Deceleration: A decrease in the rate of speed.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Echocardiography, Doppler: Measurement of intracardiac blood flow using an M-mode and/or two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiogram while simultaneously recording the spectrum of the audible Doppler signal (e.g., velocity, direction, amplitude, intensity, timing) reflected from the moving column of red blood cells.Diastole: Post-systolic relaxation of the HEART, especially the HEART VENTRICLES.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Transcranial: A non-invasive technique using ultrasound for the measurement of cerebrovascular hemodynamics, particularly cerebral blood flow velocity and cerebral collateral flow. With a high-intensity, low-frequency pulse probe, the intracranial arteries may be studied transtemporally, transorbitally, or from below the foramen magnum.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Cerebrovascular Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.Pulsatile Flow: Rhythmic, intermittent propagation of a fluid through a BLOOD VESSEL or piping system, in contrast to constant, smooth propagation, which produces laminar flow.Echocardiography, Doppler, Pulsed: Echocardiography applying the Doppler effect, with velocity detection combined with range discrimination. Short bursts of ultrasound are transmitted at regular intervals and the echoes are demodulated as they return.Ultrasonography, Doppler: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with frequency-shifted ultrasound reflections produced by moving targets (usually red blood cells) in the bloodstream along the ultrasound axis in direct proportion to the velocity of movement of the targets, to determine both direction and velocity of blood flow. (Stedman, 25th ed)Mitral Valve: The valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart.Acceleration: An increase in the rate of speed.Heart Rate, Fetal: The heart rate of the FETUS. The normal range at term is between 120 and 160 beats per minute.Middle Cerebral Artery: The largest of the cerebral arteries. It trifurcates into temporal, frontal, and parietal branches supplying blood to most of the parenchyma of these lobes in the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These are the areas involved in motor, sensory, and speech activities.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.Atrial Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the LEFT ATRIUM.Systole: Period of contraction of the HEART, especially of the HEART VENTRICLES.Ophthalmic Artery: Artery originating from the internal carotid artery and distributing to the eye, orbit and adjacent facial structures.Rheology: The study of the deformation and flow of matter, usually liquids or fluids, and of the plastic flow of solids. The concept covers consistency, dilatancy, liquefaction, resistance to flow, shearing, thixotrophy, and VISCOSITY.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Pulsed: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with velocity detection combined with range discrimination. Short bursts of ultrasound are transmitted at regular intervals and the echoes are demodulated as they return.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Umbilical Arteries: Specialized arterial vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry waste and deoxygenated blood from the FETUS to the mother via the PLACENTA. In humans, there are usually two umbilical arteries but sometimes one.Heart Sounds: The sounds heard over the cardiac region produced by the functioning of the heart. There are four distinct sounds: the first occurs at the beginning of SYSTOLE and is heard as a "lubb" sound; the second is produced by the closing of the AORTIC VALVE and PULMONARY VALVE and is heard as a "dupp" sound; the third is produced by vibrations of the ventricular walls when suddenly distended by the rush of blood from the HEART ATRIA; and the fourth is produced by atrial contraction and ventricular filling.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Echocardiography, Doppler, Color: Echocardiography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Fetal Monitoring: Physiologic or biochemical monitoring of the fetus. It is usually done during LABOR, OBSTETRIC and may be performed in conjunction with the monitoring of uterine activity. It may also be performed prenatally as when the mother is undergoing surgery.Ventricular Pressure: The pressure within a CARDIAC VENTRICLE. Ventricular pressure waveforms can be measured in the beating heart by catheterization or estimated using imaging techniques (e.g., DOPPLER ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY). The information is useful in evaluating the function of the MYOCARDIUM; CARDIAC VALVES; and PERICARDIUM, particularly with simultaneous measurement of other (e.g., aortic or atrial) pressures.