Measurement of blood flow based on induction at one point of the circulation of a known change in the intravascular heat content of flowing blood and detection of the resultant change in temperature at a point downstream.
A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)
The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.
The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).
The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.
The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).
Volume of circulating BLOOD. It is the sum of the PLASMA VOLUME and ERYTHROCYTE VOLUME.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.
A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.
Therapy whose basic objective is to restore the volume and composition of the body fluids to normal with respect to WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE. Fluids may be administered intravenously, orally, by intermittent gavage, or by HYPODERMOCLYSIS.
A type of impedance plethysmography in which bioelectrical impedance is measured between electrodes positioned around the neck and around the lower thorax. It is used principally to calculate stroke volume and cardiac volume, but it is also related to myocardial contractility, thoracic fluid content, and circulation to the extremities.
The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.
The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The volume of the HEART, usually relating to the volume of BLOOD contained within it at various periods of the cardiac cycle. The amount of blood ejected from a ventricle at each beat is STROKE VOLUME.
An abnormally low volume of blood circulating through the body. It may result in hypovolemic shock (see SHOCK).
The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the right HEART VENTRICLE.
Volume of PLASMA in the circulation. It is usually measured by INDICATOR DILUTION TECHNIQUES.
Processes and properties of the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.
The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.
Bleeding into one or both CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES including the BASAL GANGLIA and the CEREBRAL CORTEX. It is often associated with HYPERTENSION and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.
A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.
Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.
The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).
The blood pressure in the central large VEINS of the body. It is distinguished from peripheral venous pressure which occurs in an extremity.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Measurement of intracardiac blood flow using an M-mode and/or two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiogram while simultaneously recording the spectrum of the audible Doppler signal (e.g., velocity, direction, amplitude, intensity, timing) reflected from the moving column of red blood cells.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the HEART VENTRICLES.
The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)
Period of contraction of the HEART, especially of the HEART VENTRICLES.
Examinations used to diagnose and treat heart conditions.
Brief reversible episodes of focal, nonconvulsive ischemic dysfunction of the brain having a duration of less than 24 hours, and usually less than one hour, caused by transient thrombotic or embolic blood vessel occlusion or stenosis. Events may be classified by arterial distribution, temporal pattern, or etiology (e.g., embolic vs. thrombotic). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp814-6)
Posture while lying with the head lower than the rest of the body. Extended time in this position is associated with temporary physiologic disturbances.
The posture of an individual lying face up.
Method for determining the circulating blood volume by introducing a known quantity of foreign substance into the blood and determining its concentration some minutes later when thorough mixing has occurred. From these two values the blood volume can be calculated by dividing the quantity of injected material by its concentration in the blood at the time of uniform mixing. Generally expressed as cubic centimeters or liters per kilogram of body weight.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
Narrow channel in the MESENCEPHALON that connects the third and fourth CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.
Expenditure of energy during PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; HEAT produced, or HEART RATE. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.
Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.
Post-systolic relaxation of the HEART, especially the HEART VENTRICLES.
External decompression applied to the lower body. It is used to study orthostatic intolerance and the effects of gravitation and acceleration, to produce simulated hemorrhage in physiologic research, to assess cardiovascular function, and to reduce abdominal stress during childbirth.
The blood pressure as recorded after wedging a CATHETER in a small PULMONARY ARTERY; believed to reflect the PRESSURE in the pulmonary CAPILLARIES.
Measurement of the amount of air that the lungs may contain at various points in the respiratory cycle.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
The rhythmical expansion and contraction of an ARTERY produced by waves of pressure caused by the ejection of BLOOD from the left ventricle of the HEART as it contracts.
The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).
A change in cardiovascular function resulting in a reduction in BLOOD VOLUME, and reflex DIURESIS. It occurs frequently after actual or simulated WEIGHTLESSNESS.
The position or attitude of the body.
A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.
Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.
Motion pictures of the passage of contrast medium through blood vessels.
Echocardiography amplified by the addition of depth to the conventional two-dimensional ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY visualizing only the length and width of the heart. Three-dimensional ultrasound imaging was first described in 1961 but its application to echocardiography did not take place until 1974. (Mayo Clin Proc 1993;68:221-40)
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Placement of a balloon-tipped catheter into the pulmonary artery through the antecubital, subclavian, and sometimes the femoral vein. It is used to measure pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure which reflects left atrial pressure and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. The catheter is threaded into the right atrium, the balloon is inflated and the catheter follows the blood flow through the tricuspid valve into the right ventricle and out into the pulmonary artery.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
Confinement of an individual to bed for therapeutic or experimental reasons.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
A type of imaging technique used primarily in the field of cardiology. By coordinating the fast gradient-echo MRI sequence with retrospective ECG-gating, numerous short time frames evenly spaced in the cardiac cycle are produced. These images are laced together in a cinematic display so that wall motion of the ventricles, valve motion, and blood flow patterns in the heart and great vessels can be visualized.
Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.
Distensibility measure of a chamber such as the lungs (LUNG COMPLIANCE) or bladder. Compliance is expressed as a change in volume per unit change in pressure.
A general term referring to a mild to moderate degree of muscular weakness, occasionally used as a synonym for PARALYSIS (severe or complete loss of motor function). In the older literature, paresis often referred specifically to paretic neurosyphilis (see NEUROSYPHILIS). "General paresis" and "general paralysis" may still carry that connotation. Bilateral lower extremity paresis is referred to as PARAPARESIS.
Stroke caused by lacunar infarction or other small vessel diseases of the brain. It features hemiparesis (see PARESIS), hemisensory, or hemisensory motor loss.
Any liquid used to replace blood plasma, usually a saline solution, often with serum albumins, dextrans or other preparations. These substances do not enhance the oxygen- carrying capacity of blood, but merely replace the volume. They are also used to treat dehydration.
Tissue NECROSIS in any area of the brain, including the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Brain infarction is the result of a cascade of events initiated by inadequate blood flow through the brain that is followed by HYPOXIA and HYPOGLYCEMIA in brain tissue. Damage may be temporary, permanent, selective or pan-necrosis.
A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
A proteolytic enzyme in the serine protease family found in many tissues which converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. It has fibrin-binding activity and is immunologically different from UROKINASE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR. The primary sequence, composed of 527 amino acids, is identical in both the naturally occurring and synthetic proteases.
Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.
The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
Translocation of body fluids from one compartment to another, such as from the vascular to the interstitial compartments. Fluid shifts are associated with profound changes in vascular permeability and WATER-ELECTROLYTE IMBALANCE. The shift can also be from the lower body to the upper body as in conditions of weightlessness.
The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).
Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.
Backflow of blood from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the LEFT ATRIUM due to imperfect closure of the MITRAL VALVE. This can lead to mitral valve regurgitation.
The HEART and the BLOOD VESSELS by which BLOOD is pumped and circulated through the body.
Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues using a transducer placed in the esophagus.
Symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion or autonomic overaction which develop while the subject is standing, but are relieved on recumbency. Types of this include NEUROCARDIOGENIC SYNCOPE; POSTURAL ORTHOSTATIC TACHYCARDIA SYNDROME; and neurogenic ORTHOSTATIC HYPOTENSION. (From Noseworthy, JH., Neurological Therapeutics Principles and Practice, 2007, p2575-2576)
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.
The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.
Volume of circulating ERYTHROCYTES . It is usually measured by RADIOISOTOPE DILUTION TECHNIQUE.
NECROSIS occurring in the MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY distribution system which brings blood to the entire lateral aspects of each CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE. Clinical signs include impaired cognition; APHASIA; AGRAPHIA; weak and numbness in the face and arms, contralaterally or bilaterally depending on the infarction.
Freedom from activity.
The heart of the fetus of any viviparous animal. It refers to the heart in the postembryonic period and is differentiated from the embryonic heart (HEART/embryology) only on the basis of time.
A standard and widely accepted diagnostic test used to identify patients who have a vasodepressive and/or cardioinhibitory response as a cause of syncope. (From Braunwald, Heart Disease, 7th ed)
A significant drop in BLOOD PRESSURE after assuming a standing position. Orthostatic hypotension is a finding, and defined as a 20-mm Hg decrease in systolic pressure or a 10-mm Hg decrease in diastolic pressure 3 minutes after the person has risen from supine to standing. Symptoms generally include DIZZINESS, blurred vision, and SYNCOPE.
A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.
Use of infusions of FIBRINOLYTIC AGENTS to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.
