Hyperplasia: An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.Prostatic Hyperplasia: Increase in constituent cells in the PROSTATE, leading to enlargement of the organ (hypertrophy) and adverse impact on the lower urinary tract function. This can be caused by increased rate of cell proliferation, reduced rate of cell death, or both.Endometrial Hyperplasia: Benign proliferation of the ENDOMETRIUM in the UTERUS. Endometrial hyperplasia is classified by its cytology and glandular tissue. There are simple, complex (adenomatous without atypia), and atypical hyperplasia representing also the ascending risk of becoming malignant.Focal Adhesions: An anchoring junction of the cell to a non-cellular substrate. It is composed of a specialized area of the plasma membrane where bundles of the ACTIN CYTOSKELETON terminate and attach to the transmembrane linkers, INTEGRINS, which in turn attach through their extracellular domains to EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS.Adrenal Hyperplasia, Congenital: A group of inherited disorders of the ADRENAL GLANDS, caused by enzyme defects in the synthesis of cortisol (HYDROCORTISONE) and/or ALDOSTERONE leading to accumulation of precursors for ANDROGENS. Depending on the hormone imbalance, congenital adrenal hyperplasia can be classified as salt-wasting, hypertensive, virilizing, or feminizing. Defects in STEROID 21-HYDROXYLASE; STEROID 11-BETA-HYDROXYLASE; STEROID 17-ALPHA-HYDROXYLASE; 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3-HYDROXYSTEROID DEHYDROGENASES); TESTOSTERONE 5-ALPHA-REDUCTASE; or steroidogenic acute regulatory protein; among others, underlie these disorders.Focal Nodular Hyperplasia: Solitary or multiple benign hepatic vascular tumors, usually occurring in women of 20-50 years of age. The nodule, poorly encapsulated, consists of a central stellate fibrous scar and normal liver elements such as HEPATOCYTES, small BILE DUCTS, and KUPFFER CELLS among the intervening fibrous septa. The pale colored central scar represents large blood vessels with hyperplastic fibromuscular layer and narrowing lumen.Gingival Hyperplasia: Non-inflammatory enlargement of the gingivae produced by factors other than local irritation. It is characteristically due to an increase in the number of cells. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p400)Thymus Hyperplasia: Enlargement of the thymus. A condition described in the late 1940's and 1950's as pathological thymic hypertrophy was status thymolymphaticus and was treated with radiotherapy. Unnecessary removal of the thymus was also practiced. It later became apparent that the thymus undergoes normal physiological hypertrophy, reaching a maximum at puberty and involuting thereafter. The concept of status thymolymphaticus has been abandoned. Thymus hyperplasia is present in two thirds of all patients with myasthenia gravis. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992; Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1486)Tunica Intima: The innermost layer of an artery or vein, made up of one layer of endothelial cells and supported by an internal elastic lamina.Glomerulosclerosis, Focal Segmental: A clinicopathological syndrome or diagnostic term for a type of glomerular injury that has multiple causes, primary or secondary. Clinical features include PROTEINURIA, reduced GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE, and EDEMA. Kidney biopsy initially indicates focal segmental glomerular consolidation (hyalinosis) or scarring which can progress to globally sclerotic glomeruli leading to eventual KIDNEY FAILURE.Focal Epithelial Hyperplasia: Hyperplasia of the mucous membrane of the lips, tongue, and less commonly, the buccal mucosa, floor of the mouth, and palate, presenting soft, painless, round to oval sessile papules about 1 to 4 mm in diameter. The condition usually occurs in children and young adults and has familial predilection, lasting for several months, sometimes years, before running its course. A viral etiology is suspected, the isolated organism being usually the human papillomavirus. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry; Belshe, Textbook of Human Virology, 2d ed, p954)Focal InfectionNeointima: The new and thickened layer of scar tissue that forms on a PROSTHESIS, or as a result of vessel injury especially following ANGIOPLASTY or stent placement.Precancerous Conditions: Pathological processes that tend eventually to become malignant. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Angiolymphoid Hyperplasia with Eosinophilia: Solitary or multiple benign cutaneous nodules comprised of immature and mature vascular structures intermingled with endothelial cells and a varied infiltrate of eosinophils, histiocytes, lymphocytes, and mast cells.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Steroid 21-Hydroxylase: An adrenal microsomal cytochrome P450 enzyme that catalyzes the 21-hydroxylation of steroids in the presence of molecular oxygen and NADPH-FERRIHEMOPROTEIN REDUCTASE. This enzyme, encoded by CYP21 gene, converts progesterones to precursors of adrenal steroid hormones (CORTICOSTERONE; HYDROCORTISONE). Defects in CYP21 cause congenital adrenal hyperplasia (ADRENAL HYPERPLASIA, CONGENITAL).Prostate: A gland in males that surrounds the neck of the URINARY BLADDER and the URETHRA. It secretes a substance that liquefies coagulated semen. It is situated in the pelvic cavity behind the lower part of the PUBIC SYMPHYSIS, above the deep layer of the triangular ligament, and rests upon the RECTUM.Pseudolymphoma: A group of disorders having a benign course but exhibiting clinical and histological features suggestive of malignant lymphoma. Pseudolymphoma is characterized by a benign infiltration of lymphoid cells or histiocytes which microscopically resembles a malignant lymphoma. (From Dorland, 28th ed & Stedman, 26th ed)Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Parathyroid Glands: Two pairs of small oval-shaped glands located in the front and the base of the NECK and adjacent to the two lobes of THYROID GLAND. They secrete PARATHYROID HORMONE that regulates the balance of CALCIUM; PHOSPHORUS; and MAGNESIUM in the body.Endometrial Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of ENDOMETRIUM, the mucous lining of the UTERUS. