Pain emanating from below the RIBS and above the ILIUM.
A clinical syndrome with intermittent abdominal pain characterized by sudden onset and cessation that is commonly seen in infants. It is usually associated with obstruction of the INTESTINES; of the CYSTIC DUCT; or of the URINARY TRACT.
A severe intermittent and spasmodic pain in the lower back radiating to the groin, scrotum, and labia which is most commonly caused by a kidney stone (RENAL CALCULUS) passing through the URETER or by other urinary track blockage. It is often associated with nausea, vomiting, fever, restlessness, dull pain, frequent urination, and HEMATURIA.
Stones in the URETER that are formed in the KIDNEY. They are rarely more than 5 mm in diameter for larger renal stones cannot enter ureters. They are often lodged at the ureteral narrowing and can cause excruciating renal colic.
An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.
Short thick veins which return blood from the kidneys to the vena cava.
Presence of blood in the urine.
Sensation of discomfort, distress, or agony in the abdominal region.
Low-density crystals or stones in any part of the URINARY TRACT. Their chemical compositions often include CALCIUM OXALATE, magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite), CYSTINE, or URIC ACID.
A chronic inflammatory condition of the KIDNEY resulting in diffuse renal destruction, a grossly enlarged and nonfunctioning kidney associated with NEPHROLITHIASIS and KIDNEY STONES.
Abnormal enlargement or swelling of a KIDNEY due to dilation of the KIDNEY CALICES and the KIDNEY PELVIS. It is often associated with obstruction of the URETER or chronic kidney diseases that prevents normal drainage of urine into the URINARY BLADDER.
Formation of an infarct, which is NECROSIS in tissue due to local ISCHEMIA resulting from obstruction of BLOOD CIRCULATION, most commonly by a THROMBUS or EMBOLUS.
Formation of stones in any part of the URINARY TRACT, usually in the KIDNEY; URINARY BLADDER; or the URETER.
Aching sensation that persists for more than a few months. It may or may not be associated with trauma or disease, and may persist after the initial injury has healed. Its localization, character, and timing are more vague than with acute pain.
A form of therapy that employs a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach for easing the suffering and improving the quality of life of those experiencing pain.
Radiography of any part of the urinary tract.
A benign tumor containing vascular, adipose, and muscle elements. It occurs most often in the kidney with smooth muscle elements (angiolipoleiomyoma) in association with tuberous sclerosis. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Excision of kidney.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the ureter.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Stones in the KIDNEY, usually formed in the urine-collecting area of the kidney (KIDNEY PELVIS). Their sizes vary and most contains CALCIUM OXALATE.
Amount of stimulation required before the sensation of pain is experienced.
Inflammation of the KIDNEY involving the renal parenchyma (the NEPHRONS); KIDNEY PELVIS; and KIDNEY CALICES. It is characterized by ABDOMINAL PAIN; FEVER; NAUSEA; VOMITING; and occasionally DIARRHEA.
A heterogeneous group of hereditary and acquired disorders in which the KIDNEY contains one or more CYSTS unilaterally or bilaterally (KIDNEY, CYSTIC).
Pain during the period after surgery.
Acute or chronic pain in the lumbar or sacral regions, which may be associated with musculo-ligamentous SPRAINS AND STRAINS; INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; and other conditions.
Acute or chronic pain located in the posterior regions of the THORAX; LUMBOSACRAL REGION; or the adjacent regions.
Tumors or cancers of the KIDNEY.
Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.
One of a pair of thick-walled tubes that transports urine from the KIDNEY PELVIS to the URINARY BLADDER.
Discomfort or more intense forms of pain that are localized to the cervical region. This term generally refers to pain in the posterior or lateral regions of the neck.
Persistent pain that is refractory to some or all forms of treatment.
Pain in the pelvic region of genital and non-genital origin and of organic or psychogenic etiology. Frequent causes of pain are distension or contraction of hollow viscera, rapid stretching of the capsule of a solid organ, chemical irritation, tissue ischemia, and neuritis secondary to inflammatory, neoplastic, or fibrotic processes in adjacent organs. (Kase, Weingold & Gershenson: Principles and Practice of Clinical Gynecology, 2d ed, pp479-508)
The process by which PAIN is recognized and interpreted by the brain.
Pain in the facial region including orofacial pain and craniofacial pain. Associated conditions include local inflammatory and neoplastic disorders and neuralgic syndromes involving the trigeminal, facial, and glossopharyngeal nerves. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent facial pain as the primary manifestation of disease are referred to as FACIAL PAIN SYNDROMES.
Intensely discomforting, distressful, or agonizing sensation associated with trauma or disease, with well-defined location, character, and timing.
A type of pain that is perceived in an area away from the site where the pain arises, such as facial pain caused by lesion of the VAGUS NERVE, or throat problem generating referred pain in the ear.
Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.
Liquid by-product of excretion produced in the kidneys, temporarily stored in the bladder until discharge through the URETHRA.
The presence of bacteria in the urine which is normally bacteria-free. These bacteria are from the URINARY TRACT and are not contaminants of the surrounding tissues. Bacteriuria can be symptomatic or asymptomatic. Significant bacteriuria is an indicator of urinary tract infection.
Inflammatory responses of the epithelium of the URINARY TRACT to microbial invasions. They are often bacterial infections with associated BACTERIURIA and PYURIA.
Examination of urine by chemical, physical, or microscopic means. Routine urinalysis usually includes performing chemical screening tests, determining specific gravity, observing any unusual color or odor, screening for bacteriuria, and examining the sediment microscopically.
The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
The presence of white blood cells (LEUKOCYTES) in the urine. It is often associated with bacterial infections of the urinary tract. Pyuria without BACTERIURIA can be caused by TUBERCULOSIS, stones, or cancer.

Primary renal carcinoid natural history of the disease for ten years: case report. (1/58)

BACKGROUND: Primary renal carcinoid is extremely rare and there are few reports on the natural history of the disease. CASE PRESENTATION: A 68-year-old male with a right renal mass who lost to follow-up for ten years has been presented. His only complaint was a mild flank pain. Upon admission to the hospital for his renal mass, he underwent a right radical nephrectomy and pathological examination revealed the diagnosis of primary renal carcinoid. CONCLUSIONS: In light of the presented case, primary renal carcinoma may have a prolonged natural history with no distant metastasis and any change in the quality of life of the patient.  (+info)

Hydronephrosis by an aberrant renal artery: a case report. (2/58)

Ureteropelvic junction obstruction is usually intrinsic and is most common in children. Aberrant renal arteries are present in about 30% of individuals. Aberrant renal arteries to the inferior pole cross anteriorly to the ureter and may cause hydronephrosis. To the best of our knowledge, although there are some papers about aberrant renal arteries producing ureteropelvic junction obstruction, there is no report of a case which is diagnosed by the new modalities, such as computed tomography angiogram (CTA) or magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA). We describe a 36-year-old woman with right hydronephrosis. Kidney ultrasonogram and excretory urogram revealed right hydronephrosis. CTA and MRA clearly displayed an aberrant renal artery and hydronephrosis. The patient underwent surgical exploration. For the evaluation of hydronephrosis by an aberrant renal artery, use of CTA and MRA is advocated.  (+info)

Correlation of radiological and clinical features of metanephric neoplasms in adults. (3/58)

The main objective was to determine the clinical and radiological features of metanephric neoplasms. The tumors were diagnosed on histopathological examination. The clinical data and imaging features were retrospectively analyzed. Between 1998 and 2003, 3 patients underwent radical nephrectomy for renal masses turning out as metanephric neoplasms on histopathology. Two of these tumors were metanephric adenoma (MA) and one was metanephric adenofibroma (MAF). Clinical and radiological features were reviewed. All patients were adult females who presented with flank pain. Tumor was detected on screening ultrasound as a hyperechoic lesion. In all cases CT showed a hyper-attenuating exophytic lesion with cystic areas that enhanced with IV contrast. Based on combination of clinical and imaging features it may be possible to prospectively identify metanephric neoplasms and thus avoid unnecessary radical nephrectomy in favor of conservative surgery.  (+info)

Duration of symptoms and follow-up patterns of patients discharged from the emergency department after presenting with abdominal or flank pain. (4/58)

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the duration of symptoms and follow-up patterns of patients seen in emergency departments for abdominal or flank pain. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to measure the duration of symptoms and follow-up rate of patients discharged home from the emergency department after presenting with non-traumatic abdominal or flank pain. METHODS: We conducted a single-centre, prospective descriptive study of adult patients who presented to our emergency department with non-traumatic abdominal or flank pain and were discharged from the emergency department. We gathered clinical data during the index emergency department visit and conducted telephone interviews of subjects 2-5 weeks later. RESULTS: We reached 63 of 90 subjects (70%). The median duration of pain was 3 days after the emergency department visit. During the follow-up period, only 41% had followed-up with their family physician or primary care provider, although an additional 21% had planned to. Persistence of symptoms was common in the 37% of subjects who did not follow-up. CONCLUSION: Of subjects discharged from the emergency department after visits for non-traumatic abdominal or flank pain, most improve within several days. Fewer than half follow-up with a family practitioner or a primary care provider. Emergency department revisits are uncommon and often for unrelated problems.  (+info)

Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features of cricket bowler's side strain. (5/58)

The clinical features of 10 cases of lateral trunk muscle injury in first class cricket pace bowlers are described. Typically the injury occurs during a single delivery, is associated with considerable pain, and prevents the bowler from continuing. The clinical picture is typical of a muscular or musculotendinous injury. The most consistent clinical tests were focal tenderness on palpation and pain with resisted side flexion towards the painful side. The magnetic resonance image in 70% of cases was consistent with an injury to the internal oblique, the external oblique, or the transversalis muscles at or near their attachments to one or more of the lowest four ribs. The injury occurs on the non-bowling arm side. Recovery can be prolonged. The injury was a recurrence in six of the 10 cases. The biomechanics of the injury are not yet understood.  (+info)

Left flank pain as the sole manifestation of acute pancreatitis: a report of a case with an initial misdiagnosis. (6/58)