The pressure within a CARDIAC VENTRICLE. Ventricular pressure waveforms can be measured in the beating heart by catheterization or estimated using imaging techniques (e.g., DOPPLER ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY). The information is useful in evaluating the function of the MYOCARDIUM; CARDIAC VALVES; and PERICARDIUM, particularly with simultaneous measurement of other (e.g., aortic or atrial) pressures.
Echocardiography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image.
The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.
The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.
A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.
Bleeding within the SKULL, including hemorrhages in the brain and the three membranes of MENINGES. The escape of blood often leads to the formation of HEMATOMA in the cranial epidural, subdural, and subarachnoid spaces.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.
Patient care procedures performed during the operation that are ancillary to the actual surgery. It includes monitoring, fluid therapy, medication, transfusion, anesthesia, radiography, and laboratory tests.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
The movement of the BLOOD as it is pumped through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
Pathological elevation of intra-abdominal pressure (>12 mm Hg). It may develop as a result of SEPSIS; PANCREATITIS; capillary leaks, burns, or surgery. When the pressure is higher than 20 mm Hg, often with end-organ dysfunction, it is referred to as abdominal compartment syndrome.
The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
The blood pressure in the ARTERIES. It is commonly measured with a SPHYGMOMANOMETER on the upper arm which represents the arterial pressure in the BRACHIAL ARTERY.
The time span between the beginning of physical activity by an individual and the termination because of exhaustion.
The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.
A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.
Blocking of a blood vessel in the SKULL by an EMBOLUS which can be a blood clot (THROMBUS) or other undissolved material in the blood stream. Most emboli are of cardiac origin and are associated with HEART DISEASES. Other non-cardiac sources of emboli are usually associated with VASCULAR DISEASES.
Plethysmographic determination in which the intensity of light reflected from the skin surface and the red cells below is measured to determine the blood volume of the respective area. There are two types, transmission and reflectance.
The measure of a BLOOD VESSEL's ability to increase the volume of BLOOD it holds without a large increase in BLOOD PRESSURE. The vascular capacitance is equal to the change in volume divided by the change in pressure.
A condition caused by the failure of body to dissipate heat in an excessively hot environment or during PHYSICAL EXERTION in a hot environment. Contrast to HEAT EXHAUSTION, the body temperature in heat stroke patient is dangerously high with red, hot skin accompanied by DELUSIONS; CONVULSIONS; or COMA. It can be a life-threatening emergency and is most common in infants and the elderly.
Agents that have a strengthening effect on the heart or that can increase cardiac output. They may be CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES; SYMPATHOMIMETICS; or other drugs. They are used after MYOCARDIAL INFARCT; CARDIAC SURGICAL PROCEDURES; in SHOCK; or in congestive heart failure (HEART FAILURE).
The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.
Severe or complete loss of motor function on one side of the body. This condition is usually caused by BRAIN DISEASES that are localized to the cerebral hemisphere opposite to the side of weakness. Less frequently, BRAIN STEM lesions; cervical SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and other conditions may manifest as hemiplegia. The term hemiparesis (see PARESIS) refers to mild to moderate weakness involving one side of the body.
Dynamic three-dimensional echocardiography using the added dimension of time to impart the cinematic perception of motion. (Mayo Clin Proc 1993;68:221-40)
Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Radionuclide ventriculography where scintigraphic data is acquired during repeated cardiac cycles at specific times in the cycle, using an electrocardiographic synchronizer or gating device. Analysis of right ventricular function is difficult with this technique; that is best evaluated by first-pass ventriculography (VENTRICULOGRAPHY, FIRST-PASS).
Abnormally low BLOOD PRESSURE that can result in inadequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Common symptom is DIZZINESS but greater negative impacts on the body occur when there is prolonged depravation of oxygen and nutrients.
Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.
The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.
Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).
Method for assessing flow through a system by injection of a known quantity of dye into the system and monitoring its concentration over time at a specific point in the system. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
An imprecise term which may refer to a sense of spatial disorientation, motion of the environment, or lightheadedness.
NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).
An activity in which the organism plunges into water. It includes scuba and bell diving. Diving as natural behavior of animals goes here, as well as diving in decompression experiments with humans or animals.
The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.
The valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart.
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
Applies to movements of the forearm in turning the palm forward or upward. When referring to the foot, a combination of adduction and inversion movements of the foot.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
The exercise capacity of an individual as measured by endurance (maximal exercise duration and/or maximal attained work load) during an EXERCISE TEST.
A twisting deformation of a solid body about an axis. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
Starches that have been chemically modified so that a percentage of OH groups are substituted with 2-hydroxyethyl ether groups.
A catecholamine derivative with specificity for BETA-1 ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS. It is commonly used as a cardiotonic agent after CARDIAC SURGERY and during DOBUTAMINE STRESS ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY.
Apparatus and instruments that generate and operate with ELECTRICITY, and their electrical components.
Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.
Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.
Techniques for supplying artificial respiration to a single lung.
The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.
Recording changes in electrical impedance between electrodes placed on opposite sides of a part of the body, as a measure of volume changes in the path of the current. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Agents that prevent clotting.
Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)
The main trunk of the systemic arteries.
A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.
The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.
Graphic registration of the heart sounds picked up as vibrations and transformed by a piezoelectric crystal microphone into a varying electrical output according to the stresses imposed by the sound waves. The electrical output is amplified by a stethograph amplifier and recorded by a device incorporated into the electrocardiograph or by a multichannel recording machine.
Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.
The upper part of the trunk between the NECK and the ABDOMEN. It contains the chief organs of the circulatory and respiratory systems. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.
The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.
The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the HEART ATRIA.
The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.
A state of subnormal or depressed cardiac output at rest or during stress. It is a characteristic of CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES, including congenital, valvular, rheumatic, hypertensive, coronary, and cardiomyopathic. The serious form of low cardiac output is characterized by marked reduction in STROKE VOLUME, and systemic vasoconstriction resulting in cold, pale, and sometimes cyanotic extremities.
Those areas of the hospital organization not considered departments which provide specialized patient care. They include various hospital special care wards.
Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.
Methods developed to aid in the interpretation of ultrasound, radiographic images, etc., for diagnosis of disease.
Echocardiography applying the Doppler effect, with velocity detection combined with range discrimination. Short bursts of ultrasound are transmitted at regular intervals and the echoes are demodulated as they return.
The geometric and structural changes that the HEART VENTRICLES undergo, usually following MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. It comprises expansion of the infarct and dilatation of the healthy ventricle segments. While most prevalent in the left ventricle, it can also occur in the right ventricle.
Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.
Solutions having the same osmotic pressure as blood serum, or another solution with which they are compared. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Dorland, 28th ed)
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.
The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.
A response by the BARORECEPTORS to increased BLOOD PRESSURE. Increased pressure stretches BLOOD VESSELS which activates the baroreceptors in the vessel walls. The net response of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM is a reduction of central sympathetic outflow. This reduces blood pressure both by decreasing peripheral VASCULAR RESISTANCE and by lowering CARDIAC OUTPUT. Because the baroreceptors are tonically active, the baroreflex can compensate rapidly for both increases and decreases in blood pressure.
The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.
Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.
A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.
Those characteristics that distinguish one SEX from the other. The primary sex characteristics are the OVARIES and TESTES and their related hormones. Secondary sex characteristics are those which are masculine or feminine but not directly related to reproduction.
The excision of the thickened, atheromatous tunica intima of a carotid artery.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate beta-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic beta-antagonists are used for treatment of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, glaucoma, migraine headaches, and anxiety.
The balance of fluid in the BODY FLUID COMPARTMENTS; total BODY WATER; BLOOD VOLUME; EXTRACELLULAR SPACE; INTRACELLULAR SPACE, maintained by processes in the body that regulate the intake and excretion of WATER and ELECTROLYTES, particularly SODIUM and POTASSIUM.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in a blood vessel within the SKULL. Intracranial thrombosis can lead to thrombotic occlusions and BRAIN INFARCTION. The majority of the thrombotic occlusions are associated with ATHEROSCLEROSIS.
A condition in which HEART VENTRICLES exhibit impaired function.
A pathological constriction that can occur above (supravalvular stenosis), below (subvalvular stenosis), or at the AORTIC VALVE. It is characterized by restricted outflow from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the AORTA.
Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.
Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.
The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.
A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.
The measurement of visualization by radiation of any organ after a radionuclide has been injected into its blood supply. It is used to diagnose heart, liver, lung, and other diseases and to measure the function of those organs, except renography, for which RADIOISOTOPE RENOGRAPHY is available.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
Backflow of blood from the PULMONARY ARTERY into the RIGHT VENTRICLE due to imperfect closure of the PULMONARY VALVE.
