An abnormal direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. An A-V fistula usually leads to the formation of a dilated sac-like connection, arteriovenous aneurysm. The locations and size of the shunts determine the degree of effects on the cardiovascular functions such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEART RATE.
Surgical shunt allowing direct passage of blood from an artery to a vein. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Abnormal communication most commonly seen between two internal organs, or between an internal organ and the surface of the body.
Congenital, inherited, or acquired abnormalities involving ARTERIES; VEINS; or venous sinuses in the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and MENINGES.
An abnormal anatomical passage between the INTESTINE, and another segment of the intestine or other organs. External intestinal fistula is connected to the SKIN (enterocutaneous fistula). Internal intestinal fistula can be connected to a number of organs, such as STOMACH (gastrocolic fistula), the BILIARY TRACT (cholecystoduodenal fistula), or the URINARY BLADDER of the URINARY TRACT (colovesical fistula). Risk factors include inflammatory processes, cancer, radiation treatment, and surgical misadventures (MEDICAL ERRORS).
An abnormal anatomical passage connecting the RECTUM to the outside, with an orifice at the site of drainage.
An abnormal passage or communication between a bronchus and another part of the body.
An abnormal passage in any part of the URINARY TRACT between itself or with other organs.
An abnormal passage or communication leading from an internal organ to the surface of the body.
An abnormal passage between two or more BLOOD VESSELS, between ARTERIES; VEINS; or between an artery and a vein.
The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.
A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.
Abnormal passage communicating with the STOMACH.
Therapy for the insufficient cleansing of the BLOOD by the kidneys based on dialysis and including hemodialysis, PERITONEAL DIALYSIS, and HEMODIAFILTRATION.
Abnormal passage communicating with the ESOPHAGUS. The most common type is TRACHEOESOPHAGEAL FISTULA between the esophagus and the TRACHEA.
Large endothelium-lined venous channels situated between the two layers of DURA MATER, the endosteal and the meningeal layers. They are devoid of valves and are parts of the venous system of dura mater. Major cranial sinuses include a postero-superior group (such as superior sagittal, inferior sagittal, straight, transverse, and occipital) and an antero-inferior group (such as cavernous, petrosal, and basilar plexus).
Large veins on either side of the root of the neck formed by the junction of the internal jugular and subclavian veins. They drain blood from the head, neck, and upper extremities, and unite to form the superior vena cava.
Abnormal passage in any organ of the biliary tract or between biliary organs and other organs.
An irregularly shaped venous space in the dura mater at either side of the sphenoid bone.
An abnormal anatomical passage between the URINARY BLADDER and the VAGINA.
An abnormal anatomical passage that connects the VAGINA to other organs, such as the bladder (VESICOVAGINAL FISTULA) or the rectum (RECTOVAGINAL FISTULA).
The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.
Veins draining the cerebrum.
Abnormal passage communicating with the PANCREAS.
The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.
An abnormal passage in the URINARY BLADDER or between the bladder and any surrounding organ.
Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.
Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.
An abnormal passage communicating between any component of the respiratory tract or between any part of the respiratory system and surrounding organs.
An abnormal anatomical passage between the RECTUM and the VAGINA.
Abnormal passage between the ESOPHAGUS and the TRACHEA, acquired or congenital, often associated with ESOPHAGEAL ATRESIA.
Abnormal communication between two ARTERIES that may result from injury or occur as a congenital abnormality.
Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.
Arteries which supply the dura mater.
An acquired or spontaneous abnormality in which there is communication between CAVERNOUS SINUS, a venous structure, and the CAROTID ARTERIES. It is often associated with HEAD TRAUMA, specifically basilar skull fractures (SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR). Clinical signs often include VISION DISORDERS and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION.
The compartment containing the inferior part and anterior extremities of the frontal lobes (FRONTAL LOBE) of the cerebral hemispheres. It is formed mainly by orbital parts of the FRONTAL BONE and the lesser wings of the SPHENOID BONE.
Abnormal formation of blood vessels that shunt arterial blood directly into veins without passing through the CAPILLARIES. They usually are crooked, dilated, and with thick vessel walls. A common type is the congenital arteriovenous fistula. The lack of blood flow and oxygen in the capillaries can lead to tissue damage in the affected areas.
The region of the upper limb in animals, extending from the deltoid region to the HAND, and including the ARM; AXILLA; and SHOULDER.
The direct continuation of the brachial trunk, originating at the bifurcation of the brachial artery opposite the neck of the radius. Its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to the three regions in which the vessel is situated, the forearm, wrist, and hand.
The long large endothelium-lined venous channel on the top outer surface of the brain. It receives blood from a vein in the nasal cavity, runs backwards, and gradually increases in size as blood drains from veins of the brain and the DURA MATER. Near the lower back of the CRANIUM, the superior sagittal sinus deviates to one side (usually the right) and continues on as one of the TRANSVERSE SINUSES.
Penetrating wounds caused by a pointed object.
The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.
Congenital vascular anomalies in the brain characterized by direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. The locations and size of the shunts determine the symptoms including HEADACHES; SEIZURES; STROKE; INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES; mass effect; and vascular steal effect.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
A vein on either side of the body which is formed by the union of the external and internal iliac veins and passes upward to join with its fellow of the opposite side to form the inferior vena cava.
Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.
Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.
Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.
Malformations of CORONARY VESSELS, either arteries or veins. Included are anomalous origins of coronary arteries; ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA; CORONARY ANEURYSM; MYOCARDIAL BRIDGING; and others.
The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.
The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.
Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.
The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.
Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.
The venous trunk of the upper limb; a continuation of the basilar and brachial veins running from the lower border of the teres major muscle to the outer border of the first rib where it becomes the subclavian vein.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.
Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.
The two large endothelium-lined venous channels that begin at the internal occipital protuberance at the back and lower part of the CRANIUM and travels laterally and forward ending in the internal jugular vein (JUGULAR VEINS). One of the transverse sinuses, usually the right one, is the continuation of the SUPERIOR SAGITTAL SINUS. The other transverse sinus is the continuation of the straight sinus.
The first branch of the SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY with distribution to muscles of the NECK; VERTEBRAE; SPINAL CORD; CEREBELLUM; and interior of the CEREBRUM.
Pathologic conditions which feature SPINAL CORD damage or dysfunction, including disorders involving the meninges and perimeningeal spaces surrounding the spinal cord. Traumatic injuries, vascular diseases, infections, and inflammatory/autoimmune processes may affect the spinal cord.
The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.
Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.
Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.
Radiographic visualization or recording of a vein after the injection of contrast medium.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.
The continuation of the axillary artery; it branches into the radial and ulnar arteries.
Not an aneurysm but a well-defined collection of blood and CONNECTIVE TISSUE outside the wall of a blood vessel or the heart. It is the containment of a ruptured blood vessel or heart, such as sealing a rupture of the left ventricle. False aneurysm is formed by organized THROMBUS and HEMATOMA in surrounding tissue.
Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.
A tissue adhesive that is applied as a monomer to moist tissue and polymerizes to form a bond. It is slowly biodegradable and used in all kinds of surgery, including dental.
Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.
A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.
The continuation of the axillary vein which follows the subclavian artery and then joins the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
Part of the arm in humans and primates extending from the ELBOW to the WRIST.
The blood pressure in the VEINS. It is usually measured to assess the filling PRESSURE to the HEART VENTRICLE.
Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the exterior of the head, the face, and the greater part of the neck.
Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.
A fistula between a salivary duct or gland and the cutaneous surface of the oral cavity.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.
A state of elevated cardiac output due to conditions of either increased hemodynamic demand or reduced cardiac oxygen output. These conditions may include ANEMIA; ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA; THYROTOXICOSIS; PREGNANCY; EXERCISE; FEVER; and ANOXIA. In time, compensatory changes of the heart can lead to pathological form of high cardiac output and eventual HEART FAILURE.
Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.
Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.
Vein formed by the union (at the hilus of the spleen) of several small veins from the stomach, pancreas, spleen and mesentery.
Pathological processes in the COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.
The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.
Substances used to cause adherence of tissue to tissue or tissue to non-tissue surfaces, as for prostheses.
The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.
Vomiting of blood that is either fresh bright red, or older "coffee-ground" in character. It generally indicates bleeding of the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
The veins that return the oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart.
An abnormal passage communicating between any components of the digestive system, or between any part of the digestive system and surrounding organ(s).
Placement of an intravenous CATHETER in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein.
Pathological conditions in the DUODENUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).
The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.
Pathological processes involving the URETHRA.
X-ray visualization of the spinal cord following injection of contrast medium into the spinal arachnoid space.
A spontaneous diminution or abatement of a disease over time, without formal treatment.
The largest branch of the celiac trunk with distribution to the spleen, pancreas, stomach and greater omentum.
The larger of the two terminal branches of the brachial artery, beginning about one centimeter distal to the bend of the elbow. Like the RADIAL ARTERY, its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to their locations in the forearm, wrist, and hand.
Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are invasive or surgical in nature, and require the expertise of a specially trained radiologist. In general, they are more invasive than diagnostic imaging but less invasive than major surgery. They often involve catheterization, fluoroscopy, or computed tomography. Some examples include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, percutaneous transthoracic biopsy, balloon angioplasty, and arterial embolization.
Methods to repair breaks in tissue caused by trauma or to close surgical incisions.
The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.
Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.
A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.
The innermost layer of the three meninges covering the brain and spinal cord. It is the fine vascular membrane that lies under the ARACHNOID and the DURA MATER.
A nonspecific symptom of hearing disorder characterized by the sensation of buzzing, ringing, clicking, pulsations, and other noises in the ear. Objective tinnitus refers to noises generated from within the ear or adjacent structures that can be heard by other individuals. The term subjective tinnitus is used when the sound is audible only to the affected individual. Tinnitus may occur as a manifestation of COCHLEAR DISEASES; VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; and other conditions.
Surgery performed on the urinary tract or its organs and on the male or female genitalia.
An abnormal passage within the mouth communicating between two or more anatomical structures.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
Pathological development in the ILEUM including the ILEOCECAL VALVE.
A highly polar organic liquid, that is used widely as a chemical solvent. Because of its ability to penetrate biological membranes, it is used as a vehicle for topical application of pharmaceuticals. It is also used to protect tissue during CRYOPRESERVATION. Dimethyl sulfoxide shows a range of pharmacological activity including analgesia and anti-inflammation.
Mild to moderate loss of bilateral lower extremity motor function, which may be a manifestation of SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; MUSCULAR DISEASES; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; parasagittal brain lesions; and other conditions.
Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.
Short thick veins which return blood from the kidneys to the vena cava.
Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.
A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.
A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.
Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.
A vessel that directly interconnects an artery and a vein, and that acts as a shunt to bypass the capillary bed. Not to be confused with surgical anastomosis, nor with arteriovenous fistula.
A chronic transmural inflammation that may involve any part of the DIGESTIVE TRACT from MOUTH to ANUS, mostly found in the ILEUM, the CECUM, and the COLON. In Crohn disease, the inflammation, extending through the intestinal wall from the MUCOSA to the serosa, is characteristically asymmetric and segmental. Epithelioid GRANULOMAS may be seen in some patients.
The black, tarry, foul-smelling FECES that contain degraded blood.
Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.
The compartment containing the anterior extremities and half the inferior surface of the temporal lobes (TEMPORAL LOBE) of the cerebral hemispheres. Lying posterior and inferior to the anterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, ANTERIOR), it is formed by part of the TEMPORAL BONE and SPHENOID BONE. It is separated from the posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) by crests formed by the superior borders of the petrous parts of the temporal bones.
Pathological processes involving any part of the AORTA.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.
Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.
Part of the back and base of the CRANIUM that encloses the FORAMEN MAGNUM.
Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.
Injuries to blood vessels caused by laceration, contusion, puncture, or crush and other types of injuries. Symptoms vary by site and mode of injuries and may include bleeding, bruising, swelling, pain, and numbness. It does not include injuries secondary to pathologic function or diseases such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS.
An autologous or commercial tissue adhesive containing FIBRINOGEN and THROMBIN. The commercial product is a two component system from human plasma that contains more than fibrinogen and thrombin. The first component contains highly concentrated fibrinogen, FACTOR VIII, fibronectin, and traces of other plasma proteins. The second component contains thrombin, calcium chloride, and antifibrinolytic agents such as APROTININ. Mixing of the two components promotes BLOOD CLOTTING and the formation and cross-linking of fibrin. The tissue adhesive is used for tissue sealing, HEMOSTASIS, and WOUND HEALING.
Veins which return blood from the intestines; the inferior mesenteric vein empties into the splenic vein, the superior mesenteric vein joins the splenic vein to form the portal vein.
The therapy of the same disease in a patient, with the same agent or procedure repeated after initial treatment, or with an additional or alternate measure or follow-up. It does not include therapy which requires more than one administration of a therapeutic agent or regimen. Retreatment is often used with reference to a different modality when the original one was inadequate, harmful, or unsuccessful.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CRANIAL SINUSES, large endothelium-lined venous channels situated within the SKULL. Intracranial sinuses, also called cranial venous sinuses, include the superior sagittal, cavernous, lateral, petrous sinuses, and many others. Cranial sinus thrombosis can lead to severe HEADACHE; SEIZURE; and other neurological defects.
Incision of tissues for injection of medication or for other diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Punctures of the skin, for example may be used for diagnostic drainage; of blood vessels for diagnostic imaging procedures.
Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
An autosomal dominant vascular anomaly characterized by telangiectases of the skin and mucous membranes and by recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding. This disorder is caused by mutations of a gene (on chromosome 9q3) which encodes endoglin, a membrane glycoprotein that binds TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR BETA.
Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.
Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.
Pathological processes in the SIGMOID COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).
Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.
The vein formed by the union of the anterior and posterior tibial veins; it courses through the popliteal space and becomes the femoral vein.
Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.
The tearing or bursting of the weakened wall of the aneurysmal sac, usually heralded by sudden worsening pain. The great danger of a ruptured aneurysm is the large amount of blood spilling into the surrounding tissues and cavities, causing HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK.
Pathological processes involving the PHARYNX.
The inferior region of the skull consisting of an internal (cerebral), and an external (basilar) surface.
Bleeding into the intracranial or spinal SUBARACHNOID SPACE, most resulting from INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM rupture. It can occur after traumatic injuries (SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC). Clinical features include HEADACHE; NAUSEA; VOMITING, nuchal rigidity, variable neurological deficits and reduced mental status.
The vein which drains the foot and leg.
Total or partial excision of the larynx.
Catheters that are inserted into a large central vein such as a SUBCLAVIAN VEIN or FEMORAL VEIN.
Agents acting to arrest the flow of blood. Absorbable hemostatics arrest bleeding either by the formation of an artificial clot or by providing a mechanical matrix that facilitates clotting when applied directly to the bleeding surface. These agents function more at the capillary level and are not effective at stemming arterial or venous bleeding under any significant intravascular pressure.
Abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any one of the iliac arteries including the common, the internal, or the external ILIAC ARTERY.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.
Bleeding into one or both CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES including the BASAL GANGLIA and the CEREBRAL CORTEX. It is often associated with HYPERTENSION and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.
The continuation of the femoral artery coursing through the popliteal fossa; it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.
Subspecialty of radiology that combines organ system radiography, catheter techniques and sectional imaging.
The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.
Congenital abnormality characterized by the lack of full development of the ESOPHAGUS that commonly occurs with TRACHEOESOPHAGEAL FISTULA. Symptoms include excessive SALIVATION; GAGGING; CYANOSIS; and DYSPNEA.
Application of a ligature to tie a vessel or strangulate a part.

No data available that match "fistulae arteriovenous fistula"


No data available that match "fistulae arteriovenous fistula"


  • A dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) or Malformation, is an abnormal direct connection (fistula) between a meningeal artery and a meningeal vein or dural venous sinus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Borden Classification of dural arteriovenous malformations or fistulas, groups into three types based upon their venous drainage: Type I: dural arterial supply drains anterograde into venous sinus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Type I dural arteriovenous fistulas are supplied by meningeal arteries and drain into a meningeal vein or dural venous sinus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cervical vertebral AV fistulae are uncommon vascular lesions involving abnormal communication between the extradural vertebral artery and surrounding venous structures. (hindawi.com)
  • The flow pattern was characterized by high-velocity, turbulent, slightly pulsating, monophasic venous flow that was not influenced by respiration ( Figure , B). When interpreted together, these spectral Doppler findings indicate the presence of a pseudoaneurysm in communication with an arteriovenous fistula emptying into the distal portion of the common femoral vein. (ahajournals.org)
  • B , Color Doppler short-axis view of the femoral vessels and the pseudoaneurysm with the pseudoaneurysm neck (red) and the arteriovenous fistula (blue) and the corresponding spectral Doppler signal from low-resistance monophasic arterial flow in the pseudoaneurysm neck (upper right) and high-velocity turbulent venous flow in the arteriovenous fistula (lower right). (ahajournals.org)
  • 1 , 2 Rarely, the pseudoaneurysm may be complicated by an arteriovenous fistula, making treatment with thrombin injection contraindicated because of the potential leakage into the venous circulation, which may cause venous thrombosis. (ahajournals.org)
  • S pinal extradural arteriovenous fistulas (eAVFs), at times referred to as "epidural AVFs," are typically supplied by radicular branches, with drainage into the epidural venous plexus. (thejns.org)
  • A large vertebral arteriovenous fistula located at the C-2 vertebral level, and rapid opacification of the cervical venous plexus, can be seen. (thejns.org)
  • Venous interruption through surgical clip ligation is the gold standard treatment for ethmoidal dural arteriovenous fistula (e-dAVF). (bioportfolio.com)
  • Ilio - iliac arteriovenous fistula (AVF) presents with progressive abdominal distention , dyspnea , and edema of the leg , which makes it difficult to distinguish from deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and can lead to a delay in the diagnosis . (wikidoc.org)
  • Clinical cure was obtained in 23 cases (96%), as follows: 15 patients with a single transvenous approach, 6 with a combined arteriovenous approach, and 2 with an arterial approach after failure of venous access. (nih.gov)
  • It has a lower infection rate than arteriovenous (AV) graft or central venous catheter. (davita.com)
  • It has less risk of clotting than arteriovenous (AV) graft or central venous catheter. (davita.com)
  • It lasts longer than arteriovenous (AV) graft or central venous catheter. (davita.com)
  • Costs associated with creating and maintaining an AV fistula are less than arteriovenous (AV) graft or central venous catheter. (davita.com)
  • Methods and apparatus are provided for temporarily excluding an aneurysm or an arterio-venous fistula from a flow path by transluminally disposing a hollow balloon catheter structure within the aneurysm so that its proximal and distal ends extend past the aneurysm while maintaining continuity of the. (google.com.au)
  • the risk factor for hemorrhages, including those related to venous outflow obstruction, is high in patients with multiple dural arteriovenous fistulas. (ajnr.org)
  • Cell counts revealed that, in the anastomosed vein of the fistula, an initially high frequency of abnormal cells decreased 3-12 weeks postoperatively but rose again within 20-50 weeks to levels significantly higher than those in either normal venous endothelium or sham-operated veins. (ahajournals.org)
  • As there is a combination of either an isolated sinus or direct drainage into the vein, with reflux and cortical venous drainage together with varicosities, this represents a high cognard grade ( grade 4 ) fistula. (radiopaedia.org)
  • This case illustrates a typical intracranial hemorrhage following venous hypertension in a complicated intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula, previously asymptomatic. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Thus, when treating ACF DAVFs, endovascular treatment (EVT) can completely obliterate the fistula point and correct the venous shunting. (medsci.org)
  • A dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) is an arteriovenous shunt located in the dural wall of the venous sinus or the expanded layer of the dura mater [ 1 - 3 ]. (medsci.org)
  • Stenosis from venous neointimal hyperplasia is common in native arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs). (asnjournals.org)
  • We describe a rare case of splenic arteriovenous fistula and venous aneurysm which developed after splenectomy in a 40-year-old woman who presented with epigastralgia, watery diarrhoea, repeated haematemesis and melaena caused by hyperkinetic status of the portal system and bleeding of oesophageal varices. (bmj.com)
  • Splenic arteriovenous fistula (SAVF) and splenic venous aneurysm after splenectomy are extremely rare. (bmj.com)
  • A tentative diagnosis of splenic arteriovenous fistula and splenic venous aneurysm with hyperkinetic portal hypertension was made. (bmj.com)
  • Angiography revealed a dural arteriovenous (AV) fistula with multiple venous aneurysms fed by a radicular branch of the right vertebral artery. (ovid.com)
