Fishes: A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.Fish Diseases: Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).Fish Oils: Oils high in unsaturated fats extracted from the bodies of fish or fish parts, especially the LIVER. Those from the liver are usually high in VITAMIN A. The oils are used as DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS. They are also used in soaps and detergents and as protective coatings.Fish Products: Food products manufactured from fish (e.g., FISH FLOUR, fish meal).Fish Proteins: Proteins obtained from species of fish (FISHES).Perciformes: The most diversified of all fish orders and the largest vertebrate order. It includes many of the commonly known fish such as porgies, croakers, sunfishes, dolphin fish, mackerels, TUNA, etc.Electric Fish: Fishes which generate an electric discharge. The voltage of the discharge varies from weak to strong in various groups of fish. The ELECTRIC ORGAN and electroplax are of prime interest in this group. They occur in more than one family.Skates (Fish): The common name for all members of the Rajidae family. Skates and rays are members of the same order (Rajiformes). Skates have weak electric organs.Seafood: Marine fish and shellfish used as food or suitable for food. (Webster, 3d ed) SHELLFISH and FISH PRODUCTS are more specific types of SEAFOOD.In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence: A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.Fishes, PoisonousOncorhynchus mykiss: A large stout-bodied, sometimes anadromous, TROUT found in still and flowing waters of the Pacific coast from southern California to Alaska. It has a greenish back, a whitish belly, and pink, red, or lavender stripes on the sides, with usually a sprinkling of black dots. It is highly regarded as a sport and food fish. Its former name was Salmo gairdneri. The sea-run rainbow trouts are often called steelheads. Redband trouts refer to interior populations of rainbows.Fisheries: Places for cultivation and harvesting of fish, particularly in sea waters. (from McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Cyprinidae: A family of freshwater fish comprising the minnows or CARPS.Aquaculture: Cultivation of natural faunal resources of water. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Oryzias: The only genus in the family Oryziinae, order BELONIFORMES. Oryzias are egg-layers; other fish of the same order are livebearers. Oryzias are used extensively in testing carcinogens.Cichlids: Common name for perch-like fish of the family Cichlidae, belonging to the suborder Labroidei, order PERCIFORMES.Carps: Common name for a number of different species of fish in the family Cyprinidae. This includes, among others, the common carp, crucian carp, grass carp, and silver carp.Gills: Paired respiratory organs of fishes and some amphibians that are analogous to lungs. They are richly supplied with blood vessels by which oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged directly with the environment.Tilapia: A freshwater fish used as an experimental organism and for food. This genus of the family Cichlidae (CICHLIDS) inhabits Central and South America (one species extends north into Texas), West Indies, Africa, Madagascar, Syria, and coastal India.Salmon: Fish of the genera ONCORHYNCHUS and Salmo in the family SALMONIDAE. They are anadromous game fish, frequenting the coastal waters of both the North Atlantic and Pacific. They are known for their gameness as a sport fish and for the quality of their flesh as a table fish. (Webster, 3d ed).Cyprinodontiformes: An order of fish with eight families and numerous species of both egg-laying and livebearing fish. Families include Cyprinodontidae (egg-laying KILLIFISHES;), FUNDULIDAEl; (topminnows), Goodeidae (Mexican livebearers), Jenynsiidae (jenynsiids), Poeciliidae (livebearers), Profundulidae (Middle American killifishes), Aplocheilidae, and Rivulidae (rivulines). In the family Poeciliidae, the guppy and molly belong to the genus POECILIA.Salmonidae: A family of anadromous fish comprising SALMON; TROUT; whitefish; and graylings. They are the most important food and game fishes. Their habitat is the northern Atlantic and Pacific, both marine and inland, and the Great Lakes. (Nelson: Fishes of the World, 1976, p97)Fresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.Sea Bream: A species of PERCIFORMES commonly used in saline aquaculture.Catfishes: Common name of the order Siluriformes. This order contains many families and over 2,000 species, including venomous species. Heteropneustes and Plotosus genera have dangerous stings and are aggressive. Most species are passive stingers.Tetraodontiformes: A small order of primarily marine fish containing 340 species. Most have a rotund or box-like shape. TETRODOTOXIN is found in their liver and ovaries.Bass: Common name for FISHES belonging to the order Perciformes and occurring in three different families.Zebrafish: An exotic species of the family CYPRINIDAE, originally from Asia, that has been introduced in North America. They are used in embryological studies and to study the effects of certain chemicals on development.Rivers: Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).Fish Venoms: Venoms produced by FISHES, including SHARKS and sting rays, usually delivered by spines. They contain various substances, including very labile toxins that affect the HEART specifically and all MUSCLES generally.Water Pollutants, Chemical: Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.Perches: A common name for fish of the family Percidae, belonging to the suborder Percoidei, order PERCIFORMES.Trematode Infections: Infections caused by infestation with worms of the class Trematoda.Trematoda: Class of parasitic flukes consisting of three subclasses, Monogenea, Aspidogastrea, and Digenea. The digenetic trematodes are the only ones found in man. They are endoparasites and require two hosts to complete their life cycle.Flatfishes: Common name for the order Pleuronectiformes. A very distinctive group in that during development they become asymmetrical, i.e., one eye migrates to lie adjacent to the other. They swim on the eyeless side. FLOUNDER, sole, and turbot, along with several others, are included in this order.Tuna: Common name for various species of large, vigorous ocean fishes in the family Scombridae.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Goldfish: Common name for Carassius auratus, a type of carp (CARPS).Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Swimming: An activity in which the body is propelled through water by specific movement of the arms and/or the legs. Swimming as propulsion through water by the movement of limbs, tail, or fins of animals is often studied as a form of PHYSICAL EXERTION or endurance.Predatory Behavior: Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.Cypriniformes: An order of fish with 26 families and over 3,000 species. This order includes the families CYPRINIDAE (minnows and CARPS), Cobitidae (loaches), and Catostomidae (suckers).Takifugu: A genus of pufferfish commonly used for research.Smegmamorpha: Group of fish under the superorder Acanthopterygii, separate from the PERCIFORMES, which includes swamp eels, mullets, sticklebacks, seahorses, spiny eels, rainbowfishes, and KILLIFISHES. The name is derived from the six taxa which comprise the group. (From http://www.nanfa.org/articles/Elassoma/elassoma.htm, 8/4/2000)Salmo salar: A commercially important species of SALMON in the family SALMONIDAE, order SALMONIFORMES, which occurs in the North Atlantic.Eicosapentaenoic Acid: Important polyunsaturated fatty acid found in fish oils. It serves as the precursor for the prostaglandin-3 and thromboxane-3 families. A diet rich in eicosapentaenoic acid lowers serum lipid concentration, reduces incidence of cardiovascular disorders, prevents platelet aggregation, and inhibits arachidonic acid conversion into the thromboxane-2 and prostaglandin-2 families.Docosahexaenoic Acids: C22-unsaturated fatty acids found predominantly in FISH OILS.Coral Reefs: Marine ridges composed of living CORALS, coral skeletons, calcareous algae, and other organisms, mixed with minerals and organic matter. They are found most commonly in tropical waters and support other animal and plant life.Poecilia: A genus of livebearing cyprinodont fish comprising the guppy and molly. Some species are virtually all female and depend on sperm from other species to stimulate egg development. Poecilia is used in carcinogenicity studies as well as neurologic and physiologic research.