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Laser-Doppler Flowmetry: A method of non-invasive, continuous measurement of MICROCIRCULATION. The technique is based on the values of the DOPPLER EFFECT of low-power laser light scattered randomly by static structures and moving tissue particulates.Vascular Resistance: The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Pulmonary Veins: The veins that return the oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart.Cardiotocography: Monitoring of FETAL HEART frequency before birth in order to assess impending prematurity in relation to the pattern or intensity of antepartum UTERINE CONTRACTION.Echocardiography, Transesophageal: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues using a transducer placed in the esophagus.Phonocardiography: Graphic registration of the heart sounds picked up as vibrations and transformed by a piezoelectric crystal microphone into a varying electrical output according to the stresses imposed by the sound waves. The electrical output is amplified by a stethograph amplifier and recorded by a device incorporated into the electrocardiograph or by a multichannel recording machine.Fetal Distress: A nonreassuring fetal status (NRFS) indicating that the FETUS is compromised (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists 1988). It can be identified by sub-optimal values in FETAL HEART RATE; oxygenation of FETAL BLOOD; and other parameters.Retinal Artery: Central retinal artery and its branches. It arises from the ophthalmic artery, pierces the optic nerve and runs through its center, enters the eye through the porus opticus and branches to supply the retina.Ultrasonography, Prenatal: The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Echoencephalography: Use of reflected ultrasound in the diagnosis of intracranial pathologic processes.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Contrecoup Injury: An injury in which the damage is located on the opposite side of the primary impact site. A blow to the back of head which results in contrecoup injury to the frontal lobes of the brain is the most common type.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Ciliary Arteries: Three groups of arteries found in the eye which supply the iris, pupil, sclera, conjunctiva, and the muscles of the iris.Microcirculation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the MICROVASCULAR NETWORK.Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Hypocapnia: Clinical manifestation consisting of a deficiency of carbon dioxide in arterial blood.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Pulmonary Wedge Pressure: The blood pressure as recorded after wedging a CATHETER in a small PULMONARY ARTERY; believed to reflect the PRESSURE in the pulmonary CAPILLARIES.Placental Circulation: The circulation of BLOOD, of both the mother and the FETUS, through the PLACENTA.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Hyperemia: The presence of an increased amount of blood in a body part or an organ leading to congestion or engorgement of blood vessels. Hyperemia can be due to increase of blood flow into the area (active or arterial), or due to obstruction of outflow of blood from the area (passive or venous).Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Doppler Effect: Changes in the observed frequency of waves (as sound, light, or radio waves) due to the relative motion of source and observer. The effect was named for the 19th century Austrian physicist Johann Christian Doppler.Hyperventilation: A pulmonary ventilation rate faster than is metabolically necessary for the exchange of gases. It is the result of an increased frequency of breathing, an increased tidal volume, or a combination of both. It causes an excess intake of oxygen and the blowing off of carbon dioxide.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Hemorheology: The deformation and flow behavior of BLOOD and its elements i.e., PLASMA; ERYTHROCYTES; WHITE BLOOD CELLS; and BLOOD PLATELETS.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Carotid Artery, Internal: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.Cardiomyopathy, Dilated: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease that is characterized by ventricular dilation, VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION, and HEART FAILURE. Risk factors include SMOKING; ALCOHOL DRINKING; HYPERTENSION; INFECTION; PREGNANCY; and mutations in the LMNA gene encoding LAMIN TYPE A, a NUCLEAR LAMINA protein.Bradycardia: Cardiac arrhythmias that are characterized by excessively slow HEART RATE, usually below 50 beats per minute in human adults. They can be classified broadly into SINOATRIAL NODE dysfunction and ATRIOVENTRICULAR BLOCK.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Ventricular Function: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the HEART VENTRICLES.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Anterior Cerebral Artery: Artery formed by the bifurcation of the internal carotid artery (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL). Branches of the anterior cerebral artery supply the CAUDATE NUCLEUS; INTERNAL CAPSULE; PUTAMEN; SEPTAL NUCLEI; GYRUS CINGULI; and surfaces of the FRONTAL LOBE and PARIETAL LOBE.Fetal Heart: The heart of the fetus of any viviparous animal. It refers to the heart in the postembryonic period and is differentiated from the embryonic heart (HEART/embryology) only on the basis of time.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Mitral Valve Insufficiency: Backflow of blood from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the LEFT ATRIUM due to imperfect closure of the MITRAL VALVE. This can lead to mitral valve regurgitation.