  • Arteriovenous fistula is a rare complication of peripheral venous cannulation. (omicsonline.org)
  • Subcutaneous swelling found at previous peripheral venous cannulation site found to be an arteriovenous fistula. (omicsonline.org)
  • Hepatic venous blood and the development of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations in congenital heart disease. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The cause of this condition include[citation needed] Congenital (developmental defect) Rupture of arterial aneurysm into an adjacent vein Penetrating injuries Inflammatory necrosis of adjacent vessels Intentionally created (for example, Cimino fistula as vascular access for hemodialysis). (wikipedia.org)
  • An arteriovenous fistula (AV fistula) is the connection of a vein and an artery, usually in the forearm, to allow access to the vascular system for hemodialysis, a procedure that performs the functions of the kidneys in people whose kidneys have failed. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The surgical creation of an AV fistula provides a long-lasting site through which blood can be removed and returned during hemodialysis. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Patients on hemodialysis with arteriovenous fistula (AVF) can develop pseudo- Kaposi's sarcoma . (wikidoc.org)
  • Health care professionals and kidney disease advocates believe the optimal hemodialysis access is the arteriovenous (AV) fistula . (davita.com)
  • What is an AV fistula and why is it preferred for hemodialysis? (davita.com)
  • After several weeks or months, the fistula matures making it ready to use for hemodialysis. (davita.com)
  • This initiative was started to support better health for Medicare patients on dialysis and lower costs for the Medicare program by increasing the number of hemodialysis patients using fistulas as their hemodialysis access. (davita.com)
  • Ideally, the person will then have an AV fistula created and will remove the catheter once the fistula has matured and can be used for hemodialysis. (davita.com)
  • A fistula used for hemodialysis is a direct connection of an artery to a vein. (davita.com)
  • It can take weeks to months before the fistula is ready to be used for hemodialysis. (davita.com)
  • Cleanliness is one way someone on hemodialysis can keep their fistula uninfected. (davita.com)
  • In the case of patients on hemodialysis, physicians perform surgery to create a fistula. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In patients with end-stage renal disease requiring hemodialysis , an arteriovenous fistula is created surgically to provide vascular access for the procedure. (merckmanuals.com)
  • HealthDay)-The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has permitted marketing of two catheter-based devices designed to create an arteriovenous (AV) fistula in patients with chronic kidney disease in need of hemodialysis. (medicalxpress.com)
  • the AV fistulas are needed before patients can start hemodialysis. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Background and objectives The arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is the preferred hemodialysis access, but AVF-failure rate is high, and complications from AVF placement are rarely reported. (asnjournals.org)
  • Fistula First, broadly supported by the renal community and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, proved an effective initiative because its implementation was attended by a steady increase in the percentage of prevalent hemodialysis patients using AVFs ( 7 , 9 , 12 ). (asnjournals.org)
  • In this study, we conducted histologic analysis of a segment of the vein used for anastomosis creation, obtained during AVF creation from 554 of the 602 participants in the multicenter Hemodialysis Fistula Maturation Cohort Study. (asnjournals.org)
  • Catheter interventions for hemodialysis fistulas and grafts. (springer.com)
  • Patency of autogenous and polytetrafluoroethylene upper extremity arteriovenous hemodialysis accesses a systematic review. (springer.com)
  • Such external arteriovenous shunts are currently in use on a portion of those patients receiving intermittent hemodialysis with artificial kidneys. (patents.com)
  • See Medication for the recommended prophylactic regimen for dental, oral, sinus, and genitourinary, and GI procedures in patients with pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs). (medscape.com)
  • Thoroughly educate patients with pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) about their diagnosis and its clinical implications, complications, and hereditary nature. (medscape.com)
  • Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations: techniques and long-term outcome of embolotherapy. (medscape.com)
  • Pierucci P, Murphy J, Henderson KJ, Chyun DA, White RI Jr. New definition and natural history of patients with diffuse pulmonary arteriovenous malformations: twenty-seven-year experience. (medscape.com)
  • Reliability of Contrast Echocardiography to Rule Out Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations and Avoid CT Irradiation in Pediatric Patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia. (medscape.com)
  • Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations: percutaneous treatment preserving parenchyma in high-flow fistulae. (medscape.com)
  • Ishikawa Y, Yamanaka K, Nishii T, Fujii K, Rino Y, Maehara T. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for pulmonary arteriovenous malformations: report of five cases. (medscape.com)
  • Clinical and anatomic outcomes after embolotherapy of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. (medscape.com)
  • Two of the most common types are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs). (upmc.com)
  • S pinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) comprise 80 to 85% of spinal arteriovenous malformations. (thejns.org)
  • AVFs are similar to arteriovenous malformations (AVM) in that both have abnormal connections between arteries and veins. (uclahealth.org)
  • Somatic mutations in intracranial arteriovenous malformations. (harvard.edu)
  • It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations: results of treatment with coil embolization in 53 patients. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Being born with an arteriovenous fistula (congenital). (mayoclinic.org)
  • Congenital coronary arteriovenous fistula (CAVF) is a rare anomaly present in 0.002% of the general population, which are often found incidentally during angiographic evaluation. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Congenital arteriovenous fistula (AVF) of the coronary arteries , a rare cardiac anomaly , was first described by Krause W. Uber, in 1865. (wikidoc.org)
  • Congenital arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is present at birth and may manifest early or later in life. (wikidoc.org)
  • Aetiologically speaking fistulas are differentiated by being either congenital or acquired. (doccheck.com)
  • There are two types of arteriovenous fistulas, congenital and acquired. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A congenital arteriovenous fistula is one that formed during fetal development. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In congenital fistulas, blood vessels of the lower extremity are more frequently involved than other areas of the body. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Congenital fistulas are not common. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • An arteriovenous fistula may be congenital (usually affecting smaller vessels) or acquired as a result of trauma (eg, a bullet or stab wound) or erosion of an arterial aneurysm into an adjacent vein. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Congenital fistulas need no treatment unless significant complications developing. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Congenital arteriovenous malformation involving the VEIN OF GALEN, a large deep vein at the base of the brain. (bioportfolio.com)
  • PDF] A very rare case of polysplenia syndrome with congenital diffuse pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas. (semanticscholar.org)
  • If treatment involves embolization, it will only typically be effective if the glue traverses the actual fistula and enters, at least slightly, the draining vein. (wikipedia.org)
  • For most people with fistulas, the treatment of choice is to block the fistula during an arteriogram (embolization). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Large arteriovenous fistulas that can't be treated with catheter embolization may require surgery. (mayoclinic.org)
  • In cases of high-risk dAVFs where embolization isn't an option, surgical disconnection can effectively cure the fistula. (upmc.com)