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. Their classification and grading are based on the various cell types and the percent of undifferentiated cells.Adenoma: A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Transurethral Resection of Prostate: Removal of all or part of the PROSTATE, often using a cystoscope and/or resectoscope passed through the URETHRA.Carotid Artery Injuries: Damages to the CAROTID ARTERIES caused either by blunt force or penetrating trauma, such as CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; THORACIC INJURIES; and NECK INJURIES. Damaged carotid arteries can lead to CAROTID ARTERY THROMBOSIS; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; pseudoaneurysm formation; and INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY DISSECTION. (From Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1997, 18:251; J Trauma 1994, 37:473)Focal Adhesion Kinase 2: A non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinase that is expressed primarily in the BRAIN; OSTEOBLASTS; and LYMPHOID CELLS. In the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM focal adhesion kinase 2 modulates ION CHANNEL function and MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES activity.Vinculin: A cytoskeletal protein associated with cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The amino acid sequence of human vinculin has been determined. The protein consists of 1066 amino acid residues and its gene has been assigned to chromosome 10.17-alpha-Hydroxyprogesterone: A metabolite of PROGESTERONE with a hydroxyl group at the 17-alpha position. It serves as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of HYDROCORTISONE and GONADAL STEROID HORMONES.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Graft Occlusion, Vascular: Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Jugular Veins: Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Goblet Cells: A glandular epithelial cell or a unicellular gland. Goblet cells secrete MUCUS. They are scattered in the epithelial linings of many organs, especially the SMALL INTESTINE and the RESPIRATORY TRACT.Cell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Giant Lymph Node Hyperplasia: Large benign, hyperplastic lymph nodes. The more common hyaline vascular subtype is characterized by small hyaline vascular follicles and interfollicular capillary proliferations. Plasma cells are often present and represent another subtype with the plasma cells containing IgM and IMMUNOGLOBULIN A.Rats, Inbred F344Hypertrophy: General increase in bulk of a part or organ due to CELL ENLARGEMENT and accumulation of FLUIDS AND SECRETIONS, not due to tumor formation, nor to an increase in the number of cells (HYPERPLASIA).Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Papilloma: A circumscribed benign epithelial tumor projecting from the surrounding surface; more precisely, a benign epithelial neoplasm consisting of villous or arborescent outgrowths of fibrovascular stroma covered by neoplastic cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Parathyroid Diseases: Pathological processes of the PARATHYROID GLANDS. They usually manifest as hypersecretion or hyposecretion of PARATHYROID HORMONE that regulates the balance of CALCIUM; PHOSPHORUS; and MAGNESIUM in the body.Adrenocortical Hyperfunction: Excess production of ADRENAL CORTEX HORMONES such as ALDOSTERONE; HYDROCORTISONE; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE; and/or ANDROSTENEDIONE. Hyperadrenal syndromes include CUSHING SYNDROME; HYPERALDOSTERONISM; and VIRILISM.5-alpha Reductase Inhibitors: Drugs that inhibit 3-OXO-5-ALPHA-STEROID 4-DEHYDROGENASE. They are commonly used to reduce the production of DIHYDROTESTOSTERONE.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Polytetrafluoroethylene: Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Brain Ischemia: Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.Mice, Inbred C57BLBreast Diseases: Pathological processes of the BREAST.Adrenal Glands: A pair of glands located at the cranial pole of each of the two KIDNEYS. Each adrenal gland is composed of two distinct endocrine tissues with separate embryonic origins, the ADRENAL CORTEX producing STEROIDS and the ADRENAL MEDULLA producing NEUROTRANSMITTERS.Epilepsies, Partial: Conditions characterized by recurrent paroxysmal neuronal discharges which arise from a focal region of the brain. Partial seizures are divided into simple and complex, depending on whether consciousness is unaltered (simple partial seizure) or disturbed (complex partial seizure). Both types may feature a wide variety of motor, sensory, and autonomic symptoms. Partial seizures may be classified by associated clinical features or anatomic location of the seizure focus. A secondary generalized seizure refers to a partial seizure that spreads to involve the brain diffusely. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp317)Parathyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PARATHYROID GLANDS.Vascular Grafting: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES, or transplanted BLOOD VESSELS, or other biological material to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Cushing Syndrome: A condition caused by prolonged exposure to excess levels of cortisol (HYDROCORTISONE) or other GLUCOCORTICOIDS from endogenous or exogenous sources. It is characterized by upper body OBESITY; OSTEOPOROSIS; HYPERTENSION; DIABETES MELLITUS; HIRSUTISM; AMENORRHEA; and excess body fluid. Endogenous Cushing syndrome or spontaneous hypercortisolism is divided into two groups, those due to an excess of ADRENOCORTICOTROPIN and those that are ACTH-independent.Serenoa: A plant genus in the family ARECACEAE, order Arecales, subclass Arecidae. The fruit or the extract (Permixon) is used for PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Protein-Tyrosine Kinases: Protein kinases that catalyze the PHOSPHORYLATION of TYROSINE residues in proteins with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.Myocytes, Smooth Muscle: Non-striated, elongated, spindle-shaped cells found lining the digestive tract, uterus, and blood vessels. They are derived from specialized myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, SMOOTH MUSCLE).Adenoma, Liver Cell: A benign epithelial tumor of the LIVER.Epidermis: The external, nonvascular layer of the skin. It is made up, from within outward, of five layers of EPITHELIUM: (1) basal layer (stratum basale epidermidis); (2) spinous layer (stratum spinosum epidermidis); (3) granular layer (stratum granulosum epidermidis); (4) clear layer (stratum lucidum epidermidis); and (5) horny layer (stratum corneum epidermidis).Finasteride: An orally active 3-OXO-5-ALPHA-STEROID 4-DEHYDROGENASE inhibitor. It is used as a surgical alternative for treatment of benign PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA.Carcinoma in Situ: A lesion with cytological characteristics associated with invasive carcinoma but the tumor cells are confined to the epithelium of origin, without invasion of the basement membrane.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Carcinogens: Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.Adrenal Gland Diseases: Pathological processes of the ADRENAL GLANDS.Endometrium: The mucous membrane lining of the uterine cavity that is hormonally responsive during the MENSTRUAL CYCLE and PREGNANCY. The endometrium undergoes cyclic changes that characterize MENSTRUATION. After successful FERTILIZATION, it serves to sustain the developing embryo.Cytoskeletal Proteins: Major constituent of the cytoskeleton found in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. They form a flexible framework for the cell, provide attachment points for organelles and formed bodies, and make communication between parts of the cell possible.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Angioplasty, Balloon: Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.Actins: Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen: Nuclear antigen with a role in DNA synthesis, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. PCNA is required for the coordinated synthesis of both leading and lagging strands at the replication fork during DNA replication. PCNA expression correlates with the proliferation activity of several malignant and non-malignant cell types.Phosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.Carcinogenicity Tests: Tests to experimentally measure the tumor-producing/cancer cell-producing potency of an agent by administering the agent (e.g., benzanthracenes) and observing the quantity of tumors or the cell transformation developed over a given period of time. The carcinogenicity value is usually measured as milligrams of agent administered per tumor developed. Though this test differs from the DNA-repair and bacterial microsome MUTAGENICITY TESTS, researchers often attempt to correlate the finding of carcinogenicity values and mutagenicity values.Mammary Glands, Animal: MAMMARY GLANDS in the non-human MAMMALS.Breast: In humans, one of the paired regions in the anterior portion of the THORAX. The breasts consist of the MAMMARY GLANDS, the SKIN, the MUSCLES, the ADIPOSE TISSUE, and the CONNECTIVE TISSUES.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Ischemic Attack, Transient: Brief reversible episodes of focal, nonconvulsive ischemic dysfunction of the brain having a duration of less than 24 hours, and usually less than one hour, caused by transient thrombotic or embolic blood vessel occlusion or stenosis. Events may be classified by arterial distribution, temporal pattern, or etiology (e.g., embolic vs. thrombotic). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp814-6)Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Azasteroids: Steroidal compounds in which one or more carbon atoms in the steroid ring system have been substituted with nitrogen atoms.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Fibrocystic Breast Disease: A common and benign breast disease characterized by varying degree of fibrocystic changes in the breast tissue. There are three major patterns of morphological changes, including FIBROSIS, formation of CYSTS, and proliferation of glandular tissue (adenosis). The fibrocystic breast has a dense irregular, lumpy, bumpy consistency.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Metaplasia: A condition in which there is a change of one adult cell type to another similar adult cell type.Cell Adhesion Molecules: Surface ligands, usually glycoproteins, that mediate cell-to-cell adhesion. Their functions include the assembly and interconnection of various vertebrate systems, as well as maintenance of tissue integration, wound healing, morphogenic movements, cellular migrations, and metastasis.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Polyps: Discrete abnormal tissue masses that protrude into the lumen of the DIGESTIVE TRACT or the RESPIRATORY TRACT. Polyps can be spheroidal, hemispheroidal, or irregular mound-shaped structures attached to the MUCOUS MEMBRANE of the lumen wall either by a stalk, pedunculus, or by a broad base.Hyperparathyroidism: A condition of abnormally elevated output of PARATHYROID HORMONE (or PTH) triggering responses that increase blood CALCIUM. It is characterized by HYPERCALCEMIA and BONE RESORPTION, eventually leading to bone diseases. PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM is caused by parathyroid HYPERPLASIA or PARATHYROID NEOPLASMS. SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM is increased PTH secretion in response to HYPOCALCEMIA, usually caused by chronic KIDNEY DISEASES.