Fistula: Abnormal communication most commonly seen between two internal organs, or between an internal organ and the surface of the body.Arteriovenous Fistula: An abnormal direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. An A-V fistula usually leads to the formation of a dilated sac-like connection, arteriovenous aneurysm. The locations and size of the shunts determine the degree of effects on the cardiovascular functions such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEART RATE.Intestinal Fistula: An abnormal anatomical passage between the INTESTINE, and another segment of the intestine or other organs. External intestinal fistula is connected to the SKIN (enterocutaneous fistula). Internal intestinal fistula can be connected to a number of organs, such as STOMACH (gastrocolic fistula), the BILIARY TRACT (cholecystoduodenal fistula), or the URINARY BLADDER of the URINARY TRACT (colovesical fistula). Risk factors include inflammatory processes, cancer, radiation treatment, and surgical misadventures (MEDICAL ERRORS).Cutaneous Fistula: An abnormal passage or communication leading from an internal organ to the surface of the body.Bronchial Fistula: An abnormal passage or communication between a bronchus and another part of the body.Vascular Fistula: An abnormal passage between two or more BLOOD VESSELS, between ARTERIES; VEINS; or between an artery and a vein.Rectal Fistula: An abnormal anatomical passage connecting the RECTUM to the outside, with an orifice at the site of drainage.Gastric Fistula: Abnormal passage communicating with the STOMACH.Urinary Fistula: An abnormal passage in any part of the URINARY TRACT between itself or with other organs.Esophageal Fistula: Abnormal passage communicating with the ESOPHAGUS. The most common type is TRACHEOESOPHAGEAL FISTULA between the esophagus and the TRACHEA.Biliary Fistula: Abnormal passage in any organ of the biliary tract or between biliary organs and other organs.Pancreatic Fistula: Abnormal passage communicating with the PANCREAS.Rectovaginal Fistula: An abnormal anatomical passage between the RECTUM and the VAGINA.Vesicovaginal Fistula: An abnormal anatomical passage between the URINARY BLADDER and the VAGINA.Respiratory Tract Fistula: An abnormal passage communicating between any component of the respiratory tract or between any part of the respiratory system and surrounding organs.Vaginal Fistula: An abnormal anatomical passage that connects the VAGINA to other organs, such as the bladder (VESICOVAGINAL FISTULA) or the rectum (RECTOVAGINAL FISTULA).Tracheoesophageal Fistula: Abnormal passage between the ESOPHAGUS and the TRACHEA, acquired or congenital, often associated with ESOPHAGEAL ATRESIA.Urinary Bladder Fistula: An abnormal passage in the URINARY BLADDER or between the bladder and any surrounding organ.Arterio-Arterial Fistula: Abnormal communication between two ARTERIES that may result from injury or occur as a congenital abnormality.Arteriovenous Shunt, Surgical: Surgical shunt allowing direct passage of blood from an artery to a vein. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula: An acquired or spontaneous abnormality in which there is communication between CAVERNOUS SINUS, a venous structure, and the CAROTID ARTERIES. It is often associated with HEAD TRAUMA, specifically basilar skull fractures (SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR). Clinical signs often include VISION DISORDERS and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION.Digestive System Fistula: An abnormal passage communicating between any components of the digestive system, or between any part of the digestive system and surrounding organ(s).Central Nervous System Vascular Malformations: Congenital, inherited, or acquired abnormalities involving ARTERIES; VEINS; or venous sinuses in the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and MENINGES.Pleural DiseasesOral Fistula: An abnormal passage within the mouth communicating between two or more anatomical structures.Cavernous Sinus: An irregularly shaped venous space in the dura mater at either side of the sphenoid bone.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Duodenal Diseases: Pathological conditions in the DUODENUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).Urethral Diseases: Pathological processes involving the URETHRA.Esophageal Atresia: Congenital abnormality characterized by the lack of full development of the ESOPHAGUS that commonly occurs with TRACHEOESOPHAGEAL FISTULA. Symptoms include excessive SALIVATION; GAGGING; CYANOSIS; and DYSPNEA.Brachiocephalic Veins: Large veins on either side of the root of the neck formed by the junction of the internal jugular and subclavian veins. They drain blood from the head, neck, and upper extremities, and unite to form the superior vena cava.Oroantral Fistula: A fistula between the maxillary sinus and the oral cavity.Renal Dialysis: Therapy for the insufficient cleansing of the BLOOD by the kidneys based on dialysis and including hemodialysis, PERITONEAL DIALYSIS, and HEMODIAFILTRATION.Dura Mater: The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.Aortic Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the AORTA.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Vascular Patency: The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.Colonic Diseases: Pathological processes in the COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Coronary Vessel Anomalies: Malformations of CORONARY VESSELS, either arteries or veins. Included are anomalous origins of coronary arteries; ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA; CORONARY ANEURYSM; MYOCARDIAL BRIDGING; and others.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Fibrin Tissue Adhesive: An autologous or commercial tissue adhesive containing FIBRINOGEN and THROMBIN. The commercial product is a two component system from human plasma that contains more than fibrinogen and thrombin. The first component contains highly concentrated fibrinogen, FACTOR VIII, fibronectin, and traces of other plasma proteins. The second component contains thrombin, calcium chloride, and antifibrinolytic agents such as APROTININ. Mixing of the two components promotes BLOOD CLOTTING and the formation and cross-linking of fibrin. The tissue adhesive is used for tissue sealing, HEMOSTASIS, and WOUND HEALING.Cranial Sinuses: Large endothelium-lined venous channels situated between the two layers of DURA MATER, the endosteal and the meningeal layers. They are devoid of valves and are parts of the venous system of dura mater. Major cranial sinuses include a postero-superior group (such as superior sagittal, inferior sagittal, straight, transverse, and occipital) and an antero-inferior group (such as cavernous, petrosal, and basilar plexus).Drainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Catheters, Indwelling: Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.Pharyngeal Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PHARYNX.