  • Primary two-stage transarterial embolization was performed with near-total occlusion of the fistula to prevent it from rebleeding in the acute phase. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The role of transvenous embolization in the treatment of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas. (nih.gov)
  • To evaluate the role of transvenous embolization in the treatment of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs), including its efficacy and safety. (nih.gov)
  • Paradoxical Embolization via Large Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformation. (harvard.edu)
  • After embolization, residual fistula was treated by CK with a mean marginal dose of 19.95 Gy. (ahajournals.org)
  • Retrograde cannulation of the draining vein for embolization of filum terminale arteriovenous fistula in the lower sacral region. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Transvenous embolization of thalamic arteriovenous malformation under transient cardiac standstill. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Transvenous embolization (TE) has been increasingly applied for arteriovenous malformation (AVM) treatment. (bioportfolio.com)
  • After the embolization by coils, Gelfoam pledgets were added to the coil tangle for further closure of the fistula (figure 3 ). (bmj.com)
  • Interruption of the fistula was possible by transluminal embolization with polyvinyl alcohol and silk. (ovid.com)
  • If an arteriovenous fistula is suspected, it is important to make a diagnosis and consult with a specialist quickly to prevent worsening of the disease. (bcm.edu)
  • If your doctor suspects a fistula, you'll have other tests to confirm your diagnosis. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Dr. Bradley Gross discusses dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. (upmc.com)
  • We report a case of an unusual spontaneous obliteration of a spinal dural arteriovenous fistula after diagnosis confirmation through spinal angiography. (bioportfolio.com)
  • This video demonstrates the diagnosis and surgical ligation of a C1 dural arteriovenous fistula via a far lateral, transcondylar approach. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The diagnosis of pathological AV fistulas is carried out in image form by way of angiography (eg. (doccheck.com)
  • Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula diagnosis was confirmed by DSA study after left ECA selective catheterization, which is the most common origin of the afferent arterial feeders. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Diagnosis and therapeutics of pulmonary arteriovenous fistula in childhood. (semanticscholar.org)
  • When the vein and artery are joined, the vein gradually becomes larger and stronger, creating the fistula that provides vascular access years longer than other types of access and with fewer complications. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Among dialysis patients, over half will have an AV fistula as vascular access. (encyclopedia.com)
  • While the best form of vascular access is the arteriovenous fistula (AVF), its primary problem is early, aggressive cellular ingrowth that leads to poor maturation of the vessel, preventing its use for dialysis. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The native arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is the preferred vascular access because of the lower thrombosis and infe. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The National Kidney Foundation (NKF), Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and Dialysis Patient Citizens (DPC) agree fistulas are the best type of vascular access. (davita.com)
  • Arteriovenous fistula has been prioritized as the first choice of long-term vascular access for its inferior rate of complications and improved pat. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Spinal dural arteriovenous (AV) fistulas are the most commonly encountered vascular malformation of the spinal cord and a treatable cause for progressive para- or tetraplegia. (biomedsearch.com)
  • She had small telangiectatic lesions on her face and cerebral arteriovenous malformation, but no family history of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. (semanticscholar.org)
  • What Are Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas (DAVF)? (bcm.edu)
  • MRIs can establish the shape and extent of a dAVF, detect any micro-hemorrhages (very small bleed locations), and determine the impact of any abnormal blood vessel structures related to the fistula itself. (sparrow.org)
  • Patients with Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas (dAVF) have a few choice for safe treatment. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Postoperative angiograms, anteroposterior (left) and lateral (right) views, demonstrating complete obliteration of the arteriovenous shunt on the lateral aspect of the brain stem. (thejns.org)
  • A universal connector for a blood tubing set having a blood tube attached to one end portion and alternative means on the other end portion of said connector for selectively connecting and locking to the blood tube an external arteriovenous shunt, or a fistula. (patents.com)
  • Connection to the artificial kidney is made by attaching blood tubing from the artificial kidney to the external connectors on each of the two portions of the external plastic tubes forming the arteriovenous shunt. (patents.com)
  • Tomasian A, Lell M, Currier J, Rahman J, Krishnam MS. Coronary artery to pulmonary artery fistulae with multiple aneurysms: radiological features on dual-source 64-slice CT angiography. (medscape.com)
  • Angiography is indispensible in defining the fistula. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Follow-up angiography 8 months later demonstrated obvious recurrence and progression of the fistula from adjacent feeders. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Postoperative angiography confirmed complete occlusion of the fistula, and the patient remained intact from the procedure.The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/DJvpa8G4olc. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Spotting inferior petrosal sinus for embolizing cavernous dural arteriovenous fistula with the help of preoperative computed tomography angiography. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Angiography showed engorged perimedullary veins and a fistula fed by the anterior spinal artery from the right ninth segmental artery and by 2 branches of the left lateral sacral artery. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • At a 6-month follow-up, the patient was neurologically intact, and angiography demonstrated no AV fistula. (ovid.com)
  • Contrast echocardiography and pulmonary angiography demonstrated diffuse pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas. (semanticscholar.org)
  • A large untreated arteriovenous fistula can lead to serious complications. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Left untreated, an arteriovenous fistula can cause complications, some of which can be serious. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Large fistulas, as in this case, are commonly incidentally found during workup of cardiovascular symptoms and complications secondary to the anomaly. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Early surgical intervention of CAVF by surgery or transcatheter closure is indicated due to high prevalence of symptoms and fistula related complications. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Complications arising from a functional arteriovenous fistula (AVF) in successful kidney transplant recipients (KT) have been overlooked despite some reports of its deleterious effect on heart, lungs, and kidney allograft. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Small arteriovenous fistulas in your legs, arms, lungs, kidneys or brain often won't have any signs or symptoms and usually don't need treatment other than monitoring by your doctor. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Large arteriovenous fistulas may cause signs and symptoms. (mayoclinic.org)
  • If you have any of these signs and symptoms and think you might have an arteriovenous fistula, make an appointment to see your doctor. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Write down any symptoms you're experiencing, including any that may seem unrelated to an arteriovenous fistula. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Following occlusion of the fistula, the progression of the disease can be stopped and improvement of symptoms is typically observed. (biomedsearch.com)
  • However, in patients who develop symptoms indicating disease progression or the pseudoaneurysm/arteriovenous fistula fails to undergo spontaneous thrombosis within 3 months, other treatment options, including surgery or interventional therapy with stent graft of the feeding artery, must be considered. (ahajournals.org)
