Fisheries: Places for cultivation and harvesting of fish, particularly in sea waters. (from McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Fishes: A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.Oceans and Seas: A great expanse of continuous bodies of salt water which together cover more than 70 percent of the earth's surface. Seas may be partially or entirely enclosed by land, and are smaller than the five oceans (Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Antarctic).Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Gadus morhua: A species of fish in the cod family GADIDAE, known as the Atlantic cod. It is one of the most important commercial FISHES.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.North SeaMarine Biology: The study of the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of organisms which inhabit the OCEANS AND SEAS.Food Chain: The sequence of transfers of matter and energy from organism to organism in the form of FOOD. Food chains intertwine locally into a food web because most organisms consume more than one type of animal or plant. PLANTS, which convert SOLAR ENERGY to food by PHOTOSYNTHESIS, are the primary food source. In a predator chain, a plant-eating animal is eaten by a larger animal. In a parasite chain, a smaller organism consumes part of a larger host and may itself be parasitized by smaller organisms. In a saprophytic chain, microorganisms live on dead organic matter.Biomass: Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.Atlantic OceanPerciformes: The most diversified of all fish orders and the largest vertebrate order. It includes many of the commonly known fish such as porgies, croakers, sunfishes, dolphin fish, mackerels, TUNA, etc.Aquaculture: Cultivation of natural faunal resources of water. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Pacific OceanBiodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Tuna: Common name for various species of large, vigorous ocean fishes in the family Scombridae.Indian Ocean: A body of water covering approximately one-fifth of the total ocean area of the earth, extending amidst Africa in the west, Australia in the east, Asia in the north, and Antarctica in the south. Including the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf, it constitutes the third largest ocean after the ATLANTIC OCEAN and the PACIFIC OCEAN. (New Encyclopaedia Britannica Micropaedia, 15th ed, 1990, p289)Mediterranean SeaCoral Reefs: Marine ridges composed of living CORALS, coral skeletons, calcareous algae, and other organisms, mixed with minerals and organic matter. They are found most commonly in tropical waters and support other animal and plant life.Animal Migration: Periodic movements of animals in response to seasonal changes or reproductive instinct. Hormonal changes are the trigger in at least some animals. Most migrations are made for reasons of climatic change, feeding, or breeding.Ecology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)Oceanography: The science that deals with the ocean and its phenomena. (Webster, 3d ed)Food Supply: The production and movement of food items from point of origin to use or consumption.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Gadiformes: An order of fish including the families Gadidae (cods), Macrouridae (grenadiers), and hakes. The large Gadidae family includes cod, haddock, whiting, and pollock.Shellfish: Aquatic invertebrates belonging to the phylum MOLLUSCA or the subphylum CRUSTACEA, and used as food.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Animal Distribution: A process by which animals in various forms and stages of development are physically distributed through time and space.Sharks: A group of elongate elasmobranchs. Sharks are mostly marine fish, with certain species large and voracious.Euphausiacea: An order of pelagic, shrimplike CRUSTACEA. Many consume ZOOPLANKTON and a few are predacious. Many antarctic species, such as Euphausia superba, constitute the chief food of other animals.Rivers: Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).Saint Lucia: An independent state in the West Indies. Its capital is Castries. It was probably discovered by Columbus in 1502 and first settled by the English in 1605. Contended for by the French and English in the 17th century, it was regarded as neutral in 1748 but changed hands many times in the wars of the 19th century. It became a self-governing state in association with Great Britain in 1967 and achieved independence in 1979. Columbus named it for the day on which he discovered it, the feast of St. Lucy, a Sicilian virgin martyr. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1051 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p477)Aquatic Organisms: Organisms that live in water.Palinuridae: A family of marine CRUSTACEA, in the order DECAPODA, comprising the clawless lobsters. They are found in tropical and subtropical waters and characterized by short spines along the length of the tail and body.Bays: An area of water mostly surrounded by land, usually smaller than a gulf, and affording access to the sea.Ships: Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.Seafood: Marine fish and shellfish used as food or suitable for food. (Webster, 3d ed) SHELLFISH and FISH PRODUCTS are more specific types of SEAFOOD.Phocoena: A genus of PORPOISES, in the family Phocoenidae, comprised of several species. They frequent coastal waters, bays, estuaries, and the mouths of large rivers.Baltic States: The collective name for the republics of ESTONIA; LATVIA; and LITHUANIA on the eastern shore of the Baltic Sea. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p111)Skates (Fish): The common name for all members of the Rajidae family. Skates and rays are members of the same order (Rajiformes). Skates have weak electric organs.Salmon: Fish of the genera ONCORHYNCHUS and Salmo in the family SALMONIDAE. They are anadromous game fish, frequenting the coastal waters of both the North Atlantic and Pacific. They are known for their gameness as a sport fish and for the quality of their flesh as a table fish. (Webster, 3d ed).Predatory Behavior: Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.Limnology: The study of the physical, chemical, hydrological, and biological aspects of fresh water bodies. (EPA Terms of Environment: Glossary, Abbreviations and Acronyms [Internet] US Environmental Protection Agency [cited 2008 Sep 25] available from http://www.epa.gov/OCEPAterms/aterms.html)Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Alligators and Crocodiles: Large, long-tailed reptiles, including caimans, of the order Loricata.Chordata: Phylum in the domain Eukarya, comprised of animals either with fully developed backbones (VERTEBRATES), or those with notochords only during some developmental stage (CHORDATA, NONVERTEBRATE).Senegal: A republic in western Africa, southwest of MAURITANIA and east of MALI. Its capital is Dakar.Africa, Western: The geographical area of Africa comprising BENIN; BURKINA FASO; COTE D'IVOIRE; GAMBIA; GHANA; GUINEA; GUINEA-BISSAU; LIBERIA; MALI; MAURITANIA; NIGER; NIGERIA; SENEGAL; SIERRA LEONE; and TOGO.AfricaSouth Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.

