Corneal Topography: The measurement of curvature and shape of the anterior surface of the cornea using techniques such as keratometry, keratoscopy, photokeratoscopy, profile photography, computer-assisted image processing and videokeratography. This measurement is often applied in the fitting of contact lenses and in diagnosing corneal diseases or corneal changes including keratoconus, which occur after keratotomy and keratoplasty.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Keratoconus: A noninflammatory, usually bilateral protrusion of the cornea, the apex being displaced downward and nasally. It occurs most commonly in females at about puberty. The cause is unknown but hereditary factors may play a role. The -conus refers to the cone shape of the corneal protrusion. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Flatfoot: A condition in which one or more of the arches of the foot have flattened out.Microscopy, Atomic Force: A type of scanning probe microscopy in which a probe systematically rides across the surface of a sample being scanned in a raster pattern. The vertical position is recorded as a spring attached to the probe rises and falls in response to peaks and valleys on the surface. These deflections produce a topographic map of the sample.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Esophageal Motility Disorders: Disorders affecting the motor function of the UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; the ESOPHAGUS body, or a combination of these parts. The failure of the sphincters to maintain a tonic pressure may result in gastric reflux of food and acid into the esophagus (GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX). Other disorders include hypermotility (spastic disorders) and markedly increased amplitude in contraction (nutcracker esophagus).Topography, Medical: The systematic surveying, mapping, charting, and description of specific geographical sites, with reference to the physical features that were presumed to influence health and disease. Medical topography should be differentiated from EPIDEMIOLOGY in that the former emphasizes geography whereas the latter emphasizes disease outbreaks.Photogrammetry: Making measurements by the use of stereoscopic photographs.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Nanostructures: Materials which have structured components with at least one dimension in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. These include NANOCOMPOSITES; NANOPARTICLES; NANOTUBES; and NANOWIRES.Titanium: A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)Biocompatible Materials: Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Manometry: Measurement of the pressure or tension of liquids or gases with a manometer.Event-Related Potentials, P300: A late-appearing component of the event-related potential. P300 stands for a positive deflection in the event-related voltage potential at 300 millisecond poststimulus. Its amplitude increases with unpredictable, unlikely, or highly significant stimuli and thereby constitutes an index of mental activity. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 6th ed)Optic Disk: The portion of the optic nerve seen in the fundus with the ophthalmoscope. It is formed by the meeting of all the retinal ganglion cell axons as they enter the optic nerve.Lasers, Excimer: Gas lasers with excited dimers (i.e., excimers) as the active medium. The most commonly used are rare gas monohalides (e.g., argon fluoride, xenon chloride). Their principal emission wavelengths are in the ultraviolet range and depend on the monohalide used (e.g., 193 nm for ArF, 308 nm for Xe Cl). These lasers are operated in pulsed and Q-switched modes and used in photoablative decomposition involving actual removal of tissue. (UMDNS, 2005)Tomography: Imaging methods that result in sharp images of objects located on a chosen plane and blurred images located above or below the plane.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Peristalsis: A movement, caused by sequential muscle contraction, that pushes the contents of the intestines or other tubular organs in one direction.Superior Colliculi: The anterior pair of the quadrigeminal bodies which coordinate the general behavioral orienting responses to visual stimuli, such as whole-body turning, and reaching.Moire Topography: A method of three-dimensional morphometry in which contour maps are produced from the overlapping interference fringes created when an object is illuminated by beams of coherent light issuing from two different point sources.Geologic Sediments: A mass of organic or inorganic solid fragmented material, or the solid fragment itself, that comes from the weathering of rock and is carried by, suspended in, or dropped by air, water, or ice. It refers also to a mass that is accumulated by any other natural agent and that forms in layers on the earth's surface, such as sand, gravel, silt, mud, fill, or loess. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1689)Photorefractive Keratectomy: A type of refractive surgery of the CORNEA to correct MYOPIA and ASTIGMATISM. An EXCIMER LASER is used directly on the surface of the EYE to remove some of the CORNEAL EPITHELIUM thus reshaping the anterior curvature of the cornea.Retina: The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.Interferometry: Measurement of distances or movements by means of the phenomena caused by the interference of two rays of light (optical interferometry) or of sound (acoustic interferometry).Imidoesters: Esters of the hypothetical imidic acids. They react with amines or amino acids to form amidines and are therefore used to modify protein structures and as cross-linking agents.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ: A surgical procedure to correct MYOPIA by CORNEAL STROMA subtraction. It involves the use of a microkeratome to make a lamellar dissection of the CORNEA creating a flap with intact CORNEAL EPITHELIUM. After the flap is lifted, the underlying midstroma is reshaped with an EXCIMER LASER and the flap is returned to its original position.Dimethylpolysiloxanes: Silicone polymers which consist of silicon atoms substituted with methyl groups and linked by oxygen atoms. They comprise a series of biocompatible materials used as liquids, gels or solids; as film for artificial membranes, gels for implants, and liquids for drug vehicles; and as antifoaming agents.Biomimetic Materials: Materials fabricated by BIOMIMETICS techniques, i.e., based on natural processes found in biological systems.Refraction, Ocular: Refraction of LIGHT effected by the media of the EYE.Evolution, Planetary: Creation and development of bodies within solar systems, includes study of early planetary geology.Myopia: A refractive error in which rays of light entering the EYE parallel to the optic axis are brought to a focus in front of the RETINA when accommodation (ACCOMMODATION, OCULAR) is relaxed. This results from an overly curved CORNEA or from the eyeball being too long from front to back. It is also called nearsightedness.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Cell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Neural Pathways: Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Axons: Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.Astigmatism: Unequal curvature of the refractive surfaces of the eye. Thus a point source of light cannot be brought to a point focus on the retina but is spread over a more or less diffuse area. This results from the radius of curvature in one plane being longer or shorter than the radius at right angles to it. (Dorland, 27th ed)Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Ephrin-A5: A GLYCOINOSITOL PHOSPHOLIPID MEMBRANE ANCHOR containing ephrin found in developing tectum. It has been shown to mediate the bundling of cortical axons and repel the axonal growth of retinal ganglia axons. It is found in a variety of adult tissues of BRAIN; HEART; and KIDNEY.Ophthalmoscopy: Examination of the interior of the eye with an ophthalmoscope.Nanotechnology: The development and use of techniques to study physical phenomena and construct structures in the nanoscale size range or smaller.Mars: The fourth planet in order from the sun. Its two natural satellites are Deimos and Phobos. It is one of the four inner or terrestrial planets of the solar system.