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Salivary Gland Fistula: A fistula between a salivary duct or gland and the cutaneous surface of the oral cavity.Ureteral Diseases: Pathological processes involving the URETERS.Hematemesis: Vomiting of blood that is either fresh bright red, or older "coffee-ground" in character. It generally indicates bleeding of the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Cassia: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. Many species of this genus, including the medicinal C. senna and C. angustifolia, have been reclassified into the Senna genus (SENNA PLANT) and some to CHAMAECRISTA.Cerebral Veins: Veins draining the cerebrum.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Cerebral Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.Abscess: Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.Tissue Adhesives: Substances used to cause adherence of tissue to tissue or tissue to non-tissue surfaces, as for prostheses.Tracheal DiseasesBlood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Upper Extremity: The region of the upper limb in animals, extending from the deltoid region to the HAND, and including the ARM; AXILLA; and SHOULDER.Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea: Discharge of cerebrospinal fluid through the nose. Common etiologies include trauma, neoplasms, and prior surgery, although the condition may occur spontaneously. (Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1997 Apr;116(4):442-9)Vena Cava, Inferior: The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.PolyvinylsBlood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Iatrogenic Disease: Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.Radial Artery: The direct continuation of the brachial trunk, originating at the bifurcation of the brachial artery opposite the neck of the radius. Its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to the three regions in which the vessel is situated, the forearm, wrist, and hand.Axillary Vein: The venous trunk of the upper limb; a continuation of the basilar and brachial veins running from the lower border of the teres major muscle to the outer border of the first rib where it becomes the subclavian vein.Graft Occlusion, Vascular: Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.Pancreaticojejunostomy: Surgical anastomosis of the pancreatic duct, or the divided end of the transected pancreas, with the jejunum. (Dorland, 28th ed)Wounds, Stab: Penetrating wounds caused by a pointed object.Aneurysm, False: Not an aneurysm but a well-defined collection of blood and CONNECTIVE TISSUE outside the wall of a blood vessel or the heart. It is the containment of a ruptured blood vessel or heart, such as sealing a rupture of the left ventricle. False aneurysm is formed by organized THROMBUS and HEMATOMA in surrounding tissue.Arteriovenous Malformations: Abnormal formation of blood vessels that shunt arterial blood directly into veins without passing through the CAPILLARIES. They usually are crooked, dilated, and with thick vessel walls. A common type is the congenital arteriovenous fistula. The lack of blood flow and oxygen in the capillaries can lead to tissue damage in the affected areas.Pancreatectomy: Surgical removal of the pancreas. (Dorland, 28th ed)Pancreaticoduodenectomy: The excision of the head of the pancreas and the encircling loop of the duodenum to which it is connected.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Wounds, Gunshot: Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.Jugular Veins: Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.Anal Canal: The terminal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, beginning from the ampulla of the RECTUM and ending at the anus.Anus DiseasesKidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Iliac Vein: A vein on either side of the body which is formed by the union of the external and internal iliac veins and passes upward to join with its fellow of the opposite side to form the inferior vena cava.Laryngectomy: Total or partial excision of the larynx.Hypospadias: A birth defect due to malformation of the URETHRA in which the urethral opening is below its normal location. In the male, the malformed urethra generally opens on the ventral surface of the PENIS or on the PERINEUM. In the female, the malformed urethral opening is in the VAGINA.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Femoral Vein: The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.Perilymph: The fluid separating the membranous labyrinth from the osseous labyrinth of the ear. It is entirely separate from the ENDOLYMPH which is contained in the membranous labyrinth. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1396, 642)Crohn Disease: A chronic transmural inflammation that may involve any part of the DIGESTIVE TRACT from MOUTH to ANUS, mostly found in the ILEUM, the CECUM, and the COLON. In Crohn disease, the inflammation, extending through the intestinal wall from the MUCOSA to the serosa, is characteristically asymmetric and segmental. Epithelioid GRANULOMAS may be seen in some patients.Venae Cavae: The inferior and superior venae cavae.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Ileal Diseases: Pathological development in the ILEUM including the ILEOCECAL VALVE.Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations: Congenital vascular anomalies in the brain characterized by direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. The locations and size of the shunts determine the symptoms including HEADACHES; SEIZURES; STROKE; INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES; mass effect; and vascular steal effect.Enbucrilate: A tissue adhesive that is applied as a monomer to moist tissue and polymerizes to form a bond. It is slowly biodegradable and used in all kinds of surgery, including dental.Sigmoid Diseases: Pathological processes in the SIGMOID COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Pneumonectomy: The excision of lung tissue including partial or total lung lobectomy.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Dental Fistula: An abnormal passage in the oral cavity on the gingiva.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Meningeal Arteries: Arteries which supply the dura mater.