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Fetal Growth Retardation: The failure of a FETUS to attain its expected FETAL GROWTH at any GESTATIONAL AGE.Posterior Cerebral Artery: Artery formed by the bifurcation of the BASILAR ARTERY. Branches of the posterior cerebral artery supply portions of the OCCIPITAL LOBE; PARIETAL LOBE; inferior temporal gyrus, brainstem, and CHOROID PLEXUS.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Ventricular Function, Right: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the right HEART VENTRICLE.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Vasodilator Agents: Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, Traumatic: Bleeding into the SUBARACHNOID SPACE due to CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA. Minor hemorrhages may be asymptomatic; moderate to severe hemorrhages may be associated with INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION and VASOSPASM, INTRACRANIAL.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Hydrodynamics: The motion of fluids, especially noncompressible liquids, under the influence of internal and external forces.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Intracranial Pressure: Pressure within the cranial cavity. It is influenced by brain mass, the circulatory system, CSF dynamics, and skull rigidity.Motion Perception: The real or apparent movement of objects through the visual field.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular: Enlargement of the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart. This increase in ventricular mass is attributed to sustained abnormal pressure or volume loads and is a contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Gene Flow: The change in gene frequency in a population due to migration of gametes or individuals (ANIMAL MIGRATION) across population barriers. In contrast, in GENETIC DRIFT the cause of gene frequency changes are not a result of population or gamete movement.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Papaverine: An alkaloid found in opium but not closely related to the other opium alkaloids in its structure or pharmacological actions. It is a direct-acting smooth muscle relaxant used in the treatment of impotence and as a vasodilator, especially for cerebral vasodilation. The mechanism of its pharmacological actions is not clear, but it apparently can inhibit phosphodiesterases and it may have direct actions on calcium channels.Collateral Circulation: Maintenance of blood flow to an organ despite obstruction of a principal vessel. Blood flow is maintained through small vessels.Vasodilation: The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Neural Conduction: The propagation of the NERVE IMPULSE along the nerve away from the site of an excitation stimulus.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Pulse: The rhythmical expansion and contraction of an ARTERY produced by waves of pressure caused by the ejection of BLOOD from the left ventricle of the HEART as it contracts.Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Blood Circulation: The movement of the BLOOD as it is pumped through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Democratic Republic of the Congo: A republic in central Africa, east of the REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO, south of the CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC and north of ANGOLA and ZAMBIA. The capital is Kinshasa.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Dobutamine: A catecholamine derivative with specificity for BETA-1 ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS. It is commonly used as a cardiotonic agent after CARDIAC SURGERY and during DOBUTAMINE STRESS ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY.Celiac Artery: The arterial trunk that arises from the abdominal aorta and after a short course divides into the left gastric, common hepatic and splenic arteries.Circle of Willis: A polygonal anastomosis at the base of the brain formed by the internal carotid (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL), proximal parts of the anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral arteries (ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY; MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY; POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), the anterior communicating artery and the posterior communicating arteries.Saccades: An abrupt voluntary shift in ocular fixation from one point to another, as occurs in reading.Homeostasis: The processes whereby the internal environment of an organism tends to remain balanced and stable.Ductus Arteriosus: A fetal blood vessel connecting the pulmonary artery with the descending aorta.Acetazolamide: One of the CARBONIC ANHYDRASE INHIBITORS that is sometimes effective against absence seizures. It is sometimes useful also as an adjunct in the treatment of tonic-clonic, myoclonic, and atonic seizures, particularly in women whose seizures occur or are exacerbated at specific times in the menstrual cycle. However, its usefulness is transient often because of rapid development of tolerance. Its antiepileptic effect may be due to its inhibitory effect on brain carbonic anhydrase, which leads to an increased transneuronal chloride gradient, increased chloride current, and increased inhibition. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p337)Pulmonary Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary: Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Blood Volume: Volume of circulating BLOOD. It is the sum of the PLASMA VOLUME and ERYTHROCYTE VOLUME.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Craniocerebral Trauma: Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Mesenteric Artery, Superior: A large vessel supplying the whole length of the small intestine except the superior part of the duodenum. It also supplies the cecum and the ascending part of the colon and about half the transverse part of the colon. It arises from the anterior surface of the aorta below the celiac artery at the level of the first lumbar vertebra.Play and Playthings: Spontaneous or voluntary recreational activities pursued for enjoyment and accessories or equipment used in the activities; includes games, toys, etc.Ventricular Remodeling: The geometric and structural changes that the HEART VENTRICLES undergo, usually following MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. It comprises expansion of the infarct and dilatation of the healthy ventricle segments. While most prevalent in the left ventricle, it can also occur in the right ventricle.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Water Movements: The flow of water in enviromental bodies of water such as rivers, oceans, water supplies, aquariums, etc. It includes currents, tides, and waves.Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Adenosine: A nucleoside that is composed of ADENINE and D-RIBOSE. Adenosine or adenosine derivatives play many important biological roles in addition to being components of DNA and RNA. Adenosine itself is a neurotransmitter.Running: An activity in which the body is propelled by moving the legs rapidly. Running is performed at a moderate to rapid pace and should be differentiated from JOGGING, which is performed at a much slower pace.Fetus: The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Heart Failure, Diastolic: Heart failure caused by abnormal myocardial relaxation during DIASTOLE leading to defective cardiac filling.Cardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Blood Viscosity: The internal resistance of the BLOOD to shear forces. The in vitro measure of whole blood viscosity is of limited clinical utility because it bears little relationship to the actual viscosity within the circulation, but an increase in the viscosity of circulating blood can contribute to morbidity in patients suffering from disorders such as SICKLE CELL ANEMIA and POLYCYTHEMIA.Cardiomyopathy, Restrictive: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease in which the ventricular walls are excessively rigid, impeding ventricular filling. It is marked by reduced diastolic volume of either or both ventricles but normal or nearly normal systolic function. It may be idiopathic or associated with other diseases (ENDOMYOCARDIAL FIBROSIS or AMYLOIDOSIS) causing interstitial fibrosis.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Growth Disorders: Deviations from the average values for a specific age and sex in any or all of the following: height, weight, skeletal proportions, osseous development, or maturation of features. Included here are both acceleration and retardation of growth.Manometry: Measurement of the pressure or tension of liquids or gases with a manometer.Atrial Appendage: Ear-shaped appendage of either atrium of the heart. (Dorland, 28th ed)Cerebral Arterial Diseases: Pathological conditions of intracranial ARTERIES supplying the CEREBRUM. These diseases often are due to abnormalities or pathological processes in the ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY; MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY; and POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY.Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Hypercapnia: A clinical manifestation of abnormal increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in arterial blood.Vasomotor System: The neural systems which act on VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE to control blood vessel diameter. The major neural control is through the sympathetic nervous system.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Carotid Stenosis: Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)Arm: The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.Carotid Artery, Common: The two principal arteries supplying the structures of the head and neck. They ascend in the neck, one on each side, and at the level of the upper border of the thyroid cartilage, each divides into two branches, the external (CAROTID ARTERY, EXTERNAL) and internal (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL) carotid arteries.Uterus: The hollow thick-walled muscular organ in the female PELVIS. It consists of the fundus (the body) which is the site of EMBRYO IMPLANTATION and FETAL DEVELOPMENT. Beyond the isthmus at the perineal end of fundus, is CERVIX UTERI (the neck) opening into VAGINA. Beyond the isthmi at the upper abdominal end of fundus, are the FALLOPIAN TUBES.Cardiotonic Agents: Agents that have a strengthening effect on the heart or that can increase cardiac output. They may be CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES; SYMPATHOMIMETICS; or other drugs. They are used after MYOCARDIAL INFARCT; CARDIAC SURGICAL PROCEDURES; in SHOCK; or in congestive heart failure (HEART FAILURE).Tilt-Table Test: A standard and widely accepted diagnostic test used to identify patients who have a vasodepressive and/or cardioinhibitory response as a cause of syncope. (From Braunwald, Heart Disease, 7th ed)Basilar Artery: The artery formed by the union of the right and left vertebral arteries; it runs from the lower to the upper border of the pons, where it bifurcates into the two posterior cerebral arteries.