The articulation between the head of one phalanx and the base of the one distal to it, in each finger.
The articulation between a metacarpal bone and a phalanx.
Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.
Inflammation of a synovial membrane. It is usually painful, particularly on motion, and is characterized by a fluctuating swelling due to effusion within a synovial sac. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Motifs in DNA- and RNA-binding proteins whose amino acids are folded into a single structural unit around a zinc atom. In the classic zinc finger, one zinc atom is bound to two cysteines and two histidines. In between the cysteines and histidines are 12 residues which form a DNA binding fingertip. By variations in the composition of the sequences in the fingertip and the number and spacing of tandem repeats of the motif, zinc fingers can form a large number of different sequence specific binding sites.
The joint that is formed by the distal end of the RADIUS, the articular disc of the distal radioulnar joint, and the proximal row of CARPAL BONES; (SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; triquetral bone).
Inflammation of the synovial lining of a tendon sheath. Causes include trauma, tendon stress, bacterial disease (gonorrhea, tuberculosis), rheumatic disease, and gout. Common sites are the hand, wrist, shoulder capsule, hip capsule, hamstring muscles, and Achilles tendon. The tendon sheaths become inflamed and painful, and accumulate fluid. Joint mobility is usually reduced.
Projection of near-IR light (INFRARED RAYS), in the 700-1000 nm region, across an object in parallel beams to an array of sensitive photodetectors. This is repeated at various angles and a mathematical reconstruction provides three dimensional MEDICAL IMAGING of tissues. Based on the relative transparency of tissues to this spectra, it has been used to monitor local oxygenation, brain and joints.
Also known as articulations, these are points of connection between the ends of certain separate bones, or where the borders of other bones are juxtaposed.
A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.
The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.
A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.
Arthritis is a general term used to describe inflammation in the joints, often resulting in pain, stiffness, and reduced mobility, which can be caused by various conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, or lupus.
A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
'Joint diseases' is a broad term that refers to medical conditions causing inflammation, degeneration, or functional impairment in any part of a joint, including the cartilage, bone, ligament, tendon, or bursa, thereby affecting movement and potentially causing pain, stiffness, deformity, or reduced range of motion.

Assessment of mutilans-like hand deformities in chronic inflammatory joint diseases. A radiographic study of 52 patients. (1/309)

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate patients with mutilans-like hand deformities in chronic inflammatory joint diseases and to determine radiographic scoring systems for arthritis mutilans (AM). METHODS: A total of 52 patients with severe hand deformities were collected during 1997. A Larsen hand score of 0-110 was formed to describe destruction of the hand joints. Secondly, each ray of the hand was assessed individually by summing the Larsen grade of the wrist and the grades of the MCP and PIP joints. When the sum of these grades was > or = 13, the finger was considered to be mutilated. A mutilans hand score of 0-10 was formed according to the number of mutilans fingers. Surgical treatment and spontaneous fusions were recorded. RESULTS: The study consisted of 22 patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), nine with rheumatoid factor (RF) positive and 13 with RF negative arthritis, 27 patients with RF positive RA, and three adult patients with other diagnoses. The mean age of patients with adult rheumatic diseases was 27 years at the onset of arthritis. The mean disease duration in all patients was 30 years. The mean Larsen hand score was 93. Four patients had no mutilans fingers and in 15 patients all 10 fingers were mutilated. The Larsen hand score of 0-110 and the mutilans hand score of 0-10 correlated well (rs = 0.90). Fourteen patients showed spontaneous fusions in the peripheral joints. A total of 457 operations were performed on 48 patients. CONCLUSION: Both the Larsen hand score of 0-110 and the mutilans hand score of 0-10 improve accuracy in evaluating mutilans-like hand deformities, but in unevenly distributed hand deformities the mutilans hand score is better in describing deformation of individual fingers.  (+info)

Arthritis of the finger joints: a comprehensive approach comparing conventional radiography, scintigraphy, ultrasound, and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. (2/309)