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Esophageal Stenosis: A stricture of the ESOPHAGUS. Most are acquired but can be congenital.Polytetrafluoroethylene: Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.Jejunal Diseases: Pathological development in the JEJUNUM region of the SMALL INTESTINE.Cranial Fossa, Anterior: The compartment containing the inferior part and anterior extremities of the frontal lobes (FRONTAL LOBE) of the cerebral hemispheres. It is formed mainly by orbital parts of the FRONTAL BONE and the lesser wings of the SPHENOID BONE.Urogenital Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the urinary tract or its organs and on the male or female genitalia.Aneurysm: Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.Exophthalmos: Abnormal protrusion of both eyes; may be caused by endocrine gland malfunction, malignancy, injury, or paralysis of the extrinsic muscles of the eye.Phlebography: Radiographic visualization or recording of a vein after the injection of contrast medium.Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Brachial Artery: The continuation of the axillary artery; it branches into the radial and ulnar arteries.Urologic Surgical Procedures, Male: Surgery performed on the male genitalia.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Perineum: The body region lying between the genital area and the ANUS on the surface of the trunk, and to the shallow compartment lying deep to this area that is inferior to the PELVIC DIAPHRAGM. The surface area is between the VULVA and the anus in the female, and between the SCROTUM and the anus in the male.Ulnar Artery: The larger of the two terminal branches of the brachial artery, beginning about one centimeter distal to the bend of the elbow. Like the RADIAL ARTERY, its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to their locations in the forearm, wrist, and hand.Arm: The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage: Bleeding in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Subclavian Vein: The continuation of the axillary vein which follows the subclavian artery and then joins the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.Gastrostomy: Creation of an artificial external opening into the stomach for nutritional support or gastrointestinal compression.Bronchoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.Surgical Stapling: A technique of closing incisions and wounds, or of joining and connecting tissues, in which staples are used as sutures.Forearm: Part of the arm in humans and primates extending from the ELBOW to the WRIST.Jejunostomy: Surgical formation of an opening through the ABDOMINAL WALL into the JEJUNUM, usually for enteral hyperalimentation.Treatment Failure: A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.Empyema: Presence of pus in a hollow organ or body cavity.Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.Ligation: Application of a ligature to tie a vessel or strangulate a part.Pneumoencephalography: Radiographic visualization of the cerebral ventricles by injection of air or other gas.Angiography, Digital Subtraction: A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.Esophagoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the esophagus.Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Thoracostomy: Surgical procedure involving the creation of an opening (stoma) into the chest cavity for drainage; used in the treatment of PLEURAL EFFUSION; PNEUMOTHORAX; HEMOTHORAX; and EMPYEMA.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Aortography: Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.Empyema, Pleural: Suppurative inflammation of the pleural space.Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the THORACIC AORTA. This proximal descending portion of aorta gives rise to the visceral and the parietal branches above the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Esophagostomy: Surgical formation of an external opening (stoma) into the esophagus.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Radiography, Interventional: Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are invasive or surgical in nature, and require the expertise of a specially trained radiologist. In general, they are more invasive than diagnostic imaging but less invasive than major surgery. They often involve catheterization, fluoroscopy, or computed tomography. Some examples include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, percutaneous transthoracic biopsy, balloon angioplasty, and arterial embolization.Spinal Cord Diseases: Pathologic conditions which feature SPINAL CORD damage or dysfunction, including disorders involving the meninges and perimeningeal spaces surrounding the spinal cord. Traumatic injuries, vascular diseases, infections, and inflammatory/autoimmune processes may affect the spinal cord.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Obstetric Labor Complications: Medical problems associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR, such as BREECH PRESENTATION; PREMATURE OBSTETRIC LABOR; HEMORRHAGE; or others. These complications can affect the well-being of the mother, the FETUS, or both.Common Bile Duct Diseases: Diseases of the COMMON BILE DUCT including the AMPULLA OF VATER and the SPHINCTER OF ODDI.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.Gastroscopes: Endoscopes used for examining the interior of the stomach.Esophagus: The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Vertebral Artery: The first branch of the SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY with distribution to muscles of the NECK; VERTEBRAE; SPINAL CORD; CEREBELLUM; and interior of the CEREBRUM.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Venous Pressure: The blood pressure in the VEINS. It is usually measured to assess the filling PRESSURE to the HEART VENTRICLE.Echinococcosis, Hepatic: Liver disease caused by infections with parasitic tapeworms of the genus ECHINOCOCCUS, such as Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multilocularis. Ingested Echinococcus ova burrow into the intestinal mucosa. The larval migration to the liver via the PORTAL VEIN leads to watery vesicles (HYDATID CYST).Chyle: An opaque, milky-white fluid consisting mainly of emulsified fats that passes through the lacteals of the small intestines into the lymphatic system.Surgical Wound Dehiscence: Pathologic process consisting of a partial or complete disruption of the layers of a surgical wound.Intestinal Perforation: Opening or penetration through the wall of the INTESTINES.Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde: Fiberoptic endoscopy designed for duodenal observation and cannulation of VATER'S AMPULLA, in order to visualize the pancreatic and biliary duct system by retrograde injection of contrast media. Endoscopic (Vater) papillotomy (SPHINCTEROTOMY, ENDOSCOPIC) may be performed during this procedure.