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Ultrasonics: A subfield of acoustics dealing in the radio frequency range higher than acoustic SOUND waves (approximately above 20 kilohertz). Ultrasonic radiation is used therapeutically (DIATHERMY and ULTRASONIC THERAPY) to generate HEAT and to selectively destroy tissues. It is also used in diagnostics, for example, ULTRASONOGRAPHY; ECHOENCEPHALOGRAPHY; and ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY, to visually display echoes received from irradiated tissues.Natriuretic Peptide, Brain: A PEPTIDE that is secreted by the BRAIN and the HEART ATRIA, stored mainly in cardiac ventricular MYOCARDIUM. It can cause NATRIURESIS; DIURESIS; VASODILATION; and inhibits secretion of RENIN and ALDOSTERONE. It improves heart function. It contains 32 AMINO ACIDS.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Pregnancy Trimester, Second: The middle third of a human PREGNANCY, from the beginning of the 15th through the 28th completed week (99 to 196 days) of gestation.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Tricuspid Valve: The valve consisting of three cusps situated between the right atrium and right ventricle of the heart.Galvanic Skin Response: A change in electrical resistance of the skin, occurring in emotion and in certain other conditions.Vertebral Artery: The first branch of the SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY with distribution to muscles of the NECK; VERTEBRAE; SPINAL CORD; CEREBELLUM; and interior of the CEREBRUM.Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Fixation, Ocular: The positioning and accommodation of eyes that allows the image to be brought into place on the FOVEA CENTRALIS of each eye.Fetal Diseases: Pathophysiological conditions of the FETUS in the UTERUS. Some fetal diseases may be treated with FETAL THERAPIES.Hematocrit: The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.Splanchnic Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS supplying the abdominal VISCERA.Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Brachial Artery: The continuation of the axillary artery; it branches into the radial and ulnar arteries.Dipyridamole: A phosphodiesterase inhibitor that blocks uptake and metabolism of adenosine by erythrocytes and vascular endothelial cells. Dipyridamole also potentiates the antiaggregating action of prostacyclin. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p752)Hypotension, Orthostatic: A significant drop in BLOOD PRESSURE after assuming a standing position. Orthostatic hypotension is a finding, and defined as a 20-mm Hg decrease in systolic pressure or a 10-mm Hg decrease in diastolic pressure 3 minutes after the person has risen from supine to standing. Symptoms generally include DIZZINESS, blurred vision, and SYNCOPE.Pulse Wave Analysis: Evaluation of the contour of the PULSE waves which vary in different parts of the circulation and depend on physiological as well as pathophysiological conditions of the individual.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Retinal Vessels: The blood vessels which supply and drain the RETINA.Coronary Stenosis: Narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery.Capillaries: The minute vessels that connect the arterioles and venules.
  • These results may be explained by the observation that the momentum (momentum = mv, where m is the mass and v is the velocity) per unit volume of flow is greatest in the central streams because of the relatively high flow velocities (4) . (ajnr.org)
  • Areas of high WSS and high flow velocities were found adjacent to plaques, with values correlating with the degree of stenosis. (rero.ch)
  • They then seek to validate the model predictions using human, in vivo physiologic measurements of pressures (high fidelity transducers) and flows (echocardiography) of masses and volumes of heart chambers (cardiac MRI). (wikipedia.org)
  • The force of the tidal bore flow often poses a challenge to scientific measurements, as evidenced by a number of field work incidents in the River Dee, Rio Mearim, Daly River, and Sélune River. (wikipedia.org)
  • CFD provided detailed mass flow measurements. (rero.ch)
  • Measurements of the volume extension of the mush in the cell and the velocity of the solid front were also taken during the solidification experiment. (springer.com)
  • Phase-averaged, two-component, two-dimensional (2C-2D) particle image velocimeter measurements revealed the changing morphologies of these secondary flow structures. (deepdyve.com)