Different prevalences of Renibacterium salmoninarum detected by ELISA in Alaskan chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha spawned from freshwater and seawater. (1/711)

Soluble antigen of Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs) was detected by a polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at significantly higher prevalences in adult chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that matured in freshwater than in the same cohort of fish spawned after maturation in seawater. The cumulative results were consistent during 4 yr of comparison at the Little Port Walter Hatchery on Baranof Island, Alaska, USA. Possible causes for this difference are discussed. Maturation of chinook salmon broodstock in seawater has become a practical strategy at this hatchery to reduce the prevalence of Rs-positive parent fish and the numbers of culled eggs.  (+info)

Relative virulence of three isolates of Piscirickettsia salmonis for coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch. (2/711)

Piscirickettsia salmonis was first recognized as the cause of mortality among pen-reared coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch in Chile. Since the initial isolation of this intracellular Gram-negative bacterium in 1989, similar organisms have been described from several areas of the world, but the associated outbreaks were not reported to be as serious as those that occurred in Chile. To determine if this was due to differences in virulence among isolates of P. salmonis, we conducted an experiment comparing isolates from Chile, British Columbia, Canada, and Norway (LF-89, ATL-4-91 and NOR-92, respectively). For each of the isolates, 3 replicates of 30 coho salmon were injected intraperitoneally with each of 3 concentrations of the bacterium. Negative control fish were injected with MEM-10. Mortalities were collected daily for 41 d post-injection. Piscirickettsiosis was observed in fish injected with each of the 3 isolates, and for each isolate, cumulative mortality was directly related to the concentration of bacterial cells administered. The LF-89 isolate was the most virulent, with losses reaching 97% in the 3 replicates injected with 10(5.0) TCID50, 91% in the replicates injected with 10(4.0) TCID50, and 57% in the fish injected with 10(3.0) TCID50. The ATL-4-91 isolate caused losses of 92% in the 3 replicates injected with 10(5.0) TCID50, 76% in the fish injected with 10(4.0) TCID50, and 32% in those injected with 10(3.0) TCID50. The NOR-92 isolate was the least virulent, causing 41% mortality in the replicates injected with 10(4.6) TCID50. At 41 d post-injection, 6% of the fish injected with 10(3.6) TCID50 NOR-92 had died. Mortality was only 2% in the fish injected with 10(2.6) TCID50 NOR-92, which was the same as the negative control group. Because the group injected with the highest concentration (10(4.6) TCID50) of NOR-92 was still experiencing mortality at 41 d, it was held for an additional 46 d. At 87 d post-injection, the cumulative mortality in this group had reached 70%. These differences in virulence among the isolates were statistically significant (p < 0.0001), and are important for the management of affected stocks of fish.  (+info)

Further observations on the epidemiology and spread of epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV) in farmed rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in southeastern Australia and a recommended sampling strategy for surveillance. (3/711)

Epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV) is an iridovirus confined to Australia and is known only from rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and redfin perch Perca fluviatilis. Outbreaks of disease caused by EHNV in trout populations have invariably been of low severity, affecting only 0+ post-hatchery phase fingerlings < 125 mm in length. To date the virus has been demonstrated in very few live in-contact fish, and anti-EHNV antibodies have not been found in survivors of outbreaks, suggesting low infectivity but high case fatality rates in trout. During an on-going study on an endemically infected farm (Farm A) in the Murrumbidgee River catchment of southeastern New South Wales, EHNV infection was demonstrated in 4 to 6 wk old trout fingerlings in the hatchery as well as in 1+ to 2+ grower fish. During a separate investigation of mortalities in 1+ to 2+ trout on Farm B in the Shoalhaven River catchment in southeastern New South Wales, EHNV infection was demonstrated in both fingerlings and adult fish in association with nocardiosis. A 0.7% prevalence of antibodies against EHNV was detected by ELISA in the serum of grower fish at this time, providing the first evidence that EHNV might not kill all infected trout. EHNV infection on Farm B occurred after transfer of fingerlings from Farm C in the Murrumbidgee river catchment. When investigated, there were no obvious signs of diseases on Farm C. 'Routine' mortalities were collected over 10 d on Farm C and EHNV was detected in 2.1% of 190 fish. Tracing investigations of sources of supply of fingerlings to Farm B also led to investigation of Farm D in Victoria, where the prevalence of anti-EHNV antibodies in 3+ to 4+ fish was 1.3%. The results of this study indicate that EHNV may be found in trout in all age classes, need not be associated with clinically detectable disease in the population, can be transferred with shipments of live fish, can be detected in a small proportion of 'routine' mortalities and may be associated with specific antibodies in a small proportion of older fish. Sampling to detect EHNV for certification purposes should be based on examination of 'routine' mortalities rather than random samples of live fish. Antigen-capture ELISA can be used as a cost effective screening test to detect EHNV on a farm provided that sampling rates conform with statistical principles.  (+info)

Molecular characterization of the myxosporean associated with parasitic encephalitis of farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar in Ireland. (4/711)

During seasonal epizootics of neurologic disease and mass mortality in the summers of 1992, 1993 and 1994 on a sea-farm in Ireland, Atlantic salmon Salmo salar smolts suffered from encephalitis associated with infection by a neurotropic parasite. Based on ultrastructural studies, this neurotropic parasite was identified as an intercellular presporogonic multicellular developmental stage of a histozoic myxosporean, possibly a Myxobolus species. In order to generate sequence data for phylogenetic comparisons to substantiate the present morphological identification of this myxosporean in the absence of detectable sporogony, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blot hybridization, dideoxynucleotide chain-termination DNA sequencing, and in situ hybridization (ISH) were used in concert to characterize segments of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene. Oligonucleotide primers were created from sequences of the SSU rRNA gene of M. cerebralis and were employed in PCR experiments using DNA extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections of brains from Atlantic salmon smolts in which the myxosporean had been detected by light microscopy. Five segments of the SSU rRNA gene of the myxosporean, ranging in length from 187 to 287 base pairs, were amplified, detected by hybridization with sequence-specific probes, and sequenced. Consensus sequences from these segments were aligned to create a partial sequence of the SSU rRNA gene of the myxosporean. Assessments of sequence identity were made between this partial sequence and sequences of SSU rRNA genes from 7 myxosporeans, including Ceratomyxa shasta, Henneguya doori, M. arcticus, M. cerebralis, M. insidiosus, M. neurobius, and M. squamalis. The partial SSU rRNA gene sequence from the myxosporean had more sequence identity with SSU rRNA gene sequences from neurotropic and myotropic species of Myxobolus than to those from epitheliotropic species of Myxobolus or Henneguya, or the enterotropic species of Ceratomyxa, and was identical to regions of the SSU rRNA gene of M. cerebralis. Digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide DNA probes complementary to multiple segments of the SSU rRNA gene of M. cerebralis hybridized with DNA of the parasite in histologic sections of brain in ISH experiments, demonstrating definitively that the segments of genome amplified were from the organisms identified by histology and ultrastructural analysis. Based on sequence data derived entirely from genetic material of extrasporogonic stages, the SSU rDNA sequence identity discovered in this study supports the hypothesis that the myxosporean associated with encephalitis of farmed Atlantic salmon smolts is a neurotropic species of the genus Myxobolus, with sequences identical to those of M. cerebralis.  (+info)

Aspects of the epizootiology of pancreas disease in farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar in Ireland. (5/711)