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Protozoan Infections, Animal: Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa. The infections may be experimental or veterinary.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Gadiformes: An order of fish including the families Gadidae (cods), Macrouridae (grenadiers), and hakes. The large Gadidae family includes cod, haddock, whiting, and pollock.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Dietary Fats, Unsaturated: Unsaturated fats or oils used in foods or as a food.Flounder: Common name for two families of FLATFISHES belonging to the order Pleuronectiformes: left-eye flounders (Bothidae) and right-eye flounders (Pleuronectidae). The latter is more commonly used in research.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Ciguatera Poisoning: Poisoning caused by ingestion of SEAFOOD containing microgram levels of CIGUATOXINS. The poisoning is characterized by gastrointestinal, neurological and cardiovascular disturbances.Killifishes: Small oviparous fishes in the family Cyprinodontidae, usually striped or barred black. They are much used in mosquito control.Animal Fins: Membranous appendage of fish and other aquatic organisms used for locomotion or balance.Methylmercury Compounds: Organic compounds in which mercury is attached to a methyl group.Gadus morhua: A species of fish in the cod family GADIDAE, known as the Atlantic cod. It is one of the most important commercial FISHES.Ictaluridae: A family of North American freshwater CATFISHES. It consists of four genera (Ameiurus, Ictalurus, Noturus, Pylodictis,) comprising several species, two of which are eyeless.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Great Lakes Region: The geographic area of the Great Lakes in general and when the specific state or states are not indicated. It usually includes Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.Mercury: A silver metallic element that exists as a liquid at room temperature. It has the atomic symbol Hg (from hydrargyrum, liquid silver), atomic number 80, and atomic weight 200.59. Mercury is used in many industrial applications and its salts have been employed therapeutically as purgatives, antisyphilitics, disinfectants, and astringents. It can be absorbed through the skin and mucous membranes which leads to MERCURY POISONING. Because of its toxicity, the clinical use of mercury and mercurials is diminishing.Batrachoidiformes: An order of bottom fishes with short, small, spinous dorsal fins. It is comprised of one family (Batrachoididae) and about 70 species.Osmeriformes: An order of fish including smelts, galaxiids, and salamanderfish.Plant Oils: Oils derived from plants or plant products.Ectoparasitic Infestations: Infestations by PARASITES which live on, or burrow into, the surface of their host's EPIDERMIS. Most ectoparasites are ARTHROPODS.Oncorhynchus kisutch: An anadromous species of SALMON ranging from the Arctic and Pacific Oceans to Monterey Bay, California and inhabiting ocean and coastal streams. It is familiarly known as the coho or silver salmon. It is relatively small but its light-colored flesh is of good flavor.Sharks: A group of elongate elasmobranchs. Sharks are mostly marine fish, with certain species large and voracious.Oceans and Seas: A great expanse of continuous bodies of salt water which together cover more than 70 percent of the earth's surface. Seas may be partially or entirely enclosed by land, and are smaller than the five oceans (Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Antarctic).Antarctic Regions: The continent lying around the South Pole and the southern waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. It includes the Falkland Islands Dependencies. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p55)Body Size: The physical measurements of a body.Characiformes: An order of fresh water fish with 18 families and over 1600 species. The order includes CHARACINS, hatchetfish, piranhas, and TETRAS.Elasmobranchii: A subclass of cartilaginous fish comprising the SHARKS; rays; skates (SKATES (FISH);), and sawfish. Elasmobranchs are typically predaceous, relying more on smell (the olfactory capsules are relatively large) than sight (the eyes are relatively small) for obtaining their food.Lakes: Inland bodies of still or slowly moving FRESH WATER or salt water, larger than a pond, and supplied by RIVERS and streams.Fundulidae: Family of small, surface-dwelling fish that inhabit fresh and brackish waters, and coastal marine areas.Metacercariae: Encysted cercaria which house the intermediate stages of trematode parasites in tissues of an intermediate host.Food Chain: The sequence of transfers of matter and energy from organism to organism in the form of FOOD. Food chains intertwine locally into a food web because most organisms consume more than one type of animal or plant. PLANTS, which convert SOLAR ENERGY to food by PHOTOSYNTHESIS, are the primary food source. In a predator chain, a plant-eating animal is eaten by a larger animal. In a parasite chain, a smaller organism consumes part of a larger host and may itself be parasitized by smaller organisms. In a saprophytic chain, microorganisms live on dead organic matter.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Water Movements: The flow of water in enviromental bodies of water such as rivers, oceans, water supplies, aquariums, etc. It includes currents, tides, and waves.Electric Organ: In about 250 species of electric fishes, modified muscle fibers forming disklike multinucleate plates arranged in stacks like batteries in series and embedded in a gelatinous matrix. A large torpedo ray may have half a million plates. Muscles in different parts of the body may be modified, i.e., the trunk and tail in the electric eel, the hyobranchial apparatus in the electric ray, and extrinsic eye muscles in the stargazers. Powerful electric organs emit pulses in brief bursts several times a second. They serve to stun prey and ward off predators. A large torpedo ray can produce of shock of more than 200 volts, capable of stunning a human. (Storer et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p672)Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.RNA Virus InfectionsRhabdoviridae: A family of bullet-shaped viruses of the order MONONEGAVIRALES, infecting vertebrates, arthropods, protozoa, and plants. Genera include VESICULOVIRUS; LYSSAVIRUS; EPHEMEROVIRUS; NOVIRHABDOVIRUS; Cytorhabdovirus; and Nucleorhabdovirus.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Flavobacteriaceae Infections: Infections with bacteria of the family FLAVOBACTERIACEAE.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.

