of responsibility, as an important part of their research activities, or as an application area for tools they are developing. (elixir-europe.org)
  • The Volvo Group will also demonstrate some of its latest, innovations in research & development, including a fully electric city bus, autonomous refuse truck and fully electric compact excavator concept. (newswire.ca)
  • Focus groups : a practical guide for applied research / Richard A. Krueger & Mary Anne Casey. (who.int)
  • In the research field of social science and health, and in the development and evaluation of social and education programas, there is an increase use of focus group. (bvsalud.org)
  • Focus Group Discussions addresses the challenges associated with conducting and writing focus group research. (lu.se)
  • This paper describes how focus group interviews were used in a project on developing research support services. (lu.se)
  • Known as Langenberger Innovation Group or LIG since December 2019, it has companies and brands in recycling, minerals and raw materials, and biofuels. (khl.com)
  • If group members are representative of a larger population, those reactions may be expected to reflect the views of that larger population. (wikipedia.org)
  • Group members are often free to talk and interact with each other. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers/evaluators should select members of the focus group carefully in order to obtain useful information. (wikipedia.org)
  • The focus groups were organized into 18 distinct Asian ethnic origin groups, fielded in 18 languages and moderated by members of their own ethnic groups. (pewresearch.org)
  • MSA FIGs are groups of MSA members who have organized, with the approval of MSA Council, to promote a specific discipline relevant to microscopy or microanalysis. (microscopy.org)
  • Focus on Technology courses are for adults of all ages, including friends, family members or anyone close to you. (rnib.org.uk)
  • Of that initial group, 181 applicants, many of them renters, people of color, community activists, and members of other groups that have traditionally been excluded from city planning processes, were chosen to serve on the four HALA focus groups that have been meeting monthly since last April. (publicola.com)
  • Attendance logs, obtained from OPCD through a records request, show that 137 focus group members showed up for that first meeting in April-a not-bad 76 percent attendance rate. (publicola.com)
  • The numbers for October aren't available yet, but based on anecdotal reports from group members and my observations at the medium-density focus group I attended near the end of the month, with only 15 of 40 original members present, October attendance was probably lower still. (publicola.com)
  • The one clear exception to this rule is eight focus group members who were recruited by Puget Sound Sage, which provided them with ongoing technical support and follow-up meetings on the fundamentals of zoning and land use law. (publicola.com)
  • The Council of Stellar Management (CSM) is a focus group comprised of members of the Eve Online team and invited delegates from the playerbase. (eveonline.com)
  • Establishing and Composing the Group - Introducing the Demonstration Group 6. (routledge.com)
  • At the meetings, the groups typically have received a presentation on some aspect of the HALA plan, followed by opportunities to ask questions, provide input, and engage in small-group discussions. (publicola.com)
  • Section III focusses on specific themes that emerged from these discussions. (kansascityfed.org)
  • Le Centre International de Recherche sur le Cancer, sis 150 Cours Albert Thomas 69008 LYON, émet un appel d'offres qui a pour objet le Recrutement et à l'animation de groupes de discussions en vue du développement d'un outil d'aide à la décision intégré dans une plateforme d'intelligence artificielle Chatbot - Ref. RFP-2021-06 SCR Focus Groups. (who.int)
  • Fourteen focus group discussions were conducted with nurses in 2 university hospitals in Egypt. (who.int)
  • Quatorze discussions thématiques en groupes ont été organisées avec le personnel infirmier dans deux hôpitaux universitaires en Égypte. (who.int)
  • This approach allowed us to hear a diverse set of voices - especially from less populous Asian ethnic groups whose views, attitudes and opinions are seldom presented in traditional polling. (pewresearch.org)
  • Conventional survey methods typically reflect the voices of larger groups without fully capturing the broad range of views, attitudes, life starting points and perspectives experienced by Asian Americans. (pewresearch.org)
  • Le Dossier de Consultation sera disponible uniquement en version électronique à partir du mardi 1er juin 2021. (who.int)
  • In addition, teachers, other professionals, and researchers can also be recruited to participate in focus groups to ascertain those individuals' library-related needs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Focus groups have advantages for researchers in the field of health and medicine: they do not discriminate against people who cannot read or write and they can encourage participation from people reluctant to be interviewed on their own or who feel they have nothing to say. (bmj.com)
  • [ 5 ] This group developed a uniform definition that allowed more accurate analysis and comparison of studies, enabled researchers to draw more meaningful conclusions from pooled data, and improved the ease of surveillance and prevention activities. (medscape.com)
  • The group awards "Best Student Paper" $500 prizes at the March Meeting, open to both undergraduate and graduate students. (aps.org)
  • The Focus on Technology course is an introductory level course that aims to improve your knowledge on accessible technologies and to give you the confidence to start using technology on a day-to-day basis or alternatively to build on any existing knowledge you already have. (rnib.org.uk)
  • While the focus group is taking place, the facilitator either takes notes and/or records the discussion for later note-taking in order to learn from the group. (wikipedia.org)
  • You will be expected to attend ONE focus group discussion (1.5-2 hours approx. (google.com)
  • You will be given a $20 honorarium for your time and work during the focus group discussion. (google.com)
