Rutin: A flavonol glycoside found in many plants, including BUCKWHEAT; TOBACCO; FORSYTHIA; HYDRANGEA; VIOLA, etc. It has been used therapeutically to decrease capillary fragility.Quercetin: A flavonol widely distributed in plants. It is an antioxidant, like many other phenolic heterocyclic compounds. Glycosylated forms include RUTIN and quercetrin.Flavonoids: A group of phenyl benzopyrans named for having structures like FLAVONES.Kaempferols: A group of FLAVONOLS based on kaempferol. They are derived from naringenin and can be hydroxylated to QUERCETIN or reduced to leucopelargonidin.Flavanones: A group of FLAVONOIDS characterized with a 4-ketone.Fagopyrum: A plant genus of the family POLYGONACEAE that is used as an EDIBLE GRAIN. Although the seeds are used as cereal, the plant is not one of the cereal grasses (POACEAE).Luteolin: 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxy-flavone, one of the FLAVONES.Flavonols: A group of 3-hydroxy-4-keto-FLAVONOIDS.Saussurea: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE, order Asterales, subclass Asteridae. It is a source of costus root oil and should not be confused with the genus COSTUS.Mental Fatigue: A condition of low alertness or cognitive impairment, usually associated with prolonged mental activities or stress.Fatigue: The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.Cornaceae: A plant family of the order Cornales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida that is a loose grouping of woody ornamentals: 11 of its 14 genera have been placed in single families by some authorities. Some botanists combine members of NYSSACEAE into this family.Nyssaceae: A plant family of the order Cornales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida. Some botanical classifications do not recognize this family and place the members in CORNACEAE.Superoxide Dismutase: An oxidoreductase that catalyzes the reaction between superoxide anions and hydrogen to yield molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme protects the cell against dangerous levels of superoxide. EC 1.15.1.1.Glutathione Peroxidase: An enzyme catalyzing the oxidation of 2 moles of glutathione in the presence of hydrogen peroxide to yield oxidized glutathione and water. EC 1.11.1.9.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Clot Retraction: Retraction of a clot resulting from contraction of PLATELET pseudopods attached to FIBRIN strands. The retraction is dependent on the contractile protein thrombosthenin. Clot retraction is used as a measure of platelet function.Isoniazid: Antibacterial agent used primarily as a tuberculostatic. It remains the treatment of choice for tuberculosis.Blood Coagulation: The process of the interaction of BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS that results in an insoluble FIBRIN clot.Dietary Supplements: Products in capsule, tablet or liquid form that provide dietary ingredients, and that are intended to be taken by mouth to increase the intake of nutrients. Dietary supplements can include macronutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fats; and/or MICRONUTRIENTS, such as VITAMINS; MINERALS; and PHYTOCHEMICALS.Fermentation: Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.Rumen: The first stomach of ruminants. It lies on the left side of the body, occupying the whole of the left side of the abdomen and even stretching across the median plane of the body to the right side. It is capacious, divided into an upper and a lower sac, each of which has a blind sac at its posterior extremity. The rumen is lined by mucous membrane containing no digestive glands, but mucus-secreting glands are present in large numbers. Coarse, partially chewed food is stored and churned in the rumen until the animal finds circumstances convenient for rumination. When this occurs, little balls of food are regurgitated through the esophagus into the mouth, and are subjected to a second more thorough mastication, swallowed, and passed on into other parts of the compound stomach. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)Methane: The simplest saturated hydrocarbon. It is a colorless, flammable gas, slightly soluble in water. It is one of the chief constituents of natural gas and is formed in the decomposition of organic matter. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Fatty Acids, Volatile: Short-chain fatty acids of up to six carbon atoms in length. They are the major end products of microbial fermentation in the ruminant digestive tract and have also been implicated in the causation of neurological diseases in humans.