A computerised database containing information on over 17.8 million salmon contained within 49 separate marine populations was used to study the epidemiology of pancreas disease (PD) in Ireland. Of the 43 recorded PD outbreaks, 57% occurred in the 3 mo period August to October inclusive (17 to 32 wk post-transfer). Analysis of variance of mortality rates during PD outbreaks occurring on 6 marine sites over a 5 yr period showed that mortality rates vary significantly between sites (p < 0.001) but not between years over this time period. The mortality rate during PD outbreaks ranged from 0.1 to 63%. Mortality rates were significantly higher when PD outbreaks occurred earlier in the year (y = -1.28x + 59, SE of b 0.33). The mean length of a PD outbreak was 112 d (SE = 7.7, n = 37). There was no correlation between PD mortality rate and smolt input weight, initial stocking density and transfer mortality.  (+info)

Streptococcus iniae, a bacterial infection in barramundi Lates calcarifer. (6/711)

The cause of ongoing mortality in barramundi Lates calcarifer (Bloch) in seawater culture was identified as Streptococcus iniae by biochemical and physiological tests. This is the first published record of this bacterial species in Australia and the first confirmed report of S. iniae causing mortality in barramundi. The bacterium was highly pathogenic for barramundi when challenged by bath exposure. The pathogen was found to have a LD50 of 2.5 x 10(5) and 3.2 x 10(4) colony-forming units at 48 h and 10 d respectively. Experimental challenge of barramundi resulted in high levels of mortality (> 40%) within a 48 h period. Ten days after the challenge, S. iniae could not be isolated from kidney, spleen, liver or eye of surviving fish. However, the organism was easily isolated from the brain of both moribund and healthy fish, indicating that barramundi can carry the bacterium asymptomatically.  (+info)

Ichthyophthiriasis in carp Cyprinus carpio: infectivity of trophonts prematurely exiting both the immune and non-immune host. (7/711)

Ichthyophthirius multifiliis exposed to naturally immunised carp established short-term infections, the majority of parasites actively emerging within 2 h of entering the epidermis. A small, but significant, number of these expelled parasites were shown to retain theront-like properties with the capacity to directly re-invade a further fish host. Infectivity fell rapidly with time in the host and was comparable to that of trophonts of a similar age artificially induced to emerge from non-immune hosts with the aid of MEM (minimal essential medium). Trophonts recovered with MEM from immune carp 2 to 8 h post infection rarely established infections upon exposure to susceptible new hosts and no infections resulted from older trophonts recovered after 8 to 24 h exposure; older trophonts, however, represented only a small percentage of the original parasite population. A low level of infectivity was recorded in trophonts collected with the aid of MEM from non-immune carp after up to 24 h of infection. The results are discussed in relation to theront transformation and evasion of the host immune response.  (+info)

Molecular evidence that the proliferative kidney disease organism unknown (PKX) is a myxosporean. (8/711)

The proliferative kidney organism unknown (PKX), a serious salmonid fish pathogen, is considered to be a myxosporean on the basis of ultrastructural studies, but its real taxonomic position has never been confirmed. In order to ascertain its position, genomic DNA was extracted from PKX and small subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA was amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced. A phylogenetical analysis on SSU rDNA from 76 or 128 eucaryotic species was carried out. Whatever the tree reconstruction methods used, PKX was found to be a sister group of the Myxozoa phylum, providing the first molecular evidence for its membership in this phylum.  (+info)