  • Using custom-designed software which stored operators' traces, we investigated the reproducibility of peak and velocity time integral (VTI) measurements across a much larger group of operators and explored the mechanisms by which disagreement arose. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Repeated assessment of coronary flow velocity pattern in patients with first acute myocardial infarction. (nih.gov)
  • The coronary flow velocity pattern showed a tendency for improvement after 24 h in the reperfusion and the nonreperfusion groups. (nih.gov)
  • The coronary flow velocity pattern immediately and 24 h after PTCA for AMI relates to myocardial perfusion determined by MCE and LV function at four weeks. (nih.gov)
  • Thus, the characteristic coronary flow velocity pattern is either established at the moment of coronary reperfusion or progresses thereafter in patients with no-reflow phenomenon. (elsevier.com)
  • Analysis of coronary blood flow velocity pattern after AMI may provide information about microvascular damage and the occurrence of a reperfusion injury. (nih.gov)
  • It had to do with return vehicles from capsules traveling at escape velocity, being oriented and controlled completely by telemetering devices. (youscribe.com)
  • R/acc recognises the need to keep decelerative forces away from the Process - the techonomic spiral of mutual excitation - since it is only by circumventing the critical retardation of the Process that intelligence optimisation can reach escape velocity. (parallaxoptics.com)
  • By using Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equation (RANS) simulations general effects characterizing complex terrain flows like a large inclination of the flow and a speedup due to the steep slope can be estimated. (gauss-centre.eu)
  • As the valley is narrow and its geomorphology is rapidly evolving, 3D point cloud technologies based on aerial photogrammetry from UAV or ground and airborne laser technologies are essential to understand the geomorphology and generate boundary conditions to run hazard simulations such as debris flows. (springeropen.com)
  • Flood simulations show that these controls can be overcome and instead of being channeled in other sub-channels, the flow tends to spread on the true right (downstream) end of the fan as a sheet flow. (springeropen.com)
  • Supports visualization and quantification of blood flow dynamics by assisting in review of MR phase-contrast data, on vascular region of interest segmented manually, or semi-automatically. (philips.co.uk)
  • In the experimental section, we investigate the hydrodynamic coefficients of drag and lift as well as the torque on the glider then analyze the launch velocity, launch angles, angular velocity, and displacement range as the main parameters for evaluating of motion dynamics. (springer.com)
  • 2000) developed a model coupling mass balance and flow dynamics of debris covered glaciers and applied it to the Khumbu Glacier. (agu.org)
  • Rob Fraser Is this like a car crash test dummy, except instead of putting on accelerometers, you're actually looking deeper into what happens with the actual flows in the body, like during a car accident? (vivitrolabs.com)
  • 12 ] are among the first to study the geometrical shape parameters of a body in 1974 and its effect on reducing drag force in an incompressible flow. (springer.com)
  • They come with a selection of valve body and internal orifice designs and springs that are specifically optimised for the flow conditions of any given application. (mgacontrols.com)
  • Mathematical modeling is offered for describing the effect of variable incidence between the body axis and the high enthalpy air flow on conjugated heat and mass transfer in a heat shield material at the thermochemical decomposition of the shield. (x-mol.com)
  • Results of numerical simulation were obtained for spatial supersonic flow near a body with pitch variations. (x-mol.com)
  • A force of 2N acting on a body changes its velocity uniformly from 2ms-1 to 5 ms-1… The SI unit for time, the second (abbreviated s), has a long history. (artevaconsulting.com)
  • The shifts in flow regime and body inertia lead to changing functional demands on the locomotory system during larval growth. (biologists.org)
  • In classical mechanics, the motion of a body is described by its position and velocity as the time value varies. (caece.net)
  • Generally speaking, however, the movement of the body centre is more flowing than the steps of the feet. (archives.dance)
  • Each piston has a valve for allowing fluid flow in one direction through the tube, and spring means acts on the pistons to control their positions. (justia.com)
  • On the basis of the analysis of a large array of experimental data on average heat transfer and hydraulic resistance, calculations of the dynamic velocity on the wall in deep rows of in-line and staggered tube bundles transversely streamlined by the turbulent flow of the coolant are performed. (x-mol.com)
  • In order to establish a hydraulic system with a good flow-matching relationship, the asymmetric hydraulic servo valve is adopted to control the asymmetrical hydraulic cylinder. (ramlux.nl)