OBJECTIVE: A prospective study was performed comparing conventional radiography, 3-phase bone scintigraphy, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with precontrast and dynamic postcontrast examinations in 60 patients with various forms of arthritis including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyl-arthropathy, and arthritis associated with connective tissue disease. METHODS: A total of 840 finger joints were examined clinically and by all 4 imaging methods. Experienced investigators blinded to the clinical findings and diagnoses analyzed all methods independently of each other. The patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 included 32 patients (448 finger joints) without radiologic signs of destructive arthritis (Larsen grades 0-1) of the evaluated hand and wrist and group 2 included 28 patients (392 finger joints) with radiographs revealing erosions (Larsen grade 2) of the evaluated hand and/or wrist. RESULTS: Clinical evaluation, scintigraphy, MRI, and ultrasound were each more sensitive than conventional radiography in detecting inflammatory soft tissue lesions as well as destructive joint processes in arthritis patients in group 1. All differences were statistically significant. We found ultrasound to be even more sensitive than MRI in the detection of synovitis. MRI detected erosions in 92 finger joints (20%; 26 patients) in group 1 that had not been detected by conventional radiography. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that MRI and ultrasound are valuable diagnostic methods in patients with arthritis who have normal findings on radiologic evaluation.  (+info)

The relationship between synovitis and bone changes in early untreated rheumatoid arthritis: a controlled magnetic resonance imaging study. (3/309)

OBJECTIVE: The interrelationship between synovitis and bone damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a subject of controversy. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), this study followed the bone changes in early RA and determined their relationship to synovitis. METHODS: Thirty-one patients with early RA who had swelling of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints and 31 healthy control subjects with no clinical evidence of arthritis underwent MRI of the second through fifth MCP joints of the dominant hand by use of a 1.5T scanner. Coronal T1-weighted and T2-fat suppressed (FS) sequences were performed to evaluate bone edema, and gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) pulse sequences were obtained to evaluate synovitis. Bony abnormalities were described as bone edema (low signal on T1-weighted sequences and intermediate/high signal on T2 FS sequences adjacent to the bone cortex) or as bone cysts (circular juxtacortical abnormalities with low signal on T1-weighted images and with very high signal on T2 FS sequences). Contrast and noncontrast MRI films were scored in a blinded manner, and Fisher's exact probability test was used to determine differences between groups. RESULTS: Twenty-one of the 31 RA patients (68%) had bone edema, which was seen in 43 of 124 joints (35% of joints) and 3 of the 31 control subjects had bone edema seen in 3 of 124 joints (2% of joints) (P < 0.0001). Thirty RA patients (97%) had Gd-DTPA-confirmed MCP joint synovitis, and bone edema was seen in 40 of the 75 joints with Gd-DTPA-proven synovitis (53%), but in only 3 of 49 without (6%) (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: MCP joint bone edema is present in the majority of patients with RA at presentation, but is seen only occasionally in normal control subjects. The fact that bone edema occurred rarely in the absence of synovitis in patients with RA suggests that bony changes in RA are secondary to synovitis.  (+info)

Genome scan for predisposing loci for distal interphalangeal joint osteoarthritis: evidence for a locus on 2q. (4/309)

The genetic contribution to common forms of osteoarthritis (OA) is well established but poorly understood. We performed a genome scan, using 302 markers for loci predisposing to distal interphalangeal joint (DIP) OA. To minimize genetic heterogeneity in our study sample, we identified siblings with a severe, radiologically defined phenotype from the nationwide registers of Finland. In the initial genome scan, linkage analysis in 27 sibships gave a pairwise LOD score (Z) >1.00 with nine of the screening markers. In the second stage, additional markers and family members were genotyped in these chromosomal regions. On 2q12-q13, IL1R1 resulted in Z=2.34 at recombination fraction (theta) 0, allowing a dominant mode of inheritance. Association analysis of markers D2S2264, IL1R1, D2S373, and D2S1789 jointly provided some evidence for a shared haplotype among the affected individuals (P value of.012). Also, multipoint nonparametric linkage analysis yielded a P value of.0001 near the locus IL1R1 and P=.0007 approximately 20 cM telomeric near marker D2S1399, which, in two-point analysis, gave Z=1.48 (straight theta=. 02). This chromosomal region on 2q harbors the interleukin 1 gene cluster and, thus, represents a good candidate region for inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Three additional chromosomal regions-4q26-q27, 7p15-p21, and Xcen-also provided some evidence for linkage, and further analyses would be justified to clarify their potential involvement in the genetic predisposition to DIP OA.  (+info)