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Crk-Associated Substrate Protein: Crk-associated substrate was originally identified as a highly phosphorylated 130 kDa protein that associates with ONCOGENE PROTEIN CRK and ONCOGENE PROTEIN SRC. It is a signal transducing adaptor protein that undergoes tyrosine PHOSPHORYLATION in signaling pathways that regulate CELL MIGRATION and CELL PROLIFERATION.Biopsy, Needle: Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.PhosphoproteinsCarotid Artery, Common: The two principal arteries supplying the structures of the head and neck. They ascend in the neck, one on each side, and at the level of the upper border of the thyroid cartilage, each divides into two branches, the external (CAROTID ARTERY, EXTERNAL) and internal (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL) carotid arteries.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Zyxin: A zinc-binding phosphoprotein that concentrates at focal adhesions and along the actin cytoskeleton. Zyxin has an N-terminal proline-rich domain and three LIM domains in its C-terminal half.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: Tumors or cancers of the ADRENAL CORTEX.Adenomatosis, Pulmonary: A neoplastic disease in which the alveoli and distal bronchi are filled with mucus and mucus-secreting columnar epithelial cells. It is characterized by abundant, extremely tenacious sputum, chills, fever, cough, dyspnea, and pleuritic pain. (Stedman, 25th ed)Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Urinary Bladder Neck Obstruction: Blocked urine flow through the bladder neck, the narrow internal urethral opening at the base of the URINARY BLADDER. Narrowing or strictures of the URETHRA can be congenital or acquired. It is often observed in males with enlarged PROSTATE glands.Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Cell Transformation, Neoplastic: Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Prostatic Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PROSTATE or its component tissues.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Integrins: A family of transmembrane glycoproteins (MEMBRANE GLYCOPROTEINS) consisting of noncovalent heterodimers. They interact with a wide variety of ligands including EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS; COMPLEMENT, and other cells, while their intracellular domains interact with the CYTOSKELETON. The integrins consist of at least three identified families: the cytoadhesin receptors(RECEPTORS, CYTOADHESIN), the leukocyte adhesion receptors (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE ADHESION), and the VERY LATE ANTIGEN RECEPTORS. Each family contains a common beta-subunit (INTEGRIN BETA CHAINS) combined with one or more distinct alpha-subunits (INTEGRIN ALPHA CHAINS). These receptors participate in cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion in many physiologically important processes, including embryological development; HEMOSTASIS; THROMBOSIS; WOUND HEALING; immune and nonimmune defense mechanisms; and oncogenic transformation.Enterochromaffin Cells: A subtype of enteroendocrine cells found in the gastrointestinal MUCOSA, particularly in the glands of PYLORIC ANTRUM; DUODENUM; and ILEUM. These cells secrete mainly SEROTONIN and some neuropeptides. Their secretory granules stain readily with silver (argentaffin stain).Pregnanetriol: A metabolite of 17-ALPHA-HYDROXYPROGESTERONE, normally produced in small quantities by the GONADS and the ADRENAL GLANDS, found in URINE. An elevated urinary pregnanetriol is associated with CONGENITAL ADRENAL HYPERPLASIA with a deficiency of STEROID 21-HYDROXYLASE.Adrenocorticotropic Hormone: An anterior pituitary hormone that stimulates the ADRENAL CORTEX and its production of CORTICOSTEROIDS. ACTH is a 39-amino acid polypeptide of which the N-terminal 24-amino acid segment is identical in all species and contains the adrenocorticotrophic activity. Upon further tissue-specific processing, ACTH can yield ALPHA-MSH and corticotrophin-like intermediate lobe peptide (CLIP).Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Mice, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations, or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. All animals within an inbred strain trace back to a common ancestor in the twentieth generation.Dystonic Disorders: Acquired and inherited conditions that feature DYSTONIA as a primary manifestation of disease. These disorders are generally divided into generalized dystonias (e.g., dystonia musculorum deformans) and focal dystonias (e.g., writer's cramp). They are also classified by patterns of inheritance and by age of onset.Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Hyperaldosteronism: A condition caused by the overproduction of ALDOSTERONE. It is characterized by sodium retention and potassium excretion with resultant HYPERTENSION and HYPOKALEMIA.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Cytoskeleton: The network of filaments, tubules, and interconnecting filamentous bridges which give shape, structure, and organization to the cytoplasm.Angiomatosis: A condition with multiple tumor-like lesions caused either by congenital or developmental malformations of BLOOD VESSELS, or reactive vascular proliferations, such as in bacillary angiomatosis. Angiomatosis is considered non-neoplastic.Fibroblasts: Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.Fludrocortisone: A synthetic mineralocorticoid with anti-inflammatory activity.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating: A noninvasive (noninfiltrating) carcinoma of the breast characterized by a proliferation of malignant epithelial cells confined to the mammary ducts or lobules, without light-microscopy evidence of invasion through the basement membrane into the surrounding stroma.Hydroxyprogesterones: Metabolites or derivatives of PROGESTERONE with hydroxyl group substitution at various sites.Lymphatic Diseases: Diseases of LYMPH; LYMPH NODES; or LYMPHATIC VESSELS.