Acute pancreatitis is not an uncommon disease in an emergency department (ED). It manifests as upper abdominal pain, sometimes with radiation of pain to the back and flank region. Isolated left flank pain being the sole manifestation of acute pancreatitis is very rare and not previously identified in the literature. In this report, we present a case of acute pancreatitis presenting solely with left flank pain. Having negative findings on an ultrasound initially, she was misdiagnosed as having possible "acute pyelonephritis or other renal diseases". A second radiographic evaluation with computed tomography showed pancreatitis in the tail with abnormal fluid collected extending to the left peri-renal space. We performed a literature review and discussed this rare occurrence of acute pancreatitis. We also discussed the clinical pitfalls in this case.  (+info)

Prospective validation of a current algorithm including bedside US performed by emergency physicians for patients with acute flank pain suspected for renal colic. (7/58)

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to validate an algorithm recommended by current literature for the patients with acute flank pain and evaluate the validity of bedside ultrasonography (US) performed by emergency physicians (EP) as a part of this algorithm. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective validation study was carried out over a 5 month period in a tertiary care hospital adult emergency department (ED) with annual attendance of 55,000. Adult patients presenting to the ED with unilateral acute flank pain during the study period were enrolled into the study consecutively. Oral consent was obtained after the protocol was briefly explained to the patient and before the administration of analgesia. A protocol form was recorded for each patient enrolled into the study, and patients were followed up under the guidance of a previously designated algorithm in the ED. Data were analysed with SPSS software. The chi2 test was used to compare the dichotomised data of patients, diagnosed with and without stones, and to select the significant parameters to be used in the logistic regression. RESULTS: Of the 227 patients enrolled, 176 were proven to have urinary tract stones. There were 122 patients discharged from ED without further investigation except urinalysis and bedside US. Of these 122 directly discharged patients, 99 had a urinary stone, and the others did not have a life threatening disorder. Four of the 227 patients were admitted to the hospital. The remaining 51 patients did not have stones detected, and their pain subsided. Having a previous history of stones, radiation of pain to the groin, accompanying nausea, and detection of pelvicalyceal dilatation using bedside US performed by the EPs were found to be the most significant parameters in determining urinary stones in logistic regression analysis. Sensitivity and specificity of these parameters were: previous history of stones 59% and 66%, radiating pain to the groin 68% and 49%, nausea 71% and 51%, and detection of pelvicalyceal dilatation by bedside US 81% and 37%. CONCLUSION: Bedside US performed by EPs could be used safely in the evaluation of patients with acute flank pain as a part of a clinical algorithm. Previous history of urinary stones, radiation of pain to the groin, accompanying nausea. and detection of pelvicalyceal dilatation are major parameters and symptoms of urinary stone disease, and could be used in the algorithms.  (+info)

Successful renal transcatheter arterial embolization in three patients with symptomatic hydronephrosis due to ureteral obstruction. (8/58)

BACKGROUND: Conventional treatments for symptomatic enlargement of a nonfunctional hydronephrotic kidney caused by obstructive uropathy include surgical treatments. METHODS: Patients included a 67-year-old woman whose obstruction was caused by a lower urinary tract stone complicating spinal tuberculosis (patient 1); a 52-year-old man with compressive complete congenital obstruction crossing the ureteropelvic junction from an aberrant renal artery (patient 2); and a 19-year-old woman with essentially complete idiopathic congenital obstruction at the ureteropelvic junction (patient 3), who required antibiotics for pyelonephritis before embolization. The renal artery was embolized using platinum microcoils. RESULTS: Although the sensation of abdominal fullness diminished within approximately two week after TAE, it took one to two years until the embolized kidney size shrank from 1377+/-634 cm3 (range, 829 to 2072) to 43+/-46 cm3 (42 to 94) by the evaluation of computed tomography. Fever after embolization persisted for 5 days in patient 1, 3 in patient 2, and 9 in patient 3. Flank pain resolved within 5 days in all. Pyelonephritis and complications of treatment have not occurred. CONCLUSION: Embolization for this indication was safe and effective.  (+info)

Flank pain is defined as discomfort or pain located in the area of the body between the lower ribcage and the pelvis, specifically in the region of the abdomen that lies posterior to the axillary line (the line drawn from the underarm down the side of the body). This region contains several vital organs such as the kidneys, ureters, pancreas, colon, and parts of the reproductive system. Flank pain can be a symptom of various medical conditions affecting these organs, including but not limited to kidney stones, pyelonephritis (kidney infection), musculoskeletal issues, or irritable bowel syndrome. The intensity and character of flank pain may vary depending on the underlying cause, ranging from a dull ache to sharp stabbing sensations.

Colic is a term used to describe excessive, frequent crying or fussiness in a healthy infant, often lasting several hours a day and occurring several days a week. Although the exact cause of colic is unknown, it may be related to digestive issues, such as gas or indigestion. The medical community defines colic by the "Rule of Three": crying for more than three hours per day, for more than three days per week, and for longer than three weeks in an infant who is well-fed and otherwise healthy. It typically begins within the first few weeks of life and improves on its own, usually by age 3-4 months. While colic can be distressing for parents and caregivers, it does not cause any long-term harm to the child.

Renal colic is a type of abdominal pain that occurs due to the presence of a kidney stone or other obstruction in the urinary tract. It is typically described as a severe, cramping pain that radiates from the lower back or flank area down to the groin or genitals. The pain may be accompanied by nausea, vomiting, sweating, and frequent urination. Renal colic is caused by the contraction of smooth muscles in the ureter as they attempt to move the stone or obstruction out of the body. This can cause significant discomfort and often requires medical treatment to alleviate the pain and remove the obstruction.

Ureteral calculi, also known as ureteric stones or ureteral stones, refer to the presence of solid mineral deposits (calculi) within the ureters, the tubes that transport urine from the kidneys to the bladder. These calculi can vary in size and composition, and their formation is often associated with conditions such as dehydration, urinary tract infections, or metabolic disorders. Ureteral calculi may cause symptoms like severe pain, hematuria (blood in the urine), and obstruction of urine flow, potentially leading to serious complications if left untreated.

Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage. It is a complex phenomenon that can result from various stimuli, such as thermal, mechanical, or chemical irritation, and it can be acute or chronic. The perception of pain involves the activation of specialized nerve cells called nociceptors, which transmit signals to the brain via the spinal cord. These signals are then processed in different regions of the brain, leading to the conscious experience of pain. It's important to note that pain is a highly individual and subjective experience, and its perception can vary widely among individuals.

The renal veins are a pair of large veins that carry oxygen-depleted blood and waste products from the kidneys to the inferior vena cava, which is the largest vein in the body that returns blood to the heart. The renal veins are formed by the union of several smaller veins that drain blood from different parts of the kidney.

In humans, the right renal vein is shorter and passes directly into the inferior vena cava, while the left renal vein is longer and passes in front of the aorta before entering the inferior vena cava. The left renal vein also receives blood from the gonadal (testicular or ovarian) veins, suprarenal (adrenal) veins, and the lumbar veins.

It is important to note that the renal veins are vulnerable to compression by surrounding structures, such as the overlying artery or a tumor, which can lead to renal vein thrombosis, a serious condition that requires prompt medical attention.

Hematuria is a medical term that refers to the presence of blood in urine. It can be visible to the naked eye, which is called gross hematuria, or detected only under a microscope, known as microscopic hematuria. The blood in urine may come from any site along the urinary tract, including the kidneys, ureters, bladder, or urethra. Hematuria can be a symptom of various medical conditions, such as urinary tract infections, kidney stones, kidney disease, or cancer of the urinary tract. It is essential to consult a healthcare professional if you notice blood in your urine to determine the underlying cause and receive appropriate treatment.

Abdominal pain is defined as discomfort or painful sensation in the abdomen. The abdomen is the region of the body between the chest and the pelvis, and contains many important organs such as the stomach, small intestine, large intestine, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen. Abdominal pain can vary in intensity from mild to severe, and can be acute or chronic depending on the underlying cause.

Abdominal pain can have many different causes, ranging from benign conditions such as gastritis, indigestion, or constipation, to more serious conditions such as appendicitis, inflammatory bowel disease, or abdominal aortic aneurysm. The location, quality, and duration of the pain can provide important clues about its cause. For example, sharp, localized pain in the lower right quadrant of the abdomen may indicate appendicitis, while crampy, diffuse pain in the lower abdomen may suggest irritable bowel syndrome.

It is important to seek medical attention if you experience severe or persistent abdominal pain, especially if it is accompanied by other symptoms such as fever, vomiting, or bloody stools. A thorough physical examination, including a careful history and a focused abdominal exam, can help diagnose the underlying cause of the pain and guide appropriate treatment.

Urinary calculi, also known as kidney stones or nephrolithiasis, are hard deposits made of minerals and salts that form inside the urinary system. These calculi can develop in any part of the urinary system, which includes the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra.

The formation of urinary calculi typically occurs when there is a concentration of certain substances, such as calcium, oxalate, uric acid, or struvite, in the urine. When these substances become highly concentrated, they can crystallize and form small seeds that gradually grow into larger stones over time.

The size of urinary calculi can vary from tiny, sand-like particles to large stones that can fill the entire renal pelvis. The symptoms associated with urinary calculi depend on the stone's size, location, and whether it is causing a blockage in the urinary tract. Common symptoms include severe pain in the flank, lower abdomen, or groin; nausea and vomiting; blood in the urine (hematuria); fever and chills; and frequent urge to urinate or painful urination.

Treatment for urinary calculi depends on the size and location of the stone, as well as the severity of symptoms. Small stones may pass spontaneously with increased fluid intake and pain management. Larger stones may require medical intervention, such as extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), ureteroscopy, or percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) to break up or remove the stone. Preventive measures include maintaining adequate hydration, modifying dietary habits, and taking medications to reduce the risk of stone formation.

Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XPN) is a rare and severe form of chronic pyelonephritis, which is an infection and inflammation of the renal pelvis. In XPN, there is a proliferation of lipid-laden macrophages (also known as xanthoma cells) and other inflammatory cells in the kidney parenchyma, leading to the formation of multiple granulomas.

XPN typically affects middle-aged to older women with underlying urologic abnormalities such as obstructive uropathy, calculi (stones), or chronic urinary tract infections. The condition can be difficult to diagnose and often requires a combination of imaging studies, urinalysis, and histopathological examination of renal tissue.