As fistula sizes vary, small fistulae tend to result in little to no speech alterations whereas large fistulae tend to result ... Users must cut the new piece of adhesive and hold it over the fistula until it adheres. Adhesives are not to be used for soft ... In simpler terms, a palatal obturator covers any fistulas (or "holes") in the roof of the mouth that lead to the nasal cavity, ... Occlusion for the fistula is attempted by speakers with deviant tongue placements during these palatal stops. The palatal ...
... obstetric fistula, congenital fistula and iatrogenic fistula. Urogenital fistulas can be classified by size and more specific ... Urogenital fistulas vary in etiology (cause). Ninety-seven percent of fistulas that develop from prolonged and obstructed labor ... Globally, 75% of urogenital fistulas are obstructive labor fistulas. The average age of a woman who develops a fistula due to ... A urogenital fistulas are those abnormal tracts that exist between the vagina and bladder, ureters, or urethra. A fistula ...
... which is performed to recreate the size of the vaginal orifice to be similar to the size created at the time of primary ... Types I-III vary in how much tissue is removed; Type III is the UNICEF category "sewn closed". Type IV describes miscellaneous ... Vesicovaginal or rectovaginal fistulae can develop (holes that allow urine or faeces to seep into the vagina). This and other ... Because the clitoris is a skinlike structure and stretches out excessively, do not cut off too much, as a urinary fistula may ...
Several sizes are available, but most are implanted in adolescence to avoid repeated procedures to implant larger sizes at ... The goals of surgery vary with the type of intersex condition but usually include one or more of the following: Physical health ... Long-term complications can include fistulas between colon or upper rectum and skin or other cavities, or between urethra and ... Creating a functional urethra is difficult and poor healing, with scarring, stricture, or fistula can require a vesicostomy to ...
Those with smaller pore size are called "low-flux" and those with larger pore sizes are called "high-flux." Some larger ... The risk of infection varies depending on the type of access used (see below). Bleeding may also occur, again the risk varies ... The tube is connected to a 15, 16, or 17 gauge needle inserted in the dialysis fistula or graft, or connected to one port of a ... The placement of a catheter is usually done under light sedation, while fistulas and grafts require an operation. There are ...
... valve fistulas (4.5%), and pouch fistulas (6.3%)); Of the 32 patients treated for valve slippage, 23 achieved a fully ... This can vary depending on what kinds and quantities of food eaten. The process of draining the pouch is simple and quickly ... The stomal- or colorectal-nurse does this initially for a patient and advises them on the exact size required for the bag ( ... one after development of a pouch vesical fistula, the other after emergence of Crohn's disease, which had not been diagnosed at ...
The report also noted that the free-dripping technique promoted in the Technical Code was unsanitary as the fistula was an open ... In combination with the impacts of small cage sizes, their spacing and lack of internal structures, there are several ... The report also stated that surgeries to create free-dripping fistulae caused bears great suffering as they were performed ... Unsubstantiated estimates from China give varying estimates between 15,000 and 46,000, with a government estimate of 28,000. ...
The phallic structure ranges from a penis with varying degrees of diminished size and hypospadias to a slightly enlarged ... Complications of feminizing genitoplasty can include vaginal stenosis, meatal stenosis, vaginourethral fistula, female ... urethral fistulas, and posterior displacement of the balanic meatus. Successful masculinizing genitoplasty performed on ... Predominantly male phenotypes vary in the degree of genital undermasculinization to include micropenis, chordee, bifid scrotum ...
Of near miss events, obstetrical fistulae (OF), including vesicovaginal and rectovaginal fistulae, remain one of the most ... Biological differences vary all the way from phenotype to the cellular, and manifest unique risks for the development of ill ... The UNFPA has made prevention of OF a priority and is the lead agency in the Campaign to End Fistula, which issues annual ... Changing lifestyles, including diet, physical activity and cultural factors that favour larger body size in women, are ...