  • 1 South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences/Key Laboratory of Fishery Ecology and Environment, Guangdong Province/Scientific Observing and Experimental Station of South China Sea Fishery Resources and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture/Key Laboratory of Marine Ranching Technology, CAFS, Guangzhou, China . (scirp.org)
  • Furthermore, the positive impacts on coastal fisheries through the CFI may also remove some stress on terrestrial biodiversity resources. (thegef.org)
  • Livelihood diversification can comprise the enhancement or addition of components to existing fisheries, yet the likely socioeconomic impacts are unclear. (ecologyandsociety.org)
  • Some 15 years later, we surveyed 303 fishers using structured questionnaires and mixed effects models to evaluate how the fishery has contributed to fisher well-being and what factors have influenced the socioeconomic impacts. (ecologyandsociety.org)
  • The annual meeting afforded the group the platform to review the report of the current stock assessment of the small pelagic and demersal fish and also discuss the biological and socio-economic impacts of the 2019 closed season implemented for the artisanal and inshore fisheries. (ghanabusinessnews.com)
  • We contend that the failure of fisheries science and management to anticipate these transformations results from a lack of appreciation for the nature, strength, complexity, and outcome of species interactions. (pnas.org)
  • We argue that fisheries science and management must follow this lead by developing a sharper focus on species interactions and how disrupting these interactions can push ecosystems in which fisheries are embedded past their tipping points. (pnas.org)
  • The program helps safeguard globally important coastal ecosystems (such as coral reefs, sea grass beds and mangroves) and species and genetic diversities of coastal fisheries' resources. (thegef.org)
  • Ecosystem-based fishery management (EBFM) is a new direction for fishery management, essentially reversing the order of management priorities so that management starts with the ecosystem rather than a target species. (sciencemag.org)
  • In order to understand the fishery resources, seasonal variations of species composition, dominant species composition, standardized catch per unit effort (SCPUE) and community diversity of fishery resources in Dapeng Bay, China were analyzed based on trawl survey data in spring (March) and summer (May) of 2013 as well as autumn (August) and winter (December) of 2012. (scirp.org)
  • Results demonstrated that there are 113 fishery species, which belong to 78 categories, 50 families, 14 catalogues, 3 classes. (scirp.org)
  • Therefore, there are violent seasonal variation of species composition, quantity and structure of fishery resources in Dapeng Bay. (scirp.org)
  • Transformation from high-nutrient fish species to low-nutrient fish species reflects the increasing utilization intensity of fishery resources in coral reef waters. (scirp.org)
  • The International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) is the Regional Fishery Management Organization (RFMO) responsible for the conservation of tunas and tuna-like species in the Atlantic Ocean, including elasmobranchs, as well as migratory teleost species such as the swordfish and billfishes. (conicyt.cl)
  • The book examines how we have fared conserving the world's marine mammal populations, with a focus on the key issues of fisheries and tourism. (google.com)
  • Yet many of the world's fisheries are at grave risk from human pressure including overexploitation, pollution and habitat change. (ifad.org)
  • The CFI addresses an important barrier to sustainable coastal fisheries governance and management: the limited integration between governments, and development and environmental groups working in the sector. (thegef.org)
  • It also enables countries to adopt holistic and integrated tools to enhance governance, and evaluate and track fisheries performance. (thegef.org)
  • Following an inclusive consultation and negotiation process, which involved more than 70 countries, international organizations, and representatives of the civil society and the private sector, the Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (VGs) were officially endorsed by the Committee on World Food Security on 11 May 2012. (ifad.org)
  • The VGs set out principles, technical recommendations and practices for improving the governance of tenure of land, fisheries and forests. (ifad.org)
  • The Tool is grounded in the FAO Guidelines for the Ecolabelling of Fish and Fishery Products from Marine Capture Fisheries and consists of performance areas related to scheme governance, operational management (including chain of custody) and applied wild-capture fisheries audit standards. (aquaculture.world)
  • There are three fleets of fishing in the country, involving the artisanal, semi-industrial (inshore) and the industrial artisanal which is the largest sector contributing over 70 per cent to annual fish production while small pelagic fisheries constitutes about 75 per cent of the fisheries. (ghanabusinessnews.com)
  • Our partners help to develop efficient fish value chains, promote the use of products from community fisheries, and improve fishery management. (ifad.org)
  • As existing communities have collapsed, new ones have become established, fundamentally transforming ecosystems to those that are often less productive for fisheries, more prone to cycles of booms and busts, and thus less manageable. (pnas.org)
  • Overfishing and environmental change have triggered severe and unexpected consequences in diverse ecosystems supporting marine fisheries. (pnas.org)
  • As existing fisheries have collapsed, the ecosystems in which they were embedded have changed dramatically. (pnas.org)
  • These changes have brought those ecosystems to states that are often less productive and less predictable and from which recovering the fishery is more difficult. (pnas.org)