Reliability and sensitivity to change of a simplification of the Sharp/van der Heijde radiological assessment in rheumatoid arthritis. (5/309)

OBJECTIVE: To determine the reliability and sensitivity to change of a simplified radiological scoring method [simple erosion narrowing score (SENS)] for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). SENS was compared to the Sharp/van der Heijde score (SHS) as a gold standard. METHODS: Sets of seven radiographs of hands and feet were taken of 20 RA patients with a wide spectrum of radiological damage. For 14 patients, these seven radiographs were taken during a follow-up period of 5 yr, and for six patients during a follow-up of 10 yr. Each set of radiographs was scored twice by the same observer (DvdH). Erosions and joint space narrowing were scored with SHS (range 0-448) in 32 and 30 joints in the hands, respectively, and both in 12 joints in the feet. SENS gives a score of 1 if there is any erosion in a joint and also 1 if there is any narrowing in the joint (range 0-86). In each case, SENS was derived from SHS. To analyse data, generalizability theory and repeated measurements ANOVA were used. RESULTS: The overall reliability coefficient was 0.81 for SHS and 0.80 for SENS. Intra-observer reliability [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)] was 0.99 and 0.98 for SHS and SENS, respectively. The ICC for the sensitivity to change was 0.84 for SHS and 0.88 for SENS. The smallest detectable difference (SDD) could be determined for both methods. The presence of progression based on this SDD was very comparable between the two methods. CONCLUSION: The measurement properties of SENS are good and comparable to SHS. This makes SENS suitable for use in clinical practice and in large (epidemiological) studies, especially in the first years of disease.  (+info)

Advancement in the zone of calcified cartilage in osteoarthritic hands of patients detected by high definition macroradiography. (6/309)

OBJECTIVE: High definition macroradiography permits the advancement in the zone of calcified cartilage (described as a ZCC step) to be detected in osteoarthritic (OA) hand joints of patients. The pattern of their incidence and distribution was determined and compared to the joint space width (JSW) measurement. DESIGN: Macroradiographs, x5 magnification, were obtained of the OA hands of 44 patients at baseline and at 18 months. The incidence of ZCC steps, identified as an advancement in the mineralized cartilage front into articular cartilage, was assessed at each articular surface. JSW was measured and was used to determine the difference in JSW between hands and groups of joints with and without ZCC steps at both X-ray visits. RESULTS: ZCC steps were only found at the convex articular surfaces in 42 (48%) of hand joints in 28 (64%) patients. Here, ZCC steps were present in 36 joints in the non-dominant hand compared to 30 joints in the dominant hand. In the former, they were present in 22 DIP, six PIP and eight MCP joints and in 12 DIP, 8 PIP and 10 MCP joints in the dominant hand. By 18 months new ZCC steps had formed in 15 hands with and 17 hands without previous ZCC steps. At both X-ray visits no statistically significant difference in JSW was found between the hands and joint groups with and without ZCC steps. CONCLUSION: Although ZCC steps and JSW loss were greater at the PIP joints, supporting a mechanical hypothesis for ZCC formation, their presence in joints, where JSW was larger, and their greater incidence in the non-dominant PIP joints, suggest that factors associated with vascular changes, related to subchondral bone remodeling, are responsible. inverted question markcopy inverted question mark  (+info)

Isolation of Pantoea agglomerans in two cases of septic monoarthritis after plant thorn and wood sliver injuries. (7/309)