Mercury and mink. I. The use of mercury contaminated fish as a food for ranch mink. (1/5700)

Adult female and juvenile ranch mink were fed rations containing 50 and 75% of fish containing 0.44 ppm total mercury over a 145 day period. There was no clinical or pathological evidence of intoxication in these animals and mercury concentrations in tissue appeared to be at a level below that associated with toxicity.  (+info)

Three receptor genes for plasminogen related growth factors in the genome of the puffer fish Fugu rubripes. (2/5700)

Plasminogen related growth factors (PRGFs) and their receptors play major roles in embryogenesis, tissue regeneration and neoplasia. In order to investigate the complexity and evolution of the PRGF receptor family we have cloned and sequenced three receptors for PRGFs in the teleost fish Fugu rubripes, a model vertebrate with a compact genome. One of the receptor genes isolated encodes the orthologue of mammalian MET, whilst the other two may represent Fugu rubripes orthologues of RON and SEA. This is the first time three PRGF receptors have been identified in a single species.  (+info)

Subunit dissociation in fish hemoglobins. (3/5700)

The tetramer-dimer dissociation equilibria (K 4,2) of several fish hemoglobins have been examined by sedimentation velocity measurements with a scanner-computer system for the ultracentrifuge and by flash photolysis measurements using rapid kinetic methods. Samples studied in detail included hemoglobins from a marine teleost, Brevoortia tyrannus (common name, menhaden); a fresh water teleost, Cyprinus carpio, (common name, carp); and an elasmobranch Prionace glauca (common name, blue shark). For all three species in the CO form at pH 7, in 0.1 M phosphate buffer, sedimentation coefficients of 4.3 S (typical of tetrameric hemoglobin) are observed in the micromolar concentration range. In contrast, mammalian hemoglobins dissociate appreciably to dimers under these conditions. The inability to detect dissociation in three fish hemoglobins at the lowest concentrations examined indicates that K 4,2 must have a value of 10(-8) M or less. In flash photolysis experiments on very dilute solutions in long path length cells, two kinetic components were detected with their proportions varying as expected for an equilibrium between tetramers (the slower component) and dimers (the faster component); values of K 4,2 for the three fish hemoglobins in the range 10(-9) to 10(-8) M were calculated from these data. Thus, the values of K 4,2 for liganded forms of the fish hemoglobins appear to be midway between the value for liganded human hemoglobin (K 4,2 approximately 10(-6) M) and unliganded human hemoglobin (K 4,2 approximately 10(-12) M). This conclusion is supported by measurements on solutions containing guanidine hydrochloride to enhance the degree of dissociation. All three fish hemoglobins are appreciably dissociated at guanidine concentrations of about 0.8 M, which is roughly midway between the guanidine concentrations needed to cause comparable dissociation of liganded human hemoglobin (about 0.4 M) and unliganded human hemoglobin (about 1.6 M). Kinetic measurements on solutions containing guanidine hydrochloride indicated that there are changes in both the absolute rates and the proportions of the fast and slow components, which along with other factors complicated the analysis of the data in terms of dissociation constants. Measurements were also made in solutions containing urea to promote dissociation, but with this agent very high concentrations (about 6 M) were required to give measureable dissociation and the fish hemoglobins were unstable under these conditions, with appreciable loss of absorbance spectra in both the sedimentation and kinetic experiments.  (+info)

Evidence for a correlation between the number of marginal band microtubules and the size of vertebrate erthrocytes. (4/5700)

In 23 species of vertebrates the dimensions of erythrocytes and the number of their marginal band microtubules were examined. A positive correlation was found between the size of erythrocytes and the number of microtubules. The absence of microtubules in diskoid erythrocytes of mammals-Camelidae-is discussed.  (+info)

Importance of air and water breathing in relation to size of the African lungfish Protopterus amphibius Peters. (5/5700)

1. Oxygen uptakes from air and water have been measured in relation to weight of the African lungfish Protopterus amphibius Peters. 2. Combined O2 uptake from air and water ranged from 60 ml O2 kg-1 h-1 STPD, in a 3-7 g specimen, to 30 ml O2kg-1 h-1, in a 255 g specimen. 3. While the combined O2 uptake changed by a factor of 2, within the weight range under study, the aquatic O2 uptake changed 8-fold within the same range. The smaller fish satisfy 70% of their O2 requirement by aquatic breathing compared to 10-15% in the grown specimens. 4. The pattern of bimodal breathing in P. amphibius is discussed in relation to the natural habitat of the species.  (+info)

Midbrain combinatorial code for temporal and spectral information in concurrent acoustic signals. (6/5700)

All vocal species, including humans, often encounter simultaneous (concurrent) vocal signals from conspecifics. To segregate concurrent signals, the auditory system must extract information regarding the individual signals from their summed waveforms. During the breeding season, nesting male midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus) congregate in localized regions of the intertidal zone and produce long-duration (>1 min), multi-harmonic signals ("hums") during courtship of females. The hums of neighboring males often overlap, resulting in acoustic beats with amplitude and phase modulations at the difference frequencies (dFs) between their fundamental frequencies (F0s) and harmonic components. Behavioral studies also show that midshipman can localize a single hum-like tone when presented with a choice between two concurrent tones that originate from separate speakers. A previous study of the neural mechanisms underlying the segregation of concurrent signals demonstrated that midbrain neurons temporally encode a beat's dF through spike synchronization; however, spectral information about at least one of the beat's components is also required for signal segregation. Here we examine the encoding of spectral differences in beat signals by midbrain neurons. The results show that, although the spike rate responses of many neurons are sensitive to the spectral composition of a beat, virtually all midbrain units can encode information about differences in the spectral composition of beat stimuli via their interspike intervals (ISIs) with an equal distribution of ISI spectral sensitivity across the behaviorally relevant dFs. Together, temporal encoding in the midbrain of dF information through spike synchronization and of spectral information through ISI could permit the segregation of concurrent vocal signals.  (+info)

Characterization of K+ currents underlying pacemaker potentials of fish gonadotropin-releasing hormone cells. (7/5700)