  • EBFM aims to sustain healthy marine ecosystems and the fisheries they support. (sciencemag.org)
  • Population and ecosystem dynamics involve the study of fish populations and marine ecosystems to better assess fishery stock conditions and dynamics. (flseagrant.org)
  • Fisheries graduates can get jobs as an Assistant Development Officer in NABARD, Rural Development Officer, Field Officer, Managers in agriculture loan section in nationalized as well as private banks.r76 Candidates can work as a manager or officers in seafood processing and export units: The fish processing industry is well developed in the country. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lectures on fish population dynamics and stock assessment methods to students on the post-graduate course in fisheries economics. (oregonstate.edu)
  • These lay a foundation for exploring the relationship between marine environment and fish abundance, and further guiding fishery production activities. (scirp.org)
  • Prof Yankson said the laws in the Fisheries Management Acts of Ghana, on light fishing, mesh size control, dynamite, chemicals, as well as Saiko fishing involving the transfer of "transshipment" of fish at sea from industrial trawlers to local canoes, must be critically enforced to ensure an improved fishing sector. (ghanabusinessnews.com)
  • Wild fish stocks have been hit by overfishing, illegal and destructive fishing practices, and weak fisheries management. (ifad.org)
  • For the recruitment as scientists in various agricultural and fisheries Institutions under the ICAR, Agricultural Scientist Recruitment Board (ASRB) conducts an All India Competitive Exam, Agricultural Research Service (ARS ) followed by viva voce. (wikipedia.org)
  • books.google.com - Marine Mammals: Fisheries, Tourism and Management Issues brings together contributions from 68 leading scientists from 12 countries to provide a comprehensive, up-to-date review on the way we manage our interactions with whales, dolphins, seals and dugongs. (google.com)
  • The NMFS-Sea Grant Joint Fellowship Program in Population and Ecosystem Dynamics and Marine Resource Economics is designed to help Sea Grant fulfill its broad educational responsibilities and to strengthen the collaboration between Sea Grant and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). (flseagrant.org)
  • Conducts research into the dynamics of fishery systems, particularly the response of fishermen to changing conditions within the fisheries. (oregonstate.edu)
  • It is the first "field guide" to community-based fisheries management focused specifically on fisheries, such as those of the Northwest Atlantic, that are already highly regulated by governmental authorities, with licensing and other requirements that limit access and effort. (issuelab.org)
  • Participants recognized the need for a handbook on community-based fisheries management that is relevant to their own fisheries and that can be used as a tool to provide information and support for practitioners, as well as to document current practices and insights obtained, and to promote and raise public awareness about community-based fisheries management. (issuelab.org)
  • Every state government has a Fisheries Department in which fisheries graduate can apply for the post of Inspector of Fisheries/Research Assistants, Sub-Inspector of Fisheries, Assistant Directors, Assistant Fisheries Development Officer ( AFDO ) / Fisheries Extension Officer ( FEO ) and Fisheries Development Officer(FDO). (wikipedia.org)
  • Jul.02-Present: Professor of Fisheries (tenured) with the Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station and the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife , Oregon State University. (oregonstate.edu)
  • Jul.96-Jun.02: Associate Professor of Fisheries (tenured) with the Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station and the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University. (oregonstate.edu)
  • At present, 21 Fisheries Colleges offer four-year degree programme in Bachelor of Fisheries Science (B.F.Sc), while 10 of them offer Master of Fisheries Science (M.F.Sc) in various disciplines and 6 offer Doctoral programmes. (wikipedia.org)
  • ICELAND - The GSSI Steering Board has announced its recognition of the Iceland Responsible Fisheries Management (RFM) Certification Programme. (aquaculture.world)
  • GSSI's recognition shows that the IRFM Certification Programme, with Fisheries Management Standard Version 2.0 (1 July 2016), is in alignment with all Essential Components of the Global Benchmark Tool. (aquaculture.world)
  • Coastal fisheries - defined as all fisheries within exclusive economic zones (EEZ) - provide food, nutrition and livelihoods, particularly in developing countries. (thegef.org)
  • A common historical and cultural root, the presence of leaderships, the relevance of local knowledge, the dependence on the resource to sustainable livelihoods and the threat of big-scale fisheries area have generated incentives to collective-action. (thecommonsjournal.org)
  • The STWG, made up of key individuals and researchers with in-depth knowledge of the fisheries sector, said the fishing closure also needed to be implemented in combination with effective enforcement of existing fishery laws on illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) fishing to achieve maximum impact of the closure on the sector. (ghanabusinessnews.com)
  • This document presents the preliminary results of applying the Spatially Explicit Fisheries Risk Assessment framework (SEFRA) developed by New Zealand to assessing the total mortality of great albatross caused by tuna longline operations in the southern hemisphere. (iotc.org)
  • Small-scale fisheries (SSFs) provide livelihood and nutrition to millions of coastal people worldwide (Chuenpagdee et al. (ecologyandsociety.org)
  • The note provides a review of the main characteristics of the German fisheries sector, covering both the North and Baltic seas. (europa.eu)