  • 3 The management of coronary fistulas must be individualized based on cardiovascular symptoms, concomitant cardiovascular comorbidities, the size and anatomical location of the CAVF. (appliedradiology.com)
  • 3 Large fistulas despite symptoms and small-to moderate size fistulas with evidence of arrhythmia, myocardial ischemia, ventricular enlargement or dysfunction should undergo percutaneous or surgical closure based on American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association class 1 guidelines. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Fistulae involving the spinal vasculature can present with neurologic symptoms of the lower extremities which may include weakness and sensory disturbance. (wikidoc.org)
  • What are the symptoms of an arteriovenous fistula? (uclahealth.org)
  • The main symptoms of arteriovenous fistulas near the surface of the skin are bulging and discolored veins. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The symptoms for arteriovenous fistula is swelling in legs or arms, fatigue, heart failure, and bulging of veins that can view through the skins. (futuremarketinsights.com)
  • Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia[citation needed] Just like berry aneurysm, an intracerebral arteriovenous fistula can rupture causing subarachnoid hemorrhage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most often, the fistulas are due to rupture of an aneurysm of the hepatic or splenic artery, gunshot wound of the abdomen, or the use of mass ligature during abdominal surgery. (biomedsearch.com)
  • A fistula can progress to an aneurysm , usually in the setting of a trauma , carrying a risk of rupture and necessitating surgical intervention. (wikidoc.org)
  • Once the material within the excluded aneurysm has solidified, the balloon catheter structure is deflated and removed, so that the hardened mass forms a new lining for the organ or vessel, and relieves the weakened tissue of the aneurysm or fistula from further flow-induced stress. (google.com.au)
  • An A-V fistula usually leads to the formation of a dilated sac-like connection, arteriovenous aneurysm. (harvard.edu)
  • Coronary Arteriovenous Fistula and Aortic Sinus Aneurysm Rupture. (annals.org)
  • In local experience coronary arteriovenous fistula or aortic sinus of Valsalva aneurysm rupture into the right heart are the two common causes of continuous murmurs with systolic accentuation which are maximum over the lower sternum. (annals.org)
  • This report describes three patients with coronary arteriovenous fistula subjected to successful surgical repair and five patients with anatomically verified aortic sinus aneurysm rupture, two of whom had successful repair. (annals.org)
  • Angiograms revealed a fistula between the tortuous, dilated splenic artery and aneurysm-like splenic vein (figure 2 ). (bmj.com)
  • An arteriovenous fistula is an abnormal connection or passageway between an artery and a vein. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula is an abnormal connection between an artery and vein in the lungs. (medlineplus.gov)
  • There are several benefits to correcting low vitamin D levels, however, it is not know whether correcting low vitamin D in the body will lead to better function of the vein and artery used for arteriovenous fistulae creation. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • An arteriovenous (AV) fistula is an abnormal connection between an artery and a vein in which blood flows directly from an artery into a vein, bypassing some capillaries. (mayoclinic.org)
  • With an arteriovenous fistula, blood flows directly from an artery into a vein, bypassing some capillaries. (mayoclinic.org)
  • An arteriovenous fistula may occur if you have a piercing injury, such as a gunshot or stab wound, on a part of your body where a vein and artery are side by side. (mayoclinic.org)
  • An arteriovenous fistula in your legs can cause blood clots to form, potentially leading to deep vein thrombosis, a painful and potentially life-threatening condition if the clot travels to your lungs (pulmonary embolism). (mayoclinic.org)
  • This assumption was confirmed by color Doppler imaging, in which a transverse section of the femoral vessels displayed pseudoaneurysm neck (red) and arteriovenous fistula (blue) in full length as 2 parallel tracts, shunting blood from the common femoral artery to the common femoral vein ( Figure , B). (ahajournals.org)
  • These fistulas usually represent an abnormal connection between the segmental dural arterial supply of the root sleeve and the underlying medullary vein. (thejns.org)
  • Bitoh S , Hasegawa H , Fujiwara M , et al : Traumatic arteriovenous fistula between the middle meningeal artery and cortical vein. (thejns.org)
  • Dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) are abnormal connections between an artery and a vein in the tough covering over the brain or spinal cord (dura mater). (sparrow.org)
  • The CCTA demonstrates a large fistula between the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) (Figure 1) and great cardiac vein (GCV). (appliedradiology.com)
  • An AV fistula is surgically created by connecting an artery and vein. (davita.com)
  • An arteriovenous (AV) graft is created by connecting a vein to an artery using a soft plastic tube. (davita.com)
  • The term arteriovenous fistula is used to define an abnormal short-circuit connection between a vein and artery . (doccheck.com)
  • Brinjikji W, Hilditch CA, Morris JM, Dmytriw AA, Cloft H, Pereira VM, Lanzino G, Krings T. Dilated Vein of the Filum Terminale on MRI: A Marker for Deep Lumbar and Sacral Dural and Epidural Arteriovenous Fistulas. (harvard.edu)
  • An arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is an abnormal and permanent communication between an artery and a vein caused by penetrating traumas or iatrogenic injuries. (scielo.br)
  • In the case of an arteriovenous fistula, the blood clot should stop the passage of blood from the artery to the vein. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • DSA confirms a complex dural arteriovenous fistula centered on the lateral wall of the right cavernous sinus-there is no history of nor angiographic evidence of drainage into the superior ophthalmic veins of the orbit or of the inferior petrosal vein. (radiopaedia.org)
  • A fistula between the splenic artery and vein was tentatively diagnosed. (bmj.com)
  • Arteriovenous fistula is also known as abnormal connection between and artery and vein. (futuremarketinsights.com)
  • Arteriovenous fistula is disorder in which blood flow bypassed the pattern and directly flows from artery into vein, this bypass flow effect the tissue present below the capillaries and receive a mixed blood. (futuremarketinsights.com)
  • Arteriovenous Fistula (AVF) is defined as an anomalous communication between an artery and a vein [ 1 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • We herein presented a very rare cause of PTE due to paradoxical embolism caused by arteriovenous fistula from common iliac artery to common iliac vein. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Endovascular treatment of vertebro-vertebral arteriovenousfistula: a report of three cases and literature review," The Neuroradiology Journal , vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 339-346, 2013. (hindawi.com)
  • The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the PHIL® liquid in endovascular treatment of dural arteriovenous fistula. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Although almost all dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) can be highly curable using endovascular treatment, some of them are reflactory. (ahajournals.org)
  • The AV fistula is the solution for this problem because, after 4-6 weeks, the walls of the veins become thicker due to the high arterial pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • The high pressure within a Type II dural AV fistula causes blood to flow in a retrograde fashion into subarachnoid veins which normally drain into the sinus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Type III dural AV fistulas drain directly into subarachnoid veins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) are abnormal connections between arteries and veins within the covering of the brain (dura). (bcm.edu)
  • There is new information that links vitamin D to the function of our veins and arteries, which are used in the creation of an arteriovenous fistulae. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Abnormal passageways between arteries and veins (arteriovenous fistulas) may occur in the brain, spinal cord or other areas of your body. (sparrow.org)