Endogenous pacemaker activities are important for the putative neuromodulator functions of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-immunoreactive terminal nerve (TN) cells. We analyzed several types of voltage-dependent K+ currents to investigate the ionic mechanisms underlying the repolarizing phase of pacemaker potentials of TN-GnRH cells by using the whole brain in vitro preparation of fish (dwarf gourami, Colisa lalia). TN-GnRH cells have at least four types of voltage-dependent K+ currents: 1) 4-aminopyridine (4AP)-sensitive K+ current, 2) tetraethylammonium (TEA)-sensitive K+ current, and 3) and 4) two types of TEA- and 4AP-resistant K+ currents. A transient, low-threshold K+ current, which was 4AP sensitive and showed significant steady-state inactivation in the physiological membrane potential range (-40 to -60 mV), was evoked from a holding potential of -100 mV. This current thus cannot contribute to the repolarizing phase of pacemaker potentials. TEA-sensitive K+ current evoked from a holding potential of -100 mV was slowly activating, long lasting, and showed comparatively low threshold of activation. This current was only partially inactivated at steady state of -60 to -40 mV, which is equivalent to the resting membrane potential. TEA- and 4AP-resistant sustained K+ currents were evoked from a holding potential of -100 mV and were suggested to consist of two types, based on the analysis of activation curves. From the inactivation and activation curves, it was suggested that one of them with low threshold of activation may be partly involved in the repolarizing phase of pacemaker potentials. Bath application of TEA together with tetrodotoxin reversibly blocked the pacemaker potentials in current-clamp recordings. We conclude that the TEA-sensitive K+ current is the most likely candidate that contributes to the repolarizing phase of the pacemaker potentials of TN-GnRH cells.  (+info)

Activities of citrate synthase, NAD+-linked and NADP+-linked isocitrate dehydrogenases, glutamate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in nervous tissues from vertebrates and invertebrates. (8/5700)

1. The activities of citrate synthase and NAD+-linked and NADP+-linked isocitrate dehydrogenases were measured in nervous tissue from different animals in an attempt to provide more information about the citric acid cycle in this tissue. In higher animals the activities of citrate synthase are greater than the sum of activities of the isocitrate dehydrogenases, whereas they are similar in nervous tissues from the lower animals. This suggests that in higher animals the isocitrate dehydrogenase reaction is far-removed from equilibrium. If it is assumed that isocitrate dehydrogenase activities provide an indication of the maximum flux through the citric acid cycle, the maximum glycolytic capacity in nervous tissue is considerably greater than that of the cycle. This suggest that glycolysis can provide energy in excess of the aerobic capacity of the tissue. 2. The activities of glutamate dehydrogenase are high in most nervous tissues and the activities of aspartate aminotransferase are high in all nervous tissue investigated. However, the activities of alanine aminotransferase are low in all tissues except the ganglia of the waterbug and cockroach. In these insect tissues, anaerobic glycolysis may result in the formation of alanine rather than lactate.  (+info)