... the detected pressure curve can be measured to calculate the actual beat-to-beat stroke volume. Unlike FloTrac, neither ... McGee WT (2009). "A simple physiologic algorithm for managing hemodynamics using stroke volume and stroke volume variation: ... By synchronizing fluid volume changes with the heartbeat, the change in impedance can be used to calculate stroke volume, ... The measurement of Stroke Volume Variation (SVV), which predicts volume responsiveness is intrinsic to all arterial waveform ...
Purpose Stroke volume variation (SVV) is a parameter for estimating fluid responsiveness. Recently, the Vigileo™ and the Flo- ... Stroke volume variation (SVV) is a parameter for estimating fluid responsiveness. Recently, the Vigileo™ and the Flo-Trac™ ... Stroke volume Central venous pressure Circulating blood volume This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check ... Stroke volume variation obtained with Vigileo/FloTrac™ system during bleeding and fluid overload in dogs. ...
The ability of stroke volume variations obtained with Vigileo/FloTrac system to monitor fluid responsiveness in mechanically ... Prediction of fluid responsiveness in septic shock patients: comparing stroke volume variation by FloTrac/Vigileo and automated ... Stroke volume and pulse pressure variation are good predictors of fluid responsiveness in sepsis patients]. Zeljko Drvar, Mario ... Stroke volume and pulse pressure variation for prediction of fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing off-pump coronary ...
FloTrac does not require calibration. Stroke volume and continuous systemic vascular resistance (SVR) can be measured and ... This technique relies on formulas to estimate stroke volume and cardiac output based on the measured bioimpedance of blood ... may be used to estimate right atrial filling and right ventricular volumes in patients with undetermined fluid status. TTE is a ...
In the present study, we aimed to evaluate whether stroke volume variation (SVV) can guide fluid therapy and reduce ... Keywords: central venous pressure, fluid management, lobectomy, one-lung ventilation, stroke volume variation ... Influence of stroke volume variation on fluid treatment and postoperative complications in thoracic surgery Cengiz Sahutoglu, ... The SVV, cardiac output, cardiac index (CI), stroke volume, and stroke volume index (SVI) were measured by the FloTrac Device. ...
Therefore invasive procedures as Picco2-system, FloTrac and transesophageal echocardiography (tee) have the advantage to ... stroke volume [ Time Frame: preinduction, 3 and 15 minutes after induction, before and after a volume challenge, 30 minutes ... Validation of Stroke Volume Measurement by a New Noninvasive Hemodynamic Monitoring System (NexFin)in Comparison to Different ... In this study the stroke volume measured by a new noninvasive finger cuff system (NexFin) should be validated in comparison to ...
The ability of stroke volume variations obtained with Vigileo/FloTrac system to monitor fluid responsiveness in mechanically ... stroke volume variation (SVV; d), stroke volume e and cardiac index (CI; f) during Trendelenburg (TB) and reversal to neutral ... stroke volume variation (SVV), stroke volume (SV) or cardiac index (CI), Patients were categorized according to age (,55 or ≥55 ... enabling to subsequent determination of stroke volume, cardiac index, and stroke volume variation using the Nexfin CO-trek- ...
Stroke Volume Optimization (SV) 11,16-19,21-26 Stroke volume measurement with the ClearSight and FloTrac systems enables an ... preload and stroke volume (SV) Optimal volume management is possible when dynamic and flow-based parameters are used within a ... output (CO) induced by volume expansion. 2. Stroke Volume Variation (SVV) has demonstrated a higher sensitivity and specificity ... Stroke Volume Variation Optimization (SVV) 25 For control-ventilated patients, SVV has proved to be a highly sensitive and ...
FloTrac) and a monitor to compute stroke volume and cardiac output (Vigileo). It does not need an independent calibration. The ... The difference between the end-diastolic volume (EDV) and the end-systolic volume (ESV) is the stroke volume, which is the ... the Y axis often describes the stroke volume, stroke work, or cardiac output. The X axis often describes end-diastolic volume, ... The amount of blood put out by the left ventricle of the heart in one contraction is called the stroke volume. The stroke ...
The FloTrac™ algorithm uses uncalibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis to estimate cardiac output. Recently, a new ... The aim was to assess the agreement between FloTrac™ and routinely performed cardiac output measurements obtained by critical ... Cardiac output was measured simultaneously using FloTrac™ with a fourth-generation algorithm (COAP) and critical care ... Systematic review of uncalibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis to determine cardiac output and stroke volume variation. ...
... stroke volume and systemic vascular resistance in real-time. The Vigileo (Edwards Lifesciences) monitor with software V.1.01 ... The FloTrac system (consisting of the Vigileo monitor and sensor) uses a clinically validated algorithm to provide continuous ... LV volumes were calculated using the 3D datasets (Qlab Advanced) and LV ejection fraction was derived from this analysis. In ... End-systolic LA volume was calculated from the 3D LA dataset. All 3D measurements were performed using previously well- ...
The FloTrac system--measurement of stroke volume and the assessment of dynamic fluid loading. Int Anesthesiol Clin. 2010; 48(1 ... Sundar S, Novack V, Jervis K, Bender SP, Lerner A, Panzica P, Mahmood F, Malhotra A, Talmor D. Influence of low tidal volume ...
The Flotrac™/Vigileo™ monitor is also capable of continuously measuring stroke volume variation as an essential index of ... The Flotrac™/Vigileo™ (Edwards Lifesciences) relies on the arterial blood pressure waveform to calculate stroke volume. This ... the cardiac index and stroke volume are expected to abruptly and sharply fall. However, the readings on the Flotrac™/Vigileo™ ( ... In fact, to the contrary, it may actually reflect an underlying decrease in the stroke volume-as can be seen with utilization ...
Comparison of two versions of the Vigileo-FloTrac system (1.03 and 1.07) for stroke volume estimation: a multicentre, blinded ...
Sensor FloTrac-4. Morbilidad LOS hospitalaria. 28. Goal-directed intraoperative fluid therapy guided by stroke volume and its ... Sensor FloTrac-1. Morbilidad LOS hospitalaria. 22. Intraoperative fluid optimization using stroke volume variation in high risk ... 2001) Stroke Volume Variation as a Predictor of Fluid Responsiveness in Patients Undergoing Brain Surgery. Anesthesia & ... Wu, C.Y., et al., Comparison of two stroke volume variation-based goal-directed fluid therapies for s upratentorial brain ...
Stroke Volume (SV), Stroke Volume Variation (SVV), and when used in conjunction with CVP Vigileo can display Systemic Vascular ... The FloTrac sensor hooks up to a standard arterial line with measurements taken by the device while the Vigileo does its behind ... Does she need more volume? Does she need pressers? Does she just need to get the hell out of your ED and to an ICU? ... The FloTrac sensor is a continuous monitoring device which updates every 20 seconds. SVV, when used within its limitations, is ...
... comparing stroke volume variation by FloTrac/Vigileo and automated pulse pressure variation. Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2012;29(2):64- ... stroke volume variation (SVV) and, therefore, fluid responsiveness, using APWA. The Vigileo, FloTrac device (Edwards ... Li C, Lin FQ, Fu SK, Chen GQ, Yang XH, Zhu CY, Zhang LJ, Li Q. Stroke volume variation for prediction of fluid responsiveness ... The comparison of stroke volume variation with central venous pressure in predicting fluid responsiveness in septic patients ...
FlotracTM Sensor - derived stroke volume, stroke volume variation, systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), cardiac index and ... compared with stroke volume variation (SVV) obtained by the FloTrac/Vigileo monitor to predict fluid responsiveness, in ... and stroke volume variations (SVV). Eadyn has been proposed to predict an increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) after volume ... The Use of Stroke Volume Variation to Guide Donor Management Is Associated With Increased Organs Transplanted per Donor. ...
Beta Blockers In Acute Ischemic Stroke. Lead Sponsor. Validation of Stroke Volume Measurement by a New Noninvasive Hemodynamic ... Monitoring System (NexFin)in Comparison to Different Invasive Procedures as Picco2, FloTrac and TEE. Lead Sponsor. ... HEart and BRain Interfaces in Acute Ischemic Stroke. Lead Sponsor. Stroke Volume Analysis During Aortic Valve Replacement Trial ... Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB) Prospective Stroke Cohort. Lead Sponsor. Prospective Cohort With Incident Stroke. ...