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Photography: Method of making images on a sensitized surface by exposure to light or other radiant energy.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Aluminum Oxide: An oxide of aluminum, occurring in nature as various minerals such as bauxite, corundum, etc. It is used as an adsorbent, desiccating agent, and catalyst, and in the manufacture of dental cements and refractories.Microscopy, Confocal: A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.Visual Pathways: Set of cell bodies and nerve fibers conducting impulses from the eyes to the cerebral cortex. It includes the RETINA; OPTIC NERVE; optic tract; and geniculocalcarine tract.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Visual Fields: The total area or space visible in a person's peripheral vision with the eye looking straightforward.Extraterrestrial Environment: The environment outside the earth or its atmosphere. The environment may refer to a closed cabin (such as a space shuttle or space station) or to space itself, the moon, or other planets.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Lasers: An optical source that emits photons in a coherent beam. Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER) is brought about using devices that transform light of varying frequencies into a single intense, nearly nondivergent beam of monochromatic radiation. Lasers operate in the infrared, visible, ultraviolet, or X-ray regions of the spectrum.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Microscopy: The use of instrumentation and techniques for visualizing material and details that cannot be seen by the unaided eye. It is usually done by enlarging images, transmitted by light or electron beams, with optical or magnetic lenses that magnify the entire image field. With scanning microscopy, images are generated by collecting output from the specimen in a point-by-point fashion, on a magnified scale, as it is scanned by a narrow beam of light or electrons, a laser, a conductive probe, or a topographical probe.Ice: The solid substance formed by the FREEZING of water.Polystyrenes: Polymerized forms of styrene used as a biocompatible material, especially in dentistry. They are thermoplastic and are used as insulators, for injection molding and casting, as sheets, plates, rods, rigid forms and beads.Cell Shape: The quality of surface form or outline of CELLS.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Corneal Diseases: Diseases of the cornea.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Regression (Psychology): A return to earlier, especially to infantile, patterns of thought or behavior, or stage of functioning, e.g., feelings of helplessness and dependency in a patient with a serious physical illness. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994).Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.Scalp: The outer covering of the calvaria. It is composed of several layers: SKIN; subcutaneous connective tissue; the occipitofrontal muscle which includes the tendinous galea aponeurotica; loose connective tissue; and the pericranium (the PERIOSTEUM of the SKULL).Geology: The science of the earth and other celestial bodies and their history as recorded in the rocks. It includes the study of geologic processes of an area such as rock formations, weathering and erosion, and sedimentation. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Pleasure: Sensation of enjoyment or gratification.Touch: Sensation of making physical contact with objects, animate or inanimate. Tactile stimuli are detected by MECHANORECEPTORS in the skin and mucous membranes.Deaf-Blind Disorders: The absence of both hearing and vision.Tissue Engineering: Generating tissue in vitro for clinical applications, such as replacing wounded tissues or impaired organs. The use of TISSUE SCAFFOLDING enables the generation of complex multi-layered tissues and tissue structures.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Aluminum Silicates: Any of the numerous types of clay which contain varying proportions of Al2O3 and SiO2. They are made synthetically by heating aluminum fluoride at 1000-2000 degrees C with silica and water vapor. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)Sulfanilic Acids: Aminobenzenesulfonic acids. Organic acids that are used in the manufacture of dyes and organic chemicals and as reagents.Ostrea: A genus of oysters in the family OSTREIDAE, which includes the edible true oyster, Ostrea edulis.Retinal Ganglion Cells: Neurons of the innermost layer of the retina, the internal plexiform layer. They are of variable sizes and shapes, and their axons project via the OPTIC NERVE to the brain. A small subset of these cells act as photoreceptors with projections to the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEUS, the center for regulating CIRCADIAN RHYTHM.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Visual Cortex: Area of the OCCIPITAL LOBE concerned with the processing of visual information relayed via VISUAL PATHWAYS.Cell Count: The number of CELLS of a specific kind, usually measured per unit volume or area of sample.Appetitive Behavior: Animal searching behavior. The variable introductory phase of an instinctive behavior pattern or sequence, e.g., looking for food, or sequential courtship patterns prior to mating.Cell Culture Techniques: Methods for maintaining or growing CELLS in vitro.Esophageal Spasm, Diffuse: A hypermotility disorder of the ESOPHAGUS that is characterized by spastic non-peristaltic responses to SWALLOWING; CHEST PAIN; and DYSPHAGIA.Silicon: A trace element that constitutes about 27.6% of the earth's crust in the form of SILICON DIOXIDE. It does not occur free in nature. Silicon has the atomic symbol Si, atomic number 14, and atomic weight [28.084; 28.086].Microscopy, Scanning Tunneling: A type of scanning probe microscopy in which a very sharp conducting needle is swept just a few angstroms above the surface of a sample. The tiny tunneling current that flows between the sample and the needle tip is measured, and from this are produced three-dimensional topographs. Due to the poor electron conductivity of most biological samples, thin metal coatings are deposited on the sample.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Porosity: Condition of having pores or open spaces. This often refers to bones, bone implants, or bone cements, but can refer to the porous state of any solid substance.Fingers: Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.Ephrin-A2: A GLYCOINOSITOL PHOSPHOLIPID MEMBRANE ANCHOR-containing ephrin with a high affinity for the EPHA3 RECEPTOR. Early in embryogenesis it is expressed at high levels in the MESENCEPHALON; SOMITES; branchial arches, and LIMB BUDS.Somatosensory Cortex: Area of the parietal lobe concerned with receiving sensations such as movement, pain, pressure, position, temperature, touch, and vibration. It lies posterior to the central sulcus.Osseointegration: The growth action of bone tissue as it assimilates surgically implanted devices or prostheses to be used as either replacement parts (e.g., hip) or as anchors (e.g., endosseous dental implants).Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Physical Stimulation: Act of eliciting a response from a person or organism through physical contact.Evoked Potentials: Electrical responses recorded from nerve, muscle, SENSORY RECEPTOR, or area of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM following stimulation. They range from less than a microvolt to several microvolts. The evoked potential can be auditory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, AUDITORY), somatosensory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, SOMATOSENSORY), visual (EVOKED POTENTIALS, VISUAL), or motor (EVOKED POTENTIALS, MOTOR), or other modalities that have been reported.Silicon Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain silicon as an integral part of the molecule.Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Nanofibers: Submicron-sized fibers with diameters typically between 50 and 500 nanometers. The very small dimension of these fibers can generate a high surface area to volume ratio, which makes them potential candidates for various biomedical and other applications.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Thalamus: Paired bodies containing mostly GRAY MATTER and forming part of the lateral wall of the THIRD VENTRICLE of the brain.Glaucoma: An ocular disease, occurring in many forms, having as its primary characteristics an unstable or a sustained increase in the intraocular pressure which the eye cannot withstand without damage to its structure or impairment of its function. The consequences of the increased pressure may be manifested in a variety of symptoms, depending upon type and severity, such as excavation of the optic disk, hardness of the eyeball, corneal anesthesia, reduced visual acuity, seeing of colored halos around lights, disturbed dark adaptation, visual field defects, and headaches. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Auditory Perception: The process whereby auditory stimuli are selected, organized, and interpreted by the organism.Models, Anatomic: Three-dimensional representation to show anatomic structures. Models may be used in place of intact animals or organisms for teaching, practice, and study.Microscopy, Scanning Probe: Scanning microscopy in which a very sharp probe is employed in close proximity to a surface, exploiting a particular surface-related property. When this property is local topography, the method is atomic force microscopy (MICROSCOPY, ATOMIC FORCE), and when it is local conductivity, the method is scanning tunneling microscopy (MICROSCOPY, SCANNING TUNNELING).Optics and Photonics: A specialized field of physics and engineering involved in studying the behavior and properties of light and the technology of analyzing, generating, transmitting, and manipulating ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION in the visible, infrared, and ultraviolet range.Deglutition: The act of taking solids and liquids into the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT through the mouth and throat.Occipital Lobe: Posterior portion of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES responsible for processing visual sensory information. It is located posterior to the parieto-occipital sulcus and extends to the preoccipital notch.Optic Nerve Diseases: Conditions which produce injury or dysfunction of the second cranial or optic nerve, which is generally considered a component of the central nervous system. Damage to optic nerve fibers may occur at or near their origin in the retina, at the optic disk, or in the nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, or lateral geniculate nuclei. Clinical manifestations may include decreased visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, impaired color vision, and an afferent pupillary defect.Coated Materials, Biocompatible: Biocompatible materials usually used in dental and bone implants that enhance biologic fixation, thereby increasing the bond strength between the coated material and bone, and minimize possible biological effects that may result from the implant itself.Refractive Surgical Procedures: Surgical procedures employed to correct REFRACTIVE ERRORS such as MYOPIA; HYPEROPIA; or ASTIGMATISM. These may involve altering the curvature of the CORNEA; removal or replacement of the CRYSTALLINE LENS; or modification of the SCLERA to change the axial length of the eye.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Acoustic Stimulation: Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.Haplosporida: A phylum of EUKARYOTES in the RHIZARIA group. They are small endoparasites of marine invertebrates. Spores are structurally complex but without polar filaments or tubes.Medical Illustration: The field which deals with illustrative clarification of biomedical concepts, as in the use of diagrams and drawings. The illustration may be produced by hand, photography, computer, or other electronic or mechanical methods.Plant Dispersal: The physical distribution of plants in various forms and stages of development through time and space.Echinostomatidae: A family of flukes (TREMATODA) characterized by a collar of spines at their anterior end. The body is elongated and is covered with spines, and the two suckers are usually close together. (Noble et al., Parasitology: the Biology of Animal Parasites, 6th ed, p183)Diagnostic Techniques, Ophthalmological: Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases of the eye or of vision disorders.Korea: Former kingdom, located on Korea Peninsula between Sea of Japan and Yellow Sea on east coast of Asia. In 1948, the kingdom ceased and two independent countries were formed, divided by the 38th parallel.Cell Size: The quantity of volume or surface area of CELLS.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Tissue Scaffolds: Cell growth support structures composed of BIOCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS. They are specially designed solid support matrices for cell attachment in TISSUE ENGINEERING and GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION uses.Membranes, Artificial: Artificially produced membranes, such as semipermeable membranes used in artificial kidney dialysis (RENAL DIALYSIS), monomolecular and bimolecular membranes used as models to simulate biological CELL MEMBRANES. These membranes are also used in the process of GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION.Histological Techniques: Methods of preparing tissue for examination and study of the origin, structure, function, or pathology.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Microtechnology: Manufacturing technology for making microscopic devices in the micrometer range (typically 1-100 micrometers), such as integrated circuits or MEMS. The process usually involves replication and parallel fabrication of hundreds or millions of identical structures using various thin film deposition techniques and carried out in environmentally-controlled clean rooms.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Evoked Potentials, Auditory: The electric response evoked in the CEREBRAL CORTEX by ACOUSTIC STIMULATION or stimulation of the AUDITORY PATHWAYS.Auditory Cortex: The region of the cerebral cortex that receives the auditory radiation from the MEDIAL GENICULATE BODY.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Nerve Net: A meshlike structure composed of interconnecting nerve cells that are separated at the synaptic junction or joined to one another by cytoplasmic processes. In invertebrates, for example, the nerve net allows nerve impulses to spread over a wide area of the net because synapses can pass information in any direction.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Receptor, EphA4: An eph family receptor found in variety of tissues including BRAIN. During embryogenesis, EphA4 receptor exhibits a diverse spatial and temporal patterns of expression suggesting its role in multiple developmental processes.Models, Neurological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the neurological system, processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Polymers: Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).Molecular Conformation: The characteristic three-dimensional shape of a molecule.Intraocular Pressure: The pressure of the fluids in the eye.Acrylic ResinsAdhesiveness: A property of the surface of an object that makes it stick to another surface.Alpha Rhythm: Brain waves characterized by a relatively high voltage or amplitude and a frequency of 8-13 Hz. They constitute the majority of waves recorded by EEG registering the activity of the parietal and occipital lobes when the individual is awake, but relaxed with the eyes closed.Esophagus: The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Wheat Germ Agglutinin-Horseradish Peroxidase Conjugate: The lectin wheatgerm agglutinin conjugated to the enzyme HORSERADISH PEROXIDASE. It is widely used for tracing neural pathways.Dental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.Keratoplasty, Penetrating: Partial or total replacement of all layers of a central portion of the cornea.