  • In addition, as a substitute of rising fish for meals, some folks develop goldfish and different aquarium fish species which Then they sell to pet outlets or directly to homeowners. (google.com)
  • So it's essential that you simply be sure to're feeding your fish correctly and that means researching via google and visiting forums which have members who additionally personal the identical fish species you've gotten. (google.com)
  • We invite submissions of manuscripts related to any aspect of movement of any fish species. (springer.com)
  • We attempt to provide at least one photograph of a preserved specimen for every species known to occur in Texas, and are now systematically photographing all fish lots housed at the Texas Natural History Collection as well as some in other museums. (google.com)
  • however, the declines in these fish species were not coincident. (springer.com)
  • de Sylva DP, Kalber FA Jr and Shuster CN Jr (1962) Fishes and ecological conditions in the shore zone of the Delaware River estuary, with notes on other species collected in deeper water. (springer.com)
  • Finally, some anatomical and functional comparisons are made for four species of fish with distinctly different feeding habits: carp (plant-oriented omnivore), catfish (animal-oriented omnivore), milkfish (specialized microplanktivore), and rainbow trout (carnivore). (fao.org)
  • These comparisons are best made when accompanied by dissections of specimens of each species, although drawings are provided for readers having no access to the fish. (fao.org)
  • Muskellunge , (species Esox masquinongy ), solitary and somewhat uncommon pike valued as a fighting game fish and, to a lesser extent, as a food fish. (britannica.com)
  • It is a very simple pattern but it is deadly on trout as well as several other species fish. (ebay.com)
  • But the marketing moniker "Chilean seabass" sounds more appetizing than "toothfish," and it fools at least some consumers who have learned what toothfish are and that few if any of the world's fish species are more grievously mismanaged than this slow-growing denizen of deep south-polar waters. (audubon.org)
  • Biting/striking reactions for each fish species are completely realistic and natural as well as specifics of lure attacks. (microsoft.com)
  • Antarctic fish are best known for their uses in studying adaptive radiation, the ecological process that causes the rapid development of several different species from one common ancestor of this fishes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Though many different species comprise the Antarctic icefish cluster, there are some common characteristics between fish. (wikipedia.org)
  • Notothenioid fish dominate the Southern Ocean diversity and biomass largely because of the pelagization by some species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Species have been able to colonize the water column despite not having swim bladders like other bony fishes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Monitoring of reef fish assemblages at Khangkao Island from October 1997 to November 1998 revealed 83 species from 28 families. (psu.edu)
  • The results suggest that fish assemblages on reef slopes have higher species and abundance than other habitats. (psu.edu)
  • Scripps graduate student Elizabeth Sibert and Professor Richard Norris analyzed the microscopic teeth of fishes found in sediment cores around the world and found that the abundance of ray-finned fish teeth began to explode in the aftermath of the mass die-off of species, which was triggered by an asteroid strike in the Yucatan Peninsula. (eurekalert.org)
  • Ninety-nine percent of all fish species in the world - from goldfish to tuna and salmon - are classified as ray-finned fishes. (eurekalert.org)
  • Now there are 30,000 ray-finned fish species in the ocean, making this class the most numerically diverse and ecologically dominant among all vertebrates on land or in the ocean. (eurekalert.org)
  • Those species, the researchers believe, had been either predators of ray-finned fishes or competitors with them for resources. (eurekalert.org)
  • There are 32514 species of bony fishes, in 4922 genera and 512 families. (eol.org)
  • The environments in which many bony fishes species are known to live. (eol.org)
  • Select an environment to see its bony fishes species checklist. (eol.org)
  • 120+ species of fish, each with its unique behavior and AI. (steampowered.com)
  • More than one-third of U.S. fish and wildlife species are at risk of extinction in the coming decades. (nwf.org)
  • But humans can put other kinds of pressure on species, for instance by targeting bigger fish. (treehugger.com)
  • Researchers discovered a new fish species living at the greatest depths ever explored of the world's largest ocean. (pbs.org)
  • Indiana Safe Eating Guidelines- ( Sensitive Population or General Population ) Utilize this advice if a waterbody does not have an advisory or if the waterbody has an advisory but the fish species you plan to eat is not included in that advisory. (in.gov)
  • The Fisheries Division has worked to increase the size of pike populations in Bantam Lake and the Connecticut River in order to diversify recreational fishing opportunities. (ct.gov)
  • The Inland Fisheries Division stocks channel catfish and trout in waterbodies near major population centers to enhance fishing opportunities in urban neighborhoods. (ct.gov)
  • The DEEP Commissioner has statutory and regulatory authority under several circumstances to declare and adjust closed seasons, close areas to fishing, specify conditions for operating commercial fisheries, and to establish and adjust possession and length limits. (ct.gov)
  • Subscribe to the DEEP Inland Fisheries email listserv to receive periodic updates and fishing information from the Inland Fisheries Division. (ct.gov)
  • A fishing magnate known as the Codfather will never be allowed to return to U.S. fisheries, the federal government said Monday in announcing it has settled its civil case against a man whose arrest for shirking quotas and smuggling profits overseas shocked the East Coast industry. (ap.org)
  • The Physiology of Fishes, Third Edition provides background information for advanced students as well as material of interest to marine and fisheries biologists, ichthyologists, and comparative physiologists looking to differentiate between the physiological strategies unique to fishes, and those shared with other organisms. (google.com)
  • The push towards sustainable fisheries is not just coming from government or environmental groups, but from the market itself," Valdimarsson said, noting that major seafood retailers like Unilever, Tesco, Walmart and Asda have already committed to putting on their shelves only fish that was harvested or raised sustainably. (fao.org)
  • This year's World Seafood Congress was co-organized by FAO, the United Nations Industrial Development Organization, the World Health Organization, the International Food Quality Certification Group, and Ireland's Sea Fisheries Protection Authority in collaboration with the International Association of Fish Inspectors and with the support of the Irish Sea Fisheries Board, Enterprise Ireland, and the Food Safety Authority of Ireland. (fao.org)
  • Entrusted with the task of bringing the Sheikh's favorite pastime, salmon fishing, to Yemen - Britain's leading fisheries expert (McGregor), understandably skeptical, teams up with Sheikh Muhammed's principal PR rep (Blunt) to begin planning the seemingly impossible. (forbes.com)
  • IUU fishing contributes to the overfishing of stocks around the globe by circumventing existing management systems and undermines the sustainability of all fisheries, the communities that depend on them, and food security. (state.gov)
  • The Magnuson Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act , the main U.S. domestic fisheries legislation, was reauthorized in 2006 and amended the High Seas Driftnet Fishing Moratorium Protection Act, creating substantial new obligations to address IUU fishing, including a biennial process to identify States whose vessels engage in IUU fishing and the prospect for action against nations whose vessels engage in IUU fishing. (state.gov)
  • The United States also championed the establishment of schemes within regional fisheries management organizations ( RFMOs ) to identify and penalize IUU vessels , limit port and market access by nations that fail to curb IUU fishing, and provide strong monitoring, control, and surveillance of all fisheries. (state.gov)
  • A general view shows the newly opened National Fisheries Development Board (NFDB) building, designed to resemble a fish, in Hyderabad. (baltimoresun.com)
  • La Vigilia ), is an Italian-American celebration of Christmas Eve with meals of fish and other seafood. (wikipedia.org)
  • The seafood pasta had lots of fish but not enough pasta. (wiktionary.org)
  • SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Trolling off the California coast, Sarah Bates leans over the side of her boat and pulls out a long, silvery fish prized by anglers and seafood lovers: wild king salmon. (ap.org)