  • To avoid the impact of the piston on the cylinder end-cap and improve the life of the hydraulic cylinder seals, quick deceleration is required at the end of the stroke. (ramlux.nl)
  • A plane perpendicular to the axial flow field at the flat plateau on top of the hill shows the wake of the flow in zone 5, which has crossed the forested steep slope and the area above. (gauss-centre.eu)
  • The axial movement of the disc is giving a streamlined flow path obtaining the Venture effect. (castflow.com)
  • Axial movement of the disc: the internal shape provides a streamlined flow path with venturi effect which results in low pressure drop. (castflow.com)
  • For the X(t,n) model, the Hamilton-Jacobi PDE t F In case II of Riemann's problem traffic goes from congestion to free-flow and the cars accelerate as the density drops. (ibird.com)
  • Results show that, depending on the oscillation Reynolds number, which is a function of pressure, flow amplitude and droplet diameter, there are three mechanisms involved in the enhancement of burning rate. (birmingham.ac.uk)
  • These three mechanisms explain the predominant role of the highest velocity of the oscillatory airstream in determination of the mean burning rate constant and droplet lifetime. (birmingham.ac.uk)
  • Critically, the difference is the rate of deceleration. (ishn.com)
  • So knowing your radial location can get you the element's velocity, and knowing your climb rate and help you get how fast flow is moving vertically through the rotor, but flow has to be moving vertically through the rotor even when the aircraft's not climbing -- else our analogy of a rotor being a big fan (which it is) doesn't correspond with reality. (stackexchange.com)
  • i ˙ is the desirable speed, d d {\displaystyle k={\frac {1}{s}}}. 0 {\displaystyle X(t-\tau ,n)+u\tau } n The probability of traffic breakdown is an increasing flow rate function. (ibird.com)
  • In fact, the deceleration in the rate of economic decline is not a sign of recovery at all, but proof that the economy is resetting at a lower level of activity. (wordpress.com)
  • Ideal cushioning is when the velocity of the piston hits zero as it reaches at the end of the cylinder without impact. (ramlux.nl)
  • The local flow field is divided into five characteristic zones to analyze the physical interactions between the wind flow and the forested topography separately. (gauss-centre.eu)
  • Featuring a single turbulent-free, aerodynamic flow path, Noreva's Z Type Nozzle Check Valve is a high performance, non-slam, high-flow, low head loss, solid disc non-return valve for sizes up to DN250. (mgacontrols.com)
  • R1200GS head shake during low speed deceleration (15ish or less mph) Normal? (advrider.com)
  • the VE motors still respond to the same similar centerlines as the DE motor does but with a higher flowing head. (pulsar.org.au)
  • these are designed around the VE head though as the 1.6 and 2.0 heads are the same casting and have the same/similar flow properties. (pulsar.org.au)
  • A stock VE head flows anywhere from 235cfm-274cfm @ .500' lift. (pulsar.org.au)
  • Moldbug provides a theory of deceleration via the parasitic, anti-productive energy vampire of the Cathedral, and the Leftist co-option of resources away from productive agents / processes, syphoning them into unproductive ones. (parallaxoptics.com)
  • Consequently, the connected tributaries in the lower parts of the glacial valleys have accumulated debris flow and fluviatile sediments behind the ice, as the processes of these tributaries were not governed by glacial processes but by more "temperate" processes. (springeropen.com)
  • Flow of material through Inline Pressure Jig. (lessbutmore.nl)
  • This produces optimal flow characteristics, reduced back pressure for higher HP, and enhances the sound quality of the exhaust system. (tkxperformance.com)
  • The work is devoted to the study of a vortex system formed in a flow past a streamwise-aligned external dihedral corner due to the drop of pressure between the corner faces. (x-mol.com)
  • As the throttle is opened wide enough for a no load speed of a little more then 20 mph the velocity of the air flowing down through the carburetor throat creates a pressure slightly less than atmospheric at the tip of the main nozzle. (carburetor-blog.com)
  • Since the gasoline in the float bowl is acted upon by atmospheric pressure, the difference in pressure between the two points causes gasoline to flow from the bowl, through the metering jet, and out the main nozzle into the throat of the carburetor. (carburetor-blog.com)
  • Owing to their small size and low swimming speed, larval fish operate in the intermediate hydrodynamic regime, which connects the viscous and inertial flow regimes. (biologists.org)
  • A galaxy's red-shift provides an estimate for its distance, but one that is contaminated by the radial component of the galaxy's peculiar velocity with respect to the regular (Hubble) expansion of the universe. (shawprize.org)
  • To give a basic example, if you take a flow which is in equilibrium, and then you kick it … let's say I give you a pipe, you kick the pipe and the pipe receives energy. (vivitrolabs.com)
  • Data pertaining to tissue velocity imaging (TVI)and strain imaging to assess regional myocardial function and flow mediated vasodilatation are limited in young patients with diabetes. (annalspc.com)