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.Evoked Potentials, Visual: The electric response evoked in the cerebral cortex by visual stimulation or stimulation of the visual pathways.Tomography, Optical Coherence: An imaging method using LASERS that is used for mapping subsurface structure. When a reflective site in the sample is at the same optical path length (coherence) as the reference mirror, the detector observes interference fringes.Reinforcement (Psychology): The strengthening of a conditioned response.Social Control Policies: Decisions for determining and guiding present and future objectives from among alternatives.Friction: Surface resistance to the relative motion of one body against the rubbing, sliding, rolling, or flowing of another with which it is in contact.Wettability: The quality or state of being wettable or the degree to which something can be wet. This is also the ability of any solid surface to be wetted when in contact with a liquid whose surface tension is reduced so that the liquid spreads over the surface of the solid.Corpus Callosum: Broad plate of dense myelinated fibers that reciprocally interconnect regions of the cortex in all lobes with corresponding regions of the opposite hemisphere. The corpus callosum is located deep in the longitudinal fissure.Forelimb: A front limb of a quadruped. (The Random House College Dictionary, 1980)Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Saimiri: A genus of the family CEBIDAE consisting of four species: S. boliviensis, S. orstedii (red-backed squirrel monkey), S. sciureus (common squirrel monkey), and S. ustus. They inhabit tropical rain forests in Central and South America. S. sciureus is used extensively in research studies.Space Perception: The awareness of the spatial properties of objects; includes physical space.Aberrometry: The use of an aberrometer to measure eye tissue imperfections or abnormalities based on the way light passes through the eye which affects the ability of the eye to focus properly.Silicon Dioxide: Transparent, tasteless crystals found in nature as agate, amethyst, chalcedony, cristobalite, flint, sand, QUARTZ, and tridymite. The compound is insoluble in water or acids except hydrofluoric acid.Paramphistomatidae: A family of flukes of the class Trematoda found in the intestinal tract and liver of animals and man. Some of the genera are Homalagaster, Gastrodiscus, Paramphistomum, Watsonius, Nilocotyle, Gigantocotyle, Gastrothylax, Macropotrema, Ceylonocotyle, Zygocotyle, Cotylophoron, and Calicophoron.Anatomy, Comparative: The comparative study of animal structure with regard to homologous organs or parts. (Stedman, 25th ed)Transducers, Pressure: Transducers that are activated by pressure changes, e.g., blood pressure.Trypsin: A serine endopeptidase that is formed from TRYPSINOGEN in the pancreas. It is converted into its active form by ENTEROPEPTIDASE in the small intestine. It catalyzes hydrolysis of the carboxyl group of either arginine or lysine. EC 3.4.21.4.Receptor, EphA5: An eph family receptor found primarily in differentiated neuronal tissues. Several isoforms of EphA5 receptor occur due to multiple alternative RNA splicing. The protein is prominently expressed in the NEURONS of the LIMBIC SYSTEM during development and throughout adult life, suggesting its role in the plasticity of limbic structure and function.ShoesCerebellum: The part of brain that lies behind the BRAIN STEM in the posterior base of skull (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR). It is also known as the "little brain" with convolutions similar to those of CEREBRAL CORTEX, inner white matter, and deep cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain balance, and learn motor skills.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Eye Enucleation: The surgical removal of the eyeball leaving the eye muscles and remaining orbital contents intact.Animal Distribution: A process by which animals in various forms and stages of development are physically distributed through time and space.Nerve Fibers: Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Carbocyanines: Compounds that contain three methine groups. They are frequently used as cationic dyes used for differential staining of biological materials.Cytological Techniques: Methods used to study CELLS.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted: Computer-assisted processing of electric, ultrasonic, or electronic signals to interpret function and activity.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Nicotine: Nicotine is highly toxic alkaloid. It is the prototypical agonist at nicotinic cholinergic receptors where it dramatically stimulates neurons and ultimately blocks synaptic transmission. Nicotine is also important medically because of its presence in tobacco smoke.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Refractive Errors: Deviations from the average or standard indices of refraction of the eye through its dioptric or refractive apparatus.Esophageal Achalasia: A motility disorder of the ESOPHAGUS in which the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER (near the CARDIA) fails to relax resulting in functional obstruction of the esophagus, and DYSPHAGIA. Achalasia is characterized by a grossly contorted and dilated esophagus (megaesophagus).DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Radar: A system using beamed and reflected radio signals to and from an object in such a way that range, bearing, and other characteristics of the object may be determined.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Lipid Bilayers: Layers of lipid molecules which are two molecules thick. Bilayer systems are frequently studied as models of biological membranes.
The city's topography is very flat, making flooding a recurring problem for its residents. The city stands about 50 feet (15 m ... and the Texas Medical Center, while some portions of northern Houston and Eastern Houston have been gentrified and also have ... Houston's topography is further defined by a large number of creeks and ditches. Overall, this intricate system of waterways is ... of medical facilities, of gangbuster enterprises-is located 165 miles to the east of Texas's pink-granite dome." - The first ...
The entire district falling in Sai Sub-basin of the Ganges basin represents flat topography. The irrigation in the district ... Medical College in the city is proposed. Trauma Center is proposed in government hospital. There are 538 government health care ...
The topography of Flatwoods is uncharacteristic to eastern Kentucky in that it consists of flat to rolling land on a single ... Emergency medical service is provoded by Greenup County Emergency Medical Services. Flatwoods Fire Department (Station 100) is ... Flatwoods is named for the area's unique topography, a belt of flat wooded land in the ancient Teays River valley on an ... The availability of flat level land and low tax rates made Flatwoods a local hot spot of new construction in the 1950s and ...
The municipality's terrain is relatively flat, with slope ranging from 0 to 3%. Due to the flat topography, the land is suited ... Medical and dental clinics also serve the municipality. Ricefields Governor Umali covered courts, gymnasium "Municipality". ...
Many residents owning private homes and flats can be found all over the municipality and its precinct areas such as organized ... Due to the hilly topography and the frequent rains, the town lacks effective drainage systems. The only sewerage formerly in ... The town has reputable private hospitals and medical centers. These include Hema Hospital, Getembe Hospital, Christa Marianne ... preference for owner-occupancy homes over purchasing flats or homes built by the government or the municipality. The ...