  • A fish allergy is not exactly the same as a seafood allergy. (kidshealth.org)
  • Seafood includes both fish (like tuna or cod) and shellfish (like lobster or clams). (kidshealth.org)
  • Even though they both fall into the category of "seafood," fish and shellfish are biologically different. (kidshealth.org)
  • At Earp's Seafood the fish is filleted or cleaned to order, then suited up in a plastic bag, wrapped the old-fashioned way-with newsprint-and fastened with a smile. (constantcontact.com)
  • Conduct studies to develop and assess the effectiveness of interventions to prevent fatal and non-fatal injuries among agriculture, fishing, and seafood processing workers. (cdc.gov)
  • Conduct translation research to understand barriers and aids to implementing effective safety interventions among agriculture, forestry, fishing, and seafood processing workers. (cdc.gov)
  • Conduct surveillance research to explore data sources and identification methods for non-fatal work-related injuries among agriculture, forestry, fishing, and seafood processing workers. (cdc.gov)
  • 25 September 2007, Rome - The US$400 billion seafood industry has no choice but to adapt to intensifying demand from retailers and consumers for "environmentally friendly" fish, FAO said today. (fao.org)
  • During opening remarks made to industry representatives attending the 2007 Seafood Industry Congress (25-27 September, Dublin), Grimur Valdimarsson, Director of FAO's Fishing Industries Division, said that the need for seafood producers to guarantee environmental performance is unavoidable. (fao.org)
  • Then, almost simultaneously with Audubon's toothsome toothfish dinner, he launched The Audubon (magazine) Guide to Seafood, the world's first independent and comprehensive set of directions for sustainable seafood purchasing, thereby setting a standard and trend that would save all manner of marine life around the globe and change how people perceive fish. (audubon.org)
  • Traceability programs require key information - what kind of fish it is, where and when was it caught, how and by whom - that can help markets to identify seafood that came from IUU fishing. (state.gov)
  • The United States is working to put into place a comprehensive traceability program for all fish and seafood entering commerce, whether imported or produced domestically. (state.gov)
  • The first phase of this program includes a new rule for imports of certain fish and fish products identified as particularly vulnerable to IUU fishing and/or seafood fraud. (state.gov)
  • In December 2016, the US government officially established the Seafood Import Monitoring Program to address illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing products entering the market. (worldwildlife.org)
  • WWF has provided testimony for public comment, and in partnership with TRAFFIC submitted recommendations to the Federal Register for Presidential Task Force on combating IUU Fishing and Seafood Fraud. (worldwildlife.org)
  • Can the seafood industry get Americans to eat local fish? (pbs.org)
  • Illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing (IUU) depletes fish stocks, destroys marine habitats, distorts competition, puts honest fishers at an unfair disadvantage, and weakens coastal communities, particularly in developing countries. (europa.eu)
  • We provide Garold Sneegas' in situ photographs of fishes in their natural habitats taken using scuba and snorkeling equipment. (google.com)
  • A German scientist has been putting his funding to good use by placing a tank full of goldfish into a plane and then having the plane free fall to simulate zero gravity conditions in order to determine once and for all whether fish are susceptible to seasickness. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Having a memory like a goldfish could actually be a good thing, says a Sydney scientist who has spent 10 years proving fish are not as dumb as we think. (smh.com.au)
  • The annual Canned Tuna Ranking assesses fishing practices and social responsibility to determine which brands are sustainable and which should be avoided. (treehugger.com)
  • Yellowfin: Tuna are storming the coast from Baja to the Channel Islands, including a hot bite on the back side of Catalina Island on fish to 12-0. (latimes.com)
  • The Global Record is intended to provide a tool to prevent, deter and eliminate IUU fishing and related activities, and, along with unique vessel identifiers at the heart of the Global Record, will be invaluable for tracking fishing vessels for the implementation of the Port State Measures Agreement, and strengthening and harmonizing schemes to track trade in high-value fish like tuna. (state.gov)
  • The canyon fishing remains slow, but there are schools of bluefin tuna moving along the inshore waters from the Butterfish Hole in the east to the Mud Hole in the west. (nypost.com)
  • Decision (EU) 2019/1862 restricts certain rights of individuals in the context of the processing of personal data by the Commission in the Union system to prevent, deter and eliminate illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. (europa.eu)
  • The United States supported development in 2001 of an International Plan of Action to Prevent, Deter, and Eliminate IUU Fishing through the UN Food and Agriculture Organization ( FAO ), and, pursuant to this, adopted our own National Plan of Action in 2004. (state.gov)
  • In every fishery, scientists have said that more could be caught than turned out to be supportable by the fish populations. (newscientist.com)
  • Thirty percent of all assessed marine fish populations are being killed faster than they reproduce. (audubon.org)
  • The man felt bad about keeping such small fish but not bad enough to argue about it and then Mr. Seaman, a wildlife biologist who is surveying Potomac fish populations, came along and said the boy was right, there was no point in putting the fish back. (washingtonpost.com)
  • But Illegal fishing is threatening the food supply of coastal communities as fish populations decline due to overfishing in areas fishers are not permitted to access. (worldwildlife.org)
  • Eggs are collected and brought to National Fish Hatcheries to serve as a 'safety deposit box' and preserve the genetic material of remnant populations and for development of broodstocks . (fws.gov)
  • A Woman's Guide to Eating Indiana Fish Brochure developed by Indiana State Department of Health, to provide sensitive populations such as pregnant and breast-feeding women, with fish consumption advice. (in.gov)
  • Commercial fishing is consistently one of the most dangerous industries in the U.S. During 2000-2015, an annual average of 42 deaths occurred (117 deaths per 100,000 workers in total) [BLS 2016]. (cdc.gov)
  • The PSMA is a critical component of the global fight against IUU fishing and entered into force on June 5, 2016. (state.gov)
  • Image Source: The Goldfish Bowl: Canterbury Writers Gills are to fish what lungs are to mammals. (scienceblogs.com)
  • As water flows across the gills, oxygen is taken up into the blood of the fish and carbon dioxide is removed. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Although this man may now be miles away from anyone who doesn't breathe through gills, we understand he must keep a secret because his fishing buddies would love to horn in on this find. (adweek.com)
  • The gut forms very early during embryological development (ontogeny) and shows some of the same stages of development as in the evolution of the vertebrate gut, some larval fish having portions of their gut which are ciliated, for example. (fao.org)
  • After World War II , the availability of plastics and synthetics changed fly-tying interests again toward the attraction school of fly design, and enthusiasm for saltwater fishing also stimulated creation of new types of flies. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Saltwater: Fishing in the Sebastian Inlet remains decent. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • Why can't captive breeding of saltwater aquarium fish catch on? (pbs.org)
  • A proposed bill in Hawaii has ignited renewed discussion about the impact of the state's largest aquarium fishery, which catches hundreds of thousands of gem-like saltwater fish each year for shipment to collectors around the world. (pbs.org)
  • Chao LN and Muscik JA (1977) Life history, feeding habits and functional morphology of juvenile sciaenid fishes in the York River estuary. (springer.com)
  • Sibert noted that before the extinction event, ray-finned fishes existed in a state of relative ecological insignificance, just like mammals on land. (eurekalert.org)
  • Keys to tackling IUU include finding ways to deprive IUU fishers of the economic incentives that drive IUU fishing, ensuring States effectively monitor and control their fishing vessels, and building capacity for enforcement and good governance in developing States. (state.gov)
  • Through the FAO, countries are also developing a pilot project to implement the Global Record of Fishing Vessels, Refrigerated Transport Vessels and Supply Vessels (Global Record). (state.gov)
