FloridaBites and StingsSnake Bites: Bites by snakes. Bite by a venomous snake is characterized by stinging pain at the wound puncture. The venom injected at the site of the bite is capable of producing a deleterious effect on the blood or on the nervous system. (Webster's 3d ed; from Dorland, 27th ed, at snake, venomous)Bites, Human: Bites inflicted by humans.Insect Bites and Stings: Bites and stings inflicted by insects.Bite Force: The force applied by the masticatory muscles in dental occlusion.Spider Bites: The effects, both local and systemic, caused by the bites of SPIDERS.Open Bite: A condition in which certain opposing teeth fail to establish occlusal contact when the jaws are closed.Trichechus manatus: Member of the genus Trichechus inhabiting the coast and coastal rivers of the southeastern United States as well as the West Indies and the adjacent mainland from Vera Cruz, Mexico to northern South America. (From Scott, Concise Encyclopedia Biology, 1996)Antivenins: Antisera used to counteract poisoning by animal VENOMS, especially SNAKE VENOMS.Oxocins: Compounds based on an 8-membered heterocyclic ring including an oxygen. They can be considered medium ring ethers.Marine Toxins: Toxic or poisonous substances elaborated by marine flora or fauna. They include also specific, characterized poisons or toxins for which there is no more specific heading, like those from poisonous FISHES.Tick Bites: The effects, both local and systemic, caused by the bites of TICKS.Dinoflagellida: Flagellate EUKARYOTES, found mainly in the oceans. They are characterized by the presence of transverse and longitudinal flagella which propel the organisms in a rotating manner through the water. Dinoflagellida were formerly members of the class Phytomastigophorea under the old five kingdom paradigm.Viperidae: A family of snakes comprising three subfamilies: Azemiopinae (the mountain viper, the sole member of this subfamily), Viperinae (true vipers), and Crotalinae (pit vipers). They are widespread throughout the world, being found in the United States, Central and South America, Europe, Asia and Africa. Their venoms act on the blood (hemotoxic) as compared to the venom of elapids which act on the nervous system (neurotoxic). (Goin, Goin, and Zug, Introduction to Herpetology, 3d ed, pp333-36)Jaw Relation Record: A registration of any positional relationship of the mandible in reference to the maxillae. These records may be any of the many vertical, horizontal, or orientation relations. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry)Eutrophication: The enrichment of a terrestrial or aquatic ECOSYSTEM by the addition of nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus, that results in a superabundant growth of plants, ALGAE, or other primary producers. It can be a natural process or result from human activity such as agriculture runoff or sewage pollution. In aquatic ecosystems, an increase in the algae population is termed an algal bloom.Endangered Species: An animal or plant species in danger of extinction. Causes can include human activity, changing climate, or change in predator/prey ratios.Trichechus: A genus of the order Sirenia comprising what are commonly called manatees. The distinguishing characteristics include a tail that is not notched, a short nasal cavity, the absence of nasal bones, and enamel-covered teeth. Members of this genus are found in marine bays and/or sluggish rivers, usually in turbid water. (From Scott, Concise Encyclopedia Biology, 1996)Puma: A genus in the family FELIDAE comprising one species, Puma concolor. It is a large, long-tailed, feline of uniform color. The names puma, cougar, and mountain lion are used interchangeably for this species. There are more than 20 subspecies.Alligators and Crocodiles: Large, long-tailed reptiles, including caimans, of the order Loricata.Citrus: A plant genus of the family RUTACEAE. They bear the familiar citrus fruits including oranges, grapefruit, lemons, and limes. There are many hybrids which makes the nomenclature confusing.Mastication: The act and process of chewing and grinding food in the mouth.
The portion of SR 20 running through all of Calhoun County was designated as "Fuller Warren Parkway" by the Florida State Legislature in 1999.[2] The portion of SR 20 that is co-signed with US 27 in Leon County was designated as "Apalachee Parkway" by the Florida State Legislature in 1961.[3] The portion of SR 20 that is co-signed with US 27 in Leon, Jefferson, Madison, and Taylor counties was designated as "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by the Florida State Legislature in 1957.[4] The same portion of SR 20 in Taylor, Jefferson, and Leon counties was also designated as "Paradise Drive" by the Florida State Legislature in 1951.[5] The portion of SR 20 from Perry to High Springs in Columbia County, as well as all of SR 20 that is co-signed with US 27 in Lafayette and Suwannee counties, was designated as "Fred P Parker Memorial Highway" by the Florida State Legislature in 1941.[6] The portion of SR 20 in Alachua County that is ...