The clinical presentation of XPN is variable and may include fever, flank pain, weight loss, and symptoms related to urinary tract obstruction or infection. Treatment usually involves antibiotic therapy, surgical removal of the affected kidney (nephrectomy), and management of any underlying urologic abnormalities. If left untreated, XPN can lead to irreversible kidney damage and even sepsis.

Hydronephrosis is a medical condition characterized by the swelling of one or both kidneys due to the accumulation of urine. This occurs when the flow of urine from the kidney to the bladder is obstructed, causing urine to back up into the kidney. The obstruction can be caused by various factors such as kidney stones, tumors, or congenital abnormalities. If left untreated, hydronephrosis can lead to serious complications including kidney damage and infection. It is typically diagnosed through imaging tests such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI.

Infarction is the term used in medicine to describe the death of tissue (also known as an "area of necrosis") due to the lack of blood supply. This can occur when a blood vessel that supplies oxygen and nutrients to a particular area of the body becomes blocked or obstructed, leading to the deprivation of oxygen and nutrients necessary for the survival of cells in that region.

The blockage in the blood vessel is usually caused by a clot (thrombus) or an embolus, which is a small particle that travels through the bloodstream and lodges in a smaller vessel. The severity and extent of infarction depend on several factors, including the size and location of the affected blood vessel, the duration of the obstruction, and the presence of collateral circulation (alternative blood vessels that can compensate for the blocked one).

Common examples of infarctions include myocardial infarction (heart attack), cerebral infarction (stroke), and pulmonary infarction (lung tissue death due to obstruction in the lung's blood vessels). Infarctions can lead to various symptoms, depending on the affected organ or tissue, and may require medical intervention to manage complications and prevent further damage.

Urolithiasis is the formation of stones (calculi) in the urinary system, which includes the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. These stones can be composed of various substances such as calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, uric acid, or struvite. The presence of urolithiasis can cause symptoms like severe pain in the back or side, nausea, vomiting, fever, and blood in the urine. The condition can be managed with medications, increased fluid intake, and in some cases, surgical intervention may be required to remove the stones.

Chronic pain is defined as pain that persists or recurs for a period of 3 months or longer, beyond the normal healing time for an injury or illness. It can be continuous or intermittent and range from mild to severe. Chronic pain can have various causes, such as nerve damage, musculoskeletal conditions, or chronic diseases like cancer. It can significantly impact a person's quality of life, causing limitations in mobility, sleep disturbances, mood changes, and decreased overall well-being. Effective management of chronic pain often involves a multidisciplinary approach, including medications, physical therapy, psychological interventions, and complementary therapies.

Pain management is a branch of medicine that focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of pain and improvement in the quality of life of patients with chronic pain. The goal of pain management is to reduce pain levels, improve physical functioning, and help patients cope mentally and emotionally with their pain. This may involve the use of medications, interventional procedures, physical therapy, psychological therapy, or a combination of these approaches.

The definition of pain management can vary depending on the medical context, but it generally refers to a multidisciplinary approach that addresses the complex interactions between biological, psychological, and social factors that contribute to the experience of pain. Pain management specialists may include physicians, nurses, physical therapists, psychologists, and other healthcare professionals who work together to provide comprehensive care for patients with chronic pain.

Urography is a medical imaging technique used to examine the urinary system, which includes the kidneys, ureters, and bladder. It involves the use of a contrast material that is injected into a vein or given orally, which then travels through the bloodstream to the kidneys and gets excreted in the urine. This allows the radiologist to visualize the structures and any abnormalities such as tumors, stones, or blockages. There are different types of urography, including intravenous urography (IVU), CT urography, and retrograde urography.

Angiomyolipoma is a type of benign tumor that occurs most commonly in the kidney. It is composed of blood vessels (angio-), smooth muscle cells (myo-), and fat cells (lipo-). Angiomyolipomas are usually associated with the genetic disorder tuberous sclerosis complex, but they can also occur spontaneously or as a result of other genetic conditions.

These tumors can vary in size and may cause symptoms such as pain, blood in the urine, or a palpable mass in the abdomen if they grow large enough. In some cases, angiomyolipomas may also be at risk for rupture and bleeding, particularly if they are larger than 4 cm in size.

Treatment options for angiomyolipomas include surveillance with imaging tests, medication to reduce the risk of bleeding, or surgical removal of the tumor. The choice of treatment depends on factors such as the size and location of the tumor, the presence of symptoms, and the patient's overall health.

Nephrectomy is a surgical procedure in which all or part of a kidney is removed. It may be performed due to various reasons such as severe kidney damage, kidney cancer, or living donor transplantation. The type of nephrectomy depends on the reason for the surgery - a simple nephrectomy involves removing only the affected portion of the kidney, while a radical nephrectomy includes removal of the whole kidney along with its surrounding tissues like the adrenal gland and lymph nodes.

Ureteroscopy is a medical procedure that involves the use of a ureteroscope, which is a thin, flexible or rigid fiber-optic tube with a light and camera at the end, to visualize the inside of the ureters and kidneys. The ureteroscope is inserted through the urethra and bladder, and then up into the ureter to examine it for any abnormalities such as stones, tumors, or structural issues.

During the procedure, the doctor can also remove any small stones or take a biopsy of any suspicious tissue. Ureteroscopy is typically performed under general or regional anesthesia and may require hospitalization depending on the complexity of the procedure. It is a minimally invasive alternative to traditional open surgery for diagnosing and treating ureteral and kidney conditions.

X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging method that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional (tomographic) images (virtual "slices") of the body. These cross-sectional images can then be used to display detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body.

The term "computed tomography" is used instead of "CT scan" or "CAT scan" because the machines take a series of X-ray measurements from different angles around the body and then use a computer to process these data to create detailed images of internal structures within the body.

CT scanning is a noninvasive, painless medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. CT imaging provides detailed information about many types of tissue including lung, bone, soft tissue and blood vessels. CT examinations can be performed on every part of the body for a variety of reasons including diagnosis, surgical planning, and monitoring of therapeutic responses.

In computed tomography (CT), an X-ray source and detector rotate around the patient, measuring the X-ray attenuation at many different angles. A computer uses this data to construct a cross-sectional image by the process of reconstruction. This technique is called "tomography". The term "computed" refers to the use of a computer to reconstruct the images.

CT has become an important tool in medical imaging and diagnosis, allowing radiologists and other physicians to view detailed internal images of the body. It can help identify many different medical conditions including cancer, heart disease, lung nodules, liver tumors, and internal injuries from trauma. CT is also commonly used for guiding biopsies and other minimally invasive procedures.

In summary, X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging technique that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional images of the body. It provides detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body, allowing physicians to diagnose and treat medical conditions.

Kidney calculi, also known as kidney stones, are hard deposits made of minerals and salts that form inside your kidneys. They can range in size from a grain of sand to a golf ball. When they're small enough, they can be passed through your urine without causing too much discomfort. However, larger stones may block the flow of urine, causing severe pain and potentially leading to serious complications such as urinary tract infections or kidney damage if left untreated.

The formation of kidney calculi is often associated with factors like dehydration, high levels of certain minerals in your urine, family history, obesity, and certain medical conditions such as gout or inflammatory bowel disease. Symptoms of kidney stones typically include severe pain in the back, side, lower abdomen, or groin; nausea and vomiting; fever and chills if an infection is present; and blood in the urine. Treatment options depend on the size and location of the stone but may include medications to help pass the stone, shock wave lithotripsy to break up the stone, or surgical removal of the stone in severe cases.

Pain threshold is a term used in medicine and research to describe the point at which a stimulus begins to be perceived as painful. It is an individual's subjective response and can vary from person to person based on factors such as their pain tolerance, mood, expectations, and cultural background.

The pain threshold is typically determined through a series of tests where gradually increasing levels of stimuli are applied until the individual reports feeling pain. This is often used in research settings to study pain perception and analgesic efficacy. However, it's important to note that the pain threshold should not be confused with pain tolerance, which refers to the maximum level of pain a person can endure.

Pyelonephritis is a type of urinary tract infection (UTI) that involves the renal pelvis and the kidney parenchyma. It's typically caused by bacterial invasion, often via the ascending route from the lower urinary tract. The most common causative agent is Escherichia coli (E. coli), but other bacteria such as Klebsiella, Proteus, and Pseudomonas can also be responsible.

Acute pyelonephritis can lead to symptoms like fever, chills, flank pain, nausea, vomiting, and frequent or painful urination. If left untreated, it can potentially cause permanent kidney damage, sepsis, or other complications. Chronic pyelonephritis, on the other hand, is usually associated with underlying structural or functional abnormalities of the urinary tract.

Diagnosis typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, urinalysis, and imaging studies, while treatment often consists of antibiotics tailored to the identified pathogen and the patient's overall health status.

Cystic kidney diseases are a group of genetic disorders that cause fluid-filled sacs called cysts to form in the kidneys. These cysts can vary in size and can grow over time, which can lead to damage in the kidneys and affect their function. There are two main types of cystic kidney diseases: autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD).

ADPKD is the most common type and is characterized by the presence of numerous cysts in both kidneys. It is usually diagnosed in adulthood, but it can also occur in children. The cysts can cause high blood pressure, kidney stones, urinary tract infections, and eventually kidney failure.

ARPKD is a rare, inherited disorder that affects both the kidneys and liver. It is characterized by the presence of numerous cysts in the kidneys and abnormalities in the bile ducts of the liver. ARPKD is usually diagnosed in infancy or early childhood and can cause serious complications such as respiratory distress, kidney failure, and liver fibrosis.

Other types of cystic kidney diseases include nephronophthisis, medullary cystic kidney disease, and glomerulocystic kidney disease. These conditions are also inherited and can cause kidney damage and kidney failure.

Treatment for cystic kidney diseases typically involves managing symptoms such as high blood pressure, pain, and infections. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove large cysts or to treat complications such as kidney stones. For individuals with advanced kidney disease, dialysis or a kidney transplant may be necessary.

Postoperative pain is defined as the pain or discomfort experienced by patients following a surgical procedure. It can vary in intensity and duration depending on the type of surgery performed, individual pain tolerance, and other factors. The pain may be caused by tissue trauma, inflammation, or nerve damage resulting from the surgical intervention. Proper assessment and management of postoperative pain is essential to promote recovery, prevent complications, and improve patient satisfaction.