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Extracellular Matrix: A meshwork-like substance found within the extracellular space and in association with the basement membrane of the cell surface. It promotes cellular proliferation and provides a supporting structure to which cells or cell lysates in culture dishes adhere.Cell Count: The number of CELLS of a specific kind, usually measured per unit volume or area of sample.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Prostatitis: Infiltration of inflammatory cells into the parenchyma of PROSTATE. The subtypes are classified by their varied laboratory analysis, clinical presentation and response to treatment.Arteriovenous Shunt, Surgical: Surgical shunt allowing direct passage of blood from an artery to a vein. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Lymph Nodes: They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.Adrenal Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ADRENAL GLANDS.Keratins: A class of fibrous proteins or scleroproteins that represents the principal constituent of EPIDERMIS; HAIR; NAILS; horny tissues, and the organic matrix of tooth ENAMEL. Two major conformational groups have been characterized, alpha-keratin, whose peptide backbone forms a coiled-coil alpha helical structure consisting of TYPE I KERATIN and a TYPE II KERATIN, and beta-keratin, whose backbone forms a zigzag or pleated sheet structure. alpha-Keratins have been classified into at least 20 subtypes. In addition multiple isoforms of subtypes have been found which may be due to GENE DUPLICATION.Adrenal Cortex Diseases: Pathological processes of the ADRENAL CORTEX.Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Citrobacter rodentium: A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus CITROBACTER, family ENTEROBACTERIACEAE. As an important pathogen of laboratory mice, it serves as a model for investigating epithelial hyperproliferation and tumor promotion. It was previously considered a strain of CITROBACTER FREUNDII.Hemangioma: A vascular anomaly due to proliferation of BLOOD VESSELS that forms a tumor-like mass. The common types involve CAPILLARIES and VEINS. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most frequently noticed in the SKIN and SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE. (from Stedman, 27th ed, 2000)Coronary Restenosis: Recurrent narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery following surgical procedures performed to alleviate a prior obstruction.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary: Abnormally elevated PARATHYROID HORMONE secretion as a response to HYPOCALCEMIA. It is caused by chronic KIDNEY FAILURE or other abnormalities in the controls of bone and mineral metabolism, leading to various BONE DISEASES, such as RENAL OSTEODYSTROPHY.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Adrenal Cortex: The outer layer of the adrenal gland. It is derived from MESODERM and comprised of three zones (outer ZONA GLOMERULOSA, middle ZONA FASCICULATA, and inner ZONA RETICULARIS) with each producing various steroids preferentially, such as ALDOSTERONE; HYDROCORTISONE; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE; and ANDROSTENEDIONE. Adrenal cortex function is regulated by pituitary ADRENOCORTICOTROPIN.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: Symptoms of disorders of the lower urinary tract including frequency, NOCTURIA; urgency, incomplete voiding, and URINARY INCONTINENCE. They are often associated with OVERACTIVE BLADDER; URINARY INCOMPETENCE; and INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS. Lower urinary tract symptoms in males were traditionally called PROSTATISM.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Coated Materials, Biocompatible: Biocompatible materials usually used in dental and bone implants that enhance biologic fixation, thereby increasing the bond strength between the coated material and bone, and minimize possible biological effects that may result from the implant itself.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.
... focal segmental, 1; 603278; ACTN4 Glomerulosclerosis, focal segmental, 2; 603965; TRPC6 Glomerulosclerosis, focal segmental, 3 ... TP53 Adrenal hyperplasia, congenital, due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency; 202010; CYP11B1 Adrenal hyperplasia, congenital, ... KLKB1 Focal cortical dysplasia, Taylor balloon cell type; 607341; TSC1 Focal dermal hypoplasia; 305600; PORCN Folate ... LMNB2 Lipoid adrenal hyperplasia; 201710; STAR Lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia; 201710; CYP11A Lipoid proteinosis; 247100 ...
Intraoral verruca vulgaris, Condyloma acuminatum, and Focal epithelial hyperplasia. Note: differentiation is done accurately by ...
Butcher's warts - HPV type 7. Heck's disease (Focal epithelial hyperplasia) - HPV types 13 and 32. Common warts have a ...
Benign neoplasms include hepatocellular adenoma, hepatic hemangioma and focal nodular hyperplasia. The most common malignant ...
Kikuchi M. Lymphadenitis showing focal reticulum cell hyperplasia with nuclear debris and phagocytes. Acta Hematol Jpn 1972;35: ... Cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia Rammohan A, Cherukuri SD, Manimaran AB, Manohar RR, Naidu RM (June 2012). "Kikuchi-Fujimoto ...
... comprise focal areas of iris stromal hyperplasia, surrounded by relative hypoplasia. Similar spots described ...
Focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) is the second most common tumor of the liver. This tumor is the result of a congenital ... Other types include nodular regenerative hyperplasia and hamartoma. Upon discovery of a liver tumor, the main issue in the ... follicular nodular hyperplasia (FNH), and hypervascular metastasis), but may be occult or difficult to characterize on portal ...
It occurs in cases of advanced hypertensive retinopathy, represent focal choroidal infarcts. Ophthalmology Hall of Fame ( ... "Elschnig's conjunctivitis": Conjunctivitis associated with hyperplasia of the tarsal gland. "Elschnig's pearls": Pearl-like ...