  • Join us for a 2-hour focus group discussion on what higher educational offerings (certificates, certifications, two-year degree, four-year degree) would be valuable to you. (calvin.edu)
  • The group of twelve is a nice, manageable size, allowing everyone the opportunity to join in the discussion without having to moderate the channel. (eveonline.com)
  • The discussion group was composed of six (N = 6) volunteers from a total of 20 students enrolled in this discipline. (bvsalud.org)
  • The focus group study obtained consumer reactions to several model contraceptive efficacy tables and graphs. (cdc.gov)
  • In the social sciences and in urban planning, focus groups allow interviewers to study people in a more natural conversational pattern than typically occurs in a one-to-one interview. (wikipedia.org)
  • Marketers can use the information collected from focus groups to obtain insights on a specific product, controversy, or topic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, the groups want the government to focus on making identity attribute validation services available to the private sector. (nextgov.com)
  • We can ensure your transcription is done with precision, speed, and accuracy because we work only with professional transcribers with experience in focus group transcription projects. (translation-services-usa.com)
  • He seeks in his disciplined and pragmatic way to bring clinicians back to that specific area of work, using groups and associated techniques for the relief of mental suffering. (routledge.com)
  • The aim of this work is to present the methodological foundations of focus group, its applications, potentialities and limits. (bvsalud.org)
  • This report focused on focus groups performed with black MSM enrolled in pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to determine their thoughts about condom use and STDs, with the goal of helping to inform the national conversation about condom and STD prevention messages that work for this population. (cdc.gov)
  • In this sense focus groups reach the parts that other methods cannot reach, revealing dimensions of understanding that often remain untapped by more conventional data collection techniques. (bmj.com)
  • Methods: Nine focus groups were conducted with leadership, supervisor, and frontline employees. (cdc.gov)
  • Who Can Benefit from Focused Group Analytic Psychotherapy? (routledge.com)
  • FocusVision relies on Logitech's high-quality streaming video services to enable easier review and analysis of recorded focus group sessions for their clients. (logitech.com)
  • He has trained as a psychoanalyst and group analyst and is a founding member of the Institute of Group Analysis and Group Psychotherapy in Norway, where he was a training analyst for many years. (routledge.com)
  • He has published book chapters, two books and numerous papers on different clinical psychiatric issues, with a particular focus on psychotherapy, psychodynamic groups and group analysis. (routledge.com)
  • Dr. Lorentzen is an expert on group analysis. (routledge.com)
  • This book highlights one end of the wide spectrum of current interest and publishing in group-analysis, that runs from the firmly clinical aspects of the group approach to specific treatments for mental distress on to the opposite end concerned with the social unconscious, decolonization and climate change. (routledge.com)
  • DON staffers, sensing that without more geographically diverse neighborhood representation, the focus groups would be dominated by white, north-end homeowners, put out a second call. (publicola.com)
  • The results of the focus group revealed that the recommendations of the NCG for Dentistry courses are connected with the dentist social representation. (bvsalud.org)
  • The idea behind the focus group method is that group processes can help people to explore and clarify their views in ways that would be less easily accessible in a one to one interview. (bmj.com)
  • Focus Group, Interview, or Survey: Which is Right for Your Academic or Co-Curricular Program? (hawaii.edu)
  • This book will be an essential guide for psychotherapists who have primarily focused on individual psychotherapy and who want to learn more about groups, and to those, including group analysts, who have experience with long-term groups and want to learn more about time-limited groups. (routledge.com)
  • The groups are seeking a "governmentwide approach" so that agencies that collect and manage identity data can provide the kind of yes/no validation used in the eCBSV service to assist in digital identity proofing and "enable them to be accessed with uniform fees and terms by the public and private sector. (nextgov.com)
  • In keeping with the goal of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to develop uniform contraceptive labeling, focus groups were conducted to determine a presentation format most useful to the consumer for contraceptive pregnancy rates. (cdc.gov)
  • FOCUS Group Ministries is a nonprofit organization founded in 1992 to help build a bridge to the community for a segment of society that is often forgotten. (igive.com)
  • Rest assured that when working with Translation Services USA, your focus group transcription project will be completed both quickly and accurately. (translation-services-usa.com)
  • This additional focus will allow us to respond even more quickly and accurately to the demands of recyclers for innovative technology," said Gert Schreier. (khl.com)
  • When working on a focus group transcription, we also offer timestamping, labeling each transcription with the corresponding time in the audio or video. (translation-services-usa.com)
  • It is important that we limit the size of the group, so if you are not selected this time, there's a good chance you might be chosen for one of the future sessions. (eveonline.com)
  • However, assembling focus groups can be costly and time consuming. (cdc.gov)
  • Analysts like Potok and agents at the FBI and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives increasingly are sounding the alarm about sovereign citizen groups, too. (wgbh.org)
  • Indiana has a Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services , but it does not focus on employment or job training. (publicnewsservice.org)