Post-graduate medical students are allotted posts here. The Seth VC Gandhi & MA Vora Municipal General Hospital popularly known ... There was major change in the geography and topography in the 1940s. The thick mangroves in between the pipeline and railway ... The available open space was gradually taken up for development of buildings with flats ( then popularly known as the Block ... The last major development which brought about a change in Rajawadi's demography and topography took place in the 1970s and ...
This isolation also caused problems with medical care; it took such a long time to get to the farms that when children fell ... There were few trees, and the flat land stretched out for miles and miles. Some settlers specifically spoke of the wind that ... The level of isolation depended on the topography and geography of the region. Most examples of prairie madness come from the ...
Like its namesake, Plainfield's topography is generally flat. Thousands of years ago, land in greater Plainfield used to be ... One route terminates in the Illinois Medical District and the other in Chicago's East Loop. Plainfield Community Consolidated ... The lake left behind a very flat landscape. Much of downtown Plainfield has an above sea level elevation of around 600-625 feet ...
The topography of Motrico is marked by Mt. Arno (608 m), which rises above the town. It is a mass of limestone covered with oak ... Flat land at the Saturraran river mouth has provided development space. The main business of the municipality is currently a ... canning factory Yurrita e Hijos SA,; Metec Motric SA, which manufactures medical instruments, and the Katealegaia workshop for ...
The islands of the city are flat and low-lying and are primarily composed of Ryukyuan limestone. The land area of the city of ... The only settlement on Tsuken is located in the southwest of the island, which is home to a post office, medical clinic, an ... The island has an uneven topography with few natural inlets. The three settlements on the island are Hama on the northwest ... Ukibara is primarily flat, it reaches an altitude of 12 metres (39 ft). The island composed of quaternary Ryukyu limestone. ...
The combination of the flat topography and the underlying clay resulted in extensive peat bogs developing along the Mersey ... and the head was put in the care of the Manchester Medical School. The discovery of the nearby Lindow Man in 1984 generated ... The drainage channels, still required today, give the area its distinctive flat landscape broken up by ditches instead of ...
The topography of the district is a flat plain undulating with shallow river valleys. The main permanently flowing rivers are ... A cotton mill was operational near Karanja Kala but has now been replaced by a medical college (Under construction) and there ...
So-named, the Nineveh Plains have a topography that's made up of relatively flat, fertile plains which lie on the foothills of ... In addition, agriculture and medical clinics received financial help from the Assyrian diaspora. As attacks on Christians ...
A flat trajectory also made it more difficult to shoot through a tree canopy. Two of these guns were flown to Dobodura on 20 ... Topography precluded the prospect of developing an overland route for motor transport. Supply was limited by the number of ... As a result, only essential equipment, ammunition and medical supplies were dropped with parachutes. Rations and other supplies ... The flat terrain, with dense jungle or open strips of tall grass, provided no vantage point from which to observe and adjust ...
Topography. The South West Coast Path National Trail passes through the village and gives access for walkers to the spectacular ... In one area of the village high on the side of the hill and about 100 feet above the flat area of the village, excavations for ... and rolls of perfectly white cotton for other companies to make such products as tampons and other medical/surgical products. ... At similar time in the flat area of the village, excavations for foundations revealed large rounded and smooth stones which ...
As DHM measures the 3D surface topography over the full field of view within a single camera acquisition, there is no need for ... Examples of bio-medical applications are: Label-free cell counting in adherent cell cultures. Digital holographic microscopy ... Flatness calibration of reflection type systems requires the use of a perfectly flat sample. The very short time needed to grab ... In reflection DHM, the phase shift image forms a topography image of the object. Transparent objects, like living biological ...
Flicks are often used to quickly transfer the ball to an attacker when defence inhibits a flat pass. Besides, the technique of ... If a field player is injured during a penalty corner and has to leave the field for medical attention, a replacement payer ... Along with changes in stick topography, as the drag flick became more prolific, it introduced the specialist drag flicker into ...
It is part of the Gulf Coastal Plain physiographic region, characterized by relatively flat topography. Except for the Memphis ... Tennessee Medical Association: 35-38. "Tennessee State Constitution, Article VI, Section 2" (PDF). Tennessee Blue Book. p. 547 ...
Given this topography, fighting the Spanish forces became a very difficult task. The Cuban forces fought daily in what is ... Matanzas has a flat terrain and was crisscrossed by railroad lines facilitating effective movements of Spanish troops from the ... He went to Madrid to validate his medical degree in Spain, and on May 30, 1888, he was validated by the Spanish Ministerio de ...
Daly, Reginald A. (1946). "Origin of the Moon and Its Topography". Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society. 90 (2): ... Chamberlin, Wellman (1947). The Round Earth on Flat Paper: Map Projections Used by Cartographers. Washington, D.C.: National ... English medical historian Faiza Al-Kharafi, Kuwaiti electrochemist March 8 - Frederick W. Lanchester (born 1868), English ...
Because of Dubuque's varied topography, several of the parks feature panoramic views of the city, including: Cleveland Park, ... Botanical Gardens Maus Park McAleece Sports Complex Medical Associates Greenbelt Miller-Riverview Park Murphy Park Orange Park ... Bergfeld Recreation Area Burden Park Cancer Survivor Park Cleveland Park Comiskey Park Dog Park Eagle Point Park Falk Park Flat ...
Its topography ranges from flat, level, very gently sloping to gently undulating to moderately sloping or rolling. Basically 70 ... Cotabato Regional and Medical Center - Sinsuat Avenue. Notre Dame Hospital - Sinsuat Avenue Cotabato Medical Specialist ...
Guru Gobind Singh Medical College, Faidkot Sant Baba Karnail Dass Medical Charitable Hospital, Vivek Ashram Dasmesh Institute ... The topography of the district is plain, with only 1.4% of its area under forest cover. As of 2011[update] India census, ... It is a low-lying flat area. The surface of the district is depositional plain which was formed by alleviation by the rivers ... Guru Gobind Singh Medical College and Hospital was established in the year 1973. Dasmesh Institute of Research & Dental ...
The topography of Nanticoke is hilly. The city can be divided into several sections: Honey Pot (northwestern Nanticoke), ... Nanticoke faced a projected $700,000 deficit that year, with revenues flat and falling far behind expenses. At its height, in ... It provides a variety of services, including fire extinguishment, rescue, and emergency medical services. The department also ...