"A quantitative gene expression study suggests a role for angiopoietins in focal nodular hyperplasia". Gastroenterology. 124 (3 ...
The synovium of the involved joint demonstrates villous hyperplasia, which imparts a wrinkled appearance on gross examination. ... Synovial involvement may be focal or diffuse in nature. Trauma-related: Fracture with avulsed fragment Fragmentation of ...
Areas of focal RPE hyperplasia, i.e.pigment plaques, often develop in the paramacular region as a response to these abnormal ... Probably best defined as an acquired capillary ectasia (i.e., a focal expansion or outpouching) and dilation in the parafoveal ... macular edema or focal pigment hypertrophy, especially in those patients without a history of retinopathy or contributory ... refractile deposits in the superficial retinal layers-may be seen within the affected area.a focal area of diminished retinal ...
Focal epithelial hyperplasia (mouth) 13, 32 Mouth papillomas 6, 7, 11, 16, 32 ...
The most common, or "classical", type of HIV-associated nephropathy is a collapsing focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), ... The characteristic feature of collapsing glomerulopathy is collapse of glomerular tuft and proliferation and hyperplasia of ... Typical findings are that of collapsing capillary loops, area of scarring called focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), ...
Heck's disease (focal epithelial hyperplasia) - HPV types 13 and 32.. Pathophysiology[edit]. Common warts have a characteristic ...
... (also known as focal or multifocal epithelial hyperplasia) is an asymptomatic, benign neoplastic condition ...
Most notably focal epithelial tufts were found on the surface epithelium. These tufts were composed of closely packed ... A number of jejunal biopsies had been taken during life and these showed partial villous atrophy with by crypt hyperplasia and ... The most important feature involves the epithelium where the surface enterocytes are disorganized with focal crowding creating ...
... a Belgian firearms manufacturer Focal nodular hyperplasia Fools and Heroes, a British live-action role playing system Sidus FNH ...
Tracy RE, White S (February 2002). "A method for quantifying adrenocortical nodular hyperplasia at autopsy: some use of the ... This stage corresponds to more severe generalized and focal areas of arteriolar narrowing, changes in the arteriolar and ... Persistently elevated blood pressure leads to intimal thickening, hyperplasia of the media wall, and hyaline degeneration in ... focal neurologic signs, and alterations in mental status. Untreated, hypertensive encephalopathy may progress to stupor, coma, ...
... persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy due to focal adenomatous hyperplasia, X-linked sideroblastosis and anemia, ...
Echinococcal cyst Focal fatty change Focal nodular hyperplasia Hepatoblastoma Infiltrative liver disease Inflammatory ... unlike other benign liver tumors such as hemangioma and focal nodular hyperplasia, hepatic adenomas have a small but meaningful ... pseudotumor Leiomyosarcoma Lymphoma Nodular regenerative hyperplasia Hepatic adenomas may be classified by their morphologic ...
... benign focal nodular hyperplasia) or absent, with posterior acoustic enhancement effect (cysts), have distinct delineation ( ...
Hyperimmunoglobulinemia D with periodic fever Hyperimmunoglobulinemia E Hyperinsulinism due to focal adenomatous hyperplasia ... focal Hyperkalemia Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis Hyperkeratosis lenticularis perstans of Flegel Hyperkeratosis lenticularis ... Hemi 3 syndrome Hemifacial atrophy agenesis of the caudate nucleus Hemifacial atrophy progressive Hemifacial hyperplasia ... Hirschsprung microcephaly cleft palate Hirschsprung nail hypoplasia dysmorphism Hirsutism congenital gingival hyperplasia ...
... congenital Adrenal hyperplasia Adrenal hypertension Adrenal hypoplasia congenital, X-linked Adrenal hypoplasia Adrenal ... aka Dercum's disease Adolescent benign focal crisis Adrenal adenoma, familial Adrenal cancer Adrenal disorder Adrenal gland ... intracranial berry Aneurysm Angel shaped phalangoep Anger irritation syndrome Angiofollicular lymph hyperplasia ...
Atypical adenomatous hyperplasia of the lung Adenocarcinoma in situ of the lung Adenocarcinoma of the lung Van Schil, P. E.; ... with a zone of focal invasion of the chorion, with a size inferior to 5 mm. For MIA, the prognosis is near 100% survival. ...
... and focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH). Chronic liver diseases like chronic hepatitis, chronic alcohol abuse or chronic toxic ... other rare disorders like focal nodular hyperplasia, Hepatic fibrosis, peliosis hepatis and veno-occlusive disease. Liver ...
Focal nodular hyperplasia: Focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) ni uvimbe wa pili kawaida zaidi wa ini. Uvimbe huu ni matokeo ya ...
... hepatic focal nodular hyperplasia, FNH (previous denomination: benign hepatoma, solitary hyperplastic nodule, focal sclerosis, ... Focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver in a child with sickle cell anemia. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1980 Mar;134(3):594-7. PMID: ... Focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver: a link with sickle cell disease? Arch Dis Child. 1991 Sep;66(9):1073-4. PMID: 1929517 ... Home , E. Pathology by systems , Digestive system , Liver and pancreatobiliary system , Liver , focal nodular hyperplasia ...