  • I think these things should be taken as a strong indication of the scientific solidity and visibility of the group within the broad physics community. (aps.org)
  • Thank you for your interest in attending this focus group for the business community at Thursday, December 15 from 6pm-7:30pm at 247 N Main Street Randolph. (surveymonkey.com)
  • When the city's Department of Neighborhoods (DON) first put out the call for citizens to apply as neighborhood representatives serving on one of four new community focus groups that would advise the city's Office of Planning and Community Development on the mayor's proposed Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda (HALA), residents of mostly white North End neighborhoods-many of them vocal opponents of the plan-applied en masse. (publicola.com)
  • Laura Bernstein, a University District community activist who resigned from her focus group in September, says she got discouraged when she saw her group being dominated by the "observers" who were supposed to watch quietly and not participate. (publicola.com)
  • Focus groups may also include an observer who pays attention to dynamics not expressed in words e.g., body language, people who appear to have something to add but do not speak up. (wikipedia.org)
  • It's easy to see why Translation Services USA is the number one choice for people needing to complete focus group transcription projects. (translation-services-usa.com)
  • Cancer Council Victoria is working with Deakin University to conduct a series of online and telephone-based focus groups with people diagnosed with cancer in Victoria and their carers to learn more about their experiences in being informed about the costs of cancer care and the impact it has during and post treatment. (cancervic.org.au)
  • The Volvo Group, which employs about 95,000 people, has production facilities in 18 countries and sells its products in more than 190 markets. (newswire.ca)
  • The Regional Committee agreed on the importance of effective tuberculosis (TB) prevention strategies at both country and regional levels, as well as early diagnosis, screening and adequate treatment for high-risk groups, particularly children from vulnerable groups who come into contact with people with TB. (who.int)
  • Translation Services USA is a known leader in focus group transcription and can convert any audio or video file you need transcribed. (translation-services-usa.com)
  • Many of the Melbourne groups have taken place already and the remaining sessions will now take place online (video and audio) or via telephone (not face-to-face). (cancervic.org.au)
  • Focus groups can also help librarians better understand patron behavior and the impact of services on the library use. (wikipedia.org)
  • Translation Services USA uses the following workflow for focus group transcription projects. (translation-services-usa.com)
  • After our sales representatives at Translation Services USA receive your focus group transcription request and uploaded file, they will review the audio and contact you if they have any questions about your order. (translation-services-usa.com)
  • Translation Services USA can offer a number additional services for your focus group transcription project. (translation-services-usa.com)
  • When requesting a focus group transcription quote, just mention any of these services that you require! (translation-services-usa.com)
  • Only Translation Services USA can ensure your completed focus group transcription is satisfactory because you can rely on your transcribers-they're the best in the business! (translation-services-usa.com)
  • The government should combat identity theft by encouraging the development and use of digital mobile driver's licenses and identity attribute validation services by agencies, according to a letter to Biden administration officials from six technology trade groups. (nextgov.com)
  • Focus groups were originally used within communication studies to explore the effects of films and television programmes, 2 and are a popular method for assessing health education messages and examining public understandings of illness and of health behaviours. (bmj.com)
  • The Pink Out Focus Group will briefly address Breast Cancer and related issues and then open the floor to your comments/concerns/experiences regarding your health care at the VA. (va.gov)
  • All relevant original publications with a focus on the integration of oral health into primary care were retrieved. (medscape.com)
  • Over the next year, the Regional Office will focus on long-term care and on how health systems respond to ageing populations. (who.int)
  • FocusVision enables clients to conduct online focus groups around the world with Logitech ® HD webcams. (logitech.com)
  • But in recent years, the spread of the Internet, the worsening economy and changing demographic patterns have been giving new voice to hate groups. (wgbh.org)
  • Focus Taiwan (CNA) uses tracking technologies to provide better reading experiences, but it also respects readers' privacy. (focustaiwan.tw)
  • The main event underpinning the trip, the June 6-8 Group of Eight (G8) summit in Germany, promises to be a tense affair dominated by the final status of Kosovo. (rieas.gr)
  • The group breaks down as a representative from 3 large, 3 medium-sized and 3 small corps. (eveonline.com)
  • Those who participate in online and telephone focus groups will receive their voucher by post. (cancervic.org.au)
  • Anyone who has registered for a regional event will receive an email with information on how to register for one of the online/telephone focus groups instead. (cancervic.org.au)
  • The Group Process 7. (routledge.com)
  • The Manz Group is a Reutlingen, Germany-based provider of systems and components in the areas of automation, quality assurance, and laser process technology for the photovoltaic industry and in the areas of automation and wet chemistry for the LCD industry. (laserfocusworld.com)
  • Rest assured, we will keep a sharp focus on what's happening in process safety. (chemicalprocessing.com)
  • Speakers at the event include Matthew Hudson , Head of Technology & Data Strategy at Transport for London and Terri Wills CEO of World Green Building Council as well as Lars Stenqvist, Chief Technology Officer at Volvo Group. (newswire.ca)