Arthritis after plant injury is often apparently aseptic. We report two cases due to Pantoea agglomerans. In one case, the bacterium was isolated only from the pediatric blood culture media, BACTEC Peds Plus, monitored in BACTEC 9240, and not from the other media inoculated with the joint fluid. This procedure could help improve the diagnosis of septic arthritis.  (+info)

Occupational use of precision grip and forceful gripping, and arthrosis of finger joints: a literature review. (8/309)

A systematic review of arthrosis of finger joints in relation to occupational exposure revealed 11 epidemiological studies and 13 case reports. All studies but one were cross-sectional rendering demonstration of causation problematic. The reviewed literature also had drawbacks relating to exposure classification, confounding and non-attendance. Four studies showed an association between extensive use of precision grip and development of arthrosis of the distal interphalangeal joints of fingers. Two studies found an association between forceful gripping and the occurrence of arthrosis involving the metacarpophalangeal joints. Arthrosis of the proximal interphalangeal joints and first carpo-metacarpal joints was not related to any specific occupational task. Well-designed studies are needed to further elucidate this possible occupational hazard.  (+info)

A finger joint, also known as an articulation, is the point where two bones in a finger connect and allow for movement. The majority of finger joints are classified as hinge joints, permitting flexion and extension movements. These joints consist of several components:

1. Articular cartilage: Smooth tissue that covers the ends of the bones, enabling smooth movement and protecting the bones from friction.
2. Joint capsule: A fibrous sac enclosing the joint, providing stability and producing synovial fluid for lubrication.
3. Synovial membrane: Lines the inner surface of the joint capsule and produces synovial fluid to lubricate the joint.
4. Volar plate (palmar ligament): A strong band of tissue located on the palm side of the joint, preventing excessive extension and maintaining alignment.
5. Collateral ligaments: Two bands of tissue located on each side of the joint, providing lateral stability and limiting radial and ulnar deviation.
6. Flexor tendons: Tendons that attach to the bones on the palmar side of the finger joints, facilitating flexion movements.
7. Extensor tendons: Tendons that attach to the bones on the dorsal side of the finger joints, enabling extension movements.

Finger joints are essential for hand function and enable activities such as grasping, holding, writing, and manipulating objects.

The metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint is the joint that connects the bones of the hand (metacarpals) to the bones of the fingers and thumb (phalanges). It's also commonly referred to as the "knuckle" joint. The MCP joint allows for flexion, extension, abduction, and adduction movements of the fingers and thumb. It is a synovial joint, which means it contains a lubricating fluid called synovial fluid that helps reduce friction during movement.

In medical terms, fingers are not specifically defined as they are common anatomical structures. However, I can provide you with a general anatomy definition:

Fingers are the terminal parts of the upper limb in primates, including humans, consisting of four digits (thumb, index, middle, and ring fingers) and one opposable thumb. They contain bones called phalanges, connected by joints that allow for movement and flexibility. Each finger has a nail, nerve endings for sensation, and blood vessels to supply nutrients and oxygen. Fingers are crucial for various activities such as grasping, manipulating objects, and tactile exploration of the environment.

Synovitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the synovial membrane, which is the soft tissue that lines the inner surface of joint capsules and tendon sheaths. The synovial membrane produces synovial fluid, which lubricates the joint and allows for smooth movement.

Inflammation of the synovial membrane can cause it to thicken, redden, and become painful and swollen. This can lead to stiffness, limited mobility, and discomfort in the affected joint or tendon sheath. Synovitis may occur as a result of injury, overuse, infection, or autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

If left untreated, synovitis can cause irreversible damage to the joint and surrounding tissues, including cartilage loss and bone erosion. Treatment typically involves a combination of medications, physical therapy, and lifestyle modifications to reduce inflammation and manage pain.

Zinc fingers are a type of protein structural motif involved in specific DNA binding and, by extension, in the regulation of gene expression. They are so named because of their characteristic "finger-like" shape that is formed when a zinc ion binds to the amino acids within the protein. This structure allows the protein to interact with and recognize specific DNA sequences, thereby playing a crucial role in various biological processes such as transcription, repair, and recombination of genetic material.