The racecourse serves flat racing in the spring and summer months. Thirsk Cricket Club was founded in 1851 and play in the ... Bulmer's Topography, History and Directory (Private and Commercial) of North Yorkshire 1890. S&N Publishing. 1890. pp. 816-831 ... The adjoining village of Sowerby provides the town with its medical practices, cinema, town hall building and swimming pool. ... nursery section and medical facilities. Due to rises in the school population, some temporary build classrooms have also been ...
Smith, Margot W. A Guide to the Delineation of Medical Care Regions, Medical Trade Areas and Hospital Service Areas. Public ... The Fens of East Anglia in the UK also provide a large expanse of flat land with no natural barriers to settlement development ... The validity of the place theory may vary with local factors, such as climate, topography, history of development, ... Smith was able to delineate medical care regions (the range), describe the hierarchy of medical services, the population base ...
The goal is systematically engineer the surface chemistry, energy and topography of biomaterial scaffolds to mimic the fetal ... cells cultured on chemically modified PSi and flat silicon wafer surfaces. ... Book Title: Safety of Nanoparticles: From Manufacturing to Medical Applications. Author List: DeLouise, L.A., Mortensen, L.; ... and biological and medical sciences. This interdisciplinary approach provides a firm basis for the investigation and ...
The citys topography is very flat, making flooding a recurring problem for its residents. The city stands about 50 feet (15 m ... and the Texas Medical Center, while some portions of northern Houston and Eastern Houston have been gentrified and also have ... Houstons topography is further defined by a large number of creeks and ditches. Overall, this intricate system of waterways is ... of medical facilities, of gangbuster enterprises-is located 165 miles to the east of Texass pink-granite dome." - The first ...
What is dioptric power? Meaning of dioptric power medical term. What does dioptric power mean? ... Looking for online definition of dioptric power in the Medical Dictionary? dioptric power explanation free. ... Corneas with a steep surface slope have a small radius of curvature and high dioptric power, while corneas with a flat surface ... Corneal topography in optometric practice. Accommodation is the process whereby the crystalline lens changes its dioptric power ...
The entire district falling in Sai Sub-basin of the Ganges basin represents flat topography. The irrigation in the district ... Medical College in the city is proposed. Trauma Center is proposed in government hospital. There are 538 government health care ...
Boosting medical laser offerings, Quantel Medical acquires Optotek Medical. Optotek Medical specializes in developing optical ... Photometric stereo imaging "reads" the topography of a surface by measuring distances between it and multiple light sources. It ... The approach promises to highlight flat lesions and other growths that traditional endoscopy typically misses. ... a community of medical researchers in Boston, MA, and Madrid. But, he explains, recent studies show that nonpolypoid lesions ...
... a state-of-the-art naturopathic medical clinic. The medical facility is located on the first floor of the newly expanded 155 ... flat panel monitors mounted on columns. The columns are dispersed throughout the open office, and messages broadcast on the ... changes in topography, and view corridors, contribute greatly to a successful campus plan. Master planning of the campus for ... BOMA Conference Medical Office Buildings and Healthcare Facilities Conference May 5-7 Hyatt Regency Chicago, Ill. Plan now to ...
Anopheline habitats in areas with steep topography are expected to differ from those in flat, low-altitude regions. Therefore, ... Dr Hunter is a medical entomologist and professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, Brock University, Canada. Her ... We define the term highland malaria to mean all malaria that occurs in regions with steep topography. Using geographic ... Funding for medical entomology research was so poor and unreliable that R. Levi Castillo, who had previously documented many ...
What is Platyhelminthes? Meaning of Platyhelminthes medical term. What does Platyhelminthes mean? ... Looking for online definition of Platyhelminthes in the Medical Dictionary? Platyhelminthes explanation free. ... Surface topography of the anterior adhesive apparatus of the gill monogenean parasite Diplectanum sp. diesing, 1858, with some ... Reise K: Experimental sediment disturbances on a tidal flat: Responses of free-living Platyhelminthes and small Polychaeta.. ...
By engineering the scanning architecture of an OCT system, high-precision metrology of films of either flat or spherical ... 5.2 Film interface and thickness topography. From 3-D volumetric imaging data of film samples, accurate topography of the ... Optical Coherence Tomography and Its Non-medical Applications. Edited by Michael Wang ... In the OCT sample arm, (a) a film sample and a reference flat are imaged together, and (b) the reference flat alone is imaged ...
... as compared to the HA bioceramics with flat and dense surface. Moreover, mnHA bioceramics stimulated gene expression of low- ... surface topography, periodontal ligament stem cells, Wnt signaling pathway, bioceramics, periodontal reconstruction ... Top Priority Clinical Medical Center of Shanghai Municipal Commission of Health and Family Planning, Ninth Peoples Hospital ... Dove Medical Press is part of Taylor & Francis Group, the Academic Publishing Division of Informa PLC Copyright 2017 Informa ...
The aim of this work is to develop a supportive scaffold with a favorable topography to aid functional RPE monolayer ... Facile subretinal implantation of flat 200 nm fiber membranes was achieved by electrospinning them onto a porous rigid-elastic ... 2 Department of Biomaterials, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.. *3 Department of Ophthalmology, ... The aim of this work is to develop a supportive scaffold with a favorable topography to aid functional RPE monolayer ...
The initial base curve and skirt of trial lens were selected on the basis of the corneal topography, starting on the flat K for ... MATERIALS AND METHODS The medical records of patients fit with the SynergEyes contact lenses on the Cornea Service at Wills Eye ... with steep Ks by topography ranging from 47 to 77 D. Two eyes had very irregular poor quality topographies so the Ks could not ... The final SynergEyes base curve was usually flatter than the flat K (36 of 61 eyes, 59%), and the base curvewas equal to flat K ...
Gold Coat Ophthalmic offers tomography and topography machines such as Oculus Easygraph, Oculus Keratograph, Oculus Pentacam ... Topography also uses non-invasive medical imaging, but focuses instead on the outer structure of the eye, including measuring ... A map of the cornea can reveal any flat, steep, or uneven areas that could indicate vision loss. Topography is not a routine ... Corneal topography is also essential to fitting contact lenses, as lenses must be assessed and prescribed both per patient and ...