Obstetrical fistula[edit]. Main article: Obstetrical fistulae. Women in an Ethiopian fistula hospital ... Biological differences vary all the way from phenotype to the cellular, and manifest unique risks for the development of ill ... Changing lifestyles, including diet, physical activity and cultural factors that favour larger body size in women, are ... Of near miss events, obstetrical fistulae (OF), including vesicovaginal and rectovaginal fistulae, remain one of the most ...
"Academic Achievement Varies With Gestational Age Among Children Born at Term". Archived from the original on 4 September 2015. ... Speculation explaining a relationship between birth weight and maternal pelvis size has been proposed. The explanation, based ... Obstetrical fistulae *Vesicovaginal fistula. *Rectovaginal fistula. *Episiotomy *husband stitch. *Postpartum care. *Maternal ... In Italy the incidence of Caesarean sections is particularly high, although it varies from region to region.[70] In Campania, ...
Serotonin is responsible for inhibiting eating and controlling meal size,[72] among other things, and is modulated in part by ... For an individual woman, the follicular phase often varies in length from cycle to cycle; by contrast, the length of her luteal ... Obstetrical fistulae *Vesicovaginal fistula. *Rectovaginal fistula. *Episiotomy *husband stitch. *Postpartum care. *Maternal ... The length of a woman's menstrual cycle typically varies somewhat, with some shorter cycles and some longer cycles. A woman who ...
K60) Anal and rectal fissures and fistulas *(K60.3) Anal fistula. *(K60.5) Anorectal fistula (fecal fistula, fistula-in-ano): ... Treatment for fistula varies depending on the cause and extent of the fistula, but often involves surgical intervention ... N64.0) Fistula of nipple. *(N82) Fistulae involving female genital tract / Obstetric fistula *(N82.0) Vesicovaginal fistula: ... The Latin word fistula (plural fistulas or fistulae /-li, -laɪ/) literally means tube or pipe. ...
By contrast, the normal vaginal discharge will vary in consistency and amount throughout the menstrual cycle and is at its ... Urogenital fistulas *Ureterovaginal. *Vesicovaginal. *Obstetric fistula. *Rectovaginal fistula. *Prolapse *Cystocele. * ... Rates vary considerably between ethnic groups within a country.[8] While BV like symptoms have been described for much of ... The percentage of women affected at any given time varies between 5% and 70%.[8] BV is most common in parts of Africa and least ...
Depending on the location of the volvulus, symptoms may vary. For example, in patients with a cecal volvulus, the predominant ... The obstruction may be acute or chronic after years of uncontrolled disease leads to the formation of strictures and fistulas ...
Maternal HIV rates vary around the world, ranging from 1% to 40%, with African and Asian countries having the highest rates.[16 ... Obstetrical fistulae *Vesicovaginal fistula. *Rectovaginal fistula. *Postpartum care. *Maternal deaths. *Perinatal mortality ...
High-output (defined as , 500ml/day) enteric-cutaneous fistulas (unless a feeding tube can be passed distal to the fistula) ... Incorrect dosage can lead to many adverse, hard-to-guess effects, such as death, and varying degrees of deformation or other ... a fistula) or because its absorptive capacity is impaired.[1] It has been used for comatose patients, although enteral feeding ...
... crop fistula explanation free. What is crop fistula? Meaning of crop fistula medical term. What does crop fistula mean? ... Looking for online definition of crop fistula in the Medical Dictionary? ... Arteriovenous fistulas are most often congenital defects. Symptoms vary depending on the size and location of the fistula. ... See Gastrointestinal fistula, Inner ear fistula, Urinary fistula. fis·tu·la. , pl. fistulae, pl. fistulas (fistyū-lă, -lē, - ...
The manifestations of this disease vary in severity and complexity, commonly ranging from very mild to incapacitating. ... Perilymphatic or labyrinthine fistula is a condition in which an abnormal communication is present between the perilymphatic ... The size of the cochlear aqueduct varies dramatically between subjects. Even when it is relatively large, the cochlear aqueduct ... Sustained interest in perilymphatic fistula (PLF) began in the mid 1960s. The initial focus was on perilymphatic fistulas (PLFs ...
Asymptomatic fistulae can resolve spontaneously and most lesions can be monitored after detection especially if the size of the ... These communications can occur at any point in the vascular system; varying in size, length, location, and number. ... There is no medical treatment for an arteriovenous fistula (AVF).. *Iatrogenic arteriovenous fistulae, presenting only as pain ... Acquired arteriovenous fistula (AVF) can result in digital clubbing.[18]. *Patients on hemodialysis with arteriovenous fistula ...