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Theilovirus: A species of CARDIOVIRUS which contains three strains: Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, Vilyuisk human encephalomyelitis virus, and Rat encephalomyelitis virus.Gentian Violet: A dye that is a mixture of violet rosanilinis with antibacterial, antifungal, and anthelmintic properties.Famous PersonsVermontNew HampshireTrityl CompoundsRosaniline Dyes: Compounds that contain the triphenylmethane aniline structure found in rosaniline. Many of them have a characteristic magenta color and are used as COLORING AGENTS.Cucurbitaceae: The gourd plant family of the order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. It is sometimes placed in its own order, Cucurbitales. 'Melon' generally refers to CUCUMIS; CITRULLUS; or MOMORDICA.Pollen: The fertilizing element of plants that contains the male GAMETOPHYTES.Pollen Tube: A growth from a pollen grain down into the flower style which allows two sperm to pass, one to the ovum within the ovule, and the other to the central cell of the ovule to produce endosperm of SEEDS.Cucumis melo: A plant species of the family CUCURBITACEAE, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae known for the melon fruits with reticulated (net) surface including cantaloupes, honeydew, casaba, and Persian melons.Social Stigma: A perceived attribute that is deeply discrediting and is considered to be a violation of social norms.Cupressus: A plant genus of the family CUPRESSACEAE. Cypress ordinarily refers to this but also forms part of the name of plants in other genera.Pelargonium: A plant genus of the family GERANIACEAE. The common name of geranium is also used for the GERANIUM genus.Geranium: A plant genus of the family GERANIACEAE. Geranium is also used as a common name for PELARGONIUM.Cyprus: An island republic in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Its capital is Nicosia. It was colonized by the Phoenicians and ancient Greeks and ruled successively by the Assyrian, Persian, Ptolemaic, Roman, and Byzantine Empires. It was under various countries from the 12th to the 20th century but became independent in 1960. The name comes from the Greek Kupros, probably representing the Sumerian kabar or gabar, copper, famous in historic times for its copper mines. The cypress tree is also named after the island. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p308 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p134)Cupressaceae: A plant family of the order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta (conifers). They are mainly resinous, aromatic evergreen trees.Melaleuca: A plant genus of the family MYRTACEAE. M. alternifolia foliage is a source of TEA TREE OIL. The common name of tea tree also refers to LEPTOSPERMUM or KUNZEA. M. vindifolia is a source of niaouli oil. M. cajuputi and M. leucadendra are sources of cajuput oil.Astringents: Agents, usually topical, that cause the contraction of tissues for the control of bleeding or secretions.Ruta: A plant genus of the family RUTACEAE. Members contain quinoline alkaloids.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Homeopathy: A system of therapeutics founded by Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843), based on the Law of Similars where "like cures like". Diseases are treated by highly diluted substances that cause, in healthy persons, symptoms like those of the disease to be treated.Materia Medica: Materials or substances used in the composition of traditional medical remedies. The use of this term in MeSH was formerly restricted to historical articles or those concerned with traditional medicine, but it can also refer to homeopathic remedies. Nosodes are specific types of homeopathic remedies prepared from causal agents or disease products.Pharmacognosy: The science of drugs prepared from natural-sources including preparations from PLANTS, animals, and other organisms as well as MINERALS and other substances included in MATERIA MEDICA. The therapeutic usage of plants is PHYTOTHERAPY.Apium graveolens: A plant species of the family APIACEAE. The stalks are a food source.Odors: The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
  • They contain rutin and flavonoid alkaloids. (news-medical.net)
  • Newall 1996 Diosphenol, the flavonoids and terpinen-4-ol may contribute to the plant's diuretic activity, but this action of buchu teas is probably no greater than that of the xanthine alkaloids in coffee or tea. (drugs.com)
  • In order to assess the toxicity of B. uniflora extracts, 20 Swiss mice were distributed into four groups (n=5) receiving by gavage alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, or saline (control group). (scielo.br)
  • The widespread distribution of flavonoids, their variety and their relatively low toxicity compared to other active plant compounds (for instance alkaloids) mean that many animals, including humans, ingest significant quantities in their diet. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among the more than 5,000 compounds that were screened, quercetin-3-rutinoside (rutin) emerged as the most potent agent. (quantumday.com)
  • Citation: Sachetto ATA, Rosa JG, Santoro ML (2018) Rutin (quercetin-3-rutinoside) modulates the hemostatic disturbances and redox imbalance induced by Bothrops jararacasnake venom in mice. (eurekalert.org)