Low back pain is a common musculoskeletal disorder characterized by discomfort or pain in the lower part of the back, typically between the costal margin (bottom of the ribcage) and the gluteal folds (buttocks). It can be caused by several factors including strain or sprain of the muscles or ligaments, disc herniation, spinal stenosis, osteoarthritis, or other degenerative conditions affecting the spine. The pain can range from a dull ache to a sharp stabbing sensation and may be accompanied by stiffness, limited mobility, and radiating pain down the legs in some cases. Low back pain is often described as acute (lasting less than 6 weeks), subacute (lasting between 6-12 weeks), or chronic (lasting more than 12 weeks).

Back pain is a common symptom characterized by discomfort or soreness in the back, often occurring in the lower region of the back (lumbago). It can range from a mild ache to a sharp stabbing or shooting pain, and it may be accompanied by stiffness, restricted mobility, and difficulty performing daily activities. Back pain is typically caused by strain or sprain to the muscles, ligaments, or spinal joints, but it can also result from degenerative conditions, disc herniation, spinal stenosis, osteoarthritis, or other medical issues affecting the spine. The severity and duration of back pain can vary widely, with some cases resolving on their own within a few days or weeks, while others may require medical treatment and rehabilitation.

Kidney neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the kidney tissues that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can originate from various types of kidney cells, including the renal tubules, glomeruli, and the renal pelvis.

Malignant kidney neoplasms are also known as kidney cancers, with renal cell carcinoma being the most common type. Benign kidney neoplasms include renal adenomas, oncocytomas, and angiomyolipomas. While benign neoplasms are generally not life-threatening, they can still cause problems if they grow large enough to compromise kidney function or if they undergo malignant transformation.

Early detection and appropriate management of kidney neoplasms are crucial for improving patient outcomes and overall prognosis. Regular medical check-ups, imaging studies, and urinalysis can help in the early identification of these growths, allowing for timely intervention and treatment.

Pain measurement, in a medical context, refers to the quantification or evaluation of the intensity and/or unpleasantness of a patient's subjective pain experience. This is typically accomplished through the use of standardized self-report measures such as numerical rating scales (NRS), visual analog scales (VAS), or categorical scales (mild, moderate, severe). In some cases, physiological measures like heart rate, blood pressure, and facial expressions may also be used to supplement self-reported pain ratings. The goal of pain measurement is to help healthcare providers better understand the nature and severity of a patient's pain in order to develop an effective treatment plan.

A ureter is a thin, muscular tube that transports urine from the kidney to the bladder. In humans, there are two ureters, one for each kidney, and they are typically about 10-12 inches long. The ureters are lined with a special type of cells called transitional epithelium that can stretch and expand as urine passes through them. They are located in the retroperitoneal space, which is the area behind the peritoneum, the membrane that lines the abdominal cavity. The ureters play a critical role in the urinary system by ensuring that urine flows from the kidneys to the bladder for storage and eventual elimination from the body.

Neck pain is discomfort or soreness in the neck region, which can extend from the base of the skull to the upper part of the shoulder blades, caused by injury, irritation, or inflammation of the muscles, ligaments, or nerves in the cervical spine. The pain may worsen with movement and can be accompanied by stiffness, numbness, tingling, or weakness in the neck, arms, or hands. In some cases, headaches can also occur as a result of neck pain.

In medicine, "intractable pain" is a term used to describe pain that is difficult to manage, control or relieve with standard treatments. It's a type of chronic pain that continues for an extended period, often months or even years, and does not respond to conventional therapies such as medications, physical therapy, or surgery. Intractable pain can significantly affect a person's quality of life, causing emotional distress, sleep disturbances, and reduced mobility. It is essential to distinguish intractable pain from acute pain, which is typically sharp and short-lived, resulting from tissue damage or inflammation.

Intractable pain may be classified as:

1. Refractory pain: Pain that persists despite optimal treatment with various modalities, including medications, interventions, and multidisciplinary care.
2. Incurable pain: Pain caused by a progressive or incurable disease, such as cancer, for which no curative treatment is available.
3. Functional pain: Pain without an identifiable organic cause that does not respond to standard treatments.

Managing intractable pain often requires a multidisciplinary approach involving healthcare professionals from various fields, including pain specialists, neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, and physical therapists. Treatment options may include:

1. Adjuvant medications: Medications that are not primarily analgesics but have been found to help with pain relief, such as antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and muscle relaxants.
2. Interventional procedures: Minimally invasive techniques like nerve blocks, spinal cord stimulation, or intrathecal drug delivery systems that target specific nerves or areas of the body to reduce pain signals.
3. Psychological interventions: Techniques such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), mindfulness meditation, and relaxation training can help patients cope with chronic pain and improve their overall well-being.
4. Physical therapy and rehabilitation: Exercise programs, massage, acupuncture, and other physical therapies may provide relief for some types of intractable pain.
5. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM): Techniques like yoga, tai chi, hypnosis, or biofeedback can be helpful in managing chronic pain.
6. Lifestyle modifications: Dietary changes, stress management, and quitting smoking may also contribute to improved pain management.

Pelvic pain is defined as discomfort or unpleasant sensation in the lower abdominal region, below the belly button, and between the hips. It can be acute (sudden and lasting for a short time) or chronic (persisting for months or even years), and it may be steady or intermittent, mild or severe. The pain can have various causes, including musculoskeletal issues, nerve irritation, infection, inflammation, or organic diseases in the reproductive, urinary, or gastrointestinal systems. Accurate diagnosis often requires a thorough medical evaluation to determine the underlying cause and develop an appropriate treatment plan.

Pain perception refers to the neural and psychological processes involved in receiving, interpreting, and responding to painful stimuli. It is the subjective experience of pain, which can vary greatly among individuals due to factors such as genetics, mood, expectations, and past experiences. The perception of pain involves complex interactions between the peripheral nervous system (which detects and transmits information about tissue damage or potential harm), the spinal cord (where this information is processed and integrated with other sensory inputs), and the brain (where the final interpretation and emotional response to pain occurs).

Facial pain is a condition characterized by discomfort or pain felt in any part of the face. It can result from various causes, including nerve damage or irritation, injuries, infections, dental problems, migraines, or sinus congestion. The pain can range from mild to severe and may be sharp, dull, constant, or intermittent. In some cases, facial pain can also be associated with other symptoms such as headaches, redness, swelling, or changes in sensation. Accurate diagnosis and treatment of the underlying cause are essential for effective management of facial pain.

Acute pain is a type of pain that comes on suddenly and can be severe, but it typically lasts for a short period of time. It is often described as sharp or stabbing and can be caused by tissue damage, inflammation, or injury. Acute pain is the body's way of signaling that something is wrong and that action needs to be taken to address the underlying cause.

Acute pain is different from chronic pain, which is pain that persists for 12 weeks or longer. Chronic pain can be caused by a variety of factors, including ongoing medical conditions, nerve damage, or inflammation. It is important to seek medical attention if you are experiencing acute pain that does not improve or becomes severe, as it may be a sign of a more serious underlying condition.

Referred pain is a type of pain that is felt in a part of the body other than its actual source. This occurs because the brain incorrectly interprets nerve signals from damaged tissues or organs. In the case of referred pain, the brain misinterprets the location of the pain signal and attributes it to a different area of the body.

Referred pain is often described as a dull, aching sensation rather than a sharp, stabbing pain. It can be difficult to diagnose because the source of the pain may not be immediately apparent. Common examples of referred pain include:

* Heart attack pain that is felt in the left arm or jaw
* Gallbladder pain that is felt in the right shoulder blade
* Kidney stones that cause pain in the lower back and abdomen
* Appendicitis that causes pain in the lower right quadrant of the abdomen, but can sometimes be referred to the lower left quadrant in pregnant women or those with a longer colon.

Referred pain is thought to occur because the nerves carrying pain signals from different parts of the body converge on the same neurons in the spinal cord before traveling to the brain. If these neurons are stimulated by pain signals from multiple sources, the brain may have difficulty distinguishing between them and may interpret the pain as coming from a single location.

Kidney disease, also known as nephropathy or renal disease, refers to any functional or structural damage to the kidneys that impairs their ability to filter blood, regulate electrolytes, produce hormones, and maintain fluid balance. This damage can result from a wide range of causes, including diabetes, hypertension, glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, lupus, infections, drugs, toxins, and congenital or inherited disorders.

Depending on the severity and progression of the kidney damage, kidney diseases can be classified into two main categories: acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). AKI is a sudden and often reversible loss of kidney function that occurs over hours to days, while CKD is a progressive and irreversible decline in kidney function that develops over months or years.

Symptoms of kidney diseases may include edema, proteinuria, hematuria, hypertension, electrolyte imbalances, metabolic acidosis, anemia, and decreased urine output. Treatment options depend on the underlying cause and severity of the disease and may include medications, dietary modifications, dialysis, or kidney transplantation.

Urine is a physiological excretory product that is primarily composed of water, urea, and various ions (such as sodium, potassium, chloride, and others) that are the byproducts of protein metabolism. It also contains small amounts of other substances like uric acid, creatinine, ammonia, and various organic compounds. Urine is produced by the kidneys through a process called urination or micturition, where it is filtered from the blood and then stored in the bladder until it is excreted from the body through the urethra. The color, volume, and composition of urine can provide important diagnostic information about various medical conditions.

Bacteriuria is a medical term that refers to the presence of bacteria in the urine. The condition can be asymptomatic or symptomatic, and it can occur in various populations, including hospitalized patients, pregnant women, and individuals with underlying urologic abnormalities.

There are different types of bacteriuria, including:

1. Significant bacteriuria: This refers to the presence of a large number of bacteria in the urine (usually greater than 100,000 colony-forming units per milliliter or CFU/mL) and is often associated with urinary tract infection (UTI).
2. Contaminant bacteriuria: This occurs when bacteria from the skin or external environment enter the urine sample during collection, leading to a small number of bacteria present in the urine.
3. Asymptomatic bacteriuria: This refers to the presence of bacteria in the urine without any symptoms of UTI. It is more common in older adults, pregnant women, and individuals with diabetes or other underlying medical conditions.