The wrist joint, also known as the radiocarpal joint, is a condyloid joint that connects the distal end of the radius bone in the forearm to the proximal row of carpal bones in the hand (scaphoid, lunate, and triquetral bones). It allows for flexion, extension, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation movements of the hand. The wrist joint is surrounded by a capsule and reinforced by several ligaments that provide stability and strength to the joint.

Tenosynovitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the lining (synovium) surrounding a tendon, which is a cord-like structure that attaches muscle to bone. This inflammation can cause pain, swelling, and difficulty moving the affected joint. Tenosynovitis often affects the hands, wrists, feet, and ankles, and it can result from various causes, including infection, injury, overuse, or autoimmune disorders like rheumatoid arthritis. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of tenosynovitis are essential to prevent complications such as tendon rupture or chronic pain.

Optical Tomography (OT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that uses light to visualize and measure the optical properties of tissue, such as absorption and scattering coefficients. This modality can be used to produce cross-sectional or three-dimensional images of internal structures, providing functional information about tissue physiology. It has applications in various fields including biomedical research, dermatology, and oncology for the detection and monitoring of diseases. There are different types of optical tomography, such as diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), which differ in their light sources, detection schemes, and data analysis methods.

A joint is the location at which two or more bones make contact. They are constructed to allow movement and provide support and stability to the body during motion. Joints can be classified in several ways, including structure, function, and the type of tissue that forms them. The three main types of joints based on structure are fibrous (or fixed), cartilaginous, and synovial (or diarthrosis). Fibrous joints do not have a cavity and have limited movement, while cartilaginous joints allow for some movement and are connected by cartilage. Synovial joints, the most common and most movable type, have a space between the articular surfaces containing synovial fluid, which reduces friction and wear. Examples of synovial joints include hinge, pivot, ball-and-socket, saddle, and condyloid joints.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a type of joint disease that is characterized by the breakdown and eventual loss of cartilage - the tissue that cushions the ends of bones where they meet in the joints. This breakdown can cause the bones to rub against each other, causing pain, stiffness, and loss of mobility. OA can occur in any joint, but it most commonly affects the hands, knees, hips, and spine. It is often associated with aging and can be caused or worsened by obesity, injury, or overuse.

The medical definition of osteoarthritis is: "a degenerative, non-inflammatory joint disease characterized by the loss of articular cartilage, bone remodeling, and the formation of osteophytes (bone spurs). It is often associated with pain, stiffness, and decreased range of motion in the affected joint."

In medical terms, a hand is the part of the human body that is attached to the forearm and consists of the carpus (wrist), metacarpus, and phalanges. It is made up of 27 bones, along with muscles, tendons, ligaments, and other soft tissues. The hand is a highly specialized organ that is capable of performing a wide range of complex movements and functions, including grasping, holding, manipulating objects, and communicating through gestures. It is also richly innervated with sensory receptors that provide information about touch, temperature, pain, and proprioception (the sense of the position and movement of body parts).

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that primarily affects the joints. It is characterized by persistent inflammation, synovial hyperplasia, and subsequent damage to the articular cartilage and bone. The immune system mistakenly attacks the body's own tissues, specifically targeting the synovial membrane lining the joint capsule. This results in swelling, pain, warmth, and stiffness in affected joints, often most severely in the hands and feet.

RA can also have extra-articular manifestations, affecting other organs such as the lungs, heart, skin, eyes, and blood vessels. The exact cause of RA remains unknown, but it is believed to involve a complex interplay between genetic susceptibility and environmental triggers. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial in managing rheumatoid arthritis to prevent joint damage, disability, and systemic complications.

Arthritis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation in one or more joints, leading to symptoms such as pain, stiffness, swelling, and reduced range of motion. There are many different types of arthritis, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, gout, and lupus, among others.

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis and is caused by wear and tear on the joints over time. Rheumatoid arthritis, on the other hand, is an autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks the joint lining, causing inflammation and damage.

Arthritis can affect people of all ages, including children, although it is more common in older adults. Treatment for arthritis may include medications to manage pain and reduce inflammation, physical therapy, exercise, and in some cases, surgery.