  • From a field of more than 5,000 compounds, the scientists identified rutin (also known as quercetin-3-rutinoside) as the most potent substance for the job. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Some compounds such as Chlorogenic acid ( 35 mg g-1 in leaves and fruits), Catechin ( 35 mg g-1 in leaves, peels and fruits), Rutin ( 35 mg g-1 in leaves, peels and fruits) and Isoquercetin (35 mg g-1 only in the leaves) were also identified and quantified by HPLC/UV-DAD. (academicjournals.org)
  • Over five thousand flavonoids have been identified, which comprise the most abundant group of plant Polyphenols next to Stilbenes (resveratrol, pinosylvin, isorhapontin), Lignans (nuts, seeds, and whole grain cereal sources), and Phenolic acids (found in a variety of foods). (acu-cell.com)
  • They consist of a variety of structures divided into a number of main groups including phenolic acids, flavonoids, lignans and stilbenes depending on the number of benzene rings as well as on their structure of the carbon skeleton [ 1 ]. (mdpi.com)
  • This chapter is focused on the antioxidant and anticanc-cer properties of flavonoid metal complexes, in correlation with their binding ability to vital macromolecules such as nucleic acids and serum proteins. (intechopen.com)
  • This study investigated the antifatigue effects of rutin, a flavonoid extracted from the ethyl acetate extract of S. involucrata . (medsci.org)
  • ZIC-HILIC showed better selectivity (in comparison to silica column) with the detection limit of 0.01 mg/L (only for rutin was 0.05 mg/L). Finally, this chromatographic procedure was validated and applied for the determination of some flavonoids in Genista tinctoria L. extract. (hindawi.com)
  • Rutin and pomegranate extract provide important support for blood vessel integrity and healthy cell function. (purecapspro.com)
  • A compound called rutin, commonly found in fruits and vegetables and sold over the counter as a dietary supplement, has been shown to inhibit the formation of blood clots in an animal model of thrombosis. (quantumday.com)
  • Recent studies show rutin could help prevent blood clots, so could be used to treat patients at risk of heart attacks and strokes. (wikipedia.org)
  • New research has uncovered a non-drug approach to preventing the formation of these blood clots, and that strategy involves a natural substance called rutin. (emaxhealth.com)
  • In other words, rutin may help prevent the formation of blood clots, the number one killer of Americans, and scientists are working on developing it into a form we can use. (emaxhealth.com)
  • These functional alterations were also counteracted by co-administration of rutin, and both the antioxidant and the chelating activity of rutin might have contributed to the ameliorative effect. (mtak.hu)
  • The cannabinoid mediated antidepressant activity of rutin shown in mice models employing weight-loaded forced swim test. (wikipedia.org)
  • My recommendation is to collect research on rutin, talk to your healthcare provider (and even get a second opinion if you can) and discuss your questions, concerns, and desires concerning the use of rutin. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Researchers have found that rutin, an inexpensive, plant-based compound may protect envenomed mice from bleeding and inflammation problems, according to a study published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases by Ana Teresa Azevedo Sachetto of Institute Butantan, São Paulo, Brazil. (eurekalert.org)
  • This review concentrates on two aspects of how total flavonoid content and individual flavonoid compounds change with the perception of environmental stress and the subsequent changes in those metabolites after post-harvest conditions are of the main points of the study. (intechopen.com)
  • In CHS RNAi plants, total flavonoid levels, transcript levels of both Chs1 and Chs2 , as well as CHS enzyme activity were reduced by up to a few percent of the corresponding wild-type values. (plantphysiol.org)
  • It has been shown that some flavonoids are able to increase iodide uptake and NIS expression in vitro, however, data in vivo are lacking. (nih.gov)
  • Both in vitro and in vivo studies report that flavonoids and their metal ion complexes exert pleiotropic effects on tumor promotion and progression. (intechopen.com)
  • Aspalathin, a flavonoid, and phenylpyruvic acid-2- O -β-D-glucoside, a phenolic precursor, are some of the major compounds found in rooibos that can ameliorate hyperglycemia-induced cardiomyocyte damage in vitro. (biomedcentral.com)