The diagnosis of bacteriuria typically involves a urinalysis and urine culture to identify the type and quantity of bacteria present in the urine. Treatment depends on the type and severity of bacteriuria and may involve antibiotics to eliminate the infection. However, asymptomatic bacteriuria often does not require treatment unless it occurs in pregnant women or individuals undergoing urologic procedures.

Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are defined as the presence of pathogenic microorganisms, typically bacteria, in any part of the urinary system, which includes the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra, resulting in infection and inflammation. The majority of UTIs are caused by Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, but other organisms such as Klebsiella, Proteus, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, and Enterococcus can also cause UTIs.

UTIs can be classified into two types based on the location of the infection:

1. Lower UTI or bladder infection (cystitis): This type of UTI affects the bladder and urethra. Symptoms may include a frequent and urgent need to urinate, pain or burning during urination, cloudy or strong-smelling urine, and discomfort in the lower abdomen or back.

2. Upper UTI or kidney infection (pyelonephritis): This type of UTI affects the kidneys and can be more severe than a bladder infection. Symptoms may include fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, and pain in the flanks or back.

UTIs are more common in women than men due to their shorter urethra, which makes it easier for bacteria to reach the bladder. Other risk factors for UTIs include sexual activity, use of diaphragms or spermicides, urinary catheterization, diabetes, and weakened immune systems.

UTIs are typically diagnosed through a urinalysis and urine culture to identify the causative organism and determine the appropriate antibiotic treatment. In some cases, imaging studies such as ultrasound or CT scan may be necessary to evaluate for any underlying abnormalities in the urinary tract.

Urinalysis is a medical examination and analysis of urine. It's used to detect and manage a wide range of disorders, such as diabetes, kidney disease, and liver problems. A urinalysis can also help monitor medications and drug compliance. The test typically involves checking the color, clarity, and specific gravity (concentration) of urine. It may also include chemical analysis to detect substances like glucose, protein, blood, and white blood cells, which could indicate various medical conditions. In some cases, a microscopic examination is performed to identify any abnormal cells, casts, or crystals present in the urine.

Drug utilization refers to the use of medications by patients or healthcare professionals in a real-world setting. It involves analyzing and evaluating patterns of medication use, including prescribing practices, adherence to treatment guidelines, potential duplications or interactions, and outcomes associated with drug therapy. The goal of drug utilization is to optimize medication use, improve patient safety, and minimize costs while achieving the best possible health outcomes. It can be studied through various methods such as prescription claims data analysis, surveys, and clinical audits.

Anti-bacterial agents, also known as antibiotics, are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by bacteria. These agents work by either killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth and reproduction. There are several different classes of anti-bacterial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and tetracyclines, among others. Each class of antibiotic has a specific mechanism of action and is used to treat certain types of bacterial infections. It's important to note that anti-bacterial agents are not effective against viral infections, such as the common cold or flu. Misuse and overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which is a significant global health concern.

Pyuria is a medical term that refers to the presence of pus or purulent exudate (containing white blood cells) in the urine. It's typically indicative of a urinary tract infection (UTI), inflammation, or other conditions that cause an elevated number of leukocytes in the urine. The pus may come from the kidneys, ureters, bladder, or urethra. Other possible causes include sexually transmitted infections, kidney stones, trauma, or medical procedures involving the urinary tract. A healthcare professional will usually confirm pyuria through a urinalysis and might recommend further testing to determine the underlying cause and appropriate treatment.