The ability of stroke volume variations obtained with Vigileo/FloTrac system to monitor fluid responsiveness in mechanically ... The impact of inspiratory pressure on stroke volume variation and the evaluation of indexing stroke volume variation to ... Unreliable tracking ability of the third-generation FloTrac/Vigileo system for changes in stroke volume after fluid ... Influence of tidal volume on left ventricular stroke volume variation measured by pulse contour analysis in mechanically ...
Cardiac output and stroke volume will be measured by cardiac output monitor, Edwards Lifesciences Flotrac(TM) or Clearsight (TM ... The absence of fluid responsiveness will be defined as the absence of a sustained rise in stroke volume of at least 10% for 20 ... receive 250ml fluid challenges with a recommended solution as required in order to achieve a maximal value of stroke volume. ...
Background: Stroke volume variation (SVV) has been shown to be a reliable predictor of fluid responsiveness. However, the ... predictive role of SVV measured by FloTrac/Vigileo system in prediction of fluid responsiveness was unproven in patients ... Stroke volume variation for prediction of fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing gastrointestinal ... ... Mean platelet volume (MPV) is a simple, routinely assessed biochemical parameter, which is becoming regarded asa new, ...
Various techniques have been introduced for monitoring cardiac output, stroke volume, or their surrogates. The disadvantage of ... The FloTrac™ system, which includes the FloTrac™ sensor and Vigileo™ monitor, is utilized to capture the arterial pressure- ... FLOTRAC™ SYSTEM. Device: minimally invasive cardiac output system consisting of arterial line sensor and cardiac output bedside ... We hypothesize that using the FloTrac™ system to continuously monitor cardiac output, in addition to traditional vital signs, ...
Uncalibrated pulse contourderived stroke volume variation predicts fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients ... Purgado de la bolsa y del Sistema FloTrac: Surface antimicrobial activity of heparin-bonded cudados antisepticimpregnated ... Uncalibrated pulse contour-derived stroke volume variation predicts fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients ... Monitoring right ventricular volumes: Arterial Pressure Based Technologies: Comparative in vitro efficacies and antimicrobial ...
... comparing stroke volume variation by FloTrac/Vigileo and automated pulse pressure variation. Eur J Anaesthesiol (EJA). 2012;29( ... Shock Sepsis Stress Stress response Resuscitation Fluid Fluid responsiveness FOCUS CVP PCWP Stroke volume variability Pulse ... Biais M, Vidil L, Sarrabay P, Cottenceau V, Revel P, Sztark F. Changes in stroke volume induced by passive leg raising in ... Comparison of stroke volume and fluid responsiveness measurements in commonly used technologies for goal-directed therapy. J ...
FloTrac/Vigileo / LIver resection / prediction / liver failure / monitoring / ScvO2 / stroke volume variation / ビジリオモニタリング / 肝切 ... and/or stroke volume variation (SVV) during hepatectomy, as measured with the FloTrac/Vigileo system, can predict postoperative ... Presentation] 肝切除術後肝障害予測における術中FloTrac/Vigileoモニタリングの有用性について2012. *. Author(s). 目黒 誠、水口 徹、川本雅樹、中村幸雄 太田盛道、今村将史、木村康利、古畑智久、平田公
Stroke volume variation (SVV) and stroke volume index (SVI) were measured using the FloTracTM/VigileoTM system at pre-bolus, 15 ... The percent change in pre-bolus extracellular fluid volume relative to that at the skin incision for arm (ΔVECF) was measured ... Extracellular fluid volume predicts fluid responsiveness after HES solution bolus infusion during major abdominal surgery. ... Stroke volume variation (SVV) and stroke volume index (SVI) were measured using the FloTracTM/VigileoTM system at pre-bolus, 15 ...
Intraoperative fluid optimization using stroke volume variation in high risk surgical patients: results of prospective ... Vigileo/FloTrac system). The aim was to maintain the SVV below 10% using colloid boluses of 3 ml/kg. The laboratory parameters ... Stroke volume variation (SVV) is a good and easily obtainable predictor of fluid responsiveness, which can be used to guide ... Comparison of stroke volume and fluid responsiveness measurements in commonly used technologies for goal-directed therapy. ...
Radial arterial pressure variation (ΔPPrad) and stroke volume variation measured using the FloTrac/Vigileo system (ΔSVVigileo ... Patients were classified as responders if stroke volume index (SVi) increased ≥ 15% after VE. The respiratory variation in ... predicted volume responsiveness with a sensitivity of 95% and 79%, and a specificity of 95% and 89%, respectively. Respiratory ... Volume expansion (VE) was performed with 500 mL of a synthetic colloid. ...
Influence of tidal volume on left ventricular stroke volume variation measured by pulse contour analysis in mechanically ... Edwards FloTrac sensor and Vigileo monitor: easy, accurate, reliable cardiac output assessment using the arterial pulse wave. ... As the stroke volume (SV) varies, the changes of systolic arterial pressure and pulse pressure variation (PPV) can be observed ... SVV: stroke volume variation; LVEDA: left ventricular end diastolic area. N = 240 and P < 0.05 is considered to be ...
... the detected pressure curve can be measured to calculate the actual beat-to-beat stroke volume. Unlike FloTrac, neither ... McGee WT (2009). "A simple physiologic algorithm for managing hemodynamics using stroke volume and stroke volume variation: ... By synchronizing fluid volume changes with the heartbeat, the change in impedance can be used to calculate stroke volume, ... The measurement of Stroke Volume Variation (SVV), which predicts volume responsiveness is intrinsic to all arterial waveform ...
  • The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the circulating blood volume and SVV, measured by the Vigileo-FloTrac™ system (SVV-FloTrac) or by central venous pressure (CVP), during a dynamic change in circulating blood transfusion volume, using a continuous constant bleeding and fluid-overload model in dogs. (springer.com)
  • Cannesson M, Musard H, Desebbe O, Boucau C, Simon R, Henaine R, Lehot J-J. The ability of stroke volume variations obtained with Vigileo/FloTrac system to monitor fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients. (springer.com)
  • Biais M, Nouette-Gaulain K, Roullet S, Quinart A, Revel P, Sztark F. A comparison of stroke volume variation measured by Vigileo™/FloTrac™ system and aortic Doppler echocardiography. (springer.com)
  • The aim of this study was to assess and compare the ability of the automatically and continuously measured stroke volume variation (SVV) obtained by FloTrac/Vigileo, and pulse pressure variation (PPV) measured by an IntelliVue MP monitor, to predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated septic shock patients. (qxmd.com)
  • The SVV, obtained by FloTrac/Vigileo, and the automated PPV, obtained by the IntelliVue MP monitor, showed comparable performance in terms of predicting fluid responsiveness in passively ventilated septic shock patients, with a regular cardiac rhythm and a tidal volume not less than 8 ml kg(-1). (qxmd.com)
  • The ability of stroke volume variations obtained with Vigileo/FloTrac system to monitor fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients. (qxmd.com)
  • The Flotrac™/Vigileo™ (Edwards Lifesciences) relies on the arterial blood pressure waveform to calculate stroke volume. (omicsonline.org)
  • The Flotrac™/Vigileo™ monitor is also capable of continuously measuring stroke volume variation as an essential index of preload responsiveness, systemic vascular resistance as a clinical indicator of the cardiac afterload, and central venous hemoglobin saturation as a surrogate of global tissue oxygen consumption. (omicsonline.org)
  • The Flotrac™/Vigileo™ have been regarded as a user-friendly monitor of cardiac output as it does not require an external system for calibration. (omicsonline.org)
  • We hereby describe our experience with a new generation Flotrac™/Vigileo™ (3.01) under rapidly varying hemodynamic conditions occurring in the immediate postoperative period in a cardiac surgical patient. (omicsonline.org)
  • Upon arrival to the ICU, the Flotrac™ / Vigileo™ (3.01) monitor was applied (Note: the device was not used in the operating room). (omicsonline.org)
  • The Vigileo, FloTrac device (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) utilizes algorithms to determine SVV, from standard deviations of the pulse pressure. (east.org)
  • The fourth-generation FloTrac/Vigileo™ improved its algorithm to follow changes in systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI). (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Comatose out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors receiving TTM (33 °C for 24 hrs) underwent haemodynamic monitoring with arterial pulse contour analyses with (PiCCO2®) and without (FloTrac® /Vigileo® monitor® ) transpulmonary thermodilution calibration. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • The FloTrac™ system, which includes the FloTrac™ sensor and Vigileo™ monitor, is utilized to capture the arterial pressure-based cardiac output measurement, which will be hereinafter referred to as APCO (Arterial Pressure Cardiac Output). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Stroke volume variation (SVV) and stroke volume index (SVI) were measured using the FloTrac TM /Vigileo TM system at pre-bolus, 15, 30, and 60 min after initiating bolus infusion. (scirp.org)
  • Patients undergoing elective intraabdominal surgery were randomly assigned to a Control group (n = 60) with routine intraoperative care and a Vigileo group (n = 60), where fluid management was guided by SVV (Vigileo/FloTrac system). (unboundmedicine.com)