The iDesign advanced wavescan studio (Abbott Medical Optics Inc.) is a Hartmann test-based aberrometer. In a pupil size of 7 mm ... The advantage of a Hartmann test-based topography is that there are no projected rings on the cornea, which could make ... To compare the corneal curvature in the Cartesian coordinate system, the keratometry values (flat K, steep K, and steep axis) ... The iDesign (iDesign System, Abbott Medical Optics Inc., USA) is a high-density wavefront aberrometer that is equipped with a ...
Measurements using the Atlas Corneal Topography System (Carl Zeiss Meditec) showed a steep K of 45.44 D @ 104º and a flat K of ... Medical Director and Lead Surgeon, Augentagesklinik, Rheine and Greven, Germany * CEO, ProVisus Research Institute, Augenärzte ... Topography-guided conductive keratoplasty: treatment for advanced keratoconus. Am J Ophthalmol. 2010;150(4):481-489.e1. ... He had no significant ocular surgical or medical history. His father stated that the patient rubbed his eyes aggressively at ...
CORNEAL TOPOGRAPHY (Zeiss Atlas Pathfnder). The corneal curvature is measured using this diagnostic test. It will show the flat ... PUPILLOMETRY (Oasis Medical Colvard). An infrared pupillometer will be used in a dark room to check for your pupil size at ... Lukes Medical Center Global City. 2/F MAB 217 ROQUE Eye Clinic. Rizal Drive cor 5th Ave & 32nd St. Bonifacio Global City, ... Asian Hospital and Medical Center. 5/F MOB 509 ROQUE Eye Clinic. 2205 Civic Drive, Filinvest City. Alabang, Muntinlupa 1781. ...
All the topographies are observed to induce MSC osteogenic differentiation in the absence of osteogenic supplements. The ... It has been widely used as biomaterials in the pharmaceutical and medical fields as well as collagen, for example, tissue- ... Initial SEM observations revealed that BCCs produced dense ECM fibrils on nanotubular substrates, which were lacking on flat Ti ... L. Zhao, L. Liu, Z. Wu, Y. Zhang, and P. K. Chu, "Effects of micropitted/nanotubular titania topographies on bone mesenchymal ...
Increasing the fluence leads to a relatively flat surface with clear evidence of surface melting. The X-ray diffractograms of ... a cone-like topography develops in the inner dentin where tubules are parallel to the laser beam. When laser processing is ... Lasers in medical science, vol. 21, pp. 160-164, 2006.[Abstract] ... Faculty of Medical Sciences School of Ayurveda. Amritapuri * ... carried out in the outer dentin, because tubules are significantly tilted with respect to the laser beam, flat surfaces are ...
... to change from a flat to a grooved topography and an SMP substrate programmed to change from a grooved to a flat topography. ... Practical applications of these materials range from novel medical adhesives and sealants, and coatings for medical devices and ... This produced substrates with a temporary flat or a temporary grooved topography. C3H10T1/2 cells were allowed to attach for 5 ... a permanent surface topography of triangular grooves or between glass slides to produce films with a permanent flat topography ...
Topography. The South West Coast Path National Trail passes through the village and gives access for walkers to the spectacular ... In one area of the village high on the side of the hill and about 100 feet above the flat area of the village, excavations for ... and rolls of perfectly white cotton for other companies to make such products as tampons and other medical/surgical products. ... At similar time in the flat area of the village, excavations for foundations revealed large rounded and smooth stones which ...
10(A). Nevyas-Wallace wrote (medical record 7/26/99): "Impression: Topography shows central ablation, and no increase (in ... failed to correct the irregular astigmatism and qualitative disturbances in vision in association with an exceptionally flat ... Three other ophthalmologists seeing Dominic Karen Fung, M.D. (medical record 8/3/98), John Dugan, M.D. (medical record 8/25/98 ... medical records 4/27/98, 5/4/98), and nasal decentration in the right eye (medical record 7/6/98). ...
However, contact angles were significantly greater on all of the PAA compared to flat aluminum substrates, which consequently ... X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis suggested that the chemistry of PAA and flat aluminum surfaces were similar. ... Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Peoples Republic of China; 3Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, ... Dove Medical Press is part of Taylor & Francis Group, the Academic Publishing Division of Informa PLC Copyright 2017 Informa ...
Medical Device Link . Spotlight on IV Components The shielding performance of a spiral gasket has been combined with the ... Due to the viscosity of the conformal materials , the coating thickness was different for flat areas than for edges (Fig. 18d, ... Anticipation of dimensional issues caused by topography during photo lithography Although this approximation is valid for a ... Medical Device Link . conformational change in response to its environment, and is remarkably robust in resisting denaturation ...
The use of 3D allowed the observation of access constraints related to the topography and to calculate the slope. The use of ... A search using the medical subject heading terms marker and mesenteric ischemia or intestinal ischemia or superior mesenteric ... established in the hill and whose residents are susceptible to spend more energy than the other inhabitant living on flat ... Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg ...
SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR CORNEAL TOPOGRAPHY WITH FLAT PANEL DISPLAY. A conical topographer includes: a flat panel display ... MEDICAL SYSTEM. To provide a medical system that is easy to confirm a display screen and easy to switch an image. A medical ... BLINKING MULTIPLEXED LED STRAIN AND CHEMICAL SENSORS FOR IMPLANTED MEDICAL DEVICES. Implantable sensors are described that can ...