Flank pain can indicate obstructing kidney stones or abdominal aortic aneurysm. If obstructing kidney stones are suspected, the ... 2000; 36:219-223 Gaspari RJ, Horst K. Emergency ultrasound and urinalysis in the evaluation of flank pain. Acad Emerg Med. Dec ... Testicular Pain - Evaluation for testicular torsion, orchitis, epididymitis, hernia Pelvic Pain - Evaluation for ovarian ... Cardiac: Chest pain is one of the most common complaints presenting to the emergency department. Those presenting with chest ...
Thus, pain in the flank region may be referred from corresponding kidney. Renal histology is the study of the microscopic ... One common symptom of kidney stones is a sharp to disabling pain in the middle and sides of the lower back or groin. Kidney ... joy and pain. Similarly, the Talmud (Berakhoth 61.a) states that one of the two kidneys counsels what is good, and the other ...
... the source of the pain, when a UTI or blockage is not present, is unclear at this time. Renal colic (flank and back pain) is ... Patients with the more rare form of MSK marked by chronic pain typically require pain management. Non-obstructing stones in MSK ... This pain can be constant, can often be debilitating and treatment is challenging. Narcotic medication, even in large ... It is not certain what causes this pain, but researchers have proposed that the small numerous stones seen in MSK may cause ...
The classic symptom complex of flank pain, and flank mass, and hypovolemic shock is referred to as the Lenk triad and is seen ... Initial symptoms may be subtle, such as mild pain, flank tenderness, hematuria. Depending on blood loss, symptoms of ... Patients may present with various symptoms ranging from abdominal pain to more severe manifestations such as hypovolemic shock ...
... flank, or chest pain. More severe cases may be characterized by shortness of breath, low blood pressure, hemoglobinuria, and ... chest pain, nausea, vomiting, and wheezing. The diagnosis of AHTR is made with microscopic examination of the recipient's blood ...
People often experience flank or abdominal pain which is non-colic and constant. The pain can vary in intensity and location. ... Clinical signs include: prolonged spiking fever pain on palpation of uterus midline lower abdominal pain malodorous lochia ( ... Intravenous administration of antibiotics are continued until the fever is resolved, pain improves, and the leukocyte count ...
In advanced stages, hematuria, flank pain, and abdominal mass are the three classic manifestation. While a complete list of the ... flank pain and palpable abdominal mass; only 6-10% of patients) or even nonspecific symptoms including fatigue, weight loss, ... exhibiting a wide range of symptoms including bone pain to a persistent cough. Currently, the exact cause of PRCC remains ...
... and razor-like pains during sexual intercourse. Flank pain may occur due to infection of the upper urinary tract, such as ... a bloated feeling with sharp razor pains in the lower abdomen around the bladder and ovary areas, ...
This leads to an increased risk of infection and stone formation, often causing flank pain. Furthermore, infections can cause ... For patients that present with the classical symptoms of the disorder, specifically flank pain and hematuria, the initial tests ... The signs and symptoms of this disorder can vary from asymptomatic microhematuria to severe, recurrent flank pain associated ... ipsilateral flank pain). Furthermore, when the renal artery obstructs the proximal collecting system, filling defects can occur ...
People with advanced disease may have pelvic or bony pain, lower-extremity swelling, or flank pain. Rarely, a palpable mass can ... Symptoms include blood in the urine, pain with urination, and low back pain. It is caused when epithelial cells that line the ... bone pain). Bladder cancer that is refractory or shows progression after platinum-based chemotherapy can be treated with second ... Other possible symptoms include pain during urination, frequent urination, or feeling the need to urinate without being able to ...
Pressure on the kidney or ureter from a tumor outside the kidney can cause extreme flank pain. Local recurrence of cancer after ... post-amputation pain or pelvic floor myalgia. Chemotherapy may cause mucositis, muscle pain, joint pain, abdominal pain caused ... This pain may, rarely, return as phantom pain after surgical removal of the rectum, though pain within a few weeks of surgical ... Muscle and joint pain Withdrawal of steroid medication can cause joint pain and diffuse muscle pain accompanied by fatigue; ...
Pain is typically relieved by lying down. It is believed that flank pain on standing that is relieved by lying down is due to ... However, nephroptosis can be characterized by violent attacks of colicky flank pain, nausea, chills, hypertension, hematuria ... The attack of colic pain is called 'Dietl's crisis' or 'renal paroxysm'.[citation needed] It is believed to result from ... Persons with symptomatic nephroptosis often complain of sharp pains that radiate into the groin. Many persons also suggest a ...
Loin pain-hematuria syndrome (LPHS) is a poorly defined disorder characterized by recurrent or persistent loin (flank) pain and ... Loin pain hematuria syndrome (LPHS) is the combination of debilitating unilateral or bilateral flank pain and microscopic or ... Sleep can be difficult because the supine position increases pressure on the flank. The onset of pain is often associated with ... The major causes of flank pain and hematuria, such as nephrolithiasis and blood clot, are typically not present. Renal ...
... classically left flank or pelvic pain). The abdominal pain may improve or worsen depending on positioning. Patients may also ... In contrast, more severe symptoms such as reduced renal function, flank pain, and anemia are managed with surgical ... it can also result in left testicular pain in men or left lower quadrant pain in women, especially during intercourse and ... In women, the hypertension in the left gonadal vein can also cause increased pain during menses. In normal anatomy, the LRV ...
Symptoms include pain in the abdomen or flank, blood in the urine, a palpable lump or high blood pressure. As they are benign ...
Diagnosis may be suspected from one, some, or all of the following: new onset flank pain or red urine; a positive family ... Other symptoms include pain in the back, and cyst formation (renal and other organs). PKD is caused by abnormal genes which ... Signs and symptoms include high blood pressure, headaches, abdominal pain, blood in the urine, and excessive urination. ...
Although often asymptomatic, the most common presenting symptom of patients with a horseshoe kidney is abdominal or flank pain ...
Possible signs and symptoms of a renal oncocytoma include blood in the urine, flank pain, and an abdominal mass. Renal ...
It can cause high fever, pain on passing urine, and abdominal pain that radiates along the flank towards the back. There is ... Chronic pyelonephritis causes persistent flank or abdominal pain, signs of infection (fever, unintentional weight loss, malaise ... If a kidney stone is suspected (e.g. on the basis of characteristic colicky pain or the presence of a disproportionate amount ... Symptoms most often include fever and flank tenderness. Other symptoms may include nausea, burning with urination, and frequent ...
The predominant symptom is low back pain, which may radiate to the lower rib cage, flank, groin, buttock, and thigh. ... Since iliocostal friction syndrome can present in pain in many areas surrounding the back, flank, and abdomen, the differential ... July 2014). "Iliocostal Friction Syndrome Causing Flank Pain in a Patient with a History of Stroke with Scoliosis and ... Tendon irritation can result in referred pain, therefore affected individuals may experience pain throughout the hip, low back ...
Symptoms of a kidney infection include fever and flank pain usually in addition to the symptoms of a lower UTI. Rarely the ... People experiencing an upper urinary tract infection, or pyelonephritis, may experience flank pain, fever, or nausea and ... Interstitial cystitis (chronic pain in the bladder) may be considered for people who experience multiple episodes of UTI ... Some pain above the pubic bone or in the lower back may be present. ...
Symptoms of a kidney infection include fever and flank pain usually in addition to the symptoms of a lower UTI. Rarely the ... Symptoms include blood in the urine, pain with urination, and low back pain. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a kidney cancer that ... Interstitial cystitis (IC), also known as bladder pain syndrome (BPS), is a type of chronic pain that affects the bladder. ... In later stages, it can lead to difficulty urinating, blood in the urine or pain in the pelvis, back, or when urinating. A ...
Additionally, hypercalciuria can contribute to kidney stone formation which may present with flank or back pain that comes and ...
The signs and symptoms of a ruptured AAA may include severe pain in the lower back, flank, abdomen or groin. A mass that pulses ... Aortic aneurysm rupture may be mistaken for the pain of kidney stones, or muscle related back pain. Smoking cessation Treatment ... or sudden-onset back or abdominal pain. Abdominal pain, shock, and a pulsatile mass is only present in a minority of cases.[ ... Flank ecchymosis (appearance of a bruise) is a sign of retroperitoneal bleeding and is also called Grey Turner's sign. The ...
As kidney cancer becomes more advanced it classically results in blood in the urine, flank or back pain, and a mass. Other ... The classic triad of visible blood in the urine (hematuria), flank pain and palpable abdominal mass occurs in less than 15% of ... Symptoms may include blood in the urine, lump in the abdomen, or back pain. Fever, weight loss, and tiredness may also occur. ... Risk factors for RCC and TCC include smoking, certain pain medications, previous bladder cancer, being overweight, high blood ...
Bloody urine and flank pain in a person with end-stage kidney disease raise suspicion for ACKD-associated renal cell carcinoma ...
The most common symptoms, whether in men or women, are sudden onset, intense flank pain accompanied by blood in the urine. Most ... Rest pain is a continuous burning pain in the limb that is aggravated by elevating it and improved by dangling over the bed as ... Sacral insufficiency fractures are an infrequent but often disabling cause of severe low back pain. At times, the pain can be ... cancer-related pain Sphenopalatine ganglion block A procedure performed to manage head and neck pain/headaches related to the ...
More often, women present with UTI, flank pain, or hematuria, and are found to have a persistently alkaline urine pH (>7.0). ...
In minor injuries with little bleeding, there may be abdominal pain, tenderness in the epigastrium and pain in the left flank. ... Often there is a sharp pain in the left shoulder, known as Kehr's sign. In larger injuries with more extensive bleeding, signs ...
... which classically presents with flank pain, blood in urine and a mass felt in the abdomen; a triad of features which present in ...
Flank pain is pain in one side of the body between the upper belly area (abdomen) and the back. ... Flank pain is pain in one side of the body between the upper belly area (abdomen) and the back. ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have ... Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and physical therapy may be prescribed for flank pain caused by spinal arthritis ...
Urinary calculi Flank pain is the classic presenting symptom of urinary calculi and is the predominant cause of flank pain that ... How does neuropathic flank pain occur?. How is neuropathic flank pain characterized when it involves the 10th, 11th, or 12th ... Flank pain is the classic presenting symptom of urinary calculi and is the predominant cause of flank pain in the absence of ... How is flank pain associated with renal abscess characterized?. How is flank pain caused by renal abscess diagnosed and treated ...
Flank pain that is caused by a kidney infection or a kidney stone:. *Is pain felt just below the rib cage and above the waist. ... It is sometimes hard to tell the difference between back pain that is caused by a bone or muscle problem and back pain (flank ... post a link to Back Pain and Flank Pain information on Facebook. ... send a link to Back Pain and Flank Pain information by email. ... post a link to Back Pain and Flank Pain information on Twitter. ... share a link to Back Pain and Flank Pain information by text. ...
... and labial pain ( in men and! Individuals experience a stabbing pain in the flank pain may also have flank pain medical... The ... Now pain is only on the right flank but severe. You may feel spasms of pain at times too. Flank pain has many possible causes, ... treatment and more of pain at flank pain both sides too bilateral flank may. Exact cause of the major causes of right flank ... www.healthcentral.com/chronic-pain/h/chronic-flank-pain.html, http: //stomach-pain-after-eating.net/stomach-pain-after-eating- ...
1 flanks 140/70. 2 flanks+abdomen + + 124/77. 3 flanks+abdomen + + 140/90. 4 flanks+abdomen + + 145/80. 5 flanks + + 127/75. 6 ... 7 flank+abdomen + + 125/71. 8 flank+abdomen + 134/91. 9 flank+abdomen + + 160/86. 10 flank 140/65. 11 flank+abdomen + + 159/83 ... 13 flanks + + 134/72. 14 abdomen + 150/58. 15 flanks + + 130/80. 16 flanks + + 150/80. 17 flanks+abdomen + 132/72. 18 flanks + ... The acute flank pain syndrome was defined as severe flank pain in combination with acute renal failure, unexplained except for ...
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flank pain Would you like to know how to translate flank pain to Urdu? Army Flank meaning in Urdu: کمر - meaning, Definition ... flank pain Would you like to know how to translate flank pain to Urdu? Army Flank meaning in Urdu: کمر - meaning, Definition ... Meaning of Right Flank Pain. When people we love are not with us, we love them even more. Definition of flank pain in the ... Meaning of Right Flank Pain. When people we love are not with us, we love them even more. Definition of flank pain in the ...
Emergency Medicine Physician Assistant. Duke University Graduate. Army National Guard PA/Combat Medic. Former Paramedic. Devoted to learning and sharing evidence-based medicine ...
Right flank pain: Causes and symptoms. In between the ribs and pelvic bone lie your flanks, of which there are two (one on each ... In unfortunate cases, you can experience pain in this region. There are common causes of flank pain that can affect both sides- ... Organs that exist in the right side of the body or nearby can cause right flank pain. The following organs may be suffering if ... Weekly health news: Poor circulation in feet, dementia, lumbar spondylosis exercises, right flank pain. Written by Bel Marra ...