The knee joint, also known as the tibiofemoral joint, is the largest and one of the most complex joints in the human body. It is a synovial joint that connects the thighbone (femur) to the shinbone (tibia). The patella (kneecap), which is a sesamoid bone, is located in front of the knee joint and helps in the extension of the leg.

The knee joint is made up of three articulations: the femorotibial joint between the femur and tibia, the femoropatellar joint between the femur and patella, and the tibiofibular joint between the tibia and fibula. These articulations are surrounded by a fibrous capsule that encloses the synovial membrane, which secretes synovial fluid to lubricate the joint.

The knee joint is stabilized by several ligaments, including the medial and lateral collateral ligaments, which provide stability to the sides of the joint, and the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments, which prevent excessive forward and backward movement of the tibia relative to the femur. The menisci, which are C-shaped fibrocartilaginous structures located between the femoral condyles and tibial plateaus, also help to stabilize the joint by absorbing shock and distributing weight evenly across the articular surfaces.

The knee joint allows for flexion, extension, and a small amount of rotation, making it essential for activities such as walking, running, jumping, and sitting.

Reproducibility of results in a medical context refers to the ability to obtain consistent and comparable findings when a particular experiment or study is repeated, either by the same researcher or by different researchers, following the same experimental protocol. It is an essential principle in scientific research that helps to ensure the validity and reliability of research findings.

In medical research, reproducibility of results is crucial for establishing the effectiveness and safety of new treatments, interventions, or diagnostic tools. It involves conducting well-designed studies with adequate sample sizes, appropriate statistical analyses, and transparent reporting of methods and findings to allow other researchers to replicate the study and confirm or refute the results.

The lack of reproducibility in medical research has become a significant concern in recent years, as several high-profile studies have failed to produce consistent findings when replicated by other researchers. This has led to increased scrutiny of research practices and a call for greater transparency, rigor, and standardization in the conduct and reporting of medical research.

Medical Definition:

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic imaging technique that uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed cross-sectional or three-dimensional images of the internal structures of the body. The patient lies within a large, cylindrical magnet, and the scanner detects changes in the direction of the magnetic field caused by protons in the body. These changes are then converted into detailed images that help medical professionals to diagnose and monitor various medical conditions, such as tumors, injuries, or diseases affecting the brain, spinal cord, heart, blood vessels, joints, and other internal organs. MRI does not use radiation like computed tomography (CT) scans.

Joint diseases is a broad term that refers to various conditions affecting the joints, including but not limited to:

1. Osteoarthritis (OA): A degenerative joint disease characterized by the breakdown of cartilage and underlying bone, leading to pain, stiffness, and potential loss of function.
2. Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): An autoimmune disorder causing inflammation in the synovial membrane lining the joints, resulting in swelling, pain, and joint damage if left untreated.
3. Infectious Arthritis: Joint inflammation caused by bacterial, viral, or fungal infections that spread through the bloodstream or directly enter the joint space.
4. Gout: A type of arthritis resulting from the buildup of uric acid crystals in the joints, typically affecting the big toe and characterized by sudden attacks of severe pain, redness, and swelling.
5. Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA): An inflammatory joint disease associated with psoriasis, causing symptoms such as pain, stiffness, and swelling in the joints and surrounding tissues.
6. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA): A group of chronic arthritis conditions affecting children, characterized by joint inflammation, pain, and stiffness.
7. Ankylosing Spondylitis: A form of arthritis primarily affecting the spine, causing inflammation, pain, and potential fusion of spinal vertebrae.
8. Bursitis: Inflammation of the fluid-filled sacs (bursae) that cushion joints, leading to pain and swelling.
9. Tendinitis: Inflammation or degeneration of tendons, which connect muscles to bones, often resulting in pain and stiffness near joints.

These conditions can impact the function and mobility of affected joints, causing discomfort and limiting daily activities. Proper diagnosis and treatment are essential for managing joint diseases and preserving joint health.

No FAQ available that match "finger joint"

No images available that match "finger joint"