  • WWF has found an inexpensive and effective way to retrace the routes and activities of fishing vessels. (worldwildlife.org)
  • We know Canadian Sport fishes are alot smarter and tougher then those dumber Southern State fries. (yahoo.com)
  • In addition, more fearless fish will expose themselves to more predators, which could then impact the perch population. (rt.com)
  • Dr Brown also studies 'social learning' among fish, where fish trained to recognise predators and wild food teach captivity-bred fish how to survive. (smh.com.au)
  • Salmon is a fish . (wiktionary.org)
  • Include low-mercury fish in your diet (such as salmon) and eat at least five servings a day of fruit and vegetables, especially dark leafy greens, broccoli, and cauliflower. (wiktionary.org)
  • Total Alaska hatchery releases of all salmon and rainbow trout in 2018 was 1.8 billion fish, with pink salmon. (ap.org)
  • Perhaps salmon fishing in a country famed for its deserts is a trivial example, but it brings to light how - with enough passion, strategy and stubbornness - an idea that is seemingly impossible can come to fruition. (forbes.com)
  • Before you all flood to Google to look up this crazy concept I speak of, I should break here to tell you that the concrete example of "salmon fishing in the Yemen" is fictitious. (forbes.com)
  • Not a fan of reading reviews before catching movies - I naturally thought that "Salmon Fishing In The Yemen" was an artsy metaphor for the main thematique of the production. (forbes.com)
  • Like so many new ventures, the audacious effort to bring salmon fishing to the Yemen actually fails in the end. (forbes.com)
  • The "Cosmo Gordon," for example, is a fishing fly that was made for salmon fishing in England around 1900 and is named for the legendary angler. (encyclopedia.com)
  • November 25, 2008 marked Something-Fishy.org's thirteen year anniversary on the web. (something-fishy.org)
  • First fish of the new year! (angelfire.com)
  • Reeling in a fish "feels good every time," but this year has been surprisingly good, said Bates, a commercial. (ap.org)
  • The year was 1998, and in those days, for almost everyone, fish was fish. (audubon.org)
  • Every year, the Federation of Fly Fishers holds their annual Fly Fishing Show and Conclave. (prweb.com)
  • IUU fishing involves fishing activity that does not respect rules adopted at either the national or international level and is a worldwide problem estimated to cost the global fishing industry billions, possibly tens of billions, of dollars a year. (state.gov)
  • Given its generally concealed nature, it is difficult to quantify, but the current estimates suggest the global losses of illegal fishing cost up to $36.4 billion each year. (worldwildlife.org)
  • A year later, the same fish managed to find the hole on their first try, which Dr Brown says shows they easily recalled the skills they had learned. (smh.com.au)
  • Can you find all the fish in the list? (ct.gov)
  • Fish Aggregating Devices are a serious driver of overfishing, which is why Greenpeace is on a mission to dismantle all the FADs it can find. (treehugger.com)
  • Next let's spend a lot of money to find out how drunk fish have to be before they'll spew on your shoes. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Fish it anywhere you find stonefly nymphs, which is pretty much everywhere! (ebay.com)
  • The fish were white perch, and they were devilish hard to hook but not much fun after that, so the man spent most ofhis time feeding peanuts to a bunch of small bold brown birds he did not recognize and could not find in the book. (washingtonpost.com)
  • To help prove his theories, Dr Brown put rainbow fish into a tank with a mock trawler net with a single hole and watched how long it took them to find an escape route. (smh.com.au)
  • Boats working the bottom continue to find excellent fishing for porgies and sea bass. (nypost.com)
  • A cloaca (a chamber common to anal and urogenital openings and formed from infolded body wall) never occurs in teleost fish, except the Dipnoi, although it is universal in sharks and rays. (fao.org)
  • Standard length measurements are used with Teleostei (most bony fish), while total length measurements are used with Myxini (hagfish), Petromyzontiformes (lampreys), and (usually) Elasmobranchii (sharks and rays), as well as some other fishes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United States reportedly imports nearly half of the total worldwide trade in aquarium fish, which almost all come from the wild, taken off of coral reefs and shipped to aquarists around the world. (pbs.org)
  • Quote from Bob Wiltshire, COO of the Federation of Fly Fishers: 'Our International Fly Fishing Show and Conclave offers enthusiasts the chance to take classes and participate in activities with the most talented and renowned fly fishermen in the world. (prweb.com)
  • The K/Pg extinction appears to have been a major driver in the rise of ray-finned fishes and the reason that they are dominant in the open oceans today. (eurekalert.org)
  • In cores from numerous ocean basins, they found that while the numbers of sharks remained steady before and after the extinction event, the ratio of ray-finned fish teeth to shark teeth and scales gradually rose, first doubling then becoming eight times more abundant 24 million years after the extinction event. (eurekalert.org)
  • What we found is that the mass extinction is actually where fish really took off in abundance and variety," said Sibert, who is the recipient of an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. (eurekalert.org)
  • What's amazing", said Norris, "is how quickly fish double, then triple in relative abundance to sharks after the extinction, suggesting that fish were released from predation or competition by the extinction of other groups of marine life. (eurekalert.org)
  • The lineage has been around for hundreds of millions of years, but without the mass extinction event 66 million years ago, it is very likely that the oceans wouldn't be dominated by the fish we see today. (eurekalert.org)
  • The paper, " New Age of Fishes initiated by the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction ," appears June 29 in the early edition version of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . (eurekalert.org)
  • What is the finest fish food on your pets and or in your tropical showcases of salt water fish? (google.com)
  • Along with fish meals and fish supplies, mounds provides water treatments to assist preserve your Aquarian Fish Food tank water as clean and clear as doable. (google.com)
  • You will need to provide enough food with out overfeeding the fish. (google.com)
  • If you're planning a commercial Aquaponics venture, our patented clear move aquaponic techniques® with zdep® are the only fully-developed, complete system packages out there for large scale aquaponic food production.I've written about microworms right here, -to-feed-baby-fish and i recommend you learn that article as well as it How Much Is Fish Food particulars a variety of safe life meals for child fish. (google.com)
  • Consider organic fish food - in the event you or your customers are eating your fish, you might choose an organic fish Fish Food Aquarium designed for the last few months of growout. (google.com)
  • As long as You may have a mature tank with loads of algae, you should not have to fret about what the fry will eat, they're going to Flake Fish Food have plenty of meals for a while. (google.com)
  • Jackson McLean is the face of a new vegan food movement on this remote Canadian island that's long been defined by fishing. (treehugger.com)
  • Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia (ANSP) (1973) Food habits of fish taken in the vicinity of Calvert Cliffs on the Chesapeake Bay, 1971-1972. (springer.com)
  • Carr WES and Adams CA (1973) Food habits of juvenile marine fishes occupying seagrass beds in the estuarine zone near Crystal River, Florida. (springer.com)
  • uncountable ) The flesh of the fish used as food. (wiktionary.org)
  • Some people outgrow certain food allergies over time, but those with fish allergies usually have that allergy for the rest of their lives. (kidshealth.org)
  • Also, read food labels to see if a food contains fish ingredients. (kidshealth.org)
  • The tambaqui is an important food fish for peoples of the Amazon and can weigh up to 30 kg (66 pounds). (britannica.com)
  • Taro Dried fish, snacks Spicy Grilled fish Food Camping Flavoured 40 g. (ebay.com)
  • Addressing illegal fishing will positively contribute to the equitable growth and empowerment of the people who rely on oceans for food and income. (worldwildlife.org)
  • Illegal fishing is a key driver of global overfishing, it threatens marine ecosystems, puts food security and regional stability at risk, and is linked to major human rights violations and even organized crime. (worldwildlife.org)
  • The fish near the bottom of the aquatic food chain-collectively known as forage fish-are often overlooked, but they are vital to healthy oceans and estuaries. (treehugger.com)