... , commonly referred to as Turner Tech, is a secondary technical school located at 10151 NW 19th Avenue in West Little River, unincorporated Miami-Dade County, Florida. Turner Tech is located behind Miami Central High School. According to US news (Best High Schools), William H. Turner Technical Arts High School is ranked #2574 in the National Rankings and earned a silver medal. As of July 21, 2017, Turner Tech's principal is Uwezo Frasier. The school is ranked as a "B" school and is part of the Miami Dade Public Schools magnet program. Turner Tech was founded in 1993 and was named after William H. Turner, former chairperson of the Miami-Dade County School Board and a former member of the Florida State Legislature. Turner, along with Roger C. Cuevas (a former Miami-Dade County Public Schools Superintendent), had a dream to construct a school that would provide academic and technical skills to prepare youth for the 21st century. Turner Tech operates as a ...
In 1957 the Florida Legislature authorized expansion of Florida's junior college system. North Florida Junior College, for white students, and Suwannee River Junior College, for black students, were founded simultaneously. In March 1958, Marshall W. Hamilton was appointed President, and the first classes were held in September 1958. Following the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which buttressed the Brown v. Board of Education of 1954 prohibiting racial discrimination in schools, Suwannee River Junior College was closed. Most faculty moved to North Florida Junior College, but although North Florida was now open to them, few black students did.[1]. In July 1995, the District Board of Trustees changed the institution's name to North Florida Community College.. In 2007 the college began a registered nurse program. The Public Safety Academy provides correctional officer, firefighter, EMT, paramedic and ...
The climate of South Florida is located across the broad transition zone between subtropical and tropical climates (Koppen Cfa and Aw). Like most regions with this climate type, there are two basic seasons - a "dry season" (winter) which runs from November through April, and a "wet season" (summer) which runs from May through October. About 70% of the annual rainfall in south Florida occurs in the wet season - often as brief but intense tropical downpours. The dry season sees little rainfall and dew points and humidity are often quite low. The dry season can be severe at times, as wildfires and water restrictions are often in place.. The annual range of temperatures in south Florida and the Everglades is rather small (less than 20 °F [11 °C]) - ranging from a monthly mean temperature of around 65 °F (18 °C) in January to 83 °F (28 °C) in July. High temperatures in the hot and wet season (summer) typically exceed 90 °F (32 °C) across inland south ...
The Tenth Judicial Circuit was created, along with the Ninth and Eleventh Judicial Circuits, by the addition of Chapter 6197, No.78[a][3] to the Florida Constitution by the Florida Legislature in May 1911, passed over a veto by the governor.[4]:23[3] The previous year, a new Florida constitutional amendment passed by voters gave the Florida Legislature the authority to create judicial circuits as it deemed advisable.[5] The governor in 1911, DeSoto County native Albert Gilchrist,[4]:20 was supportive of a plan to create five new judicial circuits, in which Polk County would be part of the Eleventh Circuit along with Orange and Osceola Counties while DeSoto, Manatee, and Lee Counties would form the Twelfth Circuit.[4]:22 However, Florida Senate president Fred Cone saw the five new districts as too much for Central and South Florida and the Florida Legislature passed a bill to create just ...
... is a medical research and training center with locations in Celebration and Orlando, Florida. Founded in 2001, it operates within the Florida Hospital network and trains physicians on foundational surgical techniques, including robotic surgery and laparoscopic surgery, using tools like robotic simulators, wet and dry labs. Using emerging robotic, laparoscopic and orthopedic surgical techniques, the Nicholson Center is researching to develop modified ways to operate. In 2001, the center was founded as the Surgical Learning Institute. After receiving a grant in 2008 from Orlando real estate developers, Anthony and Sonja Nicholson, the center became the Florida Hospital Nicholson Center and opened new facility in 2011. The expansion included lecture and education rooms wired for digital conferences, two simulation-training centers, 25 surgical suites and a medical lab with eight surgical robots that are worth a total of over $8 million. The facility is ...