  • While a body of evidence for the effects of rutin and quercetin is available in mice, rats, hamsters, and rabbits, as well as in vitro studies, no clinical studies directly demonstrate significant, positive effects of rutin as dietary supplement in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • The compound was tested against a panel of other flavonoids and was demonstrated to have had the most potent senotherapeutic effects in several cell types in vitro, as well as showing strong anti-geronic effects in vivo. (worldhealth.net)
  • Rutin was essentially the champion compound," says Flaumenhaft. (quantumday.com)
  • Surprisingly, studies of the rutin molecule demonstrated that the same part of the molecule that provides rutin with its ability to inhibit PDI also prevents the compound from entering cells. (quantumday.com)
  • Because they knew that humans would be taking rutin in pill form, they included studies in which the compound was administered orally and determined that it successfully retained its anti-thrombotic properties when it was metabolized following oral ingestion. (quantumday.com)
  • Rutin proved to be the most potently anti-thrombotic compound that we ever tested in this model," says Flaumenhaft. (quantumday.com)
  • There were other erlenmeyers which only contained increasing quantities of compound A. In addition, there was one erlenmeyer without flavonoid as control. (scielo.org.ar)
  • At first, chemical analysis indicated that this factor was a single flavonoid compound and it was named "citrin. (healthy.net)
  • After further extensive investigation and testing, the researchers found that "Rutin proved to be the most potently anti-thrombotic compound that we ever tested in this model," explained Robert Flaumenhaft, MD, PhD, the study's senior author and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Allelopathic activity was evaluated in germination of Stylosanthes , Macrotyloma axillare and Lactuca sativa L. (standard) in the presence of crude extracts, isolated saponins, flavonoids and trans-cinnamic acid. (scirp.org)
  • Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effect of some flavonoids on thyroid iodide uptake in Wistar rats in vivo. (nih.gov)
  • Relatively high amount of rutin increases thyroid iodide uptake in rats and decreases serum T3 and T4 level. (wikipedia.org)
  • Western blot analysis of MAPK expression further confirmed the antianxiety effects of rutin. (medsci.org)
  • In addition to the already known free radical scavenging effect, flavonoids exert beneficial effects through the interaction with nuclear transcription factor kappa-B, activator protein 1, Janus kinases and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase signaling pathways. (springer.com)
  • Oxaliplatin significantly increased thermal and mechanical nociceptive response, effects prevented by quercetin and rutin at all doses. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Buckwheat's beneficial effects are due in part to its rich supply of flavonoids, particularly rutin . (whfoods.com)
  • Future studies will be necessary to understand rutin activity once venom has initiated pathophysiological events, as well the therapeutic effects of rutin delivered with antivenom. (eurekalert.org)
  • However, in other trials, the effects of rutin were lower or negligible compared to those of quercetin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rutin produces antinociceptive effects involving central modulation of the vlPAG descending circuit partly mediated by an opioidergic mechanism Hydroxyethylrutosides, synthetic hydroxyethyl acetylations of rutin, are used in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1936, Dr. Janey reported the favorable effects of flavonoids on intact and poisoned frog hearts. (healthy.net)
  • A recent article published in the March 2019 edition of O_xidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity_ assessed the effects on citrus flavonoids on cardiometabolic health . (livestrong.com)
  • The antidiabetic potential of flavonoids are mainly through their modulatory effects on glucose transporter by enhancing GLUT-2 expression in pancreatic β cells and increasing expression and promoting translocation of GLUT-4 via PI3K/AKT, CAP/Cb1/TC10 and AMPK pathways. (ijbs.com)
  • This review highlights the recent findings on beneficial effects of flavonoids in the management of diabetes with particular emphasis on the investigations that explore the role of these compounds in modulating glucose transporter proteins at cellular and molecular level. (ijbs.com)
  • Flavonoids have antioxidative properties which protect the body against the deleterious effects of hyperglycemia in T 2 DM, through acting on the biological targets such as α-glucosidase, glucose co-transporter or aldose reductase. (ijbs.com)
  • Moreover, we highlighted the anti-diabetic effects of the flavonoids in the management of T 2 DM, through modulating glucose transporters, with particular emphasis on the investigations and recent findings. (ijbs.com)
  • Flavonoid distribution during the development of leaves, flowers, stems, and roots of Rosmarinus officinalis. (nih.gov)