  • Place half of each of the ginger, lemongrass, spring onions and chilli into a food processor, along with all of the soy, fish sauce and sugar, and whiz for 1-2 minutes to form a paste. (rte.ie)
  • Unfamiliar Fishes is a nonfiction book by This American Life contributor Sarah Vowell , first published in 2011 in print and audiobook versions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Print out a book about fish and learn about them while coloring. (enchantedlearning.com)
  • The book presents both traditional and novel methodologies of identifying and addressing fish disease risk, along with preventative and responsive insights to the challenges impacting fish production today. (elsevier.com)
  • Any book would do, as long as fishing was the primary subject. (archive.org)
  • The connection between the chemicals found in the water and fish was determined after the same substances were found in both juvenile Chinook and staghorn sculpin. (rt.com)
  • Of course, Spain's catch of juvenile fish outside Canadian waters certainly does interfere with breeding stocks. (newscientist.com)
  • In a study from the Scientific American , perch that were placed in clean water were less aggressive than fish that had been exposed to benzodiazepines - calming drugs, such as Valium or Xanax. (rt.com)
  • Fishing big water on the Columbia River below John Day Dam. (angelfire.com)
  • What brings the actual expense to the hobby of raising fish is the feeding, housing, filtering of water and the decorative points of displaying The fish and tank. (google.com)
  • Fortunately, there is a feed that gives high levels of proteins and fortified key amino acids that assist enhance fish development and reduce the quantity of phosphorus getting into the water column. (google.com)
  • Albacore: Warm water is pushing schools north up the coast as boats score fish to 50-0 in cooler patches of water. (latimes.com)
  • What makes us different: * Complex AI system for fish behavior that correlates with seasonal and climatic change, time of day, speed of water current, bottom contour and type (color and structure), water and air temperature, wind, etc. (microsoft.com)
  • Dynamic water graphics - splashes, waves and ripples on the water create a fully realistic fishing atmosphere. (microsoft.com)
  • All the fish the boy was catching went into a bucket of water even though some were little more than minnows. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Because of their movement into the water column, fish are observed to feed on both the seafloor and in the water column. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fishing operations occur far from the eyes of consumers and regulators, often in Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction , swaths of unclaimed water beginning 200 miles off the coast. (worldwildlife.org)
  • to be wide awake at dawn, no land to see, and with any luck, clear blue water and a fish that somehow has always seemed violently out of place. (sfgate.com)
  • With permission, and with scientists on board, he said he fished the closed-to-fishing water at Año Nuevo, where he and crew tagged and released rockfish. (sfgate.com)
  • If you plan to provide fish guiding services on inland water bodies and any part of your guided trip will include the use of DNR-managed public land you must receive permission. (michigan.gov)
  • Common threats to fish in and around the United States include overfishing , habitat degradation , and poor water conditions. (nwf.org)
  • Climate change is also a threat, particularly for coldwater fish, which are extremely sensitive to changes in water temperature. (nwf.org)
  • When streams get too warm, the fish can experience slower growth rates, lower oxygen levels in the water, and greater susceptibility to poisons, parasites, and disease . (nwf.org)
  • A recent study estimates how much fish China's distant-water fleet has been catching around the world between 2000 and 2011, and the numbers are shocking. (treehugger.com)
  • Fish out of water: the lure of the East River. (villagevoice.com)
  • Finally, in 1972, an increasingly conservation-minded nation passed the Clean Water Act, which required that American waterways be open to fishing and swimming by 1985. (villagevoice.com)
  • However, fish can accumulate toxins such as Mercury and Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in their tissues from the water they live in and through their diets. (in.gov)
  • Once abundant and widespread, they are big, colorful, highly sought after sport fish willing to hit flies, live and artificial baits. (fws.gov)
  • Readers desiring additional information should consult both reviews because they tend to be complementary, with Harder emphasizing anatomy of European fishes while Kapoor and co-authors emphasize digestion in North American and Asian fishes. (fao.org)
  • Fish measurement is the measuring of the length of individual fish and of various parts of their anatomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • DEP was awarded $2.5 Million in competitive NOAA Coastal and Marine Restoration Project funds for construction of the Tingue Fish Bypass on the Naugatuck River in Seymour, CT. (ct.gov)
  • When a fishing vessel passes off its catch to another boat, it creates a host of ethical and environmental problems. (treehugger.com)
  • Data from the NIOSH Commercial Fishing Incident Database reveals that from 2000-2015, the majority of the deaths (354) occurred after a vessel disaster (defined as a sinking, capsizing, or other event in which the crew was forced to abandon ship) or a fall overboard (221). (cdc.gov)
  • The Gulf of Mexico fishing region, however, had more fatalities caused by falls overboard than by vessel disasters [Lincoln and Lucas (cdc.gov)
  • But the fuss over Canada's seizure of a Spanish fishing vessel on charges of grievously threatening the North Atlantic turbot does not get to the heart of the problem. (newscientist.com)
  • The real issue is not whether Canada is entitled to seize a vessel outside its own waters in order to protect fish inside them, but what can be done to better manage fish. (newscientist.com)
  • And while aquaculture, i.e., fish farming, was at first seen as a partial solution, that rapidly expanding industry has compounded more than relieved pressure on wild stocks because it pollutes the sea with pathogens, parasites, and warped genes, and because it requires the netting of enormous quantities of small fish to serve as feed. (audubon.org)
  • Science has shown fish to be capable of collaboration, recognition, astonishing feats of memorization, and craving physical touch. (treehugger.com)
  • skill at manipulating the line and knowledge of the behaviors of both bait and prey are definitely parts of the art, history, and science of fly fishing. (encyclopedia.com)
  • If you put a fish into a plane and send the plane into a free fall and that fish is in the 16.326% of fish that are susceptible to free fall-induced seasickness and then you release the fish-- looking like it's going to puke and swimming around in uncontrollable circles-- back into the wild, it may be in danger of being eaten by a predator? (scienceblogs.com)
  • In addition, fishery biologists often use a third measure in fishes with forked tails: Fork length (FL) is the length of a fish measured from the tip of the snout to the end of the middle caudal fin rays and is used in fishes in which it is difficult to tell where the vertebral column ends. (wikipedia.org)
  • Largemouth bass: Fishing exploded after boat traffic subsided last weekend. (latimes.com)
  • Monday and Tuesday, the boat fished the South Bay, very near to the entrance to Oakland Harbor, and the spot gave up 90 halibut to the Cal Dawn. (sfgate.com)
  • Logo and Brand Graphic Design for a fishing boat trips company from Algarve, Portugal. (behance.net)
  • Analyses of variation in abundance between individual samples were used to investigate correlations between physical factors (temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen [DO]) and fish abundance. (springer.com)
  • Capt. Tony DiGiulian said fish 10-25 pounds were biting in 400-800 feet. (bing.com)
  • These smaller fish may have been more slowly growing fish which left shallow nursery grounds later than the other juveniles or may have been late-spawned fish from a different offshore spawning area than the main group of juveniles. (springer.com)
  • Connecticut has a rich heritage of commercial fishing, from the offshore fleet in Stonington and New London, to Long Island Sound lobster boats spanning the coast to Greenwich. (ct.gov)
  • And now, materials may be contributed directly by collectors and the general public via the website's online uploading tools or (in special cases where users have too much material to upload manually), by sending it to Fishes of Texas staff for bulk upload. (google.com)
  • The biology lecturer has spent the past decade putting fish through learning and memory tests, which he says shows they are much deeper thinkers than they look. (smh.com.au)