  • We examined whether the data obtained by monitoring central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) and/or stroke volume variation (SVV) during hepatectomy, as measured with the FloTrac/Vigileo system, can predict postoperative liver dysfunction. (nii.ac.jp)
  • This study was designed to assess the ability of two algorithms for automated calculation of PPV (PPV(auto)) (Intellivue MP 70) and stroke volume variation (SVV(auto)) (FloTrac/Vigileo) to predict fluid responsiveness during abdominal surgery. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Radial arterial pressure variation (ΔPP rad ) and stroke volume variation measured using the FloTrac/Vigileo system (ΔSV Vigileo ), were also calculated. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The automated PPV, obtained by the Intellivue MP monitor, and the SVV, obtained by FloTrac™/Vigileo™, showed comparable performance in terms of predicting fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients with septic shock. (biomedcentral.com)
  • All patients were also monitored with Vigileo/FloTrac system. (qxmd.com)
  • Comparison of cardiac output estimation by FloTrac/Vigileo TM and intermittent pulmonary artery thermodilution in patient with Takayasu arteritis. (bvsalud.org)
  • Stroke volume variation assessed by a FlowTrac transducer and Vigileo monitor and PPV assessed by anaesthesia workstation-integrated monitors showed comparable performance in predicting fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing major surgeries. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • We compared the sensibility of SVV by Vigileo/Flotrac to central venous pressure (CVP) when volume changes in patients undergoing intraoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) and acute hypervolemic hemodilution (AHH). (elsevier.com)
  • cardiac output (CO) and stroke volume variation (SVV) were measured with a FloTrac™/Vigileo™ system (Edwards Lifesciences, Tokyo, Japan). (springeropen.com)
  • When used with the Vigileo monitor, FloTrac sensor provides continuous cardiac output (CCO), stroke volume (SV), stroke volume variation (SVV), and systemic vascular resistance (SVR)* through an existing arterial line. (whichmedicaldevice.com)
  • CONCLUSION: The results of this study demonstrated that an optimization protocol, based on stroke volume variation and cardiac index obtained with a FloTrac/Vigileo device, increased the PaO2/FiO2-ratio and reduced the overall fluid volume, intubation time and postoperative complications (nausea and vomiting) in thoracic surgery patients requiring one-lung ventilation. (bvsalud.org)
  • Fast forward to the modern era, and many of our perioperative and ICU hemodynamic monitors (PiCCO, LiDCO, FloTrac/Vigileo) rely on this principle to help us determine dynamic metrics like stroke volume variation (SVV), pulse pressure variation (PPV) and even give us an idea about fluid responsiveness at the bedside. (rk.md)
  • BACKGROUND: The performance of a recently introduced, arterial waveform-based device for measuring cardiac output (CO) without the need of invasive calibration (FloTrac/Vigileo) has been controversial. (oaccm.com)
  • Simultaneous CO measurements by bolus thermodilution and the FloTrac/Vigileo device were obtained after induction of anesthesia (T1), before CPB (T2), after CPB (T3), after sternal closure (T4), on arrival in the intensive care unit (T5), 4 h (T6), 8 h (T7), and 24 h after surgery (T8). (oaccm.com)
  • Cardiac output and stroke volume will be measured by cardiac output monitor, Edwards Lifesciences Flotrac(TM) or Clearsight (TM). (anzctr.org.au)
  • used the 3rd generation of FloTrac™ (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, USA), a pulse contour device, to record haemodynamic measurements during pneumoperitoneum (16). (signavitae.com)
  • An arterial catheter was inserted and connected to a FloTrac sensor version 3.02 (Edwards Lifesciences, USA). (ekja.org)
  • A goal-directed anesthesia management algorithm based on serial stroke volume (SV) values obtained from FloTrac (Edwards Lifesciences, LLC. (amjcaserep.com)
  • Three main systems are currently used clinically: the FloTrac system from Edwards Lifesciences, the PiCCO monitoring system from Pulsion, and LiDCO system from LiDCO. (umich.edu)
  • Here, we report the anesthetic management of a patient with a Fontan circulation who underwent emergency craniotomy for ruptured arteriovenous malformation (AVM) by continuously measuring cardiac index (CI) and SVV calculated with a FloTrac Sensor (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) as well as CVP. (springeropen.com)
  • Stroke volume variation (SVV) is a parameter for estimating fluid responsiveness. (springer.com)
  • Hofer CK, Senn A, Weibel L, Zollinger A. Assessment of stroke volume variation for prediction of fluid responsiveness using the modified FloTrac and PiCCOplus system. (springer.com)
  • Biais M, Nouette-Gaulain K, Cottenceau V, Revel P, Sztark F. Uncalibrated pulse contour-derived stroke volume variation predicts fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients undergoing liver transplantation. (springer.com)
  • Stroke volume and pulse pressure variation are good predictors of fluid responsiveness in sepsis patients]. (qxmd.com)
  • Accuracy of stroke volume variation compared with pleth variability index to predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients undergoing major surgery. (qxmd.com)
  • Uncalibrated pulse contour-derived stroke volume variation predicts fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients undergoing liver transplantation. (qxmd.com)
  • Utility of uncalibrated femoral stroke volume variation as a predictor of fluid responsiveness during the anhepatic phase of liver transplantation. (qxmd.com)
  • Stroke volume and pulse pressure variation for prediction of fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. (qxmd.com)
  • In the present study, we aimed to evaluate whether stroke volume variation (SVV) can guide fluid therapy and reduce complications. (dovepress.com)
  • 2 , 3 As a less invasive hemodynamic monitoring system based on arterial pulse contour analysis, stroke volume variation (SVV) allows continuous monitorization of the fluid status, and several studies have suggested that CVP can be reliably replaced by SVV in the management of fluid therapy. (dovepress.com)
  • Nexfin beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure monitoring enables continuous assessment of hemodynamic indices like cardiac index (CI), pulse pressure variation (PPV) and stroke volume variation (SVV) in the perioperative setting. (springer.com)
  • [ 27 ] described a method to predict aortic flow, stroke volume variation (SVV) and, therefore, fluid responsiveness, using APWA. (east.org)
  • EJVP, stroke volume variation (SVV), and cardiac index calculated by pulse contour method were measured before and after the PEEP challenge and colloid administration. (deepdyve.com)
  • Stroke volume variation (SVV) is a good and easily obtainable predictor of fluid responsiveness, which can be used to guide fluid therapy in mechanically ventilated patients. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • TY - JOUR T1 - Intraoperative fluid optimization using stroke volume variation in high risk surgical patients: results of prospective randomized study. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to compare the stroke volume variation (SVV) and arterial pressure based cardiac output (APCO) with the current accepted methods on cardiac output and preload status.METHODS: Prospective, observational study in 100 cardiac surgery patients. (ispub.com)
  • As an alternative to these static variables, assessment of stroke volume variation (SVV) has been used as a dynamic index to guide fluid therapy in patients receiving mechanical ventilation. (ispub.com)
  • As the stroke volume (SV) varies, the changes of systolic arterial pressure and pulse pressure variation (PPV) can be observed. (ispub.com)
  • The SVV/PPV are more pronounced during hypovolemia and the variation decreases if intravascular volume is restored, and it has shown to reliably predict changes in CO 3 . (ispub.com)
  • The functional hemodynamic parameters including stroke volume variation (SVV), pulse pressure variation (PPV), and pleth variability index (PVI) under PEEP levels of 0 mmHg, 5 mmHg, 10 mmHg, and 15 mmHg were recorded before and after volume expansion (hydroxyethyl starch 6%,7 ml/kg). (qxmd.com)
  • Stroke volume variation and pleth variability index to predict fluid responsiveness during resection of primary retroperitoneal tumors in Hans Chinese. (qxmd.com)
  • Pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation to predict fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy. (qxmd.com)
  • Predicting fluid responsiveness largely falls onto respiratory induced variations of pulse pressure (pulse pressure variation, PPV), stroke volume (stroke volume variation, SVV) and sometimes others, i.e. systolic pressure. (signavitae.com)
  • Goal-directed fluid therapy using stroke volume variation does not result in pulmonary fluid overload in thoracic surgery requiring one-lung ventilation. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Background Stroke volume variation (SVV) is a robust indicator of fluid responsiveness during volume change. (elsevier.com)
  • The stroke volume variation (SVV) is an index of circulating blood volume [ 4 ]. (ekja.org)
  • This study aimed to compare the hemodynamic changes caused by three different concentrations of epidural ropivacaine and to evaluate the performance of the stroke-volume variation (SVV) and central venous pressure (CVP) during TEA with general anesthesia. (biomedcentral.com)
  • After routine induction of general anaesthesia, the patients were randomised to either the control group (traditional fluid therapy), the FloTrac group (based on stroke volume variation), or the PVI group (based on pleth variability index). (elsevier.com)