... we reported o f clinical and electron-microscopical investigations in a case o f focal epithelial hyperplasia Heck. The patient ... Human papillomavirus type 13 DNA in focal epithelial hyperplasia among Mexicans. *P. Hernandez-Jauregui. , A. Eriksson. , R. ... HPV 1 DNA in lesions of focal epithelial hyperplasia Heck. *. Detlef G. Petzoldt. , H. W. Pfister ... A human papillomavirus closely related to HPV 13 found in a focal epithelial hyperplasia lesion (Heck disease). *S. Syrjänen. ...
Focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver: a link with sickle cell disease? ... Focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver: results of treatment and options in management. ... Focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver: results of treatment and options in management. Article Abstract:. Focal nodular ... Focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver: a link with sickle cell disease?. Article Abstract:. Sickle cell disease is a ...
keywords = "Focal nodular hyperplasia, Gd-EOB-DTPA, MRI, Organic anion transporter",. author = "Hiroyasu Fujiwara and Shigeki ... Fujiwara H, Sekine S, Onaya H, Shimada K, Mikata R, Arai Y. Ring-like enhancement of focal nodular hyperplasia with ... Fujiwara, H, Sekine, S, Onaya, H, Shimada, K, Mikata, R & Arai, Y 2011, Ring-like enhancement of focal nodular hyperplasia ... We report a case of focal nodular hyperplasia in a patient for whom gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid ...
... previously known as focal epithelial hyperplasia and the results of an immunocytochemical study. PATIENTS AND METHOD ... We present the clinicopathological findings after reviewing 52 patients affected by multifocal epithelial hyperplasia (MEH), ... Focal Epithelial Hyperplasia / pathology*. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Keratins / analysis*. Lip Diseases / pathology. Male. ... previously known as focal epithelial hyperplasia and the results of an immunocytochemical study. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We ...
Gingival Hyperplasia. On-line free medical diagnosis assistant. Ranked list of possible diseases from either several symptoms ... What are they symptoms of a ruptured Focal Nodular Hyperplasia?. I was diagnosed with Focal nodular hyperplasia, which is a ... I was wondering if anyone knew the symptoms of a ruptured Focal nodular hyperplasia. I cant find any info online about it. ... Ultrasounds and MRI showed three small fibroids, focal complex hyperplasia and polyps. Ive been trying natural remedies which ...
Focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) is a benign tumor of the liver (hepatic tumor), which is the second most prevalent tumor of the ... Focal nodular hyperplasias most recognizable gross feature is a central stellate scar seen in 60-70% of cases. Microscopically ... Imaging in Focal Nodular Hyperplasia at eMedicine Scalori, Astrid; Tavani, Alessandra; Gallus, Silvano; La Vecchia, Carlo; ... Chun Hsee, Li; McCall, John L.; Koea, Jonathan B. (2005). "Focal nodular hyperplasia: what are the indications for resection ...
Focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) is the second most common tumor of the liver, surpassed in prevalence only by hepatic ... encoded search term (Imaging in Focal Nodular Hyperplasia) and Imaging in Focal Nodular Hyperplasia What to Read Next on ... Imaging in Focal Nodular Hyperplasia. Updated: Jan 04, 2016 * Author: Ali Nawaz Khan, MBBS, FRCS, FRCP, FRCR; Chief Editor: ... Focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) usually displays a homogeneous signal intensity on MRI (see the image below). [12, 22, 23, 24, ...
... Robert P Myers,1 Dónal Downey,2 ... Robert P Myers, Dónal Downey, Subrata Chakrabarti, and Paul J Marotta, "Multiple Focal Nodular Hyperplasia and Steatohepatitis ...
Superb Microvascular Imaging in Focal Nodular Hyperplasia Official Title ICMJE The Fingerprint: Spoke-wheel Sign of Focal ... Focal Nodular Hyperplasia Intervention ICMJE *Drug: Sonazoid Sonazoid: Commercially available contrast material for ... Superb Microvascular Imaging in Focal Nodular Hyperplasia. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... Measurement error of focal nodular hyperplasia between b-mode US and SMI according to the reference standard, CEUS [ Time Frame ...
Oestrogen hormone receptors in focal nodular hyperplasia.. [Manju D Chandrasegaram, Ali Shah, John W Chen, Andrew Ruszkiewicz, ... The role of hormones in focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) has been investigated with conflicting results. The aim of this study ...
... this case is suggestive of focal nodular hyperplasia. We report a patient with focal nodular hyperplasia who had increased ... In patients with focal nodular hyperplasia, liver scans with solitary defects as well as normal patterns are found. In some ... Rarely focal areas of increased activity are depicted; most are related to altered vascular dynamics in the liver secondary to ...
Focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver: the solitary cirrhotic liver nodule Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a message ... Focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver: the solitary cirrhotic liver nodule. T. S. Wilson and J. W. Macgregor ...