Illustratively, an anorectal fistula can be treated by placing a volumetric construct within the primary opening of the fistula ... and systems useful in the treatment of fistulae, and in certain embodiments those having openings extending into the alimentary ... The distance between each disc, as well as the size of each disc, can be varied in order to provide varying degrees of strain ... gastro-cutaneous fistulae, and any number of anorectal fistulae, such as recto-vaginal fistula, recto-vesical fistulae, recto- ...
This results in varied appearance of dilation of different cardiac chambers due to the shunts on echocardiography. The size of ... 6. Coronary Artery Fistulas. Congenital coronary artery fistula (CAF) is a rare, isolated anomaly of the coronary artery system ... by the size of the fistula and the pressure difference between the coronary artery and the chamber into which the fistula ... Symptoms and signs are dependent on the size of the fistulous connection; rarely, large fistulas can have a significant left-to ...
... brain often causes sudden onset of a headache with varying degrees of neurological disability related to the location and size ... Dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF). Dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF). Dural arteriovenous fistulas are abnormal connections ... Dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) are abnormal connections between an artery and a vein in the tough covering over the brain ... Most dural arteriovenous fistulas have no clear origin, although some result from identifiable causes such as traumatic head ...
Treatment may vary from surgical correction or transcatheter occlusion of the shunt to even liver transplantation [19, 20]. For ... Stage 3, next 6 weeks later, normal left and right portal veins and normal-sized intrahepatic portal veins were confirmed by ... Children with Abernathy malformation can develop hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) with pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas (PAVF) or ... Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula: clinical and histologic Spectrum of four cases. J Pathol Transl Med. 2016;50(5):390-3.CrossRef ...
As fistula sizes vary, small fistulae tend to result in little to no speech alterations whereas large fistulae tend to result ... Users must cut the new piece of adhesive and hold it over the fistula until it adheres. Adhesives are not to be used for soft ... In simpler terms, a palatal obturator covers any fistulas (or "holes") in the roof of the mouth that lead to the nasal cavity, ... Occlusion for the fistula is attempted by speakers with deviant tongue placements during these palatal stops. The palatal ...
... in many cases when the shunted pouch was located adjacent to the main lumen of the sinus because the size of the TSS varied ... transverse-sigmoid sinus dural arteriovenous fistula. Transverse-sigmoid sinus dural arteriovenous fistula is one of the most ... arteriovenous fistula. MPR. multiplanar reformatted. n-BCA. butyl 2-cyanoacrylate. SP. shunted pouch. TSS-DAVF. ... Selective transvenous embolization of dural fistulas without occlusion of the dural sinus. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 1998;19:389-91 ...
A balloon may be used to at least temporarily seal one end of the fistula. An RF probe or mechanical hook member may be used to ... The barbs may be hollow to deliver a medical fluid within the fistula. The debriding member may also include a plurality of ... The openings may include associated protrusions that are configured to debride the fistula wall. The medical fluid may include ... The tissue in the slurry may comprise minced tissue that was harvested from the patient afflicted with the fistula. ...
Arteriovenous fistula management varies depending on size and if clinical symptoms:. * Small and clinically asymptomatic ... Tao, Z. "Treatment of post catheterization femoral arteriovenous fistulas with simple prolonged bandaging". Chinese Med J. vol ... Large or clinically symptomatic fistula can should be managed with ultrasound guided compression, or surgical repair of the ... Additionally, there are several case reports of covered stent angioplasty to exclude the fistula and recreate separate channels ...
Urethral calculi can be formed in various locations of the urethra, and the size of the calculus ranged from small (multiple) ... The fistula external orifice located at the root of the penis was relatively common, and there were various etiological factors ... The patients (including those reported in the literature) were characterized by age, origin, location of calculus, size of ... Most of urethral calculi associated with a urethral fistula were native generated. ...
A: Cysts vary in size and can be as small as a penny and as large as a tennis ball. ... These growths vary in size. Cysts frequently become infected, leading to pilonidal abscesses that are very painful and require ... The growth is almost always associated with varying levels of pus build up and leakage, which have to be drained in order to ... Although there is no definitive consensus about what causes a pilonidal cyst (also known as a sacrococcygeal fistula), many ...
Characteristics of rectovaginal fistula (RVF), for example, site, size, length, activity, and symptoms, vary depending on the ... These fistulae are also called malignant fistulae.. Radiation[7]: Radiation causes long-term chronic tissue inflammation with ... Rectovaginal Fistula. Introduction. A fistula is an abnormal connection between 2 epithelial surfaces. This is a general ... The frequency of rectovaginal fistula varies according to the cause. They are typically classified by etiology, location, and ...
Arteriovenous fistulas are most often congenital defects. Symptoms vary depending on the size and location of the fistula. ... Arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) can develop between an artery and a vein in any part of the body. These fistulas vary in size, ... Fistulas Cause and Symptoms. The causes and symptoms of fistulas vary depending on their location. Anal and rectal fistulas are ... The treatment of arteriovenous fistulas depends on the size and location of the fistula and usually includes surgery. ...