  • Used almost exclusively for patients receiving positive pressure ventilation, stroke volume variation and pulse pressure gauge volume status based on a simple anatomical and physiological connection between the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. (umich.edu)
  • This is true enough for the most part and as such stroke volume variation and pulse pressure variation can be considered roughly equivalent, especially in the case of their use in assessing volume responsiveness, where they are meant to estimate where along the Frank-Starling curve a patient is (see again Figure 1.5). (umich.edu)
  • Defining the pulse pressure variability as the difference in the maximum and minimum values of the pulse pressure wave normalized to the maximum value ((PPMax − PPMin)/PPMax), it can now serve as a method to gauge volume status, with the mechanism of action and the logic of the approach directly analogous to the stroke volume variation case. (umich.edu)
  • The respiratory induced variation in the waveform is used to determine a subjects volume status. (umich.edu)
  • A meta-analysis of the literature surrounding fluid responsiveness in arterial waveform variations have shown that both stroke volume variation and pulse pressure variation to be highly predictive of fluid responsiveness (with a mean AUC of 0.84 and 0.94, respectively) [60]. (umich.edu)
  • OBJECTIVES: This pilot study was designed to utilize stroke volume variation and cardiac index to ensure fluid optimization during one-lung ventilation in patients undergoing thoracoscopic lobectomies. (bvsalud.org)
  • In the goal-directed therapy group, the stroke volume variation was controlled at 10%±1%, and the cardiac index was controlled at a minimum of 2.5 L.min-1.m-2. (bvsalud.org)
  • The origin of this method dates back to the classical Windkessel model described by Otto Frank in Assessment of stroke volume variation for prediction of fluid responsiveness using the modified FloTrac and PiCCOplus system. (cardcarrying.info)
  • We performed general anesthesia with continuous monitoring of central venous pressure (CVP) and stroke volume variation (SVV). (springeropen.com)
  • Recently, less invasive hemodynamic monitoring such as arterial pressure-based cardiac output and stroke volume variation (SVV) has become available for managing patients with hemodynamic instability [ 7 ]. (springeropen.com)
  • Abilities of pulse pressure variations and stroke volume variations to predict fluid responsiveness in prone position during scoliosis surgery. (qxmd.com)
  • Clinical studies have shown CVP is not able to predict fluid responsiveness 1 and that changes in blood pressure cannot be used to track changes in stroke volume (SV) or in cardiac output (CO) induced by volume expansion. (edwards.com)
  • The absence of fluid responsiveness will be defined as the absence of a sustained rise in stroke volume of at least 10% for 20 minutes or more. (anzctr.org.au)
  • From the waveform, pulse pressure variability, systolic pressure variability, and stroke volume variability can be measured and used to detect fluid responsiveness. (springer.com)
  • Extracellular fluid volume predicts fluid responsiveness after HES solution bolus infusion during major abdominal surgery. (scirp.org)
  • 11% predicted volume responsiveness with a sensitivity of 95% and 79%, and a specificity of 95% and 89%, respectively. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A prospective clinical study of pleth variability index in prediction of volume responsiveness in patients with septic shock]. (qxmd.com)
  • We review the importance of fluid management in the critically ill, methods of evaluating volume status, and tools to predict fluid responsiveness. (ceemjournal.org)
  • In this paper, we discuss the strengths and limitations of a spectrum of noninvasive and invasive techniques for assessing and monitoring intravascular volume status and fluid responsiveness in the perioperative and critically ill patient. (hindawi.com)
  • Fluid responsiveness describes the ability of the heart to respond to filling volume variations, modifying its stroke volume and consequently the cardiac output. (hindawi.com)
  • The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for predicting fluid responsiveness were 0.88 (CI 0.78-0.94) for IJVV compared with 0.83 (CI 0.72-0.91), 0.97 (CI 0.89-0.99), 0.91 (CI 0.82-0.97) for IVCV, SVV, and the increase in stroke volume in response to a PLR test, respectively. (springeropen.com)
  • Arterial pressure-based methods are less-invasive methods used to measure stroke volume and to predict fluid responsiveness. (oaccm.com)
  • Fluid responsiveness is generally regarded as an increase in stroke volume (or cardiac output/index) by 10-15% after fluid administration (volumes vary), depending on technique 6 . (pulmccm.org)
  • While easily obtained static measures of volume status (central venous pressure [CVP] or pulmonary artery occlusion pressure [PAOP]) have been used for decades and are still routinely used, they have been shown to be reliably unreliable at predicting fluid responsiveness in critically ill patients 7 , 8 , 9 , 10 , 11 . (pulmccm.org)
  • We compared stroke volume measured by minimally-invasive monitoring devices with or without thermodilution calibration, and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and hypothesised that thermodilution calibration would give stroke volume index (SVI) more in agreement with TTE during targeted temperature management (TTM). (readbyqxmd.com)
  • The minimally-invasive FloTrac sensor connects to any existing arterial catheter. (jahangostaresh.ir)
  • Advanced hemodynamic parameters used in a clinician-directed PGDT protocol are key to optimal volume administration. (edwards.com)
  • A clinician-directed treatment protocol, which defines and treats to a goal, using advanced hemodynamic parameters, with the objective of consistently maintaining patients in the optimal volume range during surgery. (edwards.com)
  • Benefits of advanced hemodynamic parameters in guiding volume administration. (edwards.com)
  • Continuous access to advanced hemodynamic parameters offers immediate insight into patient physiologic status, giving you the clarity to make more informed volume administration decisions to help you consistently maintain your patients in the optimal volume range. (edwards.com)
  • Advanced hemodynamic parameters provided by the FloTrac sensor offer you continuous insight to more accurately determine your patient's fluid status. (jahangostaresh.ir)
  • 1980) [10] evaluated changes in blood pressure and other hemodynamic parameters ( stroke volume , cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance) in 18 healthy men before and during exposure to recorded industrial noise. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In just a decade, the FloTrac sensor has been chosen by clinicians more than any other volume management solution to manage over 2.5 million patients worldwide. (jahangostaresh.ir)
  • Stroke volume measurement with the FloTrac sensor enables an individualized approach for administering fluid until SV reaches a plateau on the Frank-Starling curve, to prevent hypovolemia and excessive fluid administration. (jahangostaresh.ir)
  • The FloTrac sensor measures the variations of the arterial pressure which is proportional to stroke volume. (answersdrive.com)
  • According to the Frank-Starling relationship, if both ventricles remain sensitive to changes in preload, RV stroke volume, and therefore LV preload, should decrease during positive-pressure inspiration, diminishing LV stroke volume after a few beats (normally during expiration). (biomedcentral.com)
  • On the otherhand, if any of the ventricles are unaffected by cyclic variations of preload, LV stroke volume should be unaltered by swings in intrathoracic pressure. (biomedcentral.com)
  • comparing SVV with the "gold standard" of cardiac preload, the transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) measurement of the left ventricular end-diastolic area (LVEDA) and left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV). (ispub.com)
  • Preload optimization guided by stroke volume, as measured by oesophageal Doppler ultrasonography, was almost always associated with a significant reduction in length of hospital stay and postoperative morbidity. (deltexmedical.com)
  • The therapeutic goal of fluid administration is to increase preload, or the stressed venous volume, leading to an increased stroke volume and cardiac output. (ceemjournal.org)
  • The Frank-Starling relationship ( Fig. 1 ) illustrates the effect of changes in cardiac preload on stroke volume and cardiac output. (ceemjournal.org)
  • Patients whose preload exists on the slope of the curve are said to have preload reserve or dependence and are volume or fluid responsive. (ceemjournal.org)
  • An understanding of both concepts derives from the Frank-Starling relationship describing the changes in cardiac stroke volume in response to changes in cardiac preload. (hindawi.com)
  • Stroke volume is determined by preload, contractility, and afterload. (answersdrive.com)
  • The combined decrease in preload and increase in afterload causes the stroke volume from the ventricle to decrease, reaching a minimum at the end of inspiration. (umich.edu)
  • Decreased left ventricular preload reduces left ventricular stroke volume, doing so at its minimum during the expiratory period. (umich.edu)
  • It follows, then, that respiratory induced variations in magnitude of ventricular stroke volume indicate should indicate preload dependence [61]. (umich.edu)
  • 1 , 2 Mechanical ventilation induces cyclic changes in intrathoracic and transpulmonary pressures that transiently affect left ventricular preload, resulting in cyclic changes in stroke volume that are more pronounced in preload-dependent, but not in preload-independent, patients. (asahq.org)