  • Applying the WENO scheme, vortex structures within the flow domain can be resolved and propagated through the flow field with less dissipation. (gauss-centre.eu)
  • The interaction of the high speed flow of zone 1 and the strongly decreased wind speed of the forest wake lead to a shear layer that effects large fluctuations and a high turbulence intensity. (gauss-centre.eu)
  • These structures show larger turbulence intensities due to the topography and the vegetation compared to the flow field in the valley. (gauss-centre.eu)
  • When you understand the flow from a fundamental point of view, you can predict the appearance of any pathology and you know exactly what the medical device is supposed to do. (vivitrolabs.com)
  • q i .Here, notation Then the fundamental flow-density ( Network data is mostly encapsulated in network packets, which provide the load in the network. (ibird.com)
  • Unlike Pipes model which is solely relying on rules of safe driving, Newell nonlinear model aims at capturing the correct shape of fundamental diagrams (e.g., density-speed, flow-speed, density-flow, spacing-speed, pace-headway, etc.). refers to the density. (ibird.com)
  • Along with workers at the bottom of the GBS, ballast piping that controls water flow also required maximum DOP protection, as failure of this equipment could result in sinking the vessel. (ishn.com)
  • Fast flow of Slessor Glacier is controlled by the presence of subglacial water on a rough crystalline bed. (arctic-sea-ice.net)
  • It's like someone washing their hands under a running tap instead of in the sink: when that tap is suddenly turned off, or the flow through it is restricted, the washer thinks they have run out of water, even though there is an entire sink full because of the previous flow. (coppolacomment.com)
  • Scientists believe that if life ever flourished on Mars, it would have happened 3 billion to 4 billion years ago when water still flowed on the planet.Over the next two years, Percy, as it is nicknamed, will use its 7-foot arm to drill down and collect rock samples containing possible signs of bygone microscopic life. (kcci.com)
  • Kinetic energy is (mass x velocity 2 ) divided by 2 (E kinetic = (mv 2 )/2). (ishn.com)
  • Thus, an object with a mass of 2.3 kg (e.g., a 5-lb. hammer) dropped from a height of 70 m has potential energy of 1580 Joules and an impact velocity of 37 m/s. (ishn.com)
  • Changes in direction and speed of past fast flow likely occurred for upstream parts of Recovery Glacier and between Slessor Glacier and Bailey Ice Stream. (arctic-sea-ice.net)
  • Within this complex, the present contribution investigates the transition zone between the tributary and the main valley at Fox Glacier, New Zealand, where glacier recession has allowed the development of large debris flow fans. (springeropen.com)
  • The high-performance characteristics of this nozzle type check valve can assure optimal flow control in even the toughest environments. (mgacontrols.com)
  • When you're putting down after a maximum velocity flight, you feed a set of landing coordinates into the computer, and you wait for the computer to punch out a landing configuration and the controls set themselves and lock into pattern. (youscribe.com)
  • We designed it in such a way to be MRI compatible and sent it to the University of Calgary, where I'm working with my colleague Dr. Julio Garcia to image the flow inside our 3-D model using 4D-MRI. (vivitrolabs.com)
  • Or are you passing flow through a sort of a static model? (vivitrolabs.com)
  • The model includes the dynamical deceleration of participating nucleons or valence quarks, depending on the implementation. (osti.gov)
  • The Optimal Velocity Model (OVM) is introduced by Bando et al. (ibird.com)
  • Using airborne structure from motion photogrammetry with ground control points collected by RTK-GNSS, we investigated (1) the geomorphology of the valley to understand its evolution and (2) the role of this recent evolution on the flood hazards at the Yellow Creek debris flow fan. (springeropen.com)
  • The valley walls are connected to the bottom of the valley by active sediment aprons and debris flow fans at the exit of the tributaries. (springeropen.com)
  • The slopes present several topographic steps or noses on both the aprons and the debris flow fans. (springeropen.com)
  • Resistance to changes in velocity. (biologists.org)
  • Spin when added to an object can be used to straighten a projectiles flight path, such as in rifles, however if too much spin is added the air resistance would be too great and then it becomes a decelerating force on the forwards motion of the shuttle as the shape of the shuttle and air flow both contribute to high air resistance. (badmintoncentral.com)
  • We are trying to come up with ideas for medical devices - a left ventricle assist device and better control of the flow in a AAA. (vivitrolabs.com)
  • Even after a period of deceleration or stationary growth, the disease could again start spreading exponentially if control measures are abandoned. (mindzilla.com)
  • As the thrower engages his landing position, the kinetic forces of the delivery are beginning to flow up through the chain towards the scapula and arm. (ericcressey.com)