  • In conclusion, scaffolds with 200 nm fiber topography enhanced RPE culture, showed subretinal biocompatibility, and should thus be considered for future cell-based therapies in blinding retinal diseases. (nih.gov)
  • Practitioners interested in fitting CLASIKcn may choose to fit and design CLASIKcn lenses from Corneal Topography + Refractive Data, or Pre/Post-Surgical K's + Refractive Data, or through the utilization of the CLASIKcn Diagnostic Fitting Set which is available for purchase or through a loaner program from Art Optical. (constantcontact.com)
  • These are Clarity Medical Systems' Holos IntraOp and Alcon's WaveTec Vision Optiwave Refractive Analysis (ORA) with VerifEye. (aao.org)
  • The aim of this work is to develop a supportive scaffold with a favorable topography to aid functional RPE monolayer maintenance while being tolerated underneath the retina. (nih.gov)
  • The study of cell responses to such cues is important to understand complex cell functions, some diseases, and is basis for the development of new biomaterials for applications in medical implants or regenerative medicine. (reutlingen-university.de)
  • The host immune response against foreign materials, also known as the foreign body response, poses a significant challenge for implanted biomaterials and medical devices. (meducator.org)
  • biocompatibility refers to the ability of a biomaterial to perform its desired function with respect to a medical therapy, without eliciting any undesirable local or systemic effects in the recipient or beneficiary of that therapy but generating the most appropriate beneficial cellular or tissue response in that specific situation and optimising the clinically relevant performance of that therapy. (hindawi.com)
  • However, contact angles were significantly greater on all of the PAA compared to flat aluminum substrates, which consequently altered protein adsorption profiles. (dovepress.com)
  • The actin organization changes to a peripheral ring, resembling the classical actin distribution seen on homogeneous substrates, the patterned membrane topography disappears and the membrane is flat, and the cell area increases significantly. (europa.eu)
  • System calibration methods are described in Section 3 to ensure flat-field, distortion-free mapping of film samples. (intechopen.com)
  • people: University Hospital, Children's Medical Centre Methods: reflexes of download Harmful To Minors: The Perils Of Protecting environments was combined by a recurrent CR for Indo-European change, used by moment. (sankofaworldpublishers.com)
  • In both cases, we showed that for T cell adhesion mediated by T cell receptor (TCR) alone, global cell scale parameters like cell area depend only on the average density of the ligands, whereas local parameters like TCR /ZAP-70 organization, the actin distribution and membrane topography are severely altered on patterned as compared to homogeneously distributed ligands. (europa.eu)
  • To characterize the three-dimensional (3D) shape, volume distribution, and mirror symmetry of the right and left corneas at the scale of a large population, based on the integrated analysis of 3D corneal shape average maps and topography parameters. (arvojournals.org)
  • Research into the application and interpretation of medical images is usually the preserve of radiology and the medical sub-discipline relevant to medical condition or area of medical science ( neuroscience , cardiology , psychiatry, psychology, etc) under investigation. (bionity.com)
  • the device captured 45 to 65 percent of the cancer cells in the medium, compared with only 4 to 14 percent for the flat device. (innovations-report.com)
  • The nanopillar chip captured more than 10 times the amount of cells captured by the currently used flat structure," said lead study author Dr. Shutao Wang, a postdoctoral researcher at both the Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA. (innovations-report.com)
  • Medical imaging refers to the techniques and processes used to create images of the human body (or parts thereof) for clinical purposes ( medical procedures seeking to reveal, diagnose or examine disease) or medical science (including the study of normal anatomy and function). (bionity.com)
  • Just A fast physical and blood sample, and our medical experts will be able to precisely evaluate your medical issue and suggest Hormone Therapies that could boost your existence and perfectly-getting. (ampedpages.com)
  • By engineering the scanning architecture of an OCT system, high-precision metrology of films of either flat or spherical geometry is achieved. (intechopen.com)
  • Its possible key role in a host of diseases of the immune system has motivated medical research whereas its assembly, arising partly from simple underlying thermodynamic and elastic considerations has fascinated physicists. (europa.eu)
  • For example, Cassini is part of the TrueGuide system (see " Topography Plus Surgical Guidance ," below). (aao.org)
  • For instance, the bioactive-glass nanofibers have the ability to chemically bond with living bone tissue and have played a central role in the bone regeneration field, due to its excellent bioactivity, osteoconductivity, and even osteoinductivity [ 4 ], having been used in a variety of medical applications, such as implants in clinical bone repair and regeneration materials, bioactive coating of metallic implants in tissue engineering. (hindawi.com)
  • If there is suspected loss of bone, a CAT scan (computerized topography) may be ordered to get a clearer picture of the area. (moveforwardpt.com)
  • The applicant has requested council conditional use permits to allow a helistop accessory on the campus of Children's Hospital and Medical Center (CHMC) and at the Intramural Activities Field on the campus of the University of Washington. (laurelhurstcc.com)
  • Here, we have shown for the first time that a planar metasurface, based on aluminum-doped zinc oxide, can be achieved with an optical metasurface function but physically flat," said Dr Kai Sun, research lead. (electronicsworld.co.uk)
  • TTI Industries, a manufacturer of RF/microwave, hybrid and standard printed circuit boards (PCB) located in Anaheim, Calif., serves the RF, microwave, aerospace, defense, medical and satellite industries to create solutions for ever-advancing concepts and designs. (microwavejournal.com)
  • To provide morphological data that can aid the neuroprosthetic surgeon with this procedure, we investigated the fascicular topography of the human median nerve along the forearm and upper arm. (frontiersin.org)
  • TerraMetrics chose NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) terrain data to provide the 3D element. (techbriefs.com)
  • Measurement and recording techniques which are not primarily designed to produce images, such as electroencephalography ( EEG ) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) and others, but which produce data susceptible to be represented as maps (i.e. containing positional information), can be seen as forms of medical imaging. (bionity.com)
  • dreadful data will just please medical in your anti-matter of the articles you have enabled. (vortechonline.com)
  • Gastritis stage results from combining the extent of atrophy scored histologically with the topography of atrophy identified through biopsy mapping. (bmj.com)
  • Our society often discriminates or creates obstacles for individuals with medical problems, especially those with disorders that are misunderstood. (purpleday.org)
  • In the clinical context, medical imaging is generally equated to Radiology or "clinical imaging" and the medical practitioner responsible for interpreting (and sometimes acquiring) the images is a radiologist. (bionity.com)
  • Dennis Janisse, CPed, a certified pedorthist who is President and CEO of National Pedorthic Services, Inc., and is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Medical College of Wisconsin. (diabetesselfmanagement.com)
  • The presence of the river, the 'soft' water and permission for abstraction, encouraged an American company, 'Curity' to set up business in the village in the early 60's for the purposes of bleaching and processing imported raw cotton wool from the US into various products such as cotton wool balls, and rolls of perfectly white cotton for other companies to make such products as tampons and other medical/surgical products. (wikipedia.org)
  • In one area of the village high on the side of the hill and about 100 feet above the flat area of the village, excavations for 1m deep foundations of a house broke in to a pocket of sand and which was found to extend greater than 5m. (wikipedia.org)
  • At similar time in the flat area of the village, excavations for foundations revealed large rounded and smooth stones which were put down the wide water course having been present at some time rather than the small river that flows through the village now. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most PCBs are 2D and flat with a milled area or cavity. (microwavejournal.com)
  • The campus consists of several interconnected buildings, ranging from one to five stories above grade, that generally follow the site topography. (laurelhurstcc.com)