The first drug court in the United States took shape in Miami-Dade County, Florida, in 1989, as a response to the growing crack-cocaine problem plaguing the city. All 50 states now have working drug courts, with a total of more than 2,400 courts. About 120,000 people treated annually in drug courts, though an estimated 1.5 million eligible people are currently before the courts. The first drug court, in Miami-Dade County, was designed by Chief Judge Gerald Wetherington, Judge Herbert Klein, then State Attorney Janet Reno, and public defender Bennett Brummer for nonviolent offenders to receive treatment. This model of court system quickly became a popular method for dealing with an ever increasing number of drug offenders. Between 1984 and 1999, the number of defendants charged with a drug offense in the federal courts increased 3% annually, from 11,854 to 29,306. By 1999 there were 472 drug courts in the nation and by 2005 that number had increased to 1262 with another 575 drug courts in the ...
The people of the Alachua culture who built a burial mound near the College of Law on University of Florida's campus (the "Law School Mound") c 1000 AD are believed to have lived along the shore of Lake Alice.[2] How Lake Alice obtained its name is uncertain. Prior to the 1890s, Lake Alice was known as "Jonah's Pond" but by 1894, US Geological Surveys noted it as Lake Alice. A Master's thesis written in 1953 makes the unreferenced claim that it was named for the only daughter of a Mr. Witt, who owned a farm of which the lake was a part.[3] In the late 1960s, the University of Florida administration and the Florida Department of Transportation planned to drain portions of the lake and construct a cross-campus throughway and 2,000-car parking lot along its shore. Environmental activist Marjorie Harris Carr, along with University of Florida professors John Kaufmann and Joe Little, led a successful opposition movement that ...
The Florida Cracker Horse is a breed of horse from Florida in the United States. It is genetically and physically similar to many other Spanish-style horses, especially those from the Spanish Colonial Horse group. The Florida Cracker is a gaited breed known for its agility and speed. The Spanish first brought horses to Florida with their expeditions in the early 16th century; as colonial settlement progressed, they used the horses for herding cattle. These horses developed into the Florida Cracker type seen today, and continued to be used by Florida cowboys (known as "crackers") until the 1930s. At this point they were superseded by American Quarter Horses needed to work larger cattle brought to Florida during the Dust Bowl, and population numbers declined precipitously. Through the efforts of several private families and the Florida government, the breed was saved from ...
The University of South Florida's Center for Ocean Technology, which has been a leader in microelectromechanical systems research and development and has been using the technology to collect biological and chemical data to monitor water quality, provided underwater technology for port security at the 2004 Republican National Convention. USF's Center for Robot-Assisted Search and Rescue used its miniature robots to assist rescue teams at Ground Zero following the September 11 terrorist attacks. Tampa Bay is also the location of three major military installations, MacDill Air Force Base, Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater and Coast Guard Station St. Petersburg. MacDill AFB is home to the 6th Air Mobility Wing (6 AMW) of the Air Mobility Command (AMC) and the 927th Air Refueling Wing (927 ARW) of the Air Force Reserve Command (AFRC). Both wings share flight operations of a fleet of KC-135R Stratotanker aircraft and the 6 AMW also operates a fleet of C-37A Gulfstream V aircraft. MacDill AFB also ...
Ronda R. Storms (born Ronda Rehnell Newcomb on September 5, 1965) is an American politician representing her adopted home state of Florida. Affiliated with the Republican Party, she represented the 10th District in the Florida Senate from 2006 to 2012. She decided not to run in 2012 for the new 24th District. Storms had an eight-year tenure on the Hillsborough County Commission (1998-2006) and advanced a number of controversial issues. Ronda Newcomb was born in Des Moines, Iowa, into a military family, and moved around often, growing up in Germany, Turkey and Alabama. Spending many formative years in Turkey, she used to be fluent in the Turkish language, but has had "little call for the language recently." The Newcomb family finally settled in Brandon, Florida when Ronda was 16, and she graduated from Brandon High School in 1983. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in English education from the University of South Florida in 1988, as a ...
West Miami är en stad (city) i Miami-Dade County, i delstaten Florida, USA. Enligt United States Census Bureau har staden en folkmängd på 6 105 invånare (2011) och en landarea på 1,8 km². ...
Miami Gardens är en stad (city) i Miami-Dade County, i delstaten Florida, USA. Enligt United States Census Bureau har staden en folkmängd på 109 680 invånare (2011) och en landarea på 47,2 km². ...

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