The primary purpose of this brief review is to discuss the basic features of typical and atypical focal nodular hyperplasia, ... Background on focal nodular hyperplasia. Focal nodular hyperplasia is defined as a nodule composed of benign-appearing ... Focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver: MR findings in 35 proved cases. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1991;156(2):317-320. ... Atypical focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver: imaging features of nonspecific and liver-specific MR contrast agents. AJR Am ...
Focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) is the second most common liver cell-derived benign tumor [1]. The nature and pathogenesis of ... Development of Focal Nodular Hyperplasia after Cyclophosphamide-Based Chemotherapy in a Patient with Breast Cancer. Dan-Qing ... Focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) is the second most common liver cell-derived benign tumor. It is postulated that chemotherapy- ... B. L. Joyner, R. K. Goyal, B. Newman, and T. L. Levin, "Focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver: a sequela of tumor therapy," ...
The focal origins of PHHI were confirmed with histologic diagnoses.. Focal adenomatous hyperplasia as a cause of PHHI was ... Cure of hypoglycemic hyperinsulinism by enucleation of a focal islet cell adenomatous hyperplasia. J Pediatr Surg.1997;32 :1526 ... Laparoscopic Diagnosis and Cure of Hyperinsulinism in Two Cases of Focal Adenomatous Hyperplasia in Infancy. Monique De Vroede ... If a focal lesion is identified, then removal may be curative. If laparoscopy does not reveal a focal lesion, then multiple ...
liver adenoma or focal nodule hyperplasia Page 2 of 20. ,. 1. 2. 3. 4. 12. ,. Last ». ... liver adenoma or focal nodule hyperplasia Megswis,. I dont know if you have read any of my post FannyLou but I have a focal ... Re: liver adenoma or focal nodule hyperplasia Ms. Genone,. Hi. I am confused. Did you say you had one child and the tumor went ... Re: liver adenoma or focal nodule hyperplasia Hi Rutlude,. Thanks so much for writing. I am the one with the 2.2 cm adenoma (or ...
Focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver is a benign tumor that usually affects young women. Traditionally, its treatment in ... Pathology showed focal nodular hyperplasia that affected the right lobe of the liver. After surgery, the child was doing well ... Focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver is a benign tumor that usually affects young women. Traditionally, its treatment in ...
Appearances are typical of FNH, i.e. well-defined margins, early peripheral enhancement (| than surrounding liver), persistent peripheral enhancement with Primovist indicating the presence of hepatocytes, non-restriction of diffusion and central ...
Focal Nodular Hyperplasia of the Liver and Intrahepatic Hemorrhage in Young Women on Oral Contraceptives J. Q. STAUFFER, M.D.; ... Regression of Focal Nodular Hyperplasia After Discontinuation of Oral Contraceptives Annals of Internal Medicine; 85 (2): 203- ... Focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver may occur with increased frequency in young women who have been taking oral ... Focal Nodular Hyperplasia of the Liver and Intrahepatic Hemorrhage in Young Women on Oral Contraceptives. Ann Intern Med. ;83: ...
First: This is suggestive of an increased estrogen state and maybe be a precursor to endometrial hyperplasia. alternatively it ... Answers from trusted physicians on focal nodular hyperplasia symptoms. ... Focal squamous atypia. Ki-67 shows mild increase cell proliferation focal vin cant be excluded. Lichen sclerosis? ... Chronic non specific cervicitis with squamous hyperplasia, squamous metaplasia + focal ciliated tubal endometrial metaplasia. ...
Aims To examine copper deposition in focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) and inflammatory hepatocellular adenoma (IHA) and to ...
We report on a case of focal haematopoietic hyperplasia occurring in the haematopoietic marrow in a lumbar vertebral body, of a ... Haematopoietic hyperplasia; Tumor-like; Trauma. Introduction. Focal haematopoietic hyperplasia is a rare and localized ... A Case of Focal Haematopoietic Hyperplasia of a Vertebral Body and Review of the Modern Literature Beatrice Detti1*, Silvia ... Focal benign hyperplasia is regarded a late reactive process after trauma, as well as the case reported ...
Focal Nodular Hyplasia Focal Nodular Hyperplasia Treatment Focal Nodular Hyperplasia Focal Nodular Hyperplasia recurrence focal ... Focal Nodular Hyperplasia / Gallstones Focal nodular hyperplasia Focal Nodular Hyperplasia,, AND MEDICATION Any ideas about ... Focal Nodular Hyperplasia Hepatic Adenoma and pregnancy Coming off of Klonopin after 8 months...what to expect and how to do so ... Focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver By DrkAngel50223 , 1 post, last post over a year ago. ...
What is focal nodular hyperplasia? Meaning of focal nodular hyperplasia medical term. What does focal nodular hyperplasia mean? ... Looking for online definition of focal nodular hyperplasia in the Medical Dictionary? focal nodular hyperplasia explanation ... focal nodular hyperplasia. Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia. hyperplasia. [hi″per-pla´ ... nodular hyperplasia of the prostate benign prostatic hypertrophy.. focal nodular hyperplasia. A relatively common (±1% of ...
  • Intimal hyperplasia is the universal response of a vessel to injury and is an important reason of late bypass graft failure, particularly in vein and synthetic vascular grafts. (lookfordiagnosis.com)
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