University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust Care of your fistula 1 This booklet compliments the patient information booklet you ... should have received before you had your fistula created which gives details ... It can vary in colour and size and you may also have symptoms ... You may see aneurysms on fistulas that have been established ... Declotting of a fistula A fistula can clot because of a narrowing by slowing the blood flow rate through the fistula The clot ...
... and a progressive increase in the size of the fistula. The treatments of choice are selective catheterization and embolization ... Renal arteriovenous fistulas. Urology. . 1976;8(2):101-107.. PubMed *Lord RS, Cherian SM, Ozmen J. Massive renal arteriovenous ... Clinical presentation of renal AV malformations varies. Primary symptoms are hematuria, hypertension, abdominal pain, and ... Acquired renal AV fistulas are more common. They are caused by trauma, inflammation, renal surgery, renal artery angioplasty, ...
We reported a case of a giant coronary artery aneurysm in a 38-year-old female, which was 9.4 x 9.7 x 9.2cm in size, arising ... The incidence of CAA varies between 0.3% to 5.3%. Due to advancements in diagnostic technologies, the incidence of CAA is on ... and cardiac catheterization after which surgery was performed to repair the aneurysm and fistula. Postoperatively, the patient ... from the left coronary artery, extending into the proximal circumflex, and draining into the right atrium, forming a fistula ...
Left kidney normal in size.  Shrunken right kidney. * 39. Urethral tuberculosis  Male urethra - uncommon, occurs secondry to ... Varying degrees of destruction of prostatic parenchyma with sloughing may produce irregular cavities.  Tuberculous prostatitis ... Associated with prostatic abscess or fistula formation.  Result in non specific stricture in bulbo- membranous urethra. ... sinuses or fistulae to the perineum or rectum watering-can perineum.  Cystourethrography- ○ early cases - filling of the ...
They are painful lesions in varied number, shape and size owing to its characteristic of self-inoculation. Inguinal ganglionar ... and 2/3 of the cases progress with fluctuation and fistulation with drainage of purulent material through one single fistula, ... with or without formation of fistulas. Two adenomegalias separated by Poupart ligament are characteristics of this disease. ... ulcerations of varied sizes, irregular margins and frequently involved by bright erythematous halo located in the genital, anal ...
Carotid-Cavernous Fistulas. The cavernous sinus is a hollow area behind the eyes. A carotid-cavernous sinus fistula (CCF) is a ... These are rare, complicated conditions and treatment varies depending on the size and location of the malformation. ... Or, embolization may reduce the size and reduce your related symptoms. Sometimes embolization is used to shrink a malformation ... Endovascular techniques available at Aurora BayCare make treatment for these fistulas less risky. ...
... bladder vaginal fistula. What are causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment of vaginal fistula ... Characteristics of rectovaginal fistula, for example, site, size, length, activity, and symptoms, vary depending on the cause ... of bladder vaginal fistulas have associated ureteral fistulas. If suspicion is high for a ureteral injury or fistula and the ... They warn of the risk of overexcising fistula edges, thereby causing an increase in the size of the fistula. They point out ...
The authors reported an extremely rare case of bilateral spontaneous vertebro-vertebral arteriovenous fistulas (VVAVFs) ... The size of fibered coils used for embolization in our case varied from 5 mm × 15 cm to 12 mm × 30 cm. Immediate ... Only left-sized fistula was successfully treated by a combination of balloon embolization and surgery followed by ... Most of these fistulas tend to resolve spontaneously because of the small size of the fistulas. Bilateral spontaneous VVAVFs ...
It can occur at any point in the body, be of any size, and vary in length and number. It refers to both the surgical procedure ... Small AV fistulas will not have any symptoms at all. However if they increase in size, symptoms will be experienced depending ... Depending on the size of the AV fistula, various forms of treatment can be recommended. When small, they dont cause health ... Arteriovenous fistula or AV fistula is an abnormal connection between arteries and veins. ...
C. Fistula venus-arterial D. Oklusi arteri karotid dalam di dekat origin arteri optalamik E. Cavernous sinus thrombosis ... Carotid-cm•ernous fistulas ( CCFs ) can be divided into posttraumatic and spontaneous t\•pes. They are direct shunts bet\\een ... This pleomorphism is related to the number, size, and topography of the lesions. Parenchymal disease (as in this case) is most ... Clinical manifestations of the neural form of the disease are varied and nonspecific. This pleomorphism is related to the ...