  • Schematically, systolic pressure variations, pulse pressure variations, stroke volume variations, and deltadown (ΔDown) are dynamic indicators of preload dependence that can be obtained from arterial pressure waveform. (asahq.org)
  • This increased ITP impedes blood flow returning to the heart and causes a marked decrease in left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes, thereby reducing preload. (docplayer.net)
  • In a preload responsive patient, i.e., a patient whose right and left ventricles operate on the steep portion of the Frank-Starling curve, additional volume will increase stroke volume and increase cardiac output 1 . (pulmccm.org)
  • There are many limitations to pressure measurements (such as CVP or PAOP) used as surrogates for a volume (preload, or right or left ventricular end-diastolic volume). (pulmccm.org)
  • PEP is affected by cardiac contractility, preload and afterload, and is reduced as stroke volume (SV) increases. (nihonkohden.com)
  • The FloTrac™ system using the APCO method calculates CO based on the principle that aortic pulse pressure is proportional to stroke volume (SV) and inversely related to aortic compliance using a proprietary algorithm. (biomedcentral.com)
  • They have been replaced with dynamic monitors that use the aortic waveform to derive stroke volume. (springer.com)
  • Comparison of cardiac output measured with echocardiographic volumes and aortic Doppler methods during mechanical ventilation. (cardcarrying.info)
  • This approach is tested and refined using a numerical model of the systemic circulation including the effects of blood inertia, nonlinear compliance, aortic tapering, varying heart rate, and varying myocardial contractility, in which noninvasively estimated stroke volumes were compared with known stroke volumes in the model. (biomedcentral.com)
  • It is based on the principle for which the arterial blood pressure waveform results from the interaction between the systolic ejection volume and the physical characteristics of the systemic vascular system (vascular compliance, aortic impedance and peripheral arterial resistance). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Wagner JY, Grond J, Fortin J, Negulescu I, Schöfthaler M, Saugel B. Continuous noninvasive cardiac output determination using the CNAP system: evaluation of a cardiac output algorithm for the analysis of volume clamp method-derived pulse contour. (springermedizin.de)
  • Each is invasive, requiring either a peripherally or centrally inserted arterial catheter, and each must be calibrated to make use of the pressure-volume conver- sion algorithms in their pulse contour analysis: the FloTrac requires patient information including demographics and physical characteristics and the PiCCO and LiDCO system require indicator dilution cardiac output measurements. (umich.edu)
  • At the time point on the noninvasively measured pulse contour, denoted t h , when pulse amplitude has fallen midway between systolic and diastolic values, the portion of stroke volume remaining in the aorta, and in turn the entire stroke volume, can be estimated from the compliance and the pulse waveform. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The FloTrac™ algorithm uses uncalibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis to estimate cardiac output. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Cardiac output was measured simultaneously using FloTrac™ with a fourth-generation algorithm (CO AP ) and critical care ultrasonography (CO CCUS ). (biomedcentral.com)
  • In the mid-1990s, Pulsion Medical Systems developed an algorithm and a monitor (PiCCO) that estimated the left ventricular stroke volume, beat-to-beat, from the pressure curve of the aorta. (wiley.com)
  • The latter receive intraoperative GDT (guided by a stroke volume algorithm) and postoperative zero-balance fluid therapy based on body weight and fluid charts. (bmj.com)
  • Responders were defined as patients with an increase in stroke volume index of at least 15% after fluid loading. (qxmd.com)
  • So, the greater the respiratory changes in LV stroke volume, the greater the expected increase in stroke volume after fluid administration. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This fluid challenge is repeated every 10-15 min until there is no further increase in stroke volume. (deltexmedical.com)
  • Resuscitation with intravenous fluid can restore intravascular volume and improve stroke volume. (ceemjournal.org)
  • Evaluation and management of intravascular volume are a central challenge in caring for the critically ill. (ceemjournal.org)
  • The ability to assess intravascular volume is an essential part of perioperative care and the management of perioperative hemodynamic instability. (hindawi.com)
  • Insufficient intravascular volume can result in decreased oxygen delivery to tissues and organ dysfunction, while fluid overload states can contribute to the development of edema and organ dysfunction, including respiratory failure. (hindawi.com)
  • Methods of interpreting intravascular volume range from clinical assessments such as inspection of veins and passive leg raising, to more invasive methods such as central venous and pulmonary artery catheterization, to newer technically intensive methods such as echocardiography and analysis of flow parameters. (hindawi.com)
  • We chose a starch for fluid resuscitation in this study because of the volume remaining in the intravascular space. (ekja.org)
  • If blood pressure is decreased, decreased CVP is due to decreased intravascular volume or venous return. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • A pr tica de monitoriza o hemodin mica associada a vari veis din micas permite predizer quais pacientes possivelmente se beneficiar o de terapia de expans o de volume intravascular, um dado extremamente relevante no manuseio do paciente hipotenso na UTI. (uerj.br)
  • The use of hemodynamic monitoring associated with dynamic variables can predict which patients will possibly benefit from intravascular volume expansion therapy, a finding highly relevant in handling the hypotensive patient in the ICU. (uerj.br)
  • In order to avoid excess volume expansion in those patients, it is important to carefully monitor intravascular volume by the following parameters: CVP, stroke volume variance, or extravascular lung water. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The interaction between the stressed and unstressed intravascular volume (Vs and Vu, respectively) regulates the venous return, which is the main determinant of cardiac output. (springer.com)
  • These cyclic changes in left ventricular stroke volume induce cyclic changes in arterial pressure waveform. (asahq.org)
  • Use of goal-directed fluid management, either with FloTrac or pleth variability index results in a lower volume infusion and lower net fluid balance. (elsevier.com)
  • The aim of the present study was to determine the accuracy, precision and trending abilities of the FloTrac and the continuous pulmonary artery catheter thermodilution technique determining CO in septic shock patients. (uwo.ca)
  • The control to reduce variability in volume administration. (edwards.com)
  • Edwards delivers an array of product support, tools and educational resources to help you advance patient care by extending the benefits of reduced variability in volume administration to a broader range of patients, and more moderate to high-risk surgical procedures. (edwards.com)
  • The FloTrac system provides advanced hemodynamic paratmeters that can be used in PGDT to control variability in volume administration and help you maintain your patient in the optimal volume range. (jahangostaresh.ir)
  • Pulmonary artery occlusion pressure and central venous pressure fail to predict ventricular filling volume, cardiac performance, or the response to volume infusion in normal subjects. (springer.com)
  • 25 Lung Protection and Brain Injury Lung-protective ventilation saves lives High tidal volumes predict ALI/ARDS in TBI patients 1 Can we afford to relax control of PCO 2 To achieve low tidal volumes? (docplayer.net)
  • The concept of "goal-directed fluid therapy" has evolved and requires individualized pre- and postoperative optimization of stroke volume determined by providing small challenges of colloid and assessing cardiac function by the esophageal Doppler. (deltexmedical.com)
  • It has been shown that the risk of postoperative complications can be decreased by optimising the amount and type of infusion fluids given during surgery, steered by measurement of cardiac stroke volume, mostly done with a device called esophageal Doppler. (careacross.com)
  • This study wants to test the hypothesis that postoperative complications in patients operated for esophageal cancer can be partially prevented by using a goal directed strategy for the administration of fluids and drugs influencing the heart and vessels, based on measurement of stroke volume by pulse wave analysis (FloTrac). (careacross.com)
  • The aim was to assess the agreement between FloTrac™ and routinely performed cardiac output measurements obtained by critical care ultrasonography in patients with circulatory shock. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In septic shock patients, APCO measurements assessed by FloTrac but also the established CCO measurements using the PAC did not meet the currently accepted statistical criteria indicating acceptable clinical performance. (uwo.ca)
  • Measurements included the stroke volume and Left ventricular end-diastolic diameter. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The USCOM 1A offers real-time, beat-to-beat measurements of 20 parameters of cardiovascular function including cardiac output, stroke volume and systemic vascular resistance with additional parameters such as cardiac power, stroke work and oxygen delivery. (whichmedicaldevice.com)