  • Some patients may not be able to have an AV fistula because their arteries and veins are not strong enough. (davita.com)
  • Arteriovenous fistulas form when veins and arteries create abnormal connections. (uclahealth.org)
  • In the case of arteriovenous fistulas, the direct connection results in high-pressure arterial blood flowing directly through veins. (uclahealth.org)
  • Arterial blood has a higher blood pressure than veins and causes swelling of veins involved in a fistula. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • If the fistula is near the surface, a mass can be felt, and the affected area is usually swollen and warm with distended, often pulsating superficial veins. (merckmanuals.com)
  • However, the preexisting histologic characteristics of veins at fistula creation, and associations thereof with baseline patient factors, have not been well characterized. (asnjournals.org)
  • Resultant enlarged veins provide access sites for penetration with a fistula. (patents.com)
  • 1. Plethysmographs containing the hand plus forearm were used to measure blood flow in patients with a surgically created arteriovenous fistula in one forearm. (portlandpress.com)
  • Because of the circulatory strain produced by these fistulas and of the danger of portal hypertension even in the asymptomatic patient, the presence of a portosystemic arteriovenous fistula is sufficient indication for surgical treatment. (biomedsearch.com)
  • showing the surgical approach to the arteriovenous fistula on the lateral aspect of the brain stem and exposure of the fistula. (thejns.org)
  • Patient was referred for surgical consultation and fistula closure. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Coronary Arteriovenous Fistulas in Adult Patients: Surgical Management and Outcomes. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Far lateral approach for microsurgical ligation of C1 dural arteriovenous fistula: surgical anatomy and technical nuances. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Surgical resection of carotid-jugular arteriovenous fistula after multiple failed embolisation. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Not to be confused with surgical anastomosis, nor with arteriovenous fistula. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Surgical repair of arteriovenous fistulas is the traditional treatment. (scielo.br)
  • Type Ia - simple dural arteriovenous fistulas have a single meningeal arterial supply Type Ib - more complex arteriovenous fistulas are supplied by multiple meningeal arteries The distinction between Types Ia and Ib is somewhat specious as there is a rich system of meningeal arterial collaterals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carotid-cavernous arterial fistulas (CCF) are also common. (uclahealth.org)
  • After catheterizations, arteriovenous fistulas may occur as a complication of the arterial puncture in the leg or arm. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • dural arteriovenous fistula in the left parasagittal posterior parietal region of the brain, showing afferent arterial branches from the left superficial temporal artery. (radiopaedia.org)
  • 3. After arterial occlusion, blood flow increased by a similar amount on the normal side and on the side with the fistula. (portlandpress.com)
  • This AV fistula did not contribute blood flow to the cervical segment of the spinal cord, which was tested by an intra-arterial injection of methohexital. (ovid.com)
  • Although a dural or intramedullary arteriovenous fistula involving the conus medullaris and fed by the lateral sacral artery has been reported, a case of perimedullary fistula arising from an artery in the filum terminale has not been described in the literature. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • It must be noted that a fistula can be located in the filum terminale and can be successfully treated using multidisciplinary approaches. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • discussion E220 JF - Neurosurgery JO - Neurosurgery VL - 66 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Although a dural or intramedullary arteriovenous fistula involving the conus medullaris and fed by the lateral sacral artery has been reported, a case of perimedullary fistula arising from an artery in the filum terminale has not been described in the literature. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Arteriovenous Fistula of the Filum Terminale: A Case Report and Review of the Literature. (harvard.edu)
  • Filum terminale arteriovenous fistulae (FTAVF) are rare entities. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Zamani H, Meragi M, Arabi Moghadam MY, Alizadeh B, Babazadeh K, Mokhtari-Esbuie F. Clinical presentation of coronary arteriovenous fistula according to age and anatomic orientation. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Coronary artery fistulas clinical and therapeutic considerations. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Timing, severity of deficits, and clinical improvement after surgery for spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas. (annals.org)
  • Careful clinical examination and later radiological confirmation diagnosed an arteriovenous fistula. (omicsonline.org)
  • The objective is to describe the clinical, radiographic, echocardiographic and angiographic findings in dogs with systemic-to-pulmonary arteriovenous fistula (SPAVF). (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Fistulas also can be a complication of liver disease or lung injury, although these causes are much less common. (medlineplus.gov)
  • This is the most serious complication of large arteriovenous fistulas. (mayoclinic.org)
  • While pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae (PAVF) are a well-known complication of this surgery in older patients, no study of the prevalence of this condition in children and young infants has been reported. (ahajournals.org)
  • 1 2 3 The occurrence and management of pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae (PAVF) have been studied as a "late" complication of this surgery in older patients. (ahajournals.org)
  • The complication occurs due to arteriovenous fistula is blood clots, leg pain and bleeding. (futuremarketinsights.com)
  • External Manual Carotid Compression is Effective in Patients with Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistulaetreatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eleven patients have so far been dialysed for a total of 80 fistula months. (bmj.com)
  • In the case of chronic care, 78% of patients have an arteriovenous fistula. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Many people are curious as to how long an AV fistula can last - for four DaVita patients, the answer is 35 years. (davita.com)
  • Some studies indicate that people with diabetes, elderly patients and women may not be ideal candidates for a fistula. (davita.com)
  • DaVita patients Anthony Logan, Barbara Raymond, John Horath and John Hart each had an AV fistula placed in 1972. (davita.com)
  • Among 105 patients evaluated for dural arteriovenous fistulas, we identified seven patients with fistulas at two sites. (ajnr.org)
  • The presence of multiple fistulas must be considered in patients being evaluated for dural arteriovenous fistulas. (ajnr.org)
  • Of the three patients with coronary arteriovenous fistula, two patients were 20-year-old women, the third was a 24-year-old man. (annals.org)
  • Three months after the procedure, 89.3 percent of the patients met the criteria for a usable AV fistula. (medicalxpress.com)
  • To maintain the fistula, almost all patients (96.1 percent) required an additional procedure in the first 12 months. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Overall, 96.7 percent of patients required an additional procedure at the time that the fistula was created. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Dural AV fistulas are rare in the cervical region and extremely unusual in patients less than 20 years of age. (ovid.com)
  • In most rabbits with arteriovenous shunts, a small area of the inferior vena cava near the fistula was devoid of endothelium, covered with a thin deposit of mural thrombi, and considered to be a jet lesion. (ahajournals.org)
  • Large arteriovenous fistulae (AVF) can lead to congestive heart failure associated with increased activity of vasoconstrictor neurohormonal systems, the renin-angiotensin , sympathetic nervous system , endothelin system, and Arginine vasopressin . (wikidoc.org)
  • We report the case of a femoral arteriovenous fistula in a young male, who had a firearm wound in his left thigh causing high-output congestive heart failure. (scielo.br)
  • Inferior petrosal sinus (IPS) is commonly adopted as a route in embolizing cavernous dural arteriovenous fistula (cDAVF). (bioportfolio.com)