Abdominal distension Abdominal pain Acute illness Anaesthetics Arm weakness ATLS Bleeding problems Cardiac arrest Chest pain ... Dizziness Emergencies Examination Fatigue Gastroenterology cases GI bleeding Headache Itch Jaundice Joint problems Leg pain Leg ...
2012). "Loin pain hematuria syndrome-visceral or neuropathic pain syndrome?". Clin J Pain. 28 (7): 646-51. doi:10.1097/AJP. ... Causes of right flank pain developed by WikiDoc.org Causes by Organ System. Cardiovascular Acute cortical necrosis, acute ... Causes of right flank pain developed by WikiDoc.org References. *↑ Wolffram, S.; Bisang, B.; Grenacher, B.; Scharrer, E. (1990 ... Diffuse Abdominal Pain. Left Upper Quadrant. Left Flank. Left Lower Quadrant. Epigastric Quadrant. Umbilical Region. Pelvic ...
What is the icd9 for left flank pain? The icd-9 code ... flank pain is all you have to work with from the documentation ... How is left flank pain diagnosed?. Treatment for flank pain from inflammation - For flank pain from inflammation, such as an ... What is left flank pain?. Flank pain is pain on the side of the back just below the rib cage and above the waist. It can be on ... 6 Is flank pain the same as back pain?*6.1 How do you assess flank pain? ...
Flank Pain - Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment from the MSD Manuals - Medical Consumer Version. ... Pain caused by kidney disorders usually is felt in the side (flank) or small of the back. Occasionally, the pain extends to the ... Causes of Flank Pain A kidney stone Stones in the Urinary Tract Stones (calculi) are hard masses that form in the urinary tract ... Evaluation and Treatment of Flank Pain After noting symptoms, the doctor examines the person and usually does a urinalysis ...
Flank pain. Flank pain is discomfort in your upper abdomen or back and sides. It may occur when your kidneys are inflamed or ... "Flank pain is different from abdominal pain or general back pain. Its on one side and deeper inside, underneath the rib cage ... The problem is that many people dismiss lower back pain as a pulled muscle or a side effect of aging. But if your pain is ... There are plenty of conditions that can cause pain in that area, but they usually require a deeper evaluation than just a ...
Sometimes I think that the pain is coming from my right ovary. Hope your pain is gone. Report / Delete Reply ... My pain also travels into my hips and groin and I have blood in my urine but only first thing in the mornings. Report / Delete ... I am suffering from the same right flank pain for the last couple of weeks. It started all of a sudden and its worst when I ... Hi Amanda, I actually read a similar post you wrote to someone else suffering with right flank pain. I came across it after ...
Most often, patients will complain of blurry vision that may or may not be associated with pain and red eye. In the rare case ... it is usually unilateral and causes little or no pain; advanced cases of tuberculous lymphadenitis may suppurate and form a ...
Causes of stomach pain in females range from urinary tract infections and menstrual cramps to constipation and other digestive ... Symptoms and signs include fever and abdominal pain. Associated symptoms and signs include flank pain, vomiting, and blood in ... Pain is usually on one side, with right-sided pain being more common than left-sided pain. Other signs and symptoms include:. * ... The type of abdominal pain is determined by the intensity and location of the pain:. *Generalized pain: More than half of the ...
Twelve patients reported abdominal, flank, and/or back pain. None reported preexisting renal dysfunction or use of medication ... and flank or abdominal pain and went to emergency departments during February 26-29. Local law enforcement officials were ... A case initially was defined as nausea, vomiting, abdominal or back pain, and AKI (i.e., serum creatinine concentration above ...
Flank pain. 7 (32). Laboratory test*. Thrombocytopenia. 21 (100). Leukopenia. 20 (95). ...
Flank pain. *Costovertebral angle tenderness. *Oliguric renal failure. Prolonged, rarely permanent, kidney failure is ...
flank pain. *red or brown urine. *low blood pressure. Treatment. The first step is to stop the transfusion. From there, ...
Flank pain. *Complementary Health *Massage Therapy. *Light Therapy for Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) ... Injuries (e.g., sprains, strains, acute pain, fractures, concussions, etc.). *Infections (e.g., conjunctivitis, ear infections ...
Flank pain or costovertebral angle tenderness,. *acute hematuria,. *new pelvic discomfort. *New onset or worsening sepsis ...
What is causing the severe right flank pain? (1 pt). *How are the elevated levels of serum uric acid and positive uric acid ... A 56-year-old male was brought to the emergency room with a chief complaint was right flank pain.. ... One hour prior to admission, the patient developed severe right flank pain associated with nausea. Upon admission, the patient ... A 56-year-old male was brought to the emergency room with a chief complaint was right flank pain. ...
Ive been having left chest and shoulder pain, and now severe left flank pain possible kidney damage?. admin Posted on Posted in ... 4 Comments on "Ive been having left chest and shoulder pain, and now severe left flank pain possible kidney damage?" * Dr ... General › Ive been having left chest and shoulder pain, and now severe left flank pain possible kidney damage? ... But recently Ive been having left chest and shoulder pain, and now severe left flank pain. My last bloods showed high ...
"Man With Right Flank Pain." ,i>Annals of Emergency Medicine,/i> 80 (3): 278-88.,detail:{html:,p class=\doi\>\n ,span> ... "Man With Right Flank Pain." ,i>Annals of emergency medicine,/i> 80.3 (2022): 278-288. Print.,pubMedId:35995517,pubMedUrl ... Man With Right Flank Pain.,/span>\n ,i>Annals of emergency medicine,/i>\n,/span>\n,span class=\authors\>Prendergast, N., ... Man With Right Flank Pain. ,i>Annals of Emergency Medicine,/i>, ,i>80,/i>(3), 278-288.,capCitation:,span class=\title\>\n ...
Pain * Parenting * Pelvic Health * Pelvic Health Initiative Conceptual Model * Pelvic Floor Disorders * Causes ...
Flank pain can indicate obstructing kidney stones or abdominal aortic aneurysm. If obstructing kidney stones are suspected, the ... 2000; 36:219-223 Gaspari RJ, Horst K. Emergency ultrasound and urinalysis in the evaluation of flank pain. Acad Emerg Med. Dec ... Testicular Pain - Evaluation for testicular torsion, orchitis, epididymitis, hernia Pelvic Pain - Evaluation for ovarian ... Cardiac: Chest pain is one of the most common complaints presenting to the emergency department. Those presenting with chest ...
Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders: Flank pain (9%), bone inflammation (3%).. *Nervous system disorders: Agitation ... Serious eye symptoms such as sudden vision loss, blurred vision, tunnel vision, eye pain or swelling, or seeing halos around ... The most common adverse reactions (≥30%) were headache, fever, skin/mucous membrane dryness, bone pain, malaise, shivering, ... Overdosage with other retinoids has been associated with transient headache, facial flushing, cheilosis, abdominal pain, ...
flank pain * fatigue * ear noise/buzzing * breath odor * breast development in males * blood pressure, high Signs and tests ...
  • Right flank pain indicates a problem with one or more of the organs lying in this area. (softups.com)
  • Meaning of Right Flank Pain. (softups.com)
  • We have also included material on right flank pain and lumbar spondylosis exercises. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • Organs that exist in the right side of the body or nearby can cause right flank pain. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • Right flank pain is a sensation of discomfort, distress or agony in the right side of the abdomen below the rib and above the ilium , generally beginning posteriorly or in the midaxillary line. (wikidoc.org)
  • Excruciating right flank pain only in early mornings. (patient.info)
  • I am suffering from the same right flank pain for the last couple of weeks. (patient.info)
  • A 56-year-old male was brought to the emergency room with a chief complaint was right flank pain. (vastcoach.com)
  • One hour prior to admission, the patient developed severe right flank pain associated with nausea. (vastcoach.com)
  • What is causing the severe right flank pain? (vastcoach.com)
  • Man With Right Flank Pain. (stanford.edu)
  • pubMedId':'35995517','pubMedUrl':'https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/35995517','publicationId':'855162','title':'Man With Right Flank Pain. (stanford.edu)
  • Something had to be causing my persistent right flank pain! (curezone.org)
  • Acute abdominal pain. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Abdominal pain in adults. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Aching flank pain associated with a kidney infection usually begins suddenly, persists and is accompanied by fever, chills, abdominal pain, and na… Analgesics (pain relieving medicines) and high intake of fluids can help in case stones are diagnosed in kidneys. (rio-negocios.com)
  • ICD-9 code 789.04 for Abdominal pain left lower quadrant is a medical classification as listed by WHO under the range -SYMPTOMS (780-789). (com.ng)
  • Flank pain is different from abdominal pain or general back pain. (uclahealth.org)
  • Ovarian torsion is caused by ovarian tumors or cysts and can cause severe abdominal pain . (medicinenet.com)
  • Lower abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding are possible symptoms. (medicinenet.com)
  • In school-aged children, emotional distress ( stress , anxiety , depression , or other psychological issues) can cause recurring abdominal pain. (medicinenet.com)
  • Also known as functional abdominal pain, this type of stomach pain has no known cause. (medicinenet.com)
  • They experienced severe nausea, vomiting, and flank or abdominal pain and went to emergency departments during February 26-29. (cdc.gov)
  • Woman with Right Abdominal Pain. (stanford.edu)
  • pubMedId':'36685311','pubMedUrl':'https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/36685311','publicationId':'868837','title':'Woman with right abdominal pain. (stanford.edu)
  • Early symptoms can vary between age groups, but severe and sudden abdominal pain is usually the first symptom of appendicitis. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Sudden appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain requiring surgery in the United States (U.S.), with over 5 percent of the population developing appendicitis at some point. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Severe and sudden abdominal pain is usually the first symptom of appendicitis. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • While children and infants may not experience precise pain as older patients do, research suggests that abdominal pain is still the most common symptom of appendicitis symptom for this age group. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Abdominal pain can be a symptom of other conditions that seem like appendicitis. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The pain is often acute and can radiate anteriorly and inferiorly. (medscape.com)
  • Lower left pain maybe harmless or acute. (rio-negocios.com)
  • Kidney pain is usually sudden or acute, but it can also be persistent or chronic. (rio-negocios.com)
  • In men, pain in the left flank may arise due to problems like : Left flank pain in women may be a result of problems like: In both men and women, painful symptoms may arise due to other reasons like : Severe colicky flank pain that radiates to the groin, scrotum and the labia may be a result of Acute Renal Colic. (rio-negocios.com)
  • The purpose of the study was to calculate the incidence of the acute flank pain syndrome in Iceland and to describe the case series. (laeknabladid.is)
  • The acute flank pain syndrome was defined as severe flank pain in combination with acute renal failure, unexplained except for the possible consumption of NSAIDs, ethanol or both. (laeknabladid.is)
  • The annual incidence of the acute flank pain syndrome increased threefold during the study period. (laeknabladid.is)
  • The incidence of the acute flank pain syndrome was high. (laeknabladid.is)
  • The incidence of the acute flank pain syndrome during the period 1998-2007 relative to the population of the Reykjavík area (number of cases/100.000 inhabitants/year). (laeknabladid.is)
  • Table I. The demographic data and history of the patients who sought the emergency room at Landspítali University Hospital because of the acute flank pain syndrome. (laeknabladid.is)
  • The symptoms and signs of the patients who sought the emergency room at Landspítali University Hospital because of the acute flank pain syndrome. (laeknabladid.is)
  • College Documentation Acute flank pain may be piercing, without any increase or decrease in the pain with movements. (softups.com)
  • Ketorolac tromethamine tablets, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), are indicated for the short-term (up to 5 days in adults), management of moderately severe acute pain that requires analgesia at the opioid level and only as continuation treatment following IV or IM dosing of ketorolac tromethamine, if necessary. (nih.gov)
  • Ketorolac tromethamine, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is indicated for the short-term (up to 5 days in adults) management of moderately severe acute pain that requires analgesia at the opioid level. (nih.gov)
  • If you have flank pain and fever, chills, blood in the urine, or frequent or urgent urination, then a kidney problem is the likely cause. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Flank pain with fever and urinary symptoms may mean a kidney infection (pyelonephritis) is present. (healthwise.net)
  • Nephrolithiasis Flank pain is the classic presenting symptom of urinary calculi and is the predominant cause of flank pain in the absence of fever. (com.ng)
  • If that same hypotensive person has back pain instead of a fever, the clinician may see an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is leaking or ruptured. (wikipedia.org)
  • Classic renal colic is described as crampy flank pain radiating downward to the groin and is often accompanied by nausea and vomiting. (com.ng)
  • A case initially was defined as nausea, vomiting, abdominal or back pain, and AKI (i.e., serum creatinine concentration above the facility's reference range) in a patient reporting SC use and illness onset during February 1-March 1. (cdc.gov)
  • Nausea, with pain piercing to the back, for fifteen minutes (third day). (abchomeopathy.com)
  • 2012). "Loin pain hematuria syndrome-visceral or neuropathic pain syndrome? (wikidoc.org)
  • Left flank pain and hematuria. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Many abnormalities can lead to this condition, which is often accompanied by symptoms of pain and numbness in the legs, feet, and toes. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • Early symptoms include a pain near the belly button that may shift toward the lower right-hand side of the abdomen. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Some patients may experience symptoms such as stomach pain very slightly or not at all. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Before you try to find a way to treat your back pain, it is important that you understand the symptoms and the causes of back pain. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • You may also experience accompanying symptoms such as neck pain or headaches depending on the cause of your back pain. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • It is important for anyone who suffers from frequent back pain to be well informed about the symptoms of back pain. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • So what are the common symptoms of back pain? (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • The symptoms of upper back pain are quite varied and may include muscle spasms, discomfort while inhaling, weakness in the arms, restricted neck movements, and a pinching feeling between the shoulder blades. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • Some of the most common accompanying middle back pain symptoms are soreness to the touch, difficulty in performing simple activities, stiffness, and restriction in body movements. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • Some of the other lung cancer induced back pain symptoms include swelling in the face or neck, respiratory infections, hoarseness in the voice, and recurrent pneumonia. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • Stones in the Urinary Tract Stones (calculi) are hard masses that form in the urinary tract and may cause pain, bleeding, or an infection or block of the flow of urine. (msdmanuals.com)
  • My pain also travels into my hips and groin and I have blood in my urine but only first thing in the mornings. (patient.info)
  • Flank pain is pain in one side of the body between the upper belly area (abdomen) and the back. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Flank pain refers to discomfort in your upper abdomen or back and sides. (rio-negocios.com)
  • Flank pain is discomfort in your upper abdomen or back and sides. (uclahealth.org)
  • Occasionally, the pain extends to the center of the abdomen. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Ovulation pain can occur in the lower abdomen around the midpoint of the menstrual cycle and is linked to an increase in luteinizing hormone levels. (medicinenet.com)
  • Pain usually migrates from the midsection of the abdomen to the lower right section. (medicinenet.com)
  • Continual swelling and pain of the abdomen down to the left groin (fifth day). (abchomeopathy.com)
  • Non-Parenchymal Renal Etiologies - Most non-parenchymal etiologies of renal pain involve obstruction of the urinary tract. (com.ng)
  • Additionally, the upper urinary tract itself is well innervated and irritation by a foreign body (eg, kidney stone, ureteral stent) can trigger flank pain even if no hydronephrosis is present. (com.ng)
  • Flank pain from nephrolithiasis can result from marked dilation of the proximal urinary tract as well as local inflammation and possible ischemia. (com.ng)
  • In the setting of uncontrollable pain, inability to tolerate oral intake, or concomitant urinary tract infection, urologic consultation to pursue surgical management should be considered. (com.ng)
  • Direct palpation of the involved rib usually produces intense pain. (medscape.com)
  • On examination, flank palpation and percussion often confirm the pain. (com.ng)
  • On examination of the back, patient had tenderness on the right flank upon palpation. (vastcoach.com)
  • Vitamin D deficiency was the reported cause of flank pain in 187 patients with distinct tenderness over the tips of the lowermost ribs that could not be explained by history and radiology. (medscape.com)
  • You may feel pain in your back, in your side or both sides under your ribs, or in your groin. (rio-negocios.com)
  • Flank pain tends to be localized on one side, beneath the ribs but above the pelvis, and sometimes in the small of the back. (rio-negocios.com)
  • Any pain associated with one or both kidneys are usually felt in the flank or back, towards the edge of the lower ribs. (rio-negocios.com)
  • In between the ribs and pelvic bone lie your flanks, of which there are two (one on each side of the body). (belmarrahealth.com)
  • Flank pain affects the area on either side of the lower back, between the pelvis and the ribs. (com.ng)
  • The pains for gallstones often include excruciating pain under your right ribs, that isn't always there, but when it is it can be very intense, it can also cause breathlessness, the pain may also travel up to your shoulder? (patient.info)
  • The ureter contracts in response to the stone, causing severe, crampy pain (renal or ureteral colic) in the flank or lower back that often extends to the groin or, in men, to a testis. (msdmanuals.com)
  • You have groin or belly pain. (kaiserpermanente.org)
  • flank pain: Clinical medicine Pain in the side DiffDx Adrenal tumor, hydronephrosis, polycystic kidney, pyelonephritis, renal tumor, renal cyst Kokh Meaning in English - Find the correct meaning of Kokh in English, it is important to understand the word properly when we translate it from Urdu to English. (softups.com)
  • A strain, contusion, or other injury of the back or flank can lead to a dull aching discomfort or soreness in the thoracolumbar area. (medscape.com)
  • It is sometimes hard to tell the difference between back pain that is caused by a bone or muscle problem and back pain (flank pain) that is caused by a kidney or bladder infection or a kidney stone. (healthwise.net)
  • The pain continues as the stone travels through the ureters, the bladder, and out the urethra if it's small enough. (rio-negocios.com)
  • The pain stops without resuming again when the ureter relaxes or the stone passes into the bladder. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Conditions that have been known to trigger pain in the lower back include pregnancy, bladder infections, kidney problems, and even cancer. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • If you take any prescription medicines such as muscle relaxants, pain medicines, or medicines for depression or anxiety, ask your doctor or pharmacist if they can cause urination problems. (kaiserpermanente.org)
  • Side pain can be described as mild and dull or a severe cramp-like feeling. (rio-negocios.com)
  • An injury to the costovertebral junction or vertebral transverse process can also produce similar pain secondary to local effects. (medscape.com)
  • A pain characteristic of this condition may also develop due to a trauma to the costovertebral junctions. (rio-negocios.com)
  • Kidney pain is felt in your flank, which is the area on either side of your spine between the bottom of your ribcage and your hips. (softups.com)
  • It started all of a sudden and its worst when I wake up or being woken up due to the pain. (patient.info)
  • Kidney pain is a term used to describe the type of pain experienced in the back or the flank, and caused due to diseases related to the kidneys. (softups.com)
  • Kidney stone pain is severe and persistent, beginning suddenly in the back or sides. (medicinenet.com)
  • Classically accompanied by a dermatomal skin eruption, this infection of nerve cell bodies produces burning pain that generally is limited to a discrete band that corresponds to a dermatome. (medscape.com)
  • Bilateral Kidney Pain, Stones on Both Sides May Be Infection. (rio-negocios.com)
  • Most severe pain is sharp and is in the flank and right under both shoulder blades. (rio-negocios.com)
  • Upon admission, the patient was noted by the ER physician to be in severe pain, with a pain scale of 9 from a visual analog pain scale from 1 to 10. (vastcoach.com)
  • Stomach pain in girls is common during puberty and adolescence but is rarely serious. (medicinenet.com)
  • Allergic reactions to certain foods can cause stomach pain. (medicinenet.com)
  • The stomach pain may be less severe and less specific. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • If there is stomach pain, this may result from another condition. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The doctor will do a physical exam to find out more about the patient's stomach pain. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • If you do suffer from frequent bouts of back pain or a very severe back pain, it would be advisable to seek a thorough medical diagnosis. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • Is pain felt just below the rib cage and above the waist. (healthwise.net)
  • string(10) "full-width" 3 days later and still have severe stabbing pains deep into my waist/flank. (rio-negocios.com)
  • Flank pain is pain on the side of the back just below the rib cage and above the waist. (com.ng)
  • I have the same pain in a morning, same thing, starts about 5am and very painful. (patient.info)
  • Excruciating pain below lower right ribcage to lower back only upon waking - sometimes wakes me from 5 am. (patient.info)
  • Flanked meaning in Urdu has been searched 662 (six hundred and sixty-two) times till Oct 12, 2020. (softups.com)
  • Ive been having left chest and shoulder pain, and now severe left flank pain possible kidney damage? (careproper.com)
  • Neuropathic flank pain secondary to radiculitis can occur when the upper lumbar or lower thoracic nerve roots are injured. (medscape.com)
  • There are a few parts of the flank, but the easiest way to identify it is through the lower part of the flank. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • What is left lower quadrant pain ICD-9? (com.ng)
  • The problem is that many people dismiss lower back pain as a pulled muscle or a side effect of aging. (uclahealth.org)
  • Back pain could refer to any kind of pain that afflicts any area of the back, including the lower, upper, or middle back. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • Though lower back pain is a lot more prevalent, there are some people who tend to suffer from upper back pain or middle back pain on a regular basis. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • Fortunately, in most cases, upper, middle or lower back pain does not stem from any serious condition and can be managed with the help of medication, simple remedies, exercises, and so on. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • The claimant alleged disability beginning on July 6, 2009, arising from lower back pain, depression, and diabetes mellitus. (justia.com)
  • Flank pain is in most cases due to a problem in the kidney or ureters, irrespective of whether it occurs on the right or left flank. (softups.com)
  • What is the icd9 for left flank pain? (com.ng)
  • What is the ICD-10 code for left flank cellulitis? (com.ng)
  • Pain is usually on one side, with right-sided pain being more common than left-sided pain. (medicinenet.com)
  • Pain in the left flank, just when yawning (fifth day). (abchomeopathy.com)
  • Today is my fourth day with a swollen right kidney, chronic pain in my left back and flank, and the inability to sleep, drink or eat. (medhelp.org)
  • Just to correct typo in my original post - the pain is in my RIGHT back and flank, not left. (medhelp.org)
  • The diagnosis and treatment of radicular pain can be challenging, often requiring a multi-disciplinary approach. (medscape.com)
  • Stretch Quadrant Low Back Pain Pain â ¦ string(0) "" Learn how your comment data is processed. (rio-negocios.com)
  • How to fix Back Bone Pain Meaning In Urdu And Best Remedy For Bad Back Pain Downl. (softups.com)
  • Is flank pain the same as back pain? (com.ng)
  • I still have back pain in the mornings but it is a world away from the pain I was getting before. (patient.info)
  • Twelve patients reported abdominal, flank, and/or back pain. (cdc.gov)
  • As children, we often overheard our grandparents complain of back aches and back pain, and so we tend to associate back pain with old age. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • The severity of back pain can vary greatly among different individuals, and while it may simply be a bit of a bother to some, it could be almost debilitating to others. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • this is known as chronic back pain. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • Back pain can at times be indicative of a far more serious back problem and should never be treated lightly. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • Back pain is one of the most common ailments today and statistics suggest that 85 percent of all adults in the United States will suffer from low back pain at least once in their lifetime. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • Since you are reading this page, you probably fall into this category and are searching for a cure for back pain. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • If you suffer from severe back pain on a regular basis you should consult a doctor for exercises, diet, and lifestyle changes that can help prevent recurrent back pain. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • Back pain is not a condition but it is a symptom of an underlying problem. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • You may experience back pain due to an injury or a muscle pull. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • Thoracic pain is the term used to describe upper back or middle back pain. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • Though rare, back pain can also be an indication of lung cancer. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • im not very sure if its flank pain but my flank area feels a little sore kind of like i need to stretch it coz it feels a little stiff kind of feeling. (rio-negocios.com)
  • Flank hernia is a specific type of a hernia located in the side of the abdominal wall. (softups.com)
  • Pain caused by kidney disorders usually is felt in the side (flank) or small of the back. (msdmanuals.com)
  • My surgery was finished on the seventh day of the first pain in my right side. (cancer.org)
  • Flank pain is a relatively common condition seen in a variety of settings, from general practice to any number of specialties. (medscape.com)
  • The most common use for medical pot treatment is as an analgesic (pain reliever), as cancer patients often deal with debilitating pain. (marijuanadoctors.com)