  • The clarity to consistently maintain your patients in the optimal volume range. (edwards.com)
  • Each of Edwards' monitoring solutions offers continuous dynamic and flow-based information which may be used in Perioperative Goal-Directed Therapy (PGDT) to consistently maintain your moderate to high-risk surgery patients in the optimal volume range. (edwards.com)
  • FloTrac™ has been widely studied in more than 70 validation studies as of yet, mostly showing adequate performance in normo- and hypodynamic conditions, but not in patients with large changes in vascular tone which typically occur in patients with circulatory shock [ 7 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Goal-directed fluid therapy based on stroke volume variations improves fluid management and gastrointestinal perfusion in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery. (edwards.com)
  • Information Recall on Informed Consent to Intravenous Thrombolysis in Patients With Acute Ischaemic Stroke. (strokecenter.org)
  • In addition to the maintenance fluid and blood products, patients will receive 250ml fluid challenges with a recommended solution as required in order to achieve a maximal value of stroke volume. (anzctr.org.au)
  • How can the response to volume expansion in patients with spontaneous respiratory movements be predicted? (bodenseeland.info)
  • Patients were classified as responders if stroke volume index (SVi) increased ≥ 15% after VE. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Adequate volume replacement to achieve optimal cardiac performance is a primary goal of hemodynamic management in patients undergoing cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. (ispub.com)
  • However, in only half of the patients deemed to need volume replacement, does the cardiac output (CO) increase after a fluid challenge and the rest of the half does not. (ispub.com)
  • Consecutive septic shock patients were included in two centres and CO was measured every 4 h up to 48 h by FloTrac (APCO) and by pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) using the continuous (CCO) and intermittent (ICO) technique. (uwo.ca)
  • Over the past two decades, investigators have sought improved techniques and tools to identify which unstable patients are volume-responsive and will respond to intravenous fluid with an increase in cardiac output. (ceemjournal.org)
  • In these patients, increasing the stressed venous volume with intravenous fluid will increase venous return, improve overlap of cardiac myofibrils, and augment stroke volume. (ceemjournal.org)
  • If the patients were already below the target SVV, the required volume was counted as 0 ml. (ekja.org)
  • Five patients (control (1), FloTrac (2), and PVI (2)) were inoperable and were excluded. (elsevier.com)
  • Patients in the control group had greater urine volumes, and they were given greater colloid and overall fluid volumes. (bvsalud.org)
  • Concerns about the cost-effectiveness of invasive hemodynamic monitoring in critically ill patients using pulmonary artery catheters motivate a renewed search for effective noninvasive methods to measure stroke volume. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 1 Anaesthesia, 1994, Volume 49, pages CASE REPORT Decreased cardiac index as an indicator of tension pneumothorax in the ventilated patient S. C. BEARDS AND J. LIPMAN Summary We describe three critically ill patients receiving pressure-controlled ventilation who suffered acute hypotensive episodes associated with the development of tension pneumothoraces. (healthdocbox.com)
  • In treatment process, the liquid volume will impact the treatment of patients to varying degree. (alliedacademies.org)
  • A total of 108 critical patients in stroke intensive care unit were identified. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 108 critically ill patients in the stroke intensive care unit (SICU) were included in this research. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Much like the NINDS trial of tPA in ischemic stroke, this was an inspirational study which sparked widespread enthusiasm, leading to broad acceptance. (emcrit.org)
  • Berkenstadt H, Friedman Z, Preisman S, Keidan I, Livingstone D, Perel A. Pulse pressure and stroke volume variations during severe haemorrhage in ventilated dogs. (springer.com)
  • Automated pulse pressure and stroke volume variations from radial artery: evaluation during major abdominal surgery. (qxmd.com)
  • Therefore invasive procedures as Picco2-system, FloTrac and transesophageal echocardiography (tee) have the advantage to measure or calculate stroke volume. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • When this increase is associated with increased blood pressure, without changes to the systemic vascular resistance, the cause of increased CVP is an increase in volume or venous return. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • 30+ randomized controlled trials and 14+ meta-analyses have demonstrated clinical benefits of hemodynamic optimization utilizing a PGDT protocol and advanced parameters over standard volume management, including reducing post-surgical complications across a wide range of moderate to high-risk surgical populations. (edwards.com)
  • The FloTrac system automatically updates advanced parameters every 20 seconds, reflecting rapid physical changes in moderate to high-risk surgery more accurately. (jahangostaresh.ir)
  • In this study the stroke volume measured by a new noninvasive finger cuff system (NexFin) should be validated in comparison to invasive hemodynamic monitoring systems as Picco2-system, FloTrac and tee. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • We hypothesize that using the FloTrac™ system to continuously monitor cardiac output, in addition to traditional vital signs, cardiovascular instability will be identified earlier and result in earlier intervention. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Continuous cardiac output (CCO) measured by the FloTrac system can be used (in combination with SaO 2 and hemoglobin) to monitor and optimize DO 2 with fluid (including red blood cells) and inotropic agents. (jahangostaresh.ir)
  • The FloTrac system provides insight to make critical decisions earlier. (whichmedicaldevice.com)
  • Stroke volume is estimated from the area under the systolic portion of an arterial pressure curve and a variable called Z. This variable indicates the dynamic impedance of the cardiovascular system, representing all the factors which oppose to the propagation of the pressure wave on the arterial tree. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The cardiac index, stroke volume index, and SVV were recorded automatically until the end of anesthesia. (ekja.org)
  • Arterial pressure-based stroke volume and functional hemodynamic monitoring. (oaccm.com)
  • Monitoring right ventricular volumes: Arterial Pressure Based Technologies: Comparative in vitro efficacies and antimicrobial durabilities of novel antimicrobial central venous catheters. (bodenseeland.info)
  • By increasing intrathoracic pressure and lung volume, mechanical insufflation raises both pleural and transpulmonary pressure, decreasing the pressure gradient for venous return and increasing right ventricular (RV) afterload. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This inspiratory reduction in right ventricular stroke volume decreases left ventricular filling after a lag of about two or three beats as blood makes it trip through the pulmonary circuit. (umich.edu)
  • Traditional "static" monitors of volume status, such as central venous pressure and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, have been discredited. (springer.com)
  • Commonly used methods of determining fluid status such as central venous pressure (CVP) and pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) do not accurately reflect the left ventricular end diastolic area and volume values, even when trends are followed after the administration of a fluid challenge during hemodynamic instability. (ispub.com)
  • Cardiac output is the product of stroke volume and heart rate, and the stroke volume can be obtained by measuring the area and velocity time integral of the LV outflow tract (LVOT), and the value is close to the result obtained by the pulmonary artery catheter. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Congestive heart failure simply means that the pulmonary blood volume is expanded and, therefore, the pulmonary circulation is congested with blood. (answersdrive.com)
  • ERAS Recommendation 'Oesophageal Doppler ultrasonography was chosen as the preferred method of monitoring intraoperative stroke volume due to the broader evidence base in this context. (deltexmedical.com)
  • It remains as a challenge for experimentalists to explore further the potential of noninvasive measurement of stroke volume using pulse wave velocity. (biomedcentral.com)
  • While goal directed fluid therapy (GDFT) using esophageal Doppler to achieve "near maximal stroke volume" has been recommended in rectal surgery,these protocols have often been compared to obsolete regimens with either fluid overload or unwarranted restriction. (deltexmedical.com)
  • Perioperative monitoring of stroke volume with transoesophageal Doppler to optimizecardiac output with fluid boluses improves outcomes. (deltexmedical.com)
  • Epub Oct Observe la onda cuadrada generada en el monitor de cabecera 3. (bodenseeland.info)
  • 3) How and when should we monitor stroke volume or cardiac output in shock? (esicm.org)
  • Hence it is timely to revisit the issue of clinical monitoring of stroke volume and cardiac output with an eye toward less invasive and less expensive options. (biomedcentral.com)