  • There were 12 cavernous sinus, 9 transverse-sigmoid sinus, 2 inferior petrosal sinus, and 1 intradiploic fistulas. (nih.gov)
  • There was one persistent cavernous fistula despite coil packing of the cavernous sinus. (nih.gov)
  • Dural arteriovenous fistulas are acquired lesions that usually involve the dura around the cavernous sinus. (ajnr.org)
  • With the exception of bilateral cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas, the simultaneous occurrence of dural arteriovenous fistulas at two locations is rare. (ajnr.org)
  • A most unusual dural arteriovenous fistula is present, with extensive areas of fistulation shown on the lateral wall of the right cavernous sinus. (radiopaedia.org)
  • The locations of the fistulas were 10 transverse/sigmoid sinus and 2 cavernous sinus. (ahajournals.org)
  • To achieve complete occlusion of the fistula, a right far lateral approach was chosen with complete disconnection of the fistula. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Confirmation of the optimal implantation and occlusion of the fistula was performed by injection of contrast medium through the introducer ( fig. 3 ). (scielo.br)
  • Type I dural fistulas are often asymptomatic, do not have a high risk of bleeding and do not necessarily need to be treated. (wikipedia.org)
  • The fistula, which allows the person to be connected to a dialysis machine, must be prepared by a surgeon weeks or months before dialysis is started. (encyclopedia.com)
  • When kidney failure is diagnosed, time is needed to prepare the patient's body with either an AV fistula or implantable devices that will connect the person to the dialysis machine. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Arteriovenous fistulas are often surgically created for use in dialysis in people with severe kidney disease. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Your doctor monitors your arteriovenous fistula if you have one for dialysis. (mayoclinic.org)
  • People who have late-stage kidney failure may have an arteriovenous fistula surgically created in the forearm to make it easier to perform dialysis. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Usually an AV fistula is made in the arm or leg so it is easily accessible for dialysis treatment. (davita.com)
  • Many people find out they need dialysis immediately and do not have time for a fistula to be placed and mature. (davita.com)
  • And, each one of them is on dialysis now and using their 35-year-old fistula. (davita.com)
  • During those 10 years before dialysis, Anthony's fistula was maturing along with his body and was ready for treatment when his kidneys failed. (davita.com)
  • The ladder technique requires you or your dialysis care provider "stick" the fistula vertically in a different place every time. (davita.com)
  • Since then, the development of the AV fistula has marked another important advance, allowing effective treatment for longer periods of time. (encyclopedia.com)
  • When arteriovenous fistulas are caused by liver disease, the treatment is a liver transplant . (medlineplus.gov)
  • Some small arteriovenous fistulas close by themselves without treatment. (mayoclinic.org)
  • In this treatment, an ultrasound probe is used to compress the fistula and block blood flow to the damaged blood vessels. (mayoclinic.org)
  • 4 The present combined pseudoaneurysm and arteriovenous fistula resolved spontaneously within 3 weeks despite antithrombotic treatment with acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel. (ahajournals.org)
  • Additional follow-up is required to assure the usefulness of this less invasive procedure in the treatment of arteriovenous fistulas. (scielo.br)
  • This Arteriovenous Fistula Treatment market study offers a comprehensive analysis of the business models, key strategies, and respective market shares of some of the most prominent players in this landscape. (futuremarketinsights.com)
  • This study is one of the most comprehensive documentation that captures all the facets of the evolving Arteriovenous Fistula Treatment market. (futuremarketinsights.com)
  • Arteriovenous fistulas treatment market is a growing market over the forecast period, the players are coming with new treatment methods is photodynamic therapy, antiangiogenic therapy and other method of sclerotherapy. (futuremarketinsights.com)
  • Drug-eluting balloon for the treatment of failing hemodialytic radiocephalic arteriovenous fistulas: our experience in the treatment of juxta-anastomotic stenoses. (springer.com)
  • who reported on a patient with an extradural AV fistula that formed after spinal manipulation [ 4 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Our understanding of spinal extradural arteriovenous fistulas (eAVFs) is relatively limited. (nih.gov)
  • In the article titled "Vertebral Arteriovenous Fistula: An Unwelcome Thrill" [ 1 ], there was an editorial error, which was indicated in the Letter to the Editor by Foreman et al. (hindawi.com)
  • This case illustrates an unusual presentation of a dural AV fistula. (ovid.com)
  • My 7 month old son has recently been diagnosed with a Arteriovenous fistula on his spine behind his chest. (rutgers.edu)
  • Multiple dural arteriovenous fistulas of the cranium and spine. (ajnr.org)
  • The ideal access types are arteriovenous (AV) graft and AV fistula. (davita.com)
  • The complex angioarchitecture of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (SDAVFs) sometimes preclude angiographic analyses or superselective procedures. (nih.gov)
  • The fistula develops over a period of months after the surgery. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The type of surgery you'll need depends on the size and location of your arteriovenous fistula. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Most dural arteriovenous fistulas have no clear origin, although some result from identifiable causes such as traumatic head injury, infection, previous brain surgery or tumors. (sparrow.org)
  • Hollander KN, Goeddel LA. Management of Arteriovenous Fistulas in Cardiac Surgery. (harvard.edu)
  • Small arteriovenous fistulas can be corrected by surgery. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Surgery is usually used to correct acquired fistulas once they are diagnosed. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Acquired fistulas usually have a single large connection and can be effectively treated by surgery. (merckmanuals.com)
  • In this procedure, a catheter is inserted in an artery near the arteriovenous fistula. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Doctors use X-rays and other images to guide the catheter to your fistula. (mayoclinic.org)
  • A catheter is inserted into a blood vessel in the arm and guided to the site of the planned fistula. (medicalxpress.com)
  • We report the case of an intraoperatively dislodged transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion spacer with creation of a traumatic arteriovenous fistula and device migration to the pulmonary artery. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas are usually the result of abnormal development of the blood vessels of the lung. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Blood flows more quickly through an arteriovenous fistula than it does through normal blood vessels. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Other fistulas can cause more serious problems depending on their location and the blood vessels involved. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • When an arteriovenous fistula is formed involving a major artery like the abdominal aorta, it can lead to a large decrease in peripheral resistance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Peripheral arteriovenous fistulas caused by vascular trauma are rare and are difficult to repair surgically 1 . (scielo.br)
  • A peripheral arteriography was performed, depicting the extension and location of the arteriovenous fistula in the middle third of the left thigh, measuring approximately 12 mm of extension ( fig. 1 ). (scielo.br)
  • A discussion on the etiology, pathophysiology, and management of vertebral AV fistulae follows. (hindawi.com)
  • 3 ] as an example of vertebral AV fistulae potentially induced by chiropractic manipulation. (hindawi.com)
  • 4 Most fistulas are small and found incidentally during various imaging studies, requiring additional imaging with CCTA, transthoracic echocardiogram, magnetic resonance imaging or cardiac catheterization to show the presence of concomitant atherosclerosis and other structural anomalies. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Rarely, if a significant portion of cardiac output is diverted through the fistula to the right heart, high-output heart failure develops. (merckmanuals.com)