  • Ilio - iliac arteriovenous fistula (AVF) presents with progressive abdominal distention , dyspnea , and edema of the leg , which makes it difficult to distinguish from deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and can lead to a delay in the diagnosis . (wikidoc.org)
  • We present a case of a choledochoduodenal fistula in a woman with gallbladder cancer, and provide a discussion of her diagnosis and management. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A diagnosis of aortoesophageal fistula due to penetrating aortic ulcer was made and the patient taken up for an emergency surgery. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Here we describe the clinical manifestations, assessment methods, and management of 3 newborn infants with H-type tracheoesophageal fistula, together with diagnosis recommendations to prevent unnecessary delays in the management of this condition. (bvsalud.org)
  • Liquid in the pleural space, or pleural effusions, may be made conspicuous on chest radiographs by size or patient positioning, but identifying subtle findings may allow diagnosis of an effusion and its etiology. (appliedradiology.com)
  • If there is a large fistula however, a stomach bubble might be seen and the diagnosis may be missed. (chw.org)
  • In some cases it may be downsized gradually so that tissue can strengthen over time and compensate for the decreasing size of the obturator. (wikipedia.org)
  • Histopathologic examination of the tissue involved in the fistula reflects an acute inflammatory reaction besides the original pathology of the causative disease. (healthjade.net)
  • Acute inflammation is caused by a combination of more than one factor like the primary pathology causing the fistula (diverticular disease, malignancy, Crohn's, among others), tissue irritation by the flow of intestinal content, and the resulting infection. (healthjade.net)
  • Depending on the size and participation of adenomatoid tissue different types are differentiated. (usz.ch)
  • I was disgnosed when they biopsied the area around the fistula and found granuloumos tissue. (healingwell.com)
  • Additionally, because the procedure uses an endovascular (within the vessels) approach, it leaves the vasculature and tissue around the AV fistula undisturbed, improving healing time and overall outcomes. (azuravascularcare.com)
  • Large arteriovenous fistulae (AVF) can lead to congestive heart failure associated with increased activity of vasoconstrictor neurohormonal systems, the renin-angiotensin , sympathetic nervous system , endothelin system, and Arginine vasopressin . (wikidoc.org)
  • Fistulas can arise in any part of the body, but they are most common in the digestive tract. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Calculi in the urethra are uncommon, representing only 1-2% of all calculi in the genito-urinary tract [ 1 ], and urethral calculi causing urethrocutaneous fistula are extremely rare. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In the fistula methylene blue and hydrogen peroxide was injected to assess and stain fistula tract, its branches and internal opening. (drchivate.com)
  • In recurrent fistulae presenting with totally distorted anatomy and difficult to trace missed part of tract in previous surgery. (drchivate.com)
  • The Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 assigned vesicovaginal fistula a disability weight (a measure of the size of the negative impact of a fistula on a woman's life) of 0.342, similar to the disability weight assigned to moderate dementia (0.377) or the amputation of both arms without treatment (0.383). (givewell.org)
  • Although surgery can repair the physical damage of fistula, the devastating consequences that affect a woman's quality of life may persist when she reintegrates into her community. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Perilymphatic, or labyrinthine, fistula is a condition in which an abnormal communication is present between the perilymphatic space of the inner ear and the middle ear or mastoid. (medscape.com)
  • This fixed obturator is based on the Nance appliance, which was originally used as a space maintainer in dentistry and orthodontics, but has been redesigned for closing anterior palatal fistulas in patients with cleft lip and palate. (wikipedia.org)
  • The patients (including those reported in the literature) were characterized by age, origin, location of calculus, size of calculus, fistulous track, and etiological factors. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Through this work, we hope to gain clinicians' and patients' attention concerning urethral calculi with a urethral fistula, a problem which has, so far, been under-reported. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Methods After obtaining the institutional ethics committee approval, retrospective review of the medical records of five patients of pancreatico-pleural fistulae who were diagnosed and successfully managed in our hospital in 2012 and 2013 was done. (imedpub.com)
  • This test could be negative in some patients in whom oedematous middle ear mucosa occludes the fistula (false negative). (intelligentdental.com)
  • Percutaneous Fistula Creation: What Does That Mean for Dialysis Patients? (azuravascularcare.com)
  • Nearly all women believed their quality of life had improved at the individual and interpersonal levels since fistula repair, even among women who continued to have urinary incontinence. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Perilymphatic fistula (PLF) occurs when perilymph leaks from the perilymphatic spaces of the bony labyrinth into the middle ear space. (medscape.com)
  • Results and discussion Pancreatico-pleural fistulae presents with massive pleural effusion. (imedpub.com)
  • Conclusion In conclusion this case series highlights the clinical and imaging spectrum of pancreatico-pleural fistulae and provides insight into the different management strategies that can be adopted for this condition. (imedpub.com)
  • Pleural pathology varies widely and may manifest with one or more of the following: intrapleural liquid or gas, pleural thickening, and high attenuation. (appliedradiology.com)
  • In addition, we will discuss the imaging features of complex pleural-parenchymal abnormalities, with special consideration of bronchopleural fistulas, unexpandable lung, and post-pneumonectomy complications. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Although both these types of fistulas are uncommon in the developed world, they are common in poor developing countries and result from long, difficult labor and childbirth , especially in very young girls. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • If large enough, the fistula may cause a significant fraction of the total cardiac output to bypass the capillary bed, making it so that the